They’re No Laughing Matter

I may have mentioned a time or two (or ten) that I was recently hospitalized again. This time it was for an abdominal incision hernia. Usually, this is outpatient surgery. However, the surgeon who made the original abdominal incision wanted to take no chances and arranged for me to stay in the hospital overnight. And that turned into five nights since he discovered another hernia under the one he’d expected to repair and then I kept running fevers. 

You probably know that you’re expected to start walking the day of (or the day after) surgery these days. It hastens your recovery. So, I walked the halls with the aid of a nurse and a walker, which fast became annoying although necessary (the walker, not the nurse). Apparently, I didn’t walk enough since for the time in her life, this 73 year developed bed sores.   

Photo by tegh 93 on Pexels.com

Bedsores? Certainly, that’s nothing to be ashamed of. Right? But there was that teeny little kernel of shame, as if I’d done something wrong and was being punished. Did it have to do with Chronic Kidney Disease? Why didn’t this happen during my other hospitalizations this last year? Of had I been just too out of it to realize I had bedsores during those hospitalizations?  

Come along with me as I figure this out. First of all, what are bedsores? The first thing I learned from my all-time favorite dictionary, The Merriam-Webster, at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bedsores is that it’s one compound word, not two separate words as I’d always believed. Here’s their definition: 

“an ulceration of tissue deprived of adequate blood supply by prolonged pressure 

— called also decubitus ulcer” 

Wait a minute. What’s an ulcer? According to the same dictionary, but this time at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ulcer

“a break in skin or mucous membrane with loss of surface tissue, disintegration and necrosis of epithelial tissue, and often pus” 

Okay, got it. Anyone know what “decubitus” means? I don’t. Back to the dictionary, guys. Well, will you look at that? The joke’s on us. That means “bedsore.” No kidding. Check it out for yourself at  https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/decubitus.  

Now that we know what a bedsore is, let’s see if it has anything to do with CKD. Just keep in mind that diabetes is the foremost cause of CKD. This is from Beacon Health System at https://www.beaconhealthsystem.org/library/diseases-and-conditions/bedsores-pressure-ulcers/ , 

“Medical conditions affecting blood flow. Health problems that can affect blood flow, such as diabetes and vascular disease, can increase the risk of tissue damage such as bedsores.” 

Uh-oh, Type 2 diabetic here. 

Did you know there are stages of bedsores? I didn’t, but emedicine at  

https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/190115-overview educated me: 

” Stage 1 pressure injury – Nonblanchable erythema [Gail here: that means reddening.] of intact skin 

Stage 2 pressure injury – Partial-thickness skin loss with exposed dermis 

Stage 3 pressure injury – Full-thickness skin loss 

Stage 4 pressure injury – Full-thickness skin and tissue loss 

Unstageable pressure injury – Obscured full-thickness skin and tissue loss 

Deep pressure injury – Persistent nonblanchable deep red, maroon or purple discoloration” 

We know that dermis is skin, but “nonblanchable”? We can figure this out. If you remember your high school French, you know that ‘blanch’ means white. Add ‘non’ and we get ‘not white.’ That’s what nonblachable means; your skin does not turn white if you press on it.  

Wow! Lots of new information today. Okay, so how do you know if you have a bedsore? For me, it was the pain. I didn’t even have to look. 

The Mayo Clinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/bed-sores/symptoms-causes/syc-20355893 tells us other symptoms: 

“Unusual changes in skin color or texture 

Swelling 

Pus-like draining 

An area of skin that feels cooler or warmer to the touch than other areas 

Tender areas” 

Come to think of it, the area in question was swollen, tender, and unusually warm. 

Now what? We know what bedsores are, what they have to do with CKD, that they are staged, and what the symptoms are. Ah, of course. What do you do once you have them? 

I was fortunate to come upon Johns Hopkins Medicine at https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/bedsores for the answer to my question. 

  • “Removing pressure on the affected area 
  • Protecting the wound with medicated gauze or other special dressings 
  • Keeping the wound clean 
  • Ensuring good nutrition 
  • Removing the damaged, infected, or dead tissue (debridement) 
  • Transplanting healthy skin to the wound area (skin grafts) 
  • Negative pressure wound therapy 
  • Medicine (such as antibiotics to treat infections)” 

I’m thankful that removing the pressure on the affected area and a local antibiotic were all I needed. However, those were uncomfortable days for me and I’d like to avoid going through them again. 

Here’s what I should have been doing in the hospital according to Victoria State Government’s Better Health Channel (Canada),  

“Skin care in hospital 

During a stay in hospital, your skin may be affected by the hospital environment, staying in bed or sitting in one position for too long, whether you are eating and drinking enough and your physical condition. Ask hospital staff to regularly check your skin, particularly if you feel any pain. 

There are some things that you can do to look after your skin, including: 

Keep your skin clean and dry.  

Avoid any products that dry out your skin. This includes many soaps, body washes and talcum powder. Ask for skin cleansers that are non-drying. Ask nursing staff or your pharmacist to give you options. 

Use a water-based moisturiser daily. Be careful of bony areas and don’t rub or massage them. Ask staff for help if you need it. 

Check your skin every day or ask for help if you are concerned. Let a doctor or nurse know if there are any changes in your skin, especially redness, swelling or soreness. 

If you are at risk of pressure sores, a nurse will change your position often, including during the night. 

Always use any devices given to you to protect your skin from tearing and pressure sores. These may include protective mattresses, seat cushions, heel wedges and limb protectors.  

Drink plenty of water (unless the doctor has told you not to). 

Eat regular main meals and snacks. Sit out of bed to eat if you can. 

Try to maintain your regular toilet routine.  

If you have a wound, a plan will be developed with you and your family or carers before you leave hospital. It will tell you how to dress and care for the wound.”  

And here I’d been priding myself on sitting the chair from day one. I should have changing my position in that chair more often. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! 

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