Your Kidneys and Covid – or – Covid and Your Kidneys

Thanks to an unidentified woman at The Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center who passed a telephone number on to me, Bear and I have appointments for both our first and second Covid vaccinations. That got me to thinking. In this time of Covid with its breathing problems, is Chronic Kidney Disease involved in some way? We know that Covid can cause Acute Kidney Injury, but this is different. It’s trying to find out if CKD can contribute to Covid. 

Respiratory Acidosis sprang to mind, probably because of the word ‘respiratory.’ We already know acidosis can be a problem for CKD patients, but does it contribute to Covid? I didn’t know, so I started my search for an answer at The National Center for Biotechnology Information.    

“Acid-base disorders are common in patients with chronic kidney disease, with chronic metabolic acidosis receiving the most attention clinically in terms of diagnosis and treatment. A number of observational studies have reported on the prevalence of acid-base disorders in this patient population and their relationship with outcomes, mostly focusing on chronic metabolic acidosis…. “ 

Okay, so we’ve established chronic metabolic acidosis is common in CKD patients, but what is that? The National Kidney Foundation explains: 

“The buildup of acid in the body due to kidney disease or kidney failure is called metabolic acidosis. When your body fluids contain too much acid, it means that your body is either not getting rid of enough acid, is making too much acid, or cannot balance the acid in your body.” 

And, of course, we know that chronic means long term as opposed to acute, which means sudden onset. 

But respiratory acidosis? Is that part of acidosis? MedlinePlus came to the rescue with an easily understood definition for us: 

“Respiratory acidosis is a condition that occurs when the lungs cannot remove all of the carbon dioxide the body produces. This causes body fluids, especially the blood, to become too acidic.” 

Let me think a minute to figure out how this is all connected. Got it!  Let’s go back to what the kidneys do for us. 

“Your kidneys remove wastes and extra fluid from your body. Your kidneys also remove acid that is produced by the cells of your body and maintain a healthy balance of water, salts, and minerals—such as sodium, calcium, phosphorus, and potassium—in your blood. 

Without this balance, nerves, muscles, and other tissues in your body may not work normally. 

Your kidneys also make hormones that help 

  • control your blood pressure 
  • make red blood cells  
  • keep your bones strong and healthy” 

Thank you to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases for the above information. 

Aha! Carbon dioxide is a waste product even though the body produces it. The kidneys are tasked with removing wastes. CKD is a progressive decline in your kidney function for over three months. Decline as in don’t work as well. Oh, my. CKD can contribute to breathing problems with Covid. 

The January, 2021, issue of NDT [ Gail here: that stands for Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation] tells us: 

“Although not listed in initial reports as a risk factor for severe COVID-19, CKD has emerged not only as the most prevalent comorbidity conveying an increased risk for severe COVID-19, but also as the comorbidity that conveys the highest risk for severe COVID-19. The increased risk is evident below the threshold of eGFR that defines CKD and the risk increases as the eGFR decreases, with the highest risk in patients on kidney replacement therapy. Although CKD patients are known to be at increased risk of death due to infectious diseases, the factors contributing to their greater vulnerability for severe COVID-19 should be explored, as these may provide valuable insights into therapeutic approaches to the disease in this patient group. It is presently unknown if earlier categories of CKD (G1/G2, i.e. patients with preserved kidney function but with increased albuminuria) are also at an increased risk of severe COVID-19, and this must be explored. Moreover, the recognition that CKD significantly contributes to the severity of COVID-19 should now result in focused efforts to improve outcomes for the 850 million global CKD patients.”  

Uh-oh, do we panic now? No, no, no.  We protect ourselves. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC] has been extremely vocal about this: 

“It is especially important for people at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19, and those who live with them, to protect themselves from getting COVID-19. 

The best way to protect yourself and to help reduce the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19 is to: 

Limit your interactions with other people as much as possible. 

Take precautions to prevent getting COVID-19 when you do interact with others. 

If you start feeling sick and think you may have COVID-19, get in touch with your healthcare provider within 24 hours.  If you don’t have a healthcare provider, contact your nearest community health center or health department.” 

The CDC further explains: 

“Three Important Ways to Slow the Spread 

Wear a mask to protect yourself and others and stop the spread of COVID-19. 

Stay at least 6 feet (about 2 arm lengths) from others who don’t live with you. 

Avoid crowds. The more people you are in contact with, the more likely you are to be exposed to COVID-19.” 

By the way, the CDC acknowledges that CKD raises your risk of getting Covid… as does diabetes… and possibly hypertension. These are also the two primary causes of CKD.  

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

To Dye or Not

Last week, I underwent a three-month scan for cancer. I am still cancer free, so let’s get that out of the way. I’m so cancer free that I started thinking about those with kidney cancer who have scans. That’s when I started asking questions about this procedure that I’ve already undergone what seems like a million times. My questions, while answered by the technicians, of course led me to other questions. Here are the answers. 

Let’s start at the beginning. Do we use CT or CAT Scan when referring to this kind of test? According to Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center’s Blog at https://bit.ly/3lKrkjP:  

“… CAT and CT scans both mean the same type of diagnostic examination. CAT was used earlier in its history, while CT is the recent up-to-date term for convenience sake. The term CT stands for computed tomography and the term CAT stands for computed axial tomography or computerized axial tomography scan.” 

Huh? I get ‘computed,’ but what’s ‘tomography’? On to my favorite dictionary of all time. You guessed it; The Merriam-Webster Dictionary at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/tomography tells us, it’s: 

“a method of producing a three-dimensional image of the internal structures of a solid object (such as the human body or the earth) by the observation and recording of the differences in the effects on the passage of waves of energy impinging on those structures” 

Ah, that makes sense. Now what about this iodine dye that we, as Chronic Kidney Disease patients, are not supposed to have? I went to Inside Radiology at https://www.insideradiology.com.au/iodine-containing-contrast-medium/ for information. 

“Iodine-containing contrast medium (ICCM), sometimes called contrast or contrast medium, is a chemical substance used in medical X-ray imaging [Gail here: CT is a sort of X-ray.]. When injected into the body, ICCM shows what is happening inside the hollow parts of the body (like blood vessels, the stomach, bowel or even the fluid around the spinal cord) on X-ray images or pictures. When injected into a blood vessel, which can be either an artery or a vein, it not only shows the inside of the blood vessel, but it can give information about how the organs supplied by that blood vessel are working. Good examples of this are the kidneys, brain and lungs.” 

I still have my port from chemotherapy, so that was used to inject the iodine dye. Reminder, 

“A chemo port is a small, implantable reservoir with a thin silicone tube that attaches to a vein. The main advantage of this vein-access device is that chemotherapy medications can be delivered directly into the port rather than a vein, eliminating the need for needle sticks.” 

Thank you, Moffit Cancer Center, at https://moffitt.org/treatments/chemotherapy/what-is-a-chemo-port/ for this information. It’s pretty clear ports can also be used for the dye, blood draws, and infusions of any kind. For example, I’m receiving iron infusion once a week via my port. 

I know the big question here is why am I having contrast dye when it’s not recommended for CKD patients. Let’s take a closer look at that warning.

“’The historical fears of kidney injury from contrast-enhanced CT have led to unmeasured harms related to diagnostic error and diagnostic,’ explained lead author Matthew S. Davenport, MD, associate professor of radiology and urology at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan. ‘Modern data clarify that this perceived risk has been overstated….’” 

The above statement is from U.S. Pharmacist at https://www.uspharmacist.com/article/risk-of-contrast-media-in-reduced-kidney-function-patients-overstated

I’m comfortable with iodine contrast. First, it was clear that cancer took precedence over my kidney health, but now I’m not worried about it because of the overstatements. 

After the CT, saline was infused into my port. Wolf Medical Supply at https://bit.ly/3gjx8Q6 did a great job of explaining what this is and how it’s preformed in layman’s terms: 

“A saline flush is used to help prevent IV catheters from becoming blocked and to help remove any medication that may be left at the catheter site. 

A saline flush is a sterile mix of salt and water that is compatible with your body’s fluids and tissues. Typically, the healthcare provider will fill a syringe using a bottle of normal saline solution or use a prefilled flush syringe that’s been prepared under sterile conditions. 

To flush the IV, first, clean the IV port or hub, then connect an IV saline flush syringe to the port, slowly pull back on the syringe plunger, inject the saline solution into the IV line, and then start the medication drip. Before beginning another infusion, your provider will flush the line again.” 

We’re not done yet, though. Next came a heparin flush. Does the word ‘heparin’ sound familiar?  According to Drugs.com at https://bit.ly/3qvmGcW,   

“Heparin is an anticoagulant (blood thinner) that prevents the formation of blood clots. Heparin is used to treat and prevent blood clots caused by certain medical conditions or medical procedures. It is also used before surgery to reduce the risk of blood clots.” 

I didn’t understand why I needed heparin after a CT. WebMD at https://bit.ly/3mUeCjK explained: 

“This medication is used to keep IV catheters open and flowing freely. Heparin helps to keep blood flowing smoothly and from clotting in the catheter by making a certain natural substance in your body (anti-clotting protein) work better….” 

While I understood the CT process now, and hope that you do, too, there are warnings in place. For example,  

“Patients with kidney failure or other kidney problems should notify their doctor. In some cases, the contrast media can cause kidney failure, especially in patients with underlying kidney problems or dehydration. Patients taking the diabetes medication metformin (Glucophage), or its derivatives, who receive contrast are at increased risk of developing a condition called metabolic acidosis, or an unsafe change in blood pH, and the drug may be halted for 48 hours after the procedure.” 

The above is also from WebMD, but this time at https://www.webmd.com/drugs/2/drug-60428/heparin-lock-intravenous/details.  

I take the warning to mean speak with your nephrologist first. Although, your case may be like mine was: cancer first, then kidneys, especially if it’s kidney cancer. But we always speak with our nephrologists first, don’t we?  

Until next week, 

Keep living your life!

They Go Together… Sometimes 

I’m certain you’ve already read about Covid-19 causing Acute Kidney Injury (AKI). To the best of our knowledge, it’s airborne which means the lungs are involved. But did you know there’s a correlation between the lungs and the kidneys?

Think of it this way. You know Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) can be the cause of diabetes (sigh, that’s me) or hypertension (high blood pressure). You also know that hypertension can be the cause of CKD (sigh, that’s me again.) Well, AKI can be the cause of Acute Lung Disease (ALI) and ALI can be the cause of Acute Kidney Disease.

I know I just blindsided you with a new medical term, so let’s find out just what ALI is.  I went to The National Organization for Rare Disorders at https://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome/ for what turned out to be a rather comprehensive answer:

“Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a type of severe, acute lung dysfunction affecting all or most of both lungs that occurs as a result of illness or injury. Although it is sometimes called adult respiratory distress syndrome, it may also affect children. ARDS is a buildup of fluid in the small air sacs (alveoli) in the lungs. This makes it difficult for oxygen to get into the bloodstream.”

Ah, so ALI and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) are one and the same. That should make finding information about it a bit easier.

We’ve just learned that ALI can cause AKI and vice-versa, but what can cause ALI beside Covid-19? This list is from the Mayo Clinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/ards/symptoms-causes/syc-20355576. Notice they do include COVID-19 as a cause of ARDS.

  • “Sepsis. The most common cause of ARDS is sepsis, a serious and widespread infection of the bloodstream.
  • Inhalation of harmful substances. Breathing high concentrations of smoke or chemical fumes can result in ARDS, as can inhaling (aspirating) vomit or near-drowning episodes.
  • Severe pneumonia. Severe cases of pneumonia usually affect all five lobes of the lungs.
  • Head, chest or other major injury. Accidents, such as falls or car crashes, can directly damage the lungs or the portion of the brain that controls breathing.
  • Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). People who have severe COVID-19 may develop ARDS.
  • Others. Pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), massive blood transfusions and burns.”

We can probably guess that one of the symptoms of ALI or ARDS is breathlessness, but let’s see if there are any others. I decided to go to Healthline at https://www.healthline.com/health/acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome#symptoms for this information. Yep, breathlessness is not the only symptom of ARDS.

  • “labored and rapid breathing
  • muscle fatigue and general weakness
  • low blood pressure
  • discolored skin or nails
  • a dry, hacking cough
  • a fever
  • headaches
  • a fast pulse rate
  • mental confusion”

This is not looking good at all. I’m wondering how ALI is treated now. The American Lung Association at https://www.lung.org/lung-health-diseases/lung-disease-lookup/ards/ards-treatment-and-recovery was detailed in explaining.

Ventilator support

All patients with ARDS will require extra oxygen. Oxygen alone is usually not enough, and high levels of oxygen can also injure the lung. A ventilator is a machine used to open airspaces that have shut down and help with the work of breathing. The ventilator is connected to the patient through a mask on the face or a tube inserted into the windpipe.

Prone positioning

ARDS patients are typically in bed on their back. When oxygen and ventilator therapies are at high levels and blood oxygen is still low, ARDS patients are sometimes turned over on their stomach to get more oxygen into the blood. This is called proning and may help improve oxygen levels in the blood for a while. It is a complicated task and some patients are too sick for this treatment.

Sedation and medications to prevent movement

To relieve shortness of breath and prevent agitation, the ARDS patient usually needs sedation. Sometimes added medications called paralytics are needed up front to help the patient adjust to the ventilator. These medications have significant side effects and their risks and benefits must be continuously monitored.

Fluid management

Doctors may give ARDS patients a medication called a diuretic to increase urination in hopes of removing excess fluid from the body to help prevent fluid from building up in the lungs. This must be done carefully, because too much fluid removal can lower blood pressure and lead to kidney problems.

Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)

ECMO is a very complicated treatment that takes blood outside of your body and pumps it through a membrane that adds oxygen, removes carbon dioxide and then returns the blood to your body. This is a high-risk therapy with many potential complications. It is not suitable for every ARDS patient.”

Now that we understand what ALI/ARDS is, what – in heaven’s name – does it have to do with AKI?

“Renal failure is a frequent complication of ARDS, particularly in the context of sepsis. Renal failure may be related to hypotension, nephrotoxic drugs, or underlying illness. Fluid management is complicated in this context, especially if the patient is oliguric. Multisystem organ failure, rather than respiratory failure alone, is usually the cause of death in ARDS.”

Thank you Medscape at https://www.medscape.com/answers/165139-43289/why-is-renal-failure-a-frequent-complication-of-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-ards for the explanation.  I think a few definitions are in order to adequately understand this explanation.

“Sepsis refers to a bacterial infection in the bloodstream or body tissues. This is a very broad term covering the presence of many types of microscopic disease-causing organisms.

Hypotension is the medical term for low blood pressure.

Nephrotoxic is toxic, or damaging, to the kidney.

(Oligoric is the adjective meaning of or pertaining to oligoria.)

Oliguria or oliguresis is the noun meaning the excretion of an abnormally small volume of urine, often as the result of a kidney disorder.”

All the above definitions were paraphrased from The Free Dictionary by Farlex, Medical Dictionary.

You probably know more than you wanted to about the connection between Covid-19, your lungs, and your kidneys than you ever intended to find out by now. Don’t be frightened, but do wear your mask and continue to social distance. Oh, and don’t forget the hand sanitizer.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

The Dye is Cast

Bet you think I made a spelling error in the title. If you’re thinking of the original phrase, you’re right. In that one, it’s spelled ‘die’. Here’s where it came from according to Wikipedia at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alea_iacta_est:

Alea iacta est (‘The die has been cast’) is a variation of a Latin phrase (iacta alea est [ˈjakta ˈaːlɛ.a ˈɛst]) attributed by Suetonius to Julius Caesar on January 10, 49 BCE, as he led his army across the Rubicon river in Northern Italy…. The phrase, either in the original Latin or in translation, is used in many languages to indicate that events have passed a point of no return. It is now most commonly cited with the word order changed (‘Alea iacta est’) rather than in the original phrasing….”

Uh-oh, there is in existence a phrase just like the title of today’s blog. It means the tint has been applied and can’t be changed or something like that.That this phrase with this spelling exists was a bit surprising. What I meant in the title is the dye used in contrast CTs.

Let’s back up just a bit so we can explain what a CT is. The Mayo Clinic at https://mayocl.in/3jujqdk tells us:

A computerized tomography (CT) scan combines a series of X-ray images taken from different angles around your body and uses computer processing to create cross-sectional images (slices) of the bones, blood vessels and soft tissues inside your body. CT scan images provide more-detailed information than plain X-rays do.”

I’ll be having one with contrast this afternoon. You know we, as CKD patients, have been warned not to allow that contrast into our bodies. Let’s find out why and then I’ll tell you why I am allowing it. The contrast is the dye in the title of today’s blog.

“In a CT scan, dense substances like bones are easy to see. But soft tissues don’t show up as well. They may look faint in the image. To help them appear clearly, you may need a special dye called a contrast material. They block the X-rays and appear white on the scan, highlighting blood vessels, organs, or other structures.Contrast materials are usually made of iodine or barium sulfate. You might receive these drugs in one or more of three ways:

  • Injection: The drugs are injected directly into a vein. This is done to help your blood vessels, urinary tract, liver, or gallbladder stand out in the image.
  • Orally: Drinking a liquid with the contrast material can enhance scans of your digestive tract, the pathway of food through your body.
  • Enema: If your intestines are being scanned, the contrast material can be inserted in your rectum.

After the CT scan, you’ll need to drink plenty of fluids to help your kidneys remove the contrast material from your body.”Thank you, WebMD at https://www.webmd.com/cancer/what-is-a-ct-scan#2 for the above information.

Of course, now we need to know why we shouldn’t be having this contrast material. Radiology Affiliates Imagining at https://4rai.com/blog/can-contrast-hurt-my-kidneys, a new site for me but one that seems very thorough, explains that we just don’t know for sure:

“…. Unhealthy kidneys, though, may be slower and less efficient when it comes to clearing the contrast from the blood. While the medical community has not yet determined exactly how contrast dye causes kidney problems, they think it has to do with this slow clearance of the dyes from the body.”

Well, what problems can contrast dye cause for our kidneys? I went right to the National Kidney Foundation at https://bit.ly/2YL7RXv  for an answer to this question

“What is Contrast Induced Nephropathy (CIN)?

CIN is a rare disorder and occurs when kidney problems are caused by the use of certain contrast dyes. In most cases contrast dyes used in tests, such as CT (computerized tomography) and angiograms, have no reported problems. About 2 percent of people receiving dyes can develop CIN. However, the risk for CIN can increase for people with diabetes, a history of heart and blood diseases, and chronic kidney disease (CKD)….The risk of CIN in people with both CKD and diabetes is 20 to 50 percent.

CIN is associated with a sharp decrease in kidney function over a period of 48-72 hours. The symptoms can be similar to those of kidney disease, which include feeling more tired, poor appetite, swelling in the feet and ankles, puffiness around the eyes, or dry and itchy skin. In many cases, CIN is reversible and people can recover. However, in some cases, CIN can lead to more serious kidney problems and possible heart and blood vessel problems

What is Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis (NSF)?

NSF is a rare but serious disease affecting skin and other organs that has been found in some patients with advanced CKD after exposure to gadolinium-containing contrast dyes that are used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). NSF appears to affect about 4 percent of patients with advanced CKD. People with acute kidney injury (AKI) are also at higher risk. NSF has not been reported in people with mild kidney damage or normal kidney function.

NSF can be painful, debilitating, or even fatal. Symptoms and signs of NSF can include burning and itching of the skin, red or dark patches on the skin, joint stiffness, or muscle weakness. The disease can develop within 24 hours up to around 3 months….  delay in excretion [of this drug] is thought to be one the main reasons why NSF may happen.”

Notice that both possible effects of using contrast dye with kidney disease are rare.

So why am I having the contrast dye when I’ve been advised not to? My oncology team needs to see if the cancer has returned and, if it has, how badly. I told them at the beginning of my treatment to spare my kidneys as much as possible. But, in this case, I don’t want them to spare my kidneys so much that I end up dead of cancer.

There are two kinds of dye used, one less harmful to the kidneys than the other. I believe that’s the one that is used on me. It is also reduced in order to save me from any possible further kidney damage. Most importantly, my creatinine level is measured before administering the contrast dye. After a year and a half of this, my kidneys are doing just as well as they were doing before I started allowing contrast dye.

This is my story; remember, everyone is different and talk this over with your nephrologist before you agree to contrast dye. My nephrologist and I agreed that I needed to be alive more than I needed to save my kidneys.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Not Your New Age Crystals 

I was perusing the Facebook Chronic Kidney Disease online support groups as I usually do in the morning when I ran across a post that caught my eye. The person posting wanted to know if he were going to die because he had crystals in his urine. I’d never thought about that before. He sounded really scared, so I decided to take a look at this condition.

First of all, some basic information from Study.com at https://bit.ly/34n3W6H:

“Crystals in the urine is known as crystalluria. Sometimes crystals are found in healthy people and other times they are indicators of organ dysfunction, the presence of urinary tract stones of a like composition (known as urolithiasis), or an infection in the urinary tract.”

Ummm, I wanted a bit more information so I turned to Healthline.com at https://www.healthline.com/health/urine-crystals.

“Crystals can be found in the urine of healthy individuals. They may be caused by minor issues like a slight excess of protein or vitamin C. Many types of urine crystals are relatively harmless.

In some cases, however, urine crystals can be indicators of a more serious underlying condition. Symptoms that would indicate a more serious condition could include:

  • fever
  • severe abdominal pain
  • blood in the urine
  • jaundice
  • Fatigue”

Serious conditions? What does that mean? The organ dysfunction Study.com mentioned? Which organs? Urolithiasis? An infection? Can you die from any of these?

Time to slow down. Since this is a Chronic Kidney Disease blog, let’s start with the kidneys.

“Crystal-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) is caused by the intratubular precipitation of crystals, which results in obstruction. Crystal-induced AKI most commonly occurs as a result of acute uric acid nephropathy and following the administration of drugs or toxins that are poorly soluble or have metabolites that are poorly soluble in urine …. Other drugs or medications may be metabolized to insoluble products such as oxalate (ethylene glycol, vitamin C), which are associated with precipitation of calcium oxalate crystals within tubular lumens and kidney injury.”

Thank you UptoDate.com at https://bit.ly/3j3BT0k for this information, although we’ll need some explanation in order to understand it. I get it that crystals can produce obstruction in the tubules (Wikipedia: The renal tubule is the portion of the nephron containing the tubular fluid filtered through the glomerulus), rather than being passed out of the body in the urine. It makes sense that if the crystals do produce obstruction, the urine may back up… right into the kidneys. That’s when you have the AKI. Remember, this in not chronic. The condition remains until it’s remedied, but it can be remedied.

What about urolithiasis? I must thank the National Kidney Foundation at https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/hydronephrosis for their easily understood information about a condition called hydronephrosis which will explain how both urolithiasis and/or an infection would affect your kidneys.

“Hydronephrosis is the swelling of a kidney due to a build-up of urine. It happens when urine cannot drain out from the kidney to the bladder from a blockage or obstruction. (Gail here: such as the blockage caused by crystals which results in AKI.) Hydronephrosis can occur in one or both kidneys.

The main function of the urinary tract is to remove wastes and fluid from the body. The urinary tract has four parts: the kidneys, the ureters, the bladder and urethra. The urine is formed when the kidneys filter blood and remove excess waste materials and fluid. Urine collects into a part of the kidney called the renal pelvis. From the renal pelvis, the urine travels down a narrow tube called the ureter into the bladder. The bladder slowly fills up with urine, which empties from the body through another small tube called the urethra. Hydronephrosis occurs when there is either a blockage of the outflow of urine, or reverse flow of urine already in the bladder (called reflux) that can cause the renal pelvis to become enlarged.

Hydronephrosis may or may not cause symptoms. The main symptom is pain, either in the side and back (known as flank pain), abdomen or groin. Other symptoms can include pain during urination, other problems with urination (increased urge or frequency, incomplete urination, incontinence), nausea and fever. These symptoms depend on the cause and severity of urinary blockage.

How is Hydronephrosis Caused?
Hydronephrosis is usually caused by another underlying illness or risk factor. Causes of hydronephrosis include, but are not limited to, the following illnesses or risk factors:

  • Kidney stone
  • Congenital blockage (a defect that is present at birth)
  • Blood clot
  • Scarring of tissue (from injury or previous surgery)
  • Tumor or cancer (examples include bladder, cervical, colon, or prostate)
  • Enlarged prostate (noncancerous)
  • Pregnancy
  • Urinary tract infection (or other diseases that cause inflammation of the urinary tract)”

Kidney stones? MedicalNewsToday at https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/154193 helped us out with that one:

“Kidney stones are the result of a buildup of dissolved minerals on the inner lining of the kidneys.

They usually consist of calcium oxalate but may be composed of several other compounds.

Kidney stones can grow to the size of a golf ball while maintaining a sharp, crystalline structure.

The stones may be small and pass unnoticed through the urinary tract, but they can also cause extreme pain as they leave the body.”

There is quite a bit more information about kidneys stones at this site. What we needed to know is that, again, it’s a buildup – as in not passed from the body via the urine – that causes kidney stones.

Will the person who posted the comment about crystals in his urine die, whether or not he develops symptoms? It seems to me that’s not necessary IF he seeks treatment and follows medical advice.

Back to Healthline, but this time at https://www.healthline.com/health/urine-crystals#prevention, for their take on this question:

“Urine crystals that aren’t caused by underlying conditions like liver disease or genetic conditions can often be prevented. In some cases, even crystalluria triggered by genetic causes can be reduced with lifestyle or diet changes.

The most effective way to prevent urine crystals is to drink more water and stay hydrated. This helps dilute the chemical concentrations in the urine, preventing crystals from forming.

You can also make certain changes in your diet. Your doctor can help you determine what changes to make based on the type of crystals that you have. They may recommend cutting back on protein, for example, or reducing foods high in oxalate (as is the case for calcium oxalate crystals).

Avoiding salty foods can also help prevent a number of different urine crystals, so eliminating processed foods can be beneficial.”

I’m going to add today’s blog to the things-I-never-knew part of my brain.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!