Another Kind of Kidney Disease

While I’m still recuperating, I’ve had plenty of time to read Twitter articles, among other things. One topic I’ve been reading about is lupus nephritis. I think we’ve all heard of lupus, but just in case, here’s a definition from MedicineNet at https://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=8064.

“A chronic inflammatory disease that is caused by autoimmunity. Patients with lupus have in their blood unusual antibodies that are targeted against their own body tissues. Lupus can cause disease of the skin, heart, lungs, kidneys, joints, and nervous system.”

Did you catch the mention of kidneys in the above definition? That’s where the nephritis part of the condition comes in. By now, we’re all probably tired of being reminded that ‘neph’ means relating to the kidneys (although in non-medical terms, it means relating to the clouds) and ‘itis’ means inflammation. Nuts! I just reminded you again. Let’s ignore that. So, lupus nephritis actually means

“… a kidney disorder [which] is a complication of systemic lupus erythematosus.”

Thank you to MedlinePlus at https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000481.htm for the definition. Oh, “systemic lupus erythematosus” refers back to autoimmune disease. Still, the word “erythematosus” puzzled me. I finally figured it out after realizing I probably wasn’t going to get a definition since almost all the entries were for lupus erythematosus. Remember, I studied Greek & Latin roots way, way back in college. It means red and is from the Greek. I get it. Sometimes, lupus patients have a red rash in butterfly form across their face.

So, how do you develop this particular kidney disease? What better place to find out than Lupus.org at https://www.lupus.org/resources/how-lupus-affects-the-renal-kidney-system#.

“Inflammation of the nephrons, the structures within the kidneys that filter the blood, is called glomerulonephritis, or nephritis. Lupus nephritis is the term used when lupus causes inflammation in your kidneys, making them unable to properly remove waste from your blood or control the amount of fluids in your body.”

Hmmm, no lupus equals no lupus nephritis. However, if you do have lupus, you may develop lupus nephritis.

Let’s say hypothetically that you or a loved one (or even your neighbor down the block) has lupus and is concerned about developing lupus nephritis. How would they know if they were developing it? I had to look no further than the National Kidney Foundation at https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/lupus.

“Lupus nephritis can cause many signs and symptoms and may be different for everyone. Signs of lupus nephritis include:

  • Blood in the urine (hematuria): Glomerular disease can cause your glomeruli to leak blood into your urine. Your urine may look pink or light brown from blood.
  • Protein in the urine (proteinuria): Glomerular disease can cause your glomeruli to leak protein into your urine. Your urine may be foamy because of the protein.
  • Edema: Having extra fluid that your kidneys cannot remove that causes swelling in body parts like your legs, ankles, or around your eyes.
  • Weight gain: due to the fluid your body is not able to get rid of.
  • High blood pressure

I know these may also be the symptoms of Chronic Kidney Disease, but if you have lupus, then they may be symptoms of lupus nephritis. To make things even more complicated, there are five different kinds of lupus nephritis depending upon which part of the kidney is affected.

I was wondering about tests to diagnose lupus nephritis, like we have blood and urine tests to diagnose CKD. Healthline (Now do you see why I was so thrilled to receive their Best Kidney Blogs Award two years in a row?) at https://www.healthline.com/health/lupus-nephritis#diagnosis cleared that up.

Blood tests

Your doctor will look for elevated levels of waste products, such as creatinine and urea. Normally, the kidneys filter out these products.

24-hour urine collection

This test measures the kidney’s ability selectively to filter wastes. It determines how much protein appears in urine over 24 hours.

Urine tests

Urine tests measure kidney function. They identify levels of:

  • protein
  • red blood cells
  • white blood cells

Iothalamate clearance testing

This test uses a contrast dye to see if your kidneys are filtering properly.

Radioactive iothalamate is injected into your blood. Your doctor will then test how quickly it’s excreted in your urine. They may also directly test how quickly it leaves your blood. This is considered to be the most accurate test of kidney filtration speed.

Kidney biopsy

Biopsies are the most accurate and also most invasive way to diagnose kidney disease. Your doctor will insert a long needle through your abdomen and into your kidney. They’ll take a sample of kidney tissue to be analyzed for signs of damage.

Ultrasound

Ultrasounds use sound waves to create a detailed image of your kidney. Your doctor will look for anything abnormal in the size and shape of your kidney.

Yes, I know these are the same tests that are used to diagnose CKD, but if you have lupus, they also can diagnose lupus nephritis.

Okay, now the biggie: How do you treat it if you do have it? The MayoClinic at  https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/lupus-nephritis/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20446438 had some sobering news for us:

“There’s no cure for lupus nephritis. Treatment aims to:

  • Reduce symptoms or make symptoms disappear (remission)
  • Keep the disease from getting worse
  • Maintain remission
  • Avoid the need for dialysis or a kidney transplant

Conservative treatments

In general, doctors may recommend these treatments for people with kidney disease:

  • Diet changes. Limiting the amount of protein and salt in your diet can improve kidney function.
  • Blood pressure medications. Drugs called angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) can help control blood pressure. These drugs also prevent protein from leaking from the kidneys into the urine. Drugs called diuretics can help you get rid of excess fluid.

However, conservative treatment alone isn’t effective for lupus nephritis.

Immune suppressants

For severe lupus nephritis, you might take drugs that slow or stop the immune system from attacking healthy cells, such as:

  • Steroids, such as prednisone
  • Cyclosporine
  • Tacrolimus
  • Cyclophosphamide
  • Azathioprine (Imuran)
  • Mycophenolate (CellCept)
  • Rituximab (Rituxan)

When immunosuppressive therapies don’t lead to remission, clinical trials may be available for new therapies.

Treatment options for kidney failure

For people who progress to kidney failure, treatment options include:

  • Dialysis. Dialysis helps remove fluid and waste from the body, maintain the right balance of minerals in the blood, and manage blood pressure by filtering your blood through a machine.
  • Kidney transplant. You may need a new kidney from a donor if your kidneys can no longer function.”

Help! Running out of room (but we’re done anyway),

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Sorry Spiderman, That was Webinars not Webshooters

So much has been going on in my world lately that it was hard to choose what to write about today. In addition to my family, there’s the experience of my first American Association of Kidney Patients Conference, PKD, KidneyX and the list goes on. It was hard to choose, that is, until the American Kidney Fund sent me the following information. They explain who they are, what they do, and why they hold their free monthly educational seminars. Good timing here since the next webinar is this Friday. I’ll let them take over for a while and write some more once they’re done.

Oh, wait. First we need to know what a webinar is. My favorite online dictionary, Merriam-Webster, at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/webinar defines this in the following way:

“a live online educational presentation during which participating viewers can submit questions and comments”

That means it’s real time; you have to be online to participate. Don’t worry if the time doesn’t work for you because AKF has former webinars on their websites. You just won’t be able to ask your own questions, although you will be able to hear the questions others have asked during the webinar and the answers they received. Okay, now we turn this section of the blog over to The American Kidney Fund.

“The American Kidney Fund (AKF) is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping people fight kidney disease and lead healthier lives.  Living with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or kidney failure is incredibly taxing, and can put strain on all elements of a person’s life. And although doctors are available for patients to ask questions about their disease, many kidney patients do not know what they should ask, and are left needing answers even after leaving a doctor’s appointment.

AKF believes every patient and caregiver has the right to understand what is going on with their health, or the health of their loved one, and how to best manage it. That is where we come in.

The American Kidney Fund hosts free, monthly, educational webinars meant for patients and caregivers. Each webinar explores a different topic relevant to living well with kidney disease. Since the webinar program’s launch in 2016, AKF has hosted over 27 webinars on many topics including nutrition, employment, insurance, transplant, exercise, heart disease, advocacy, pregnancy, mental health, and more.

Webinar speakers are carefully chosen based on their knowledge, and ability to connect with a patient audience. This ensures we deliver the highest quality of information in the best way. Some speakers are kidney patients or kidney donors themselves.  The webinars are delivered from a variety of perspectives so that the advice given is both relatable and reliable.

AKF aims to take complex topics and simplify the content without taking away from the quality of information.  In an effort to be inclusive of non-English speakers, AKF has hosted a webinar entirely in Spanish on preventing and treating kidney disease, and is in the process of translating even more webinars into Spanish.

One of the highlights of the American Kidney Fund webinars is the live Q&A session held during the last 15-20 minutes of each presentation, when the audience can ask their questions in real time and receive an immediate answer from our speaker. This creates a unique space for our attendees to interact anonymously with an expert in a judgement-free zone. We understand the time-demands of being a kidney patient or caregiver, which is why all our webinars, along with the PowerPoint slides, are also uploaded to the AKF website for on-demand viewing.

Our next webinar is on Friday, June 22 from 1-2pm (EST) and will discuss why phosphorus is an important nutrient for kidney patients to consider, and the best ways to manage phosphorus through diet and medicine.  Carolyn Feibig, the dietitian and speaker for this webinar is exceptionally knowledgeable and enthusiastic about her field. If you have questions about how to manage a CKD-friendly diet, this is your opportunity to learn more and to ask your questions.

After each webinar we ask for feedback and suggestions from our audience about future webinars.  We invite you to register now, and then share which topics you would like to hear about next. We hope you will use our webinars as a tool to live the healthiest life possible with kidney disease.

American Kidney Fund www.kidneyfund.org/webinars

I looked at some of their past webinar topics and was impressed with the variety.

My office is abuzz. SlowItDownCKD 2013, both digital and print, is available on Amazon. Give it a few weeks before it appears on B&N.com. I’m excited because I vowed to separate the unwieldy, small print, indexless The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2 into two separate books with a SlowItDownCKD title, index, and larger print just as I’d done with The Book of Blogs: Moderate Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 (which is no longer available since it is now SlowItDownCKD 2011 and SlowItDownCKD 2012). That’s half way done now, boys and girls… I mean readers.

Here’s something a bit unusual: I have a request from a reader who has the rare kidney disease Calyceal Diverticulum. Rather than asking me to write about it, she’s looking for others with the same disease. Do we have any readers here with this disease? If so, we could make the blog a safe place to connect. Or you could email me and I’d pass on your information to her. Alternately, with her permission, I could pass her information to you. I can understand her need to communicate with others with the same disease, so please do let me know if you’d like to communicate with her.

And last, but not least, and I have to admit brain fog has me here, so bear with me if you’ve read this before. In digging through the morass of my desk, (I have been traveling a lot lately.) I uncovered a beta copy of SlowItDownCKD 2017. That means it has all the content, but I didn’t like the formatting so I re-did it. Would you like it? If so, just be the first one to contact me to let me know. Oh, one restriction: only those who haven’t received a free book from me before, please. I’d like to share the CKD information with as many people as possible.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

 

 

Last Week, The Country… This Week, The World

Last week, I wrote about a U.S. clinical trial program, AllofUs Research Program. This week we’re going global. Huh? What’s that, you ask. It’s KidneyX.

I can just feel you rolling your eyes. (Ask my children if you don’t think I can do that.)  Hold on a minute and I’ll let KidneyX explain what they are from their website at http://www.kidneyx.org.

“The Kidney Innovation Accelerator (KidneyX) is a public-private partnership to accelerate innovation in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of kidney diseases. KidneyX seeks to improve the lives of the 850 million people worldwide currently affected by kidney diseases by accelerating the development of drugs, devices, biologics and other therapies across the spectrum of kidney care including:

Prevention

Diagnostics

Treatment”

I know, I know. Now you want to know why you should be getting excited about this program you don’t know much about. Let’s put it this way. There hasn’t been all that much change in the treatment of kidney disease since it was recognized. When was that? This question was answered in SlowItDownCKD 2015:

“…nephrologist Veeraish Chauhan from his ‘A Brief History of the Field of Nephrology’ in which he emphasizes how young the field of modern nephrology is.

‘Dr. Smith was an American physician and physiologist who was almost singlehandedly responsible for our current understanding of how the kidneys work. He dominated the field of twentieth century Nephrology so much that it is called the “Smithian Era of Renal Physiology“ .He wrote the veritable modern Bible of Nephrology titled, The Kidney: Structure and Function in Health and Disease. This was only in 1951.”

1951?????? It looks like I’m older than the history of kidney disease treatment is. Of course, there were earlier attempts by other people (Let’s not forget Dr. Bright who discovered kidney disease in the early 1800s.) But treatment?

Hmmm, how did Dr. Smith treat kidney disease I wondered as I started writing about KidneyX.

Clinics in Mother and Child Health was helpful here. I turned to their “A Short History of Nephrology Up to the 20th Century” at https://www.omicsonline.org/open-access/a-short-historic-view-of-nephrology-upto-the-20th-century-2090-7214-1000195.php? and found this information:

“His NYU time has been called the Smithian Era of renal physiology for his monumental research clarifying glomerular filtration, tubular absorption, and secretion of solutes in renal physiology …. His work established the concept that the kidney worked according to principles of physiology both as a filter and also as a secretory organ. Twenty-first century clinical nephrology stems from his work and teaching on the awareness of normal and abnormal functioning of the kidney.”

I see, so first the physiology and function of the kidney had to be understood before the disease could be treated.

 

I thought I remembered sodium intake as part of the plan to treat CKD way before the Smithian Era. I was wrong. This is also from SlowItDownCKD 2015:

“With all our outcry about following a low sodium diet, it was a bit shocking to realize that when this was first suggested as a way to avoid edema in 1949, it was practically dismissed. It wasn’t until the 1970s that the importance of a low sodium diet in Chronic Kidney Disease was acknowledged.”

Aha! So one of our dietary restrictions wasn’t accepted until the 1970s. I was already teaching high school English by then. Things did seem to be moving slowly when it came to Chronic Kidney Disease treatment.

Let’s see if I can find something more recent. This, from the National Kidney Fund at https://www.kidney.org/professionals/guidelines/guidelines_commentaries sounds promising, but notice that this has only been around since 1997. That’s only 21 years ago. It has been updated several times, but there doesn’t seem to be that much difference… or maybe I just didn’t understand the differences.

“The National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF KDOQI)™ has provided evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and related complications since 1997…. KDOQI also convenes a small work group of U.S. based experts to review relevant international guidelines and write commentary to help the U.S. audience better understand applicability in their local clinical environment.

Clinical Practice Guidelines are documents that present evidence-based recommendations to aid clinicians in the treatment of particular diseases or groups of patients. They are not intended to be mandates but tools to help physicians, patients, and caregivers make treatment decisions that are right for the individual. With all guidelines, clinicians should be aware that circumstances may appear that require straying from the published recommendations.”

Time to get back to KidneyX before I run out of room in today’s blog. Here’s more that will explain their purpose:

“Principles

  • Patient-Centered Ensure all product development is patient-centered
  • Urgent Create a sense of urgency to meet the needs of people with kidney diseases
  • Achievable Ground in scientifically-driven technology development
  • Catalytic Reduce regulatory and financial risks to catalyze investment in kidney space
  • Collaborative Foster multidisciplinary collaboration including innovators throughout science and technology, the business community, patients, care partners, and other stakeholders
  • Additive Address barriers to innovation public/private sectors do not otherwise
  • Sustainable Invest in a diverse portfolio to balance risk and sustain KidneyX”

This may explain why think tanks for kidney patients, all types of kidney patients, are beginning to become more prevalent.

Let’s go back to the website for more information. This is how they plan to succeed:

“Building off the success of similar public-private accelerators, KidneyX will engage a community of researchers, innovators, and investors to bring breakthrough therapies to patients by:

Development

Driving patient access to disruptive technologies via competitive, non-dilutive funding to innovators.

Coordination

Providing a clearer and less expensive path to bringing products to patients and their families.

Urgency

Creating a sense of urgency by spotlighting the immediate needs of patients and their families.”

One word jumped out at me: urgency. I am being treated for my CKD the same way CKD patients have been treated for decades…and decades. It’s time for a change.

One thing that doesn’t change is that we celebrate Memorial Day in the U.S. every year. And every year, I honor those who have died to protect my freedom and thank my lucky stars that Bear is not one of them. There is no way to describe the gratitude those of us who haven’t served in the military – like me – owe to those who have and lost their lives in doing so.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

This Former Hippy Wannabe Likes HIPAA

Each day, I post a tidbit about, or relating to, Chronic Kidney Disease on SlowItDownCKD’s Facebook page. This is the quote from Renal and Urology News that I posted just a short while ago:

“Patients with stage 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease (CKD) who were managed by nephrology in addition to primary care experienced greater monitoring for progression and complications, according to a new study.”

My primary care physician is the one who caught my CKD in the first place and is very careful about monitoring its progress. My nephrologist is pleased with that and feels he only needs to see me once a year. The two of them work together well.

From the comments on that post, I realized this is not usual. One of my readers suggested it had to do with HIPPA, so I decided to look into that.

The California Department of Health Care Services (Weird, I know, but I liked their simple explanation.) at http://www.dhcs.ca.gov/formsandpubs/laws/hipaa/Pages/1.00WhatisHIPAA.aspx defined HIPPA and its purposes in the following way:

“HIPAA is the acronym for the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act that was passed by Congress in 1996. HIPAA does the following:

• Provides the ability to transfer and continue health insurance coverage for millions of American workers and their families when they change or lose their jobs;
• Reduces health care fraud and abuse;
• Mandates industry-wide standards for health care information on electronic billing and other processes; and
• Requires the protection and confidential handling of protected health information”

Got it. Let’s take a look at its last purpose. There is an infogram from HealthIT.gov at https://www.healthit.gov/sites/default/files/YourHealthInformationYourRights_Infographic-Web.pdf  which greatly clarifies the issue. On item on this infogram caught my eye:

“You hold the key to your health information and can send or have it sent to anyone you want. Only send your health information to someone you trust.”

I always send mine to one of my daughters and Bear… and my other doctors if they are not part of the hospital system most of my doctors belong to.

I stumbled across National Conference of State Legislatures at http://www.ncsl.org/research/health/hipaa-a-state-related-overview.aspx and learned more than I even knew existed about HIPAA. Take a look if you’d like more information. I finally tore myself away from the site to get back to writing the blog after following links for about an hour. It was fascinating, but not germane to today’s blog.

Okay, so sharing. In order to share the information from one doctor that my other doctors may not have, I simply fill out an Authorization to Release Medical Information form. A copy of this is kept in the originating doctor’s files. By the way, it is legal for the originating doctor to charge $.75/page for each page sent, but none of my doctors have ever done so.

I know, I know. What is this about doctors being part of the hospital system? What hospital system? When I first looked for a new physician since the one I had been using was so far away (Over the usual half-an-hour-to-get-anywhere-in-Arizona rule), I saw that my new PCP’s practice was affiliated with the local hospital and thought nothing of it.

Then Electronic Health Records came into widespread use at this hospital. Boom! Any doctor associated with that hospital – and that’s all but two of my myriad doctors – instantly had access to my health records. Wow, no more requesting hard copies of my health records from each doctor, making copies for all my other doctors, and then hand delivering or mailing them. No wonder I’m getting lazy; life is so much easier.

Back to HealthIt.gov for more about EHR. This time at https://www.healthit.gov/buzz-blog/electronic-health-and-medical-records/emr-vs-ehr-difference/:

“With fully functional EHRs, all members of the team have ready access to the latest information allowing for more coordinated, patient-centered care. With EHRs:

• The information gathered by the primary care provider tells the emergency department clinician about the patient’s life threatening allergy, so that care can be adjusted appropriately, even if the patient is unconscious.
• A patient can log on to his own record and see the trend of the lab results over the last year, which can help motivate him to take his medications and keep up with the lifestyle changes that have improved the numbers.
• The lab results run last week are already in the record to tell the specialist what she needs to know without running duplicate tests.
• The clinician’s notes from the patient’s hospital stay can help inform the discharge instructions and follow-up care and enable the patient to move from one care setting to another more smoothly.”

Did you notice the part about what a patient can do? With my patient portal, I can check my labs, ask questions, schedule an appointment, obtain information about medications, and spot trends in my labs. Lazy? Let’s make that even lazier. No more appointments for trivial questions, no more leaving phone messages, no more being on hold for too long. I find my care is quicker, more accessible to me, and – believe it or not – more easily understood since I am a visual, rather than an audial, person.

Kudos to American Association of Kidney Patients for postponing their National Patient Meeting in St. Petersburg from last weekend to this coming spring. The entire state of Florida was declared in a state of emergency by the governor due to the possible impact of Hurricane Irma. The very next day, AAKP acted to postpone placing the safety of its members over any monetary considerations. If I wasn’t proud to be a member before (and I was), I certainly am now.

Aha! That gives me five found days to separate The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 and The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2 each into two separate books with indexes. I never was happy with the formatting of those two. I plan to reward myself after this project. How, you ask. By writing a book of short stories. I surmise that will be out next year sometime. Meanwhile, there’s always Portal in Time, a time travel romance. Geesh! Sometimes I wonder at all my plans.

Until next week,
Keep living your life!

It’s the Funniest Thing…

You want to know about Chronic Kidney Disease brain fog?  Let me tell you about Chronic Kidney Disease brain fog.  I wrote a book about the Book Coverexperiences of the newly diagnosed CKD patient based upon my own experience – What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease.  Nice job on that one, Gail.

Four years later, I published The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Parts 1 & 2… with neither a topic listed for each blog nor an index. Well, how the heck are you supposed to find the information you’re looking for??? And it’s taken me this long to figure that out. Take it from me, CKD brain fog exists.

So, what is this CKD brain fog of which I speak? According to integrative medicine expert Dr. Isaac Eliaz, when experiencing brain fog:

“…people feel as if there is a thick fog dampening their mind. While the medical and mental health establishments don’t generally recognize brain fog as a condition, it’s a surprisingly common affliction that affects people of all ages. Symptoms include pervasive absentmindedness, muddled thought processes, poor memory recall, difficulty processing information, disorientation, fatigue, and others.”

You can read more at http://www.rodalenews.com/brain-fog.

It was www.naturopathconnect.com (a link that sometimes works, sometimes doesn’t) that offered me my first insight into how our kidneys and brain fog are connected.

bottled water“Make sure your liver and kidneys are not overloaded or congested. When your liver and kidneys are not functioning well, they are less able to clear your system of the multitude of toxins that float around in your bloodstream. When your body is overloaded with toxins, your brain suffers as well….Dehydration may be a key factor in less-than-optimal kidney function, so water is essential to keep the kidneys in tip-top shape.”

Got it – toxins.  Uh, what toxins?  And how do they affect the brain, I wondered.  Back to researching.

Dr. Martin Morrell of healthtap.com offered an explanation. However, this is not an endorsement of him or the site.  I am not a fan of asking online doctors unfamiliar with your particular medical history for advice.

“… if your blood urea increases, which is supposed to be cleared by your kidneys, this ‘poison’ will affect the ability of the brain to work properly.”

Oh, blood urea. Well that explains it. But how can I explain blood urea?  I’ll allow the experts to do that.

http://www.patient.co.uk/health/routine-kidney-function-blood-test has the simplest explanation.

“Urea is a waste product formed from the breakdown of proteins. Urea is usually passed out in the urine. A high blood level of urea (‘uraemia’) indicates that the kidneys may not be working properly, or that you are dehydrated (have a low body water content).”

In the U.S., we call this test B.U.N. or Blood Urea Nitrogen Blood Test.  So as I understand it, if your protein intake is high, more urea is produced.  But since your kidneys are already compromised by CKD, the toxins remaining in your body are not eliminated as well and are still in the blood that flows through your brain.  Okay, that’s logical.protein

The more urea remaining in your system, the more sluggish your brain.  It does sound like a perfectly formed ‘if-then’ equation from probability theory. The only difference here is that this is not a theory, but, rather, what we may encounter as CKD patients.

What to do?  What to do?  Obviously, keeping our protein intake low will help.  My renal diet limits me to five ounces of protein a day. I rarely ingest more protein than that. Well, bully for me!

So how else can I alleviate my sometimes brain fog…especially since I’m working on three books at the same time as well as wanting to make some sort of index for the books mentioned above?

I was all over the web on this one and found that besides what I was already doing for my CKD, I could also avoid heavy metal (and I always thought that was a kind of music) exposure, use a blue light, get myself some natural sun light, check my medication side effects and lots more.

Dr. Isaac Eliaz who wrote the RodaleNews article in 2013 suggests several more natural remedies:

  1. Improve your diet and digestion.
  2. Detoxify.
  3. Support cell power.water to cells
  4. Control stress.
  5. Exercise.

I can agree with most of the items on Dr. Eliaz’s list no matter what’s causing the brain fog, but with CKD I’d talk over detoxing and/or taking supplements to support cell power with my nephrologist before actually following that advice.  Some nephrologists are dead (Yikes! Wrong word choice) set against detoxifying while others have a more eclectic approach to gentle detoxifying.

Supplements are a whole other story. There are so many different approaches here that I usually research whichever supplement I’m considering, then bring that research to my nephrologist to talk it over with him. Result: some supplements I agreed weren’t looking so good for me after our talk; others, he agreed were well worth a try.

Bahar Gholipour of Live Science at http://www.livescience.com/45502-foggy-brain-causes.html writes about other possible causes of brain fog. She includes multi-tasking, pregnancy, chemotherapy, menopause, and chronic fatigue syndrome among the causes. If any one of these causes exists in your life, maybe it’s not CKD brain fog you’re experiencing… or maybe it is… or maybe it’s a combination.  No one seems to be certain just what can cause brain fog, although I’m pretty comfortable with the explanations I’ve offered above.

It’s real.  Brain fog could be affecting you, especially if you have CKD.  And from what I’ve read, once you’ve gotten your CKD slowed down as much as possible, the other ‘fixes’ are easy.Kidney Arizona

Here’s a quick reminder about The National Kidney Fund of Arizona’s Path to Wellness screening on Saturday, September 19, 2015 at the Indo American Cultural Center. This consists of free blood and urine testing, which is evaluated onsite to assess for the risk of diabetes, heart and kidney diseases, and chronic disease management education, plus overall health assessment and one-on-one consultation with a physician for the screenees. A follow-up 6-week series of Healthy Living workshops that teach chronic disease self-management skills is then offered.

Just like last week, one last thing: P2P’s Chronic Illness Buy & Sell page is on Facebook IMG_1398at https://www.facebook.com/groups/P2PBuy.Sell/.  It will be the place to go for anything chronic illness related. My first book is advertised there and both The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease books will be soon, too.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Urine or You’re Out

How odd that urine is so important to us.  Make no mistake; if you have Chronic Kidney Disease, you’re always keeping an eye on it.  I’m pretty sure you all know about the color chart to see if you’re hydrating enough.  If you don’t hydrate enough, your kidneys can’t do their jobs as well… and they’re already struggling to do them. This is the least complicated urine hydration chart I’ve seen.urine hydration

Of course, I’ll go back to remind you of just what the jobs of your kidneys are.  My source?  My first book about our disease, What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, page 7.

They filter as many as 200 quarts of blood per day to rid us of roughly two quarts of waste and extra water.

These two organs, the master chemists of our bodies, have several functions: regulating the fluid balance in the body, providing vital hormones, producing erythropoietin, and producing the renin that regulates blood pressure. This is why CKD patients need to be careful about sodium, Book Coverpotassium, chloride, calcium, magnesium, and phosphates. Your nutritionist may not even mention magnesium to you since this constitutes only 1% of extra cellular fluid. Additional important jobs of the kidneys are removing liquid waste from your body and balancing the minerals in the body. The two liquid waste products are urea which has been broken down from protein by the digestive system and creatinine which is a byproduct of muscle activity.

Wait a minute; I think we need to go even further back.  A picture of the urinary tract would probably be helpful here, too.urinary

Okay, now I can start writing about your urine. I’m pretty sure I mentioned in an earlier blog how disturbed I was to be one point over the normal range for microalbumin. Here’s a definition of just what that is.

Micro, or very small amounts, of albumin in the urine. Ur stands for urine. {As in the test for proteinuria.} Albumin is a form of protein that is water soluble. Urine is a liquid, a form of water, so the albumin should have been dissolved. Protein in the urine may be an indication of kidney disease.

Read that last sentence again. There seems to be a Catch 22 here. As a Chronic Kidney Disease patient for the last seven years, this has never shown up in a urine test for me before. I am including both the 24 hour variety and the random {Dipstick} variety in that never.

So now we know about microalbumin.  What about proteinuria?  Notice the ur in the word.  We just learned that means urine.  This is another indication of kidney disease.  I have never been out of acceptable range for this.  According to WebMd at http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/proteinuria-protein-in-urine

Healthy kidneys do not allow a significant amount of protein to pass through their filters. But filters damaged by kidney disease may let proteins such as albumin leak from the blood into the urine.

Glomerulus-Nephron 300 dpi jpgFilters?  This diagram of the glomerulus may help.

If albumin is a protein, are proteinuria and microalbumin the same? Well, no.  Health Communities at http://www.healthcommunities.com/proteinuria-and-microalbuminuria/overview-of-proteinuria.shtml tells us

Albumin is particularly useful in absorbing bodily fluid into the blood. Because the albumin molecule is relatively small, it is often among the first proteins to enter the urine after glomeruli are damaged. Therefore, even minor kidney dysfunction is detectable with proper diagnosis of microalbuminuria.

All right, got it?  Albumin is a protein.  It will show up as microalbumin in your urine test.  It may also show up as proteinuria since albumin is a protein. Once upon a time, you always needed to conduct a 24 hour urine test for this information, but…

In recent years, researchers have found that a single urine sample can provide the needed information. In the newer technique, the amount of albumin in the urine sample is compared with the amount of creatinine, a waste product of normal muscle breakdown. The measurement is called a urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR). A urine sample containing more than 30 milligrams of albumin for each gram of creatinine (30 mg/g) is a warning that there may be a problem. If the laboratory test exceeds 30 mg/g, another UACR test should be done 1 to 2 weeks later. If the second test also shows high levels of protein, the person has persistent proteinuria, a sign of declining kidney function, and should have additional tests to evaluate kidney function.

Thank you to the National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse {A service of the NIH} at http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseases/pubs/proteinuria/#tests for that information.banner-nihlogo

And that is where creatinine comes in and why you need to be aware of your creatinine levels in your urinalysis. By the way, blood tests will also report the amount of albumin and creatinine in your blood. This could promote another discussion, one about Blood Urea Nitrogen tests, but it would be out of place here since that’s not part of the urine.

As you can see this is a complex topic.  You need to be aware of what the color of your urine can tell you about your hydration – whether or not you have Chronic Kidney Disease – and monitor both your microalbumin and proteinuria, as well as your creatinine.

41DsvandphL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-stThe Book of BlogsAnother complex topic is editing the new print books.  The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 and The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2 aren’t quite ready.  I’m working with a new publisher and we’re just getting to know each other’s styles.  The good part about that is you get two books for the price of one on Amazon.com digital until the print books are ready.  Look for The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease.  Once the print copies are ready, I promise a day of the digital copy for free… if that perk is still available to me at that time.

I don’t know about you, but I get just as tired from overdoing it for good things as well as bad.  This weekend was a test of how well I could adhere to my renal diet with date day, a memorial dinner, and a celebratory champagne brunch.  Being human, I blew it on ice cream.  My pounding heart and lightheadedness have convinced me: no more sugar treats!  Although, some of my non-CKD friends report the same symptoms upon a sugar overdose…

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Never NSAIDS

Never what?  One of the first rules we learn as Chronic Kidney Disease patients is never to take a NSAID, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug.  Raise your hand if you remember why.  Hello fellow with the beard in the back of the room; what do you say?

Correct!  They further damage the kidneys.  Can you tell us how?  No?  Don’t feel bad.  Most people can’t, even those suffering from CKD.

What was that?  Oh, you want over the counter (non-prescription) names of some NSAIDS?  Sure.  Here’s a list courtesy of Nsaids-list at http://www.nsaids-list.com/:

  • Aspirin (Aspirin is a brand name; the chemical is called acetylsalicylic acid)nsaids
  • Celecoxib (Celebrex)
  • Dexdetoprofen (Keral)
  • Diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, Voltaren-XR)
  • Diflunisal (Dolobid)
  • Etodolac (Lodine, Lodine XL)
  • Etoricoxib (Algix)
  • Fenoprofen (Fenopron, Nalfron)
  • Firocoxib (Equioxx, Previcox)
  • Flurbiprofen (Urbifen, Ansaid, Flurwood, Froben)
  • Ibuprofen (Advil, Brufen, Motrin, Nurofen, Medipren, Nuprin)
  • Indomethacin (Indocin, Indocin SR, Indocin IV)
  • Ketoprofen (Actron, Orudis, Oruvail, Ketoflam)
  • Ketorolac (Toradol, Sprix, Toradol IV/IM, Toradol IM)
  • Licofelone (under development)
  • Lornoxicam (Xefo)
  • Loxoprofen (Loxonin, Loxomac, Oxeno)
  • Lumiracoxib (Prexige)
  • Meclofenamic acid (Meclomen)
  • Mefenamic acid (Ponstel)statins
  • Meloxicam (Movalis, Melox, Recoxa, Mobic)
  • Nabumetone (Relafen)
  • Naproxen (Aleve, Anaprox, Midol Extended Relief, Naprosyn, Naprelan)
  • Nimesulide (Sulide, Nimalox, Mesulid)
  • Oxaporozin (Daypro, Dayrun, Duraprox)
  • Parecoxib (Dynastat)
  • Piroxicam (Feldene)
  • Rofecoxib (Vioxx, Ceoxx, Ceeoxx)
  • Salsalate (Mono-Gesic, Salflex, Disalcid, Salsitab)
  • Sulindac (Clinoril)
  • Tenoxicam (Mobiflex)
  • Tolfenamic acid (Clotam Rapid, Tufnil)
  • Valdecoxib (Bextra)

Yes, young lady in the third row. This is a bit more detailed a list than you’d expected? Okay, let’s go back to What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease for a simple explanation of NSAID.  Please turn to page 134.  Those of you with digital copies of the book, search the phrase.  Everyone have it?

Book CoverNSAID: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen, aspirin, Aleve or naproxen usually used for arthritis or pain management, can worsen kidney disease,    sometimes irreversibly.

So now we’re back to the original question.  How do NSAIDS further damage our kidneys?

But first I want to tell you just how important it is not to take them by sharing an anecdote with you. The first year after my CKD diagnose, my nephrologist spent a great deal of his time trying to convince me that I had caused by own CKD by taking NSAIDS very, very often.  He might have been right with another patient, but I was never one to rely on medications.

I would rather have used natural means to relieve myself of pain.  I did have arthritis and usually walked off the pain.  As for headaches, I would do the darkened room, rub the temples, mute the electronics and – my magic – ask one of my daughters to kiss my forehead routine. (Class!  No snickering.  It worked for me.)

Yet, overuse of NSAIDS was so common a cause of CKD that this was the only cause my nephrologist could see.  A while after this, studies showed that aging kidneys will lose their filtering power at the rate of ½% per year.  He switched to this cause, which I could more readily accept.

Yes, yes, I know we were going to discuss how NSAIDS further damage the kidneys today.

banner-nihlogoBy the way, as early as 1984, the National Institutes of Health at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1483278/?page=2 published a journal article from the Canadian Medical Association Journal entitled Adverse effects of NSAIDs on renal function.

Why no, I’m not procrastinating at all.  Here’s the answer to today’s question.

I found this explanation at a site that’s new to me (http://www.empowher.com/wellness/content/what-nsaids-do-your-kidneys):

All NSAIDs work by blocking the action of cyclooxygenase (COX). This enzyme performs a key step in the synthesis of prostaglandins [ me here with a definition of this word from the freedictionary.com at  http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Prostaglandins – a group of potent hormonelike substances that produce a wide range of body responses such as changing capillary permeability, smooth muscle tone, clumping of platelets, and endocrine and exocrine functions. They are involved in the pain process of inflammation.], which produce many effects in the body. Two of the effects are pain and inflammation for injured tissue. Other effects include protection of the stomach and homeostasis (regulation) of kidney function. The COX enzyme comes in two forms, COX-1 and COX-2. For a while, it was thought that COX-2 produces the pain and inflammation prostaglandins, while COX-1 produces the protective and regulatory prostaglandins.

The underlining is mine. That’s right, NSAIDS interfere with the regulation of the kidney function.  How?  Another good question from the middle of the room.

According to the National Kidney Foundation at http://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/painMeds_Analgesics.cfm,

“…because they reduce the blood flow to the kidney.”

So now we need to know why blood flow to the kidneys is important for CKD patients.

Blood Oxygen Cycle Picture 400dpi jpgIf you look at a picture of your kidney, you’ll see that blood with wastes in it is brought to the kidneys by the renal artery and clean blood is exited from the kidneys by the renal vein.  Your kidneys are already compromised which means they are not doing such a great job of filtering your blood.

Reduce the blood flow and you’re exacerbating the problem you already have… and all you need to do is avoid NSAIDS to avoid this problem. You’re right, class, that’s not exactly true, but it will help you preserve more of your kidney function.

Any questions for me?  For each other?

Well then, thank you for being such a willing and involved group of students.

While we all know this isn’t really a classroom and I’m not a doctor, this should answer a great many of the questions I’ve received via email or comments.

I’m also looking for first source research on both chia seeds and Goji Berries for a reader.  It seems there’s quite a bit of conflicting information about the safety of these two for CKD patients.  Please send along what you have, but first source only (not opinion, but fact).

It’s been my pleasure, folks.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Number Three on The List

“Other studies have suggested that once diagnosed with kidney disease, weight loss may slow kidney disease progression, but this is the first research study to support losing belly fat and limiting phosphorus consumption as a possible way to prevent kidney disease from developing.”Vassalotti Photo June2010  Dr. Joseph Vassalotti, chief medical officer at the National Kidney Foundation  11/3/13

Why has this little gem not caused more positive uproar?  We already accept that high blood pressure and diabetes are the two leading causes of Chronic Kidney Disease and that preventing each may lessen your chances of developing the disease.  Are we now looking at a third deterrent to developing CKD?

When I first wrote What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, I was so eager to spread the word that I called Dr. Vassalotti and asked him to read the book.  He was encouraging, and oh-so-willing to discuss anything CKD.  I immediately trusted and believed what he had to say… and believe him now, especially with the research studies behind him.

So what is phosphorous, anyway?  I defined it in my book as

“One of the electrolytes, works with calcium for bone formation, but too much can cause calcification where you don’t want it: joints, eyes, skin and heart.”Book Cover

Hmmm, I don’t see any relation to preventing CKD there.  I researched my usual sites and found that they also discussed the effects of phosphorus on the bones in CKD, but nothing about how limiting it might prevent the disease from developing. 

You can find an abstract of the original study (but it’s rough going unless you have a medical background) at: http://www.ajkd.org/article/S0272-6386(13)00825-1/abstract. By the way, this is a well-respected journal, should you be interested in taking a gander. 

It was too technical for me, so I keep referring to the Medical News Today article.  In research work, this is called a secondary source.

AJKD Okay, let’s take another look at The American Journal of Kidney Disease’s information about this study as it was covered by Medical News Today at: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/268144.php.

But first, here’s what I found about phosphorous at MedlinePlus, a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine at The National Institutes of Health   (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002424.htm),

“It plays an important role in how the body uses carbohydrates and fats. It is also needed for the body to make protein for the growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues.”

This is new information to me and makes sense according to the article in Medical News Today.  So we’re not just dealing with phosphorus’s importance in bone health, but in the body’s use of carbs and fats.

If phosphorous is not doing its job as an electrolyte, there’s a good chance you are gaining weight. Think about all those carbs and fats not properly being eliminated from your body.  More caloric intake equals fat development.  (I do realize we’re not taking exercise into account here.)

This sentence from The Huffington Post’s Healthy Living section last March caught my attention in a big way: “Belly fat is also much more inflammatory than fat located elsewhere in the body and can create its own inflammatory chemicals (as a tumor would). “ You can read the entire article at: belly fathttp://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/21/body-fat-facts_n_2902867.html

Inflammatory?  Isn’t CKD an inflammatory disease? I went to The National Center for Biotechnology Information, which took me to the National Library of Medicine and finally to a National Institute of Health study at http://http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3332073/ for the answer.

“The persistent inflammatory state is common in diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD).”

This is a lot to take in at once.  What it amounts to is that another way to possibility prevent the onset of CKD is to lower your phosphorous intake so that you don’t accumulate belly fat.  All we need to know now is how this possible inflammatory state can cause CKD.

Thank you to Medical News Today for making it clear in this article:

“The researchers from Johns Hopkins claim that reducing your waist circumference and cutting down on dietary phosphorus have been linked to lower levels of protein in the urine (albuminuria). The presence of this protein in urine is one of the first indicators of kidney disease.”

chocolateI exercise.  I follow the kidney diet.  What was I eating before I developed CKD that might have contributed to its onset?

Although I considered myself a health nut, I loved chocolate…milk chocolate. Yep, high in phosphorous.

As I researched different sites, I realized being a health nut was exactly the opposite of what I should have been.  All of the following are on the majority of high phosphorous food lists: quinoa, oats, bran, milk, cheese, whole wheat, whole grain, dried beans or peas, brown rice or wild rice.

If you’re identifying with me, do not – I repeat: do not – beat yourself up.  Remember the connection between high phosphorous levels, belly fat, and CKD is new information.

Here’s a hint: avoid processed foods since they have phosphorous added to extend their shelf life.  I learned that somewhere along the way in my CKD journey, probably from my renal nutritionist. You can also add a recent product, flavored water, to the list of high phosphorous foods to avoid.

Unfortunately, phosphorous is not usually listed on labels.  Although, I did see PHOS listed once or twice.  Hopefully, it will become common usage to list phosphorous in the near future.

When I was a young woman, I wondered why I should keep up with the latest scientific research.  After all, new discoveries were making what I already learned obsolete on a daily basis.  Now I know why.

I have two daughters, two step-daughters, three almost sons-in-law, and a husband who loves me.  I want to be around to be part of their futures.  If it takes constant monitoring of the new CKD information, I’ll do it.

We leave for New York on Wednesday and I’m finally getting excited.  One or two medical emergencies in New York both kept me from being excited and wanting to hurry up to be there at the same time.  They are being resolved as I write.

AND I get to see Nima, my one child still living in New York. Oh, and friends of very, very long standing and my niece and her family.  Hah! I’m so excited now I can barely sit still to type. Nothing like dancing at the computer.NYC

Until next week when I’ll publish from The Big Apple,

Keep living your life!

Book It!

With the holidays over and more time to think about what I’d like to write, I decided this would be a good time to update you about whatever other books are available that also concern Chronic Kidney Disease.

You know there are many out there, too many to mention here, so I eliminated any book that couldn’t be understood by a lay person (those without specific training in a certain field – in this case, medical) and renal diet books.  You can easily find those for yourself by going to Amazon.com and B&N.com. I also excluded those I found to be dubious… the spelling errors were a dead give-away that these were not professional.

I’m not going to tell you about What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease since you already know about it from this blog.  Let’s change that, I will tell you one or two things.  First, the books included in ‘Additional Resources’ (Chapter 13) won’t appear here, as good as they are.Book Cover

And – pay attention – students, be aware that both Campus Book Rentals and Chegg are attempting to rent the book to you for more than it costs to buy it.  The digital edition – when I was teaching college, my students always seemed to prefer the digital edition – is even less expensive.

Don’t forget about The KindleMatchBook program which allows you to buy the digital version at 70% discount if you’ve ever bought the print copy. Gather your classmates: pool your money so you can save. One of you buy the print edition, then the others can get the digital edition at deep discount (I have no idea why, but I love that phrase).

Disclaimer:  I am not a doctor, have never have claimed to be one , AND am not endorsing the following books, simply letting you know they exist. For the most part, the descriptions were written by the author. The ‘Look Inside!’ function only works if you follow the link to Amazon.com – sorry! I have been dreaming about this list, so let’s get it out of my dreams and on the blog:

510smylYevL._SL160_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-dp,TopRight,12,-18_SH30_OU01_AA160_Ford, Mathea A., RD (Registered Dietician) Kidney Disease: Common Labs and Medical Terminology: The Patient’s Perspective (Renal Diet HQ IQ Pre-Dialysis Living) (Volume 4)

New to kidney failure? Have no idea what your physician just said about your kidneys? Kidney disease labs and terminology can quite often be a challenge to understand and digest. Did your doctor use the “stages of kidney disease”? Did you physician refer to “eGFR”? What does all this mean for your health and future with kidney disease, lifestyle and nutrition choices. This book is the basic platform for understanding all the common labs and terminology that your doctors and nurses will use. This book with give you and your caregivers the confidence to manage your condition knowing that you have an understanding of all the ins and outs of the nephrology jargon. (Mrs. Mathea seems to have an entire series of books about CKD.)

Hunt, Walter A. Kidney Disease: A Guide for Living. 

When Hunt learned he had kidney disease, he was overwhelmed by the prospect of facing kidney failure. He had so many questions: Why are my kidneys failing? Is there anything I can do to save them? How will I know when my kidneys have failed? What will it feel like? 41nNk5SdqIL._AA160_What treatments are available for me? Is there a cure for kidney failure? The good news, as Hunt found out, is that kidney failure is highly treatable. People with the disease can lead full and productive lives, and Hunt’s readable and empathetic book will help them do just that. It discusses the latest scientific and medical findings about kidney disease, including what kidneys do; the underlying diseases that cause failure; diagnosis, treatment, and prevention; dietary factors; clinical trials; and the future direction of research on kidney failure. Kidney disease is difficult, but as Hunt’s narrative reveals, people living with it can take control of their health and their future. By understanding kidney failure — what causes it, how it may affect their lives, and what treatment options they have — people with the disease can improve their quality of life and achieve the best possible outcome.

51nUIkG8kSL._AA160_Lewis, Dr. Robert. Understanding Chronic Kidney Disease: A guide for the Non-Specialist.

This is meant for primary care physicians, but can be easily understood by the layman. I looked under the covers of this one and was delighted to see that the information we, as patients with CKD, need to know is also what our primary care physicians need to know. (I wrote this description.)

National Kidney Foundation of Southern California. Living Well With Kidney Disease.

The first edition of “Living Well With Kidney Disease” was developed and published by the National Kidney Foundation of Southern California. Based on the handbook “When Your Kidneys Fail” (originally published in 1982), this new and 41jxZoYLGzL._AA160_updated edition provides detailed information specifically intended for people coping with Kidney Disease and other renal failure, as well as their friends and families. The question and answer format provides a clear and manageable guide for those seeking support and answers. Among the topics covered are the principles of kidney function, methods of treatment, transplantation, and financial resources available to patients. With all of the ramifications of kidney failure and the rise of Chronic Kidney Disease and Type 2 Diabetes, there is a growing population of people afflicted with kidney failure. Although it was written with the patient in mind, family members, friends and health care professionals will also find this handbook a valuable resource.

517GaXFXNPL._SL160_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-dp,TopRight,12,-18_SH30_OU01_AA160_Synder, Rich DO (Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine) What You Must Know About Kidney Disease: A Practical Guide to Using Conventional and Complementary Treatments

The book is divided into three parts. Part One provides an overview of the kidneys’ structure and function, as well as common kidney disorders. It also guides you in asking your doctor questions that will help you better understand both status and prognosis. Part Two examines kidney problems and their conventional treatments. Part Three provides an in depth look at the most effective complementary treatments, from lifestyle changes to alternative healing methods. The diagnosis of kidney disease is the first step of an unexpected journey.

*Yes, this is the same Dr. Rich Snyder who interviewed me on his radio show twice since What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease was published.

It’s always hard to find good books about CKD that non-medical personnel can understand.  I hope this four (and mine!) help you feel more comfortable and knowledgeable about your diagnosis.

Here’s a little hint about your own health.  I’m back to no sweets or desserts and, I hate to admit it, but I’m feeling better.  Don’t you just hate when that happens?sugar

Until next week (when I’ll in in Culver City for a weekend of Landmark),

Keep living your life!

None of This Matters

Household tips I have learned via prepping the house for the wedding:                                                                 IMAG0208

1. Contact paper works well on bathroom windows for privacy.
2. Adhesive white board paper makes a good privacy screen on the shower door.
3. Trees and bushes cut back due to frost damage do grow back quickly.
4. Things break at the absolutely worst time: dishwasher, solar water heating panel, a/c.
5. None of this matters.

The most important one is #5.  We are preparing for one of the most special days for us – our wedding – and we’ll be married whether we discovered these things or not.

But I may not have been here for my wedding day if my Chronic Kidney Disease had not been discovered.  Once it was, I was given the tools to retard its progression and seemingly reverse it at times.

An even earlier discovery of my ckd would probably have been better. Okay, so I was seeing a Physician’s Assistant who wasn’t all that astute.  The readings were right there in my blood tests almost a year before I changed to a primary care doctor who actually cared.  I really liked the P.A. who had been taking care of me, but learned that liking a person doesn’t necessarily mean she is a good medical practitioner.

There are so many ifs here: If I had known earlier, could I have made sure my eGFR (estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate) didn’t dip as low as it was when I was finally diagnosed? If I had been seeing a doctor rather than a P.A. would she have caught the ckd earlier?  If the blood tests had been read carefully, would I have had the opportunity to get to work on preventing rapid progression in the decline of my kidneys?glomerulus

I will never know the answers to those questions, so – as #5 says – none of this matters … for me.  For you?  That’s another story.

Have you ever heard of KEEP?  That’s the Kidney Early Evaluation Program.  Notice the word ‘Early’ in the title. With ckd, the earlier you can detect the disease, the better. According to the National Kidney Foundation:

                            The goals of KEEP are to:

  • Raise awareness about kidney disease especially among “high risk” individuals
  • Provide free testing for people at increased risk for kidney disease
  • Encourage people “at risk” to visit a clinician and follow the treatment plan recommended
  • Provide educational information so that “at risk” individuals can prevent or delay kidney damage
  • Provide  clinician referrals for follow-up care, if needed
  • Provide ongoing information and support

You can read more about the program at: http://www.kidney.org/news/keep/KEEPabout.cfm

The KEEP Program is for all people, but the ‘high risk’ ones are the ones that may need to take immediate action.  What is ‘high risk’ you ask?

According to The National Kidney Center at: http://www.nationalkidneycenter.org/chronic-kidney-disease/risk-factors/  these are the high risk people:

“High risk groups for chronic kidney disease (CKD) include those with diabetes, hypertension and a family history of kidney disease. African Americans, Hispanics, Pacific Islanders, Native Americans and Seniors are also at increased risk.”

That definition covers quite a bit of ground.  For example, I have hypertension (high blood pressure) and am a Senior (Thank you for the capital letter, National Kidney Center!).  I don’t know if there’s any history of kidney disease in my family since the cousins my age don’t know of any, but our parents would never discuss their health with us.

Alright, so we need early detection.  Now, where can you find that?  On the home page of The National Kidney Foundation, there is an orange bar running across the page.  It has different pages on it. Hit the one that reads “Events.” Once you get to that page, scroll down and you’ll see the words, “Find a KEEP Screening Near You.”  Hit it. Voila!  You’ve found your local KEEP Screening.

The logical question here is, “What if there isn’t one near me?”  You don’t have to travel across state lines to find out if you have CKD.  Speak with your pcp (primary care doctor) and ask him or her to run a blood test and a urine test. While the results may not be crystal clear to a doctor who is not a nephrologist (kidney and hypertension specialist), high or low readings will be marked.  They will let your pcp know there may be a kidney function problem.bmp

The National Kidney Disease Education Program at The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services at http://www.nkdep.nih.gov/resources/kidney-disease-mean-for-me.shtml#results provides the following information and a really nifty diagram of reduced function kidneys for you:

1. A blood test checks your GFR, which tells how well your kidneys are filtering. GFR stands for glomerular filtration rate.

2. A urine test checks for albumin. Albumin is a protein that can pass into the urine when the kidneys are damaged. See picture below.

kidney function

If necessary, meaning if your kidney function is compromised, your pcp will make certain you get to a nephrologist promptly.  This specialist will conduct more intensive tests that include:

Blood:

BUN –

BUN stands for blood urea nitrogen. Urea nitrogen is what forms when protein breaks down.

Creatinine

Creatinine is a breakdown product of creatine, which is an important part of muscle

Urine:

Creatinine clearance

The creatinine clearance test compares the level of creatinine in urine with the creatinine level in the blood. Creatinine is a breakdown product of creatine, which is an important part of muscle.

Thank you to MedLine Plus, part of the U.S. National Library of Medicine,  National Institutes of Health at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003475.htm for the above information about the blood and urine tests.

Well if this blog isn’t enough to get you to check your kidney function, I just don’t know what is.The Table

Before I leave, European sales of the book are surpassing those of U.S. sales.  I don’t know if that means we have more access to specialists and information here or that Europeans are reading more. Do let me know if there is a practice that needs a book donated to it or needs books to use as prizes or give-aways at patient education sessions.

I’m forgetting the world outside of wedding prep and CKD!  Guten Pesach to those who celebrate Passover, which started last night, and a Happy Easter to those who will be celebrating that on Sunday.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

The 24 Hour Urine Collection Revisited

I’ve just realized I’m a tweaker.  Let me explain:  I’m not a druggie, but rather someone who tries to finesse instructions in the way that best suits her.  I know, I know.  You’re asking yourself, “What is she talking about?”  You see the title of today’s blog and already know it’s 24 hour urine collection day for me. I woke up at 6:30 today after desperately trying to stay asleep and out of the bathroom until a more reasonable hour – say 7:30 – because I know I’ll have to get up a little bit earlier than I did today to complete the 24 hour urine collection tomorrow.  It IS a 24 hour test, after all.  I just wanted to sleep a little later and didn’t realize I could just start the collection period a little later until I read the 9/5/09 blog of Carolyn Cooper, MPH, RN at: http://promotinghealthandpatienteducation.blogspot.com/2009/09/24-hour-urine-collection-how-to-do-it.html

This is the most complete explanation and set of instructions I’ve uncovered since I first began exploring this test and how to do it.  If you remember (and even if you don’t), I’ve mentioned that sometimes the instructions your lab or doctor’s office give you are simply not clear or thorough. I think we can thank Ms. Cooper for taking care of that problem for us.

24 Hour Urine Collection: How to do it and Why it’s done

What’s the Purpose of Urine Testing?
An incredible amount of information can be obtained from examining a urine sample. In fact, over 100 different tests can be performed on a single specimen.Most of the time a simple “quick catch” specimen of urine (voided into a cup) is sufficient for a basic urine test. Urinalysis results may reveal problems with the body’s electrolytes or hormones, the presence of infection, dehydration, evidence of microscopic blood (that can’t be seen with the naked eye), drug levels, or problems with kidney function.Why a 24-Hour Urine Collection?
A small sample of urine isn’t always sufficient. In addition to blood tests, physicians will order a 24-hour urine collection if they have reason to be concerned about overall kidney function. This test typically focuses on creatinine clearance, sodium, protein, and urine osmolality. Other substances may be examined in a 24-hour collection; for example, hormone levels, urea nitrogen, or copper. The volume of urine that is voided during the 24-hour period also yields important information.  The laboratory will make calculations based on your 24-hour (or 12-hour) urine collection that will help determine how well your body is clearing waste products via the urine.  This finding will be compared to a blood test that measures how much of the waste products are circulating in your blood.

If your physician hasn’t explained WHY he or she is requesting the 24-hour urine collection, ask for details. As a patient, being informed is one of your fundamental rights

 
Tips for Collecting Your 24-Hour Urine Specimen
A 24-hour urine collection is easy to mess up, and that can be very frustrating. Just one moment of accidentally forgetting to collect and save the urine during the 24-hours ruins the test, and the collection might have to start all over again . . .

Before the test: Your doctor’s office will provide you with one or two brown plastic collection jugs and written instructions. Certain tests may require that urine be placed in a “double container” or that a preservative be added to the collected urine; you’ll be given the supplies and containers appropriate for your test.What you need from your lab or doctor’s office:

  • Special instructions for the test and a lab sticker with your patient information to attach to the collection container(s).
  • Collection container(s)–depending on the size of container the lab stocks–you may receive one or two of these jugs. They are made of heavy brown plastic, not just any container will do for this collection, so be sure to use the container(s) provided.
  • Nice to have items–I’d ask for these if they don’t offer them to you. For men: A plastic urinal to void into. For women: a plastic “nun’s hat” to set in the toilet to collect the voided urine. If you don’t have these items, it’s okay to void into a bedpan, large plastic cup or bowl, etc. You will pour the collected urine into the brown collection container after each void, so it’s nice to have something that pours easily.
  • You’ll also need:a way to keep the collected urine cool during the collection period. One of the most common ways to do this is to set the brown urine collection jug in larger container filled with icy water (an ice bath). An ice chest (cooler) is another option. It’s also possible to place the collection jug in the refrigerator, although there are many reasons to make this impractical.
When to begin?
 Find out in advance when and where to return your 24-hour urine collection. This information will help you decide when to begin, because if the lab or physician’s office isn’t going to be open when you finish the collection, you’ll have to keep the sample in a refrigerator, cooler, or in an ice bath until you can turn in your specimen. It’s often suggested that you begin a 24-hour collection first thing in the morning–but that is certainly not required. However, it is essentialthat you make note of the date and time that the specimen collection was started and stopped. This information will need to be recorded on the specimen container (and/or label).Ready to start?

Completely empty your bladder by voiding into the toilet and flushing–DO NOT save this first urine sample. The first time you empty your bladder you are flushing away urine that has been building up in your bladder for several hours or more.  That hours-old urine will yield incorrect results if we collect it for our 24-hour specimen.  We want to start with an empty bladder to collect only the urine our body makes during the 24-hour-period. Record the start time and determine your stop time. 

All other urine during the 24-hours will need to be saved and poured into the collection jug. It’s helpful to use the same bathroom all day long and post a note with the start/stop time to help remind you to collect all of your samples. Replenish the ice in the basin surrounding your collection jug from time-to-time in order to keep the specimen cool.Ending the collection:

  • When the 24-hour-collection period is ending, make a last effort to urinate–even if you don’t have the urge to “go,” you will still be able to produce an ounce or two of urine. Make sure your collecton jugs are tightly capped and labelled with your name, date of birth, collection date and start/stop times.   (Note: If you weren’t given a label for your specimen jug, make oneand tape it securely to your jug.) Keep the specimen in the ice bath, cooler, or refrigerator until you are ready to return it to the lab or doctor’s office. Place your specimen jug(s) in a sturdy plastic bag for easy carrying. (Your specimen will be just fine without being on ice while you return it to the lab or doctor’s office—as long as you are not exposing it to heat for a prolonged period of time.)What If . . . ? Special circumstances .                                                                                                                 
    You filled up the container the lab provided, but your 24-hour-collection is not yet complete.Use a very clean glass or plastic container to continue collecting your urine.  Your brown jug protects the collected urine from light–so if you have to use a transparent collection bottle, be sure to guard it from the light along with keeping it chilled. Using an ice chest would be a good strategy for you in this case–if that’s not possible, cover the transparent container with a brown paper bag to protect it from the light.  When you return your sample to the lab, keep the transparent container in a brown paper bag, or some similar technique to keep it protected from the light.
  • You have started the 24-hour-collection, but find you need to leave the house for several hours.  Take a backpack with you, a plastic bottle with a secure lid, and a large ziplock bag full of ice.  This will allow you to carry your collection items discreetly.  For ladies, a wide mouthed plastic container will allow you to urinate and pour the sample into your capped bottle.  Your ziplock bag of ice will help keep your sample cool while you are on the go. I know this is a rather bulky idea, but the best I can come up with at the moment.
  • For patients with urinary catheters. It would be preferable to start your collection with a fresh catheter bag in place–if that’s not possible, it would be nice to clean the existing bag–at least remove the bag from the catheter and give it a good rinse out.. Begin your collection by completely emptying the current catheter bag and flushing the accumulated urine.Record this as your start time. During the remainder of the 24-hour-collection period, empty the foley bag into the brown collection jugs at regular intervals and keep the collection jugs in the refrigerator on in an ice bath just as anyone else would do. At the designated stop time, empty your collection bag for the last time.
  • Urine becomes mixed with feces or blood. Do not empty any urine that has been contaminated by feces or menstrual blood into your collection jug. Make note of the time and stop the collection. Contact your lab or physician’s office to inform them. In some cases, if enough time has elapsed (12 hours or more), your physician may give the go-ahead to stop the test early. Possibly, you may be asked to start all over again.
  • Patients who are incontinent (cannot hold their urine).  Certainly your physician may not realize (or remember) that a particular patient struggles with complete or partial incontinence.  Do let your doctor know about incontinence issues.  Perhaps the 24-hour-test will be impossible because of complete incontinence; perhaps they might recommend a bladder catheter for the test, or perhaps they might allow a shorter period of time (12-hours or thereabouts) for the urine collection. 
  • “Oops! I didn’t collect every void during the 24 hours!” If you forget to collect all of your urine, the test results may be inaccurate. Talk to your lab or doctor’s office before disposing of all that you’ve collected. If you have already completed at least 12 hours of the urine collection, mark down the time of the last urination and keep your container on ice or in the refrigerator as discussed later in this article.  Talk to your physcian’s office or lab to let them know what you have been able to collect.  They should be able to use your sample and calculate the important information based on the number of hours you have collected–but it’s important that they know the correct number of hours when you turn in the sample.  It’s possible that you’ll be asked to start all over again, but there’s a good chance that they can use what you’ve collected and make adjustments to correctly calculate the results.
  • Why keep the urine specimen on ice?  The ice bath is just a technique for keeping the urine cool enough so that bacterial growth doesn’t overwhelm your specimen.  The ice bath should keep your specimen in the 40-45 degree Farenheit range as would your refrigerator.  Keeping a 24-hour-specimen in the refrigerator is really awkward and inconvenient.  Having your specimen container right there in the bathroom “on ice” is so much easier.
  • Other questions? Call your physician’s office or lab.

I realize I’d also forgotten the purpose of not collecting that first void of the morning until I read this blog.  There’s something about being reminded of what you know that’s almost as satisfying as learning something new – which is what I hope you’ve done today.

Until Friday,

Keep living your life.