D&C Now has Another Meaning

We usually think of a D&C as a women’s issue:  

“Dilation and curettage (D&C) is a procedure to remove tissue from inside your uterus. Doctors perform dilation and curettage to diagnose and treat certain uterine conditions — such as heavy bleeding — or to clear the uterine lining after a miscarriage or abortion.” 

Thank you to MayoClinic at https://mayocl.in/3oOzkC2 for the above explanation. 

But that’s not what I’ll be writing about today. The ‘D’ in the title stands for Dialysis and the ‘C‘ for Covid-19. Yes, Covid-19 has struck close to home for us. Someone my grown children are very close to has tested positive. He also started dialysis so recently that he hasn’t yet accepted that this is what is keeping him alive. 

Let’s get some definitions out of the way first. Take it away, Merriam-Webster Dictionary

Dialysis:  1. the separation of substances in solution by means of their unequal diffusion through semipermeable membranes 

                 2. the process of removing blood from an artery (as of a patient affected with kidney failure), purifying it by dialysis, adding vital substances, and returning it to a vein 

Covid-19: a mild to severe respiratory illness that is caused by a coronavirus (Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 of the genus Betacoronavirus), is transmitted chiefly by contact with infectious material (such as respiratory droplets) or with objects or surfaces contaminated by the causative virus, and is characterized especially by fever, cough, and shortness of breath and may progress to pneumonia and respiratory failure 

NOTE: While fever, cough, and shortness of breath are common symptoms of COVID-19, other symptoms may include fatigue, chills, body aches, headache, loss of taste or smell, sore throat, runny nose, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. 

 Here are an additional couple of definitions you may need. They’re from the glossary of What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease. 

Arteries: Vessels that carry blood from the heart. 

Veins: Vessels that carry blood toward the heart. 

Now what? Let’s see if we can find out how Covid-19 affects dialysis patients. The Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN) at https://cjasn.asnjournals.org/content/15/8/1087 reports the following in an August study: 

“The patients with kidney disease who appear most at risk for COVID-19 are those with a kidney transplant, due to immunosuppression, and those who undergo in-center hemodialysis treatments thrice weekly, due to inability to self-isolate. Patients with kidney disease also have other comorbidities, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease, that are risk factors for poor outcomes in COVID-19.” 

On December 1 of this year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cautioned those of us with chronic kidney disease, including those on dialysis: 

“Having chronic kidney disease of any stage increases your risk for severe illness from COVID-19. 

Actions to take 

Continue your medicines and your diet as directed by your healthcare provider. 

Make sure that you have at least a 30-day supply of your medicines. 

Stay in contact with your healthcare team as often as possible, especially if you have any new signs or symptoms of illness. Also reach out to them if you can’t get the medicines or foods you need. 

If you don’t have a healthcare provider, contact your nearest community health or health department. 

Have shelf-stable food choices to help you follow your kidney diet. 

If you are on dialysis: 

Contact your dialysis clinic and your healthcare provider if you feel sick or have concerns. 

Do NOT miss your treatments. 

Plan to have enough food on hand to follow the KCER 3-Day Emergency Diet for dialysis patients in case you are unable to maintain your normal treatment schedule. 

Learn more about kidney disease. 

Learn how to take care of your kidneys.” 

The KCER 3-Day Emergency Diet is not that intricate, but it is a long explanation. Click on the link to go right to the diet itself. 

We know the best way to deal with Covid-19 is prevention. I’m sure you’re tired of hearing it, but here are the ways you can hopefully do just that. This information was posted on the World Health Organization’s (WHO) website at bit.ly/3nfeMCB on December 8th of this year. 

“Maintain at least a 1-metre [Gail here: that’s 3.28 ft, so I’d be more comfortable with 2-metres.] distance between yourself and others to reduce your risk of infection when they cough, sneeze or speak. Maintain an even greater distance between yourself and others when indoors. The further away, the better. 

Make wearing a mask a normal part of being around other people. The appropriate use, storage and cleaning or disposal are essential to make masks as effective as possible. 

Here are the basics of how to wear a mask: 

Clean your hands before you put your mask on, as well as before and after you take it off, and after you touch it at any time. 

Make sure it covers both your nose, mouth and chin. 

When you take off a mask, store it in a clean plastic bag, and every day either wash it if it’s a fabric mask, or dispose of a medical mask in a trash bin. 

Don’t use masks with valves….  

How to make your environment safer 

Avoid the 3Cs: spaces that are closed, crowded or involve close contact. 

Outbreaks have been reported in restaurants, choir practices, fitness classes, nightclubs, offices and places of worship where people have gathered, often in crowded indoor settings where they talk loudly, shout, breathe heavily or sing. 

The risks of getting COVID-19 are higher in crowded and inadequately ventilated spaces where infected people spend long periods of time together in close proximity. These environments are where the virus appears to spreads by respiratory droplets or aerosols more efficiently, so taking precautions is even more important. 

Meet people outside. Outdoor gatherings are safer than indoor ones, particularly if indoor spaces are small and without outdoor air coming in…. 

Avoid crowded or indoor settings but if you can’t, then take precautions: 

Open a window. Increase the amount of ‘natural ventilation’ when indoors…. 

Wear a mask (see above for more details).  

Don’t forget the basics of good hygiene 

Regularly and thoroughly clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water. This eliminates germs including viruses that may be on your hands. 

Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Hands touch many surfaces and can pick up viruses. Once contaminated, hands can transfer the virus to your eyes, nose or mouth. From there, the virus can enter your body and infect you. 

Cover your mouth and nose with your bent elbow or tissue when you cough or sneeze. Then dispose of the used tissue immediately into a closed bin and wash your hands. By following good ‘respiratory hygiene’, you protect the people around you from viruses, which cause colds, flu and COVID-19. 

Clean and disinfect surfaces frequently especially those which are regularly touched, such as door handles, faucets and phone screens.” 

This is a long, but necessary, blog. Just a bit more now. 

I’d wondered why dialysis patients are so much more at risk of Covid-19 and was surprised at how simple and common sense the reasons are. These are gathered from multiple sites that agree that shared rides, the inability to quarantine (since hemodialysis patients usually need to go to a dialysis center), and closer than six feet distancing at the centers (if that’s the case) all contribute to the susceptibility of dialysis patients to Covid-19. 

Please be safe. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! 

The URI to TrackBack this entry is: https://gailraegarwood.wordpress.com/2020/12/14/dc-now-has-another-meaning/trackback/

RSS feed for comments on this post.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

<span>%d</span> bloggers like this: