National Kidney Month

The world has acknowledged World Kidney Day. We have had walks in many countries. We have had educational seminars in many countries. We have posted in many countries. All to bring awareness to what our kidneys do for us and the worldwide challenge of kidney disease. Thursday, March 11th, was World Kidney Day. 

But today is Monday. And you know what? It’s still March, National Kidney Month, here in the United States. Each year, I write about National Kidney Month, just as I write about World Kidney Day. Interesting tidbit: the Philippines also has a National Kidney Month which they celebrate in June. I’ll only be writing about the U.S.’s National Kidney Day. 

 As usual, let’s start at the beginning. What is National Kidney Month? Personalized Cause has a succinct explanation for us. While I’m not endorsing them since I usually try to avoid endorsements, I do want to let you know they sell the green ribbons and wristbands for kidney disease awareness that you’ll probably be seeing hither and yon all month. 

“National Kidney Month, observed in March and sponsored by the National Kidney Foundation, is a time to increase awareness of kidney disease, promote the need for a cure, and spur advocacy on behalf of those suffering with the emotional, financial and physical burden of kidney disease. The National Kidney Foundation is the leading organization in the U.S. dedicated to the awareness, prevention and treatment of kidney disease for hundreds of thousands of healthcare professionals, millions of patients and their families, and tens of millions of Americans at risk. 

National Kidney Month is a time to increase awareness about the function of the kidneys and kidney disease. Kidneys filter 200 liters of blood a day, help regulate blood pressure and direct red blood cell production. But they are also prone to disease. One in three Americans is at risk for kidney disease due to diabetes, high blood pressure or a family history of kidney failure. There are more than 26 million Americans who already have kidney disease, and most do not know it because there are often no symptoms until the disease has progressed.” 

That, of course, prompted me to go directly to the National Kidney Foundation’s information about National Kidney Month. This is what I found: 

March 1, 2021, New York, NY — In honor of National Kidney Month which starts today, the National Kidney Foundation’s (NKF) national public awareness campaign, “Are You the 33%?” enters a new phase focusing on the connection between type 2 diabetes (T2D) and kidney disease, also known as chronic kidney disease (CKD). NKF urges everyone to find out if they’re the 1 in 3 at risk for developing kidney disease by taking a one-minute quiz at MinuteForYourKidneys.org

Diabetes is a leading risk factor for developing kidney disease. Over time, having high blood sugar from diabetes can cause damage inside your kidneys. But it doesn’t have to end up this way; because with careful control of glucose (sugar) levels, there is evidence that you can prevent kidney disease in people with diabetes. 

Award-winning actress, Debbie Allen joined the campaign as the T2D Campaign Celebrity Spokesperson in February, Black History Month, to help promote awareness of diabetes as a leading cause for developing chronic kidney disease. Allen has a family history of diabetes and was recently diagnosed with pre-diabetes.” 

Indeed, the National Kidney Foundation has a lot to offer with peer mentoring, community, an information helpline, and transplant, palliative care, dialysis, kidney donation, and research information. 

The American Kidney Fund [AFK] joins in National Kidney Month with their form to pledge to fight kidney disease. I signed up; you can, too, if you’d like to. I’m not comfortable with the word “fight,” but I’m not going to let that stop me from spreading awareness of the disease.  

If you’re inclined to donate to the cause, the American Kidney Fund is doubling your donation this month. They also offer an advocacy program, as well as free screenings, activity days, financial assistance, and kidney education in addition to transplant and kidney donation information, 

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases [NIDDK], part of the National Institutes of Health [NIH], celebrates National Kidney Month with the following post and offerings. 

“Follow these healthy lifestyle tips to take charge of your kidney health. 

  1. Meet regularly with your health care team. Staying connected with your doctor, whether in-person or using telehealth via phone or computer, can help you maintain your kidney health. 
  1. Manage blood pressure and monitor blood glucose levels. Work with your health care team to develop a plan to meet your blood pressure goals and check your blood glucose level regularly if you have diabetes. 
  1. Take medicine as prescribed and avoid NSAIDs like ibuprofen and naproxen. Your pharmacist and doctor need to know about all the medicines you take. 
  1. Aim for a healthy weight. Create a healthy meal plan and consider working with your doctor to develop a weight-loss plan that works for you. 
  1. Reduce stress and make physical activity part of your routine. Consider healthy stress-reducing activities and get at least 30 minutes or more of physical activity each day. 
  1. Make time for sleep. Aim for 7 to 8 hours of sleep per night. 
  1. Quit smoking. If you smoke, take steps to quit. 

It may seem difficult, but small changes can go a long way to keeping your kidneys and you healthier for longer. 

Learn more about managing kidney disease 

As for me, I’ll continue to blog my brains out [just as I declared in last week’s blog] until more and more people are aware of the kidneys and kidney disease. Same goes for the Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and LinkedIn accounts, and the SlowItDownCKD book series. It’s all about kidney disease. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! 

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