It’s Not Just Scaly Patches

Did I ever mention that I have latent psoriasis? Or that it has something to do with Chronic Kidney Disease? Hmmm, well maybe it’s time… not that most people ever want to admit they have unsightly psoriasis. 

I realize not everyone knows what that is, so we’ll start with a definition from the Mayo Clinic

“Psoriasis is a skin disease that causes red, itchy scaly patches, most commonly on the knees, elbows, trunk and scalp. 

Psoriasis is a common, long-term (chronic) disease with no cure. It tends to go through cycles, flaring for a few weeks or months, then subsiding for a while or going into remission. Treatments are available to help you manage symptoms. And you can incorporate lifestyle habits and coping strategies to help you live better with psoriasis.” 

Now you can see why people might be lax to mention they have psoriasis. It almost appears as if you hadn’t been taking care of your personal hygiene, and no one enjoys looking at those sores. My father had it in large, constant patches, but I grew up seeing it on him and never questioned what it was or how he got it. Maybe that’s why I’m so open about having it myself. 

Oh, yes, latent. That just means it’s there, but it hasn’t made itself known yet. 

I went to WebMD for an explanation of the symptoms of psoriasis. 

“Plaques of red skin, often covered with silver-colored scales. These plaques may be itchy and painful, and they sometimes crack and bleed. In severe cases, the plaques will grow and merge, covering large areas. 

Disorders of the fingernails and toenails, including discoloration and pitting of the nails. The nails may also crumble or detach from the nail bed. 

Plaques of scales or crust on the scalp.” 

I remember a dermatologist telling me a long time ago that this skin disorder causes skin cells to produce 10 times faster than usual and asking me if I had psoriatic arthritis. I looked at him blankly. That resulted in a trip to the rheumatologist.  

Yes, that’s what I had. Arthritis.org was extremely clear about just what psoriatic arthritis [abbreviation: PsA] is: 

“Causes 

PsA (like psoriasis) is an autoimmune disease, which means the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks healthy tissue, causing inflammation and pain and resulting in damage. Researchers aren’t sure why some people develop PsA. They think it’s a combination of having certain genes, which makes them more likely to develop the disease, and being triggered by something in the environment, like an infection, stress, physical trauma or another factor.  

Symptoms: 

Skin: 

Itchy, painful red patches or a silvery white buildup of dead skin cells; most commonly on the knees, elbows and scalp, although a rash can occur anywhere on the body. It is not contagious. [Gail here: same symptoms as psoriasis] 

Joints/Spine: 

Mainly occurs in the fingers (in the joints closest to the nail), wrists, ankles and knees. Symptoms such as pain, tenderness, warmth and swelling, may affect different sides of the body (right hand and left knee). This may be referred to as peripheral arthritis. Sometimes one entire, individual finger or toe will swell up, making it painful and hard to bend. This is referred to as dactylitis. Pain and stiffness in the low back, buttock can also occur. Sometimes the neck and hips are affected and this may be referred to as spondylitis or axial arthritis.  

Nails: 

Cracking, pitting, white spots and lifting from the nail bed can occur. This may be referred to as nail disease. 

Enthesis (plural, entheses): 

Inflammation and swelling of one or more entheses, which are the places in the body where a tendon or ligament connects with a bone. Common spots include at the back of the heel and the bottom of the foot. This is called enthesitis.  
 
Many people with psoriatic arthritis get very tired (fatigue) and some may have a low-grade fever. Symptoms may come and go. A period of increased inflammation and worsening of other symptoms is called a flare. A flare can last for days or months.”   

And now for the biggie- What does any of this have to do with CKD? 

“’Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease of the skin that causes inflammation throughout the entire body,’ says Dr. Aamir Memon, nephrologist on staff at Advocate Sherman Hospital in Elgin, Ill. ‘When you have an autoimmune disease, you have antibodies in your blood, which can deposit anywhere in the body, such as your heart and kidneys. The increased inflammation increases the risk of atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) and organ damage.’ 

According to Dr. Memon, many patients with moderate to severe psoriasis take medications like Cyclosporine or Methotrexate as treatment. However, side effects from these medications include kidney problems. 

‘Since psoriasis has effects on the kidneys, it would intuitively make sense to control the inflammation to prevent further worsening of the kidneys,’ Dr Memon says. ‘Further studies are needed to evaluate if that is the case and as to what medications are best to decrease inflammation and prevent or halt kidney disease.’” 

Thank you to health enews at Advocate Aurora Health for the above information. This is a new site for me, so allow me to introduce you to them via their website: 

“health enews is the Midwest’s go-to source for timely, patient-centered and credible health news and information. Our goal is to provide readers with relevant and engaging articles and stories as part of our commitment to building healthy and informed communities across Illinois, Wisconsin and beyond. 

health enews is produced by a team of seasoned journalists and public affairs professionals from across Advocate Aurora Health.” 

From my 11 years of blogging about CKD, I’m beginning to accept that it is all connected. What happens to one part of the body does, indeed, affect the other parts of the body. Now you know how CKD and psoriasis are related, in case you’d ever wondered. 

You may have noticed there are no URLs in the blogs lately. Press control and click on the name of the organization instead. They are linked to the articles mentioned.

Until next week, 

Keep living your life!  

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