Your Kidneys and Covid – or – Covid and Your Kidneys

Thanks to an unidentified woman at The Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center who passed a telephone number on to me, Bear and I have appointments for both our first and second Covid vaccinations. That got me to thinking. In this time of Covid with its breathing problems, is Chronic Kidney Disease involved in some way? We know that Covid can cause Acute Kidney Injury, but this is different. It’s trying to find out if CKD can contribute to Covid. 

Respiratory Acidosis sprang to mind, probably because of the word ‘respiratory.’ We already know acidosis can be a problem for CKD patients, but does it contribute to Covid? I didn’t know, so I started my search for an answer at The National Center for Biotechnology Information.    

“Acid-base disorders are common in patients with chronic kidney disease, with chronic metabolic acidosis receiving the most attention clinically in terms of diagnosis and treatment. A number of observational studies have reported on the prevalence of acid-base disorders in this patient population and their relationship with outcomes, mostly focusing on chronic metabolic acidosis…. “ 

Okay, so we’ve established chronic metabolic acidosis is common in CKD patients, but what is that? The National Kidney Foundation explains: 

“The buildup of acid in the body due to kidney disease or kidney failure is called metabolic acidosis. When your body fluids contain too much acid, it means that your body is either not getting rid of enough acid, is making too much acid, or cannot balance the acid in your body.” 

And, of course, we know that chronic means long term as opposed to acute, which means sudden onset. 

But respiratory acidosis? Is that part of acidosis? MedlinePlus came to the rescue with an easily understood definition for us: 

“Respiratory acidosis is a condition that occurs when the lungs cannot remove all of the carbon dioxide the body produces. This causes body fluids, especially the blood, to become too acidic.” 

Let me think a minute to figure out how this is all connected. Got it!  Let’s go back to what the kidneys do for us. 

“Your kidneys remove wastes and extra fluid from your body. Your kidneys also remove acid that is produced by the cells of your body and maintain a healthy balance of water, salts, and minerals—such as sodium, calcium, phosphorus, and potassium—in your blood. 

Without this balance, nerves, muscles, and other tissues in your body may not work normally. 

Your kidneys also make hormones that help 

  • control your blood pressure 
  • make red blood cells  
  • keep your bones strong and healthy” 

Thank you to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases for the above information. 

Aha! Carbon dioxide is a waste product even though the body produces it. The kidneys are tasked with removing wastes. CKD is a progressive decline in your kidney function for over three months. Decline as in don’t work as well. Oh, my. CKD can contribute to breathing problems with Covid. 

The January, 2021, issue of NDT [ Gail here: that stands for Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation] tells us: 

“Although not listed in initial reports as a risk factor for severe COVID-19, CKD has emerged not only as the most prevalent comorbidity conveying an increased risk for severe COVID-19, but also as the comorbidity that conveys the highest risk for severe COVID-19. The increased risk is evident below the threshold of eGFR that defines CKD and the risk increases as the eGFR decreases, with the highest risk in patients on kidney replacement therapy. Although CKD patients are known to be at increased risk of death due to infectious diseases, the factors contributing to their greater vulnerability for severe COVID-19 should be explored, as these may provide valuable insights into therapeutic approaches to the disease in this patient group. It is presently unknown if earlier categories of CKD (G1/G2, i.e. patients with preserved kidney function but with increased albuminuria) are also at an increased risk of severe COVID-19, and this must be explored. Moreover, the recognition that CKD significantly contributes to the severity of COVID-19 should now result in focused efforts to improve outcomes for the 850 million global CKD patients.”  

Uh-oh, do we panic now? No, no, no.  We protect ourselves. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC] has been extremely vocal about this: 

“It is especially important for people at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19, and those who live with them, to protect themselves from getting COVID-19. 

The best way to protect yourself and to help reduce the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19 is to: 

Limit your interactions with other people as much as possible. 

Take precautions to prevent getting COVID-19 when you do interact with others. 

If you start feeling sick and think you may have COVID-19, get in touch with your healthcare provider within 24 hours.  If you don’t have a healthcare provider, contact your nearest community health center or health department.” 

The CDC further explains: 

“Three Important Ways to Slow the Spread 

Wear a mask to protect yourself and others and stop the spread of COVID-19. 

Stay at least 6 feet (about 2 arm lengths) from others who don’t live with you. 

Avoid crowds. The more people you are in contact with, the more likely you are to be exposed to COVID-19.” 

By the way, the CDC acknowledges that CKD raises your risk of getting Covid… as does diabetes… and possibly hypertension. These are also the two primary causes of CKD.  

Until next week,

Keep living your life!