Baby, It’s Cold Outside. I Mean Inside.

As a diabetic, I have my feet checked and my toenails cut every nine weeks. When I was at my podiatrist’s recently, we both made mention of my slightly blue skin at the same time. I thought it was just thin skin showing the veins underneath. That’s when she mentioned a syndrome I’d heard of many times, but had never explored: Raynaud’s Syndrome, named after the Frenchman who discovered it. 

Hmmm, I wondered. Could this be related to Chronic Kidney Disease? So, of course, I looked for answers to my questions. Let’s get the basics down first… like what is it? 

Circulation Foundation at http://bit.ly/37yxSy4 answers that question.  

“Raynaud’s is a common condition where the blood supply to the extremities is interrupted or reduced. This usually affects the fingers and toes, but occasionally the nose or ears. 

Attacks are usually provoked by cold or a sudden change in temperature. During an attack the affected body part first becomes white, then turns blue as the tissues use up the oxygen and finally bright red as the arteries relax and fresh blood rushes in. 

Raynaud’s can vary in form, from very mild to severe cases – which can require treatment. 

Anyone of any age can suffer from Raynaud’s, but younger women are affected more commonly. It seems to be a change in temperature, rather than just exposure to cold that precipitates an attack, so although worse in winter, it can occur in summer too. 

Stress or anxiety can also provoke a Raynaud’s attack. Some cases of Raynaud’s are associated with some other diseases (called secondary Raynaud’s).” 

Uh, secondary Raynaud’s? What’s that? Back to the drawing board or, in this case, the researching mode. Let’s try WebMD. Bingo! 

“Secondary Raynaud’s (Raynaud’s syndrome, Raynaud’s phenomenon) happens as a result of another illness. It’s often a condition that attacks your body’s connective tissues, like lupus or rheumatoid arthritis. It’s less common, but it’s more likely to cause serious health problems. This can include things like skin sores and gangrene. These happen when cells and tissue in your extremities die from lack of blood.” 

Then, according to WebMD at http://wb.md/3h3fznI, IF I have Raynaud’s, it’s probably secondary Raynaud’s. But what about the terms Raynaud’s syndrome and Raynaud’s phenomenon in the quote above? Are they interchangeable? 

Hello, my favorite dictionary. The Merriam-Webster Medical Dictionary at http://wb.md/3h3fznI tells us that Raynaud’s phenomenon is the same as Raynaud’s syndrome: 

“the symptoms associated with Raynaud’s disease 

— called also Raynaud’s syndrome” 

Of course, that brings up another question. Symptoms are mentioned in the definition. What are the symptoms of Secondary Raynaud’s? I’ll bet the Mayo Clinic at http://mayocl.in/3pn9fur can help us out here. 

“Cold fingers or toes 

Color changes in your skin in response to cold or stress 

Numb, prickly feeling or stinging pain upon warming or stress relief 

During an attack of Raynaud’s, affected areas of your skin usually first turn white. Then, they often turn blue and feel cold and numb. As you warm and your circulation improves, the affected areas may turn red, throb, tingle or swell. 

Although Raynaud’s most commonly affects your fingers and toes, it can also affect other areas of your body, such as your nose, lips, ears and even nipples. After you warm up, the return of normal blood flow to the area can take 15 minutes.” 

I should mention here that severe cases of Secondary Raynaud’s are rare. Also, I can honestly say that I have each of these symptoms at times. As far as the cold, I figured it was just anemia. Wrong. 

We know what Secondary Raynaud’s is, what the symptoms are, and that it need not be serious, but how do you treat it? 

Wait, wait, wait. I just found this from the Merck Manual, Consumer Edition at http://bit.ly/38oZwwr

“Raynaud syndrome, a functional peripheral arterial disease, is a condition in which small arteries (arterioles), usually in the fingers or toes, narrow (constrict) more tightly than normal in response to exposure to cold.” 

It’s a PAD? Oh, excuse me, that means “peripheral arterial disease,” as mentioned above. Let’s get a definition. Back to the Merriam Webster Medical Dictionary. This time at http://bit.ly/37CdR9P:  

“damage to or dysfunction of the arteries outside the heart resulting in reduced blood flow” 

Hmmm, the podiatrist did mention spasms in the arteries at the extreme ends of my body, meaning my fingers and toes. This is all starting to make sense now. 

But we were going to see what we could find out about treatment before I made the PAD discovery. Let’s go back to that.  MedicalNewsToday at https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/176713 had quite a bit of information: 

“There is no cure for Raynaud’s disease, but there are ways to manage symptoms. 

For mild forms of Raynaud’s disease, covering exposed skin before leaving the house can help. If an attack occurs, soaking the affected parts in warm, not hot, water can alleviate symptoms and prevent them from worsening. 

If stress is a factor, learning to manage stress can help. 

For moderate to severe cases, medication may be necessary. 

Alpha-1 blockers can counter the effect of norepinephrine, which constricts blood vessels. Examples include doxazosin and prazosin. 

Dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers relax the smaller blood vessels of the hands and feet. Examples include amlodipine, nifedipine, and felodipine. 

Topical nitroglycerin ointment applied to the affected area appears to relieve the symptoms by improving blood flow and cardiac output and decreasing blood pressure. 

Other vasodilators dilate the veins, easing symptoms. Examples include losartan, sildenafil (Viagra), fluoxetine (Prozac), and prostaglandin.” 

They also talk about surgery and/or chemical injections for severe cases. 

The funny thing is I live in Arizona. We have winter… sort of, but nothing drastic like snow and ice. I also take losartan for high blood pressure and to protect my kidneys. As for stress, that is present now with me just recovered from the double hernia surgery, my bother in a health care facility for Parkinson’s dementia, my husband’s Alzheimer’s and someone extremely close to my children in ICU with Covid-19 and other illnesses. (Reading this, I wonder why I’m not depressed!) 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! 

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4 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Gail You are a fountain of knowledge and with all that stress in your life. I will add u to my prayer list.

    Keep up the good work and continue to be strong.

    Warmly Beth

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

    • Thanks, Beth. My thinking is that it would be downright selfish not to share what I discover, especially concerning our disease.

      Strong is a way of life, but prayers certainly couldn’t hurt.

  2. I experienced Raynaud’s syndrome symptoms shortly after I was initially diagnosed with ESRD. I was going outside in winter to exercise and noticed that my fingertips were blue when I went back inside and took off my gloves to warm up. I was taking three different meds for hypertension. I also was experiencing hyperkalimia. Working with my nephrologist, we cut out the ACE inhibitor (Lisinopril) that I was taking and somehow this also ended the Raynaud’s symptoms. I have not found this solution anywhere in the published literature, but it seems to work for me.

    • Just goes to show, Ron: individualized medicine is a must. I’m glad it worked for you and that you had your doctor’s approval.

      By the way, thank you so much for all the likes.

      Happy holidays.


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