Giving Credit Where Credit is Due

I’ve been feeling awfully thankful these past few weeks. Nothing like a health challenge or two to make you realize just how much you have to be grateful for. 

I’m not sure if you know it or not, but my husband – Paul Garwood, better known as Bear – has been my photographer for over a decade. Periodically I’ll think to mention it but, to be honest, haven’t mentioned that I am amazed by how he’s continued to do this (and do it well) despite his own health challenges. Thank you, Bear. 

But let’s not stop there. I’ve been highly active in the Chronic Kidney Disease Awareness Movement for over a decade. During that time, I’ve met others on the same path. The American Association of Kidney Patients has honored one of our own with a National Award and I’d like to honor him, too. 

“Organization Category: Urban Kidney Alliance, a Baltimore-based non-profit, focused on advocating, and empowering individuals in urban cities at-risk for chronic kidney disease (CKD) and other conditions. Award accepted by Founder, Steven Belcher, RN” 

Steve not only interviewed me on his show May 20th of this year, but guest blogged while I was laid up. Thank you, Steve. 

There are others, many in fact, that I’ve omitted. To you, I offer my apologies.   

My final gratitude for today’s blog goes to our kidneys. I’ve just learned that they produce glucose. Is that common knowledge? It was new to me and I wanted to know exactly how they do that. This is what sparked my interest: 

“…traditionally, the kidneys have not been considered an important source of glucose (except during acidosis or after prolonged fasting), with most clinical discussions on glucose dysregulation centering on the intestine, pancreas, liver, adipose tissue, and muscle…. More recently, however, the full significance of the kidneys’ contribution to glucose homeostasis, under both physiologic and pathologic conditions, has become well recognized, and is thought to involve functions well beyond glucose uptake and release. Besides the liver, the kidney is the only organ capable of generating sufficient glucose (gluconeogenesis) to release into the circulation, and it is also responsible for filtration and subsequent reabsorption or excretion of glucose…. These findings have provided considerable insight into the myriad of pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in the development of hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) ….”  

The above is from AJMC at https://www.ajmc.com/view/ace005_12jan_triplitt_s11 and can probably use some explanation. First of all, AJMC is The American Journal of Managed Care and is actually for research outcomes. However, we find the information we need wherever we can. Let’s get to some of the explanations we may need. 

I started out by checking the glossary in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Diseasethe first book I wrote about CKD way back in 2010. 

Glucose: The main sugar found in the blood. In diabetes, the body doesn’t adequately control natural and ingested sugar.” 

That helps, but we need more definitions. Thank goodness for my all-time favorite dictionary,The Merriam-Webster Dictionary: 

“acidosis: an abnormal condition characterized by reduced alkalinity of the blood and of the body tissues 

adipose tissue: connective tissue in which fat is stored and which has the cells distended by droplets of fat 

homeostasis: a relatively stable state of equilibrium or a tendency toward such a state between the different but interdependent elements or groups of elements of an organism, population, or group 

hyperglycemia: excess of sugar in the blood 

pathologic(al): … altered or caused by disease; also, indicative of disease 

pathophysiology: the physiology of abnormal states, specifically the functional changes that accompany a particular syndrome or disease 

physiologic(al): … characteristic of or appropriate to an organism’s healthy or normal functioning 

type 2 diabetes mellitus: a common form of diabetes mellitus that develops especially in adults and most often in obese individuals and that is characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from impaired insulin utilization coupled with the body’s inability to compensate with increased insulin production — called also non-insulin-dependent diabetes, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, type 2 diabetes mellitus” 

Can you hear me laughing? I’m beginning to feel like I’m back in the classroom teaching a vocabulary lesson. 

Okay, so what happens if we apply all these definitions to the AJMC quote? For one thing, the one that I found so surprising, we discover that the kidneys do generate glucose. Why is that so surprising, you ask. Well, if you’re like me, all you’ve known is that the kidneys regulate glucose. Hmmm, and how do they do that? 

According to Medscape.com at https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/983678-overview#a4

“Under normal circumstances, the kidney filters and reabsorbs 100% of glucose, approximately 180 g (1 mole) of glucose, each day. The glucose transporters expressed in the renal proximal tubule ensure that less than 0.5 g/day (range 0.03-0.3 g/d) is excreted in the urine of healthy adults. More water than glucose is reabsorbed resulting in an increase in the glucose concentration in the urine along the tubule. Consequently the affinity of the transporters for glucose along the tubule increases to allow for complete reabsorption of glucose from the urine.” 

I know, I know. We need to take a look at these tubules they talk about. That’s what Wikipedia is for. Take a look at https://bit.ly/3pqlF5k for more specific information. 

“The proximal tubule is the segment of the nephron in kidneys which begins from the renal pole of the Bowman’s capsule to the beginning of loop of Henle.” 

This goes back to basic kidney anatomy, but if you’re anything like me, you need a reminder every once in a while. Keep in mind, also, that ‘renal’ is another way of saying kidney. Rather than explain what the Bowman’s capsule and the loop of Henle are, I’ve included a good illustration above. So, the kidneys regulate the glucose in our blood just as they regulate waste products. 

Again and again, readers ask me questions to which I need to respond, “I’m not a doctor and have never claimed to be one. You really need to ask your nephrologist.” That’s the truth. When I write a blog about a topic – especially a reader requested topic – I’m learning, just as you are. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life!  

It’s Time  

Time for what, you ask. Time to talk about Covid-19 and your kidneys. I don’t really want to, and maybe you don’t, either. But this is a pandemic, so we must. Better to know than play ostrich.

By the way, my favorite dictionary, the Merriam Webster at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pandemic defines pandemic this way:

pandemic  adjective(Entry 1 of 2)

occurring over a wide geographic area and affecting an exceptionally high proportion of the population 

…..

pandemic noun (Entry 2 of 2)

an outbreak of a disease that occurs over a wide geographic area and affects an exceptionally high proportion of the populationa pandemic outbreak of a disease”

So much is unknown about the current pandemic, but it does look like Covid-19 lends itself to AKI (Acute Kidney Injury).

Let’s go back to this 1918 flu and see if we can find any kidney involvement there. I did, sort of. This study was published by Craig Garthwaite of the Department of Economics at the University of Maryland: The Effect of In-Utero Conditions on Long Term Health: Evidence from the 1918 Spanish Flu Pandemic. It deals with children of mothers who were pregnant during the 1918 Pandemic. You can find it at https://www.kellogg.northwestern.edu/faculty/garthwaite/htm/fetal_stress_garthwaite_053008.pdf.

“Depending on the period of fetal development during which exposure occurred, individuals have a higher probability of developing coronary heart disease, diabetes, kidney disorders, or being in poor health…. When flu exposure is defined using particular quarters of birth, however, there is an approximately 23 percent increase in the probability of developing diabetes for individuals exposed to the flu during the first months of pregnancy.”

Diabetes is the number one cause of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). CKD is a kidney disorder.

Did you know that there were three other pandemics between the one in 1918 and today’s? I didn’t. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/pandemic-resources/basics/past-pandemics.html, they are

1957-1958 Pandemic (H2N2 virus) “The estimated number of deaths was 1.1 million worldwide and 116,000 in the United States.”

1968 Pandemic (H3N2 virus) “The estimated number of deaths was 1 million worldwide and about 100,000 in the United States.”

2009 H1N1 Pandemic (H1N1pdm09 virus) “… 12,469 deaths … in the United States…. Additionally, CDC estimated that 151,700-575,400 people worldwide died … during the first year the virus circulated.”

While these may seem like scary numbers, as of this past Saturday (and we know these numbers change daily), the World Health Organization (WHO) posted the following numbers:

“Total (new cases in last 24 hours)

Globally 12 322 395 cases (219 983) 556 335 deaths (5 286)”

You can check more data from WHO at https://www.who.int/docs/default-source/coronaviruse/situation-reports/20200711-covid-19-sitrep-173.pdf?sfvrsn=949920b4_2.

The United States statistics?

“Coronavirus Cases:

3,355,646

Deaths:

137,403”

This is according to Worldometers at https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/country/us/.

It’s clear the pandemic is not done with us yet. People speak of the second wave coming. I live in Arizona and believe we are still in the first wave. I have no scientific proof for my belief, but our numbers keep going up without ever having gone down.

The National Kidney Foundation at https://www.kidney.org/coronavirus/covid-19-information#can-covid-19-cause-kidney-failure-otherwise-healthy-adults gives us the insight we need into Covid-19 and our kidneys:

“Initial reports from Wuhan found approximately 3% to 9% of hospitalized patients with confirmed COVID-19 developed an AKI. Incidence rates have now increased to 15% of hospitalized patients and 20% and higher in ICU patients with many requiring dialysis treatments. AKI appears to be a marker of COVID-19 infection severity and the mortality rate is higher for these patients.

Various COVID-19-related effects that are thought to contribute to AKI include kidney tubular injury (acute tubular necrosis) with septic shock, microinflammation, increased blood clotting, and probable direct infection of the kidney. Most patients with COVID-19-related AKI who recover continue to have low kidney function after discharge from the hospital.”

As usual, we need to back up a little here. AKI in not CKD (Here we are back in alphabet city.), although it may lead to CKD. While it may raise the death rate of Covid-19 patients, not all Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients and those with Covid-19 but not in the ICU develop AKI.

Acute tubular necrosis may be a new term for you. Healthline at https://www.healthline.com/health/acute-tubular-necrosis explains it for lay folks like you and me:

“Inside your kidneys are small tube-shaped structures that remove salt, excess fluids, and waste products from your blood. When these tubules are damaged or destroyed, you develop acute tubular necrosis (ATN), a type of acute kidney injury. The damage may result in acute kidney failure.”

This past weekend I received this invitation from the American Association of Kidney Patients (AAKP) and George Washington University which you may find useful for yourself:

“Over the course of the past three months, you’ve joined AAKP and some of our allied experts in one of our nine COVID-19 webinars.

(Gail here: Go to their webinars. They’re a good way to read more about Covid-19 and your kidneys.)

We’re now pleased to invite you to pre-register to join our 2nd Annual Global Summit entitled, Global Kidney Innovations – Expanding Patient Choices & Outcomes, hosted in partnership with the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

This year’s summit focuses on the impact of COVID-19 on kidneys and kidney patients (Gail again: I purposely italicized that part of this sentence.) as well as key innovations in kidney care. All registration fees have been dropped to allow the broadest possible audience of frontline medical professionals, researchers, and kidney patients.

Join us for immediate access to key insights related to COVID-19 and risks to kidney patients! Beyond COVID-19, the agenda focuses on emerging innovation and research to care for kidney diseases, including diversity in clinical trials; precision medicine; genetic conditions such as APOL1; emerging research in the areas of early disease diagnosis and artificial intelligence; novel therapies in transplantation including wearable and artificial implantable devices; and advancements in home dialysis care.

Virtual Summit Event Dates: July 16-17, 2020

If you’re interested in this timely, free summit to learn more about your kidneys and Covid-19 – and/or for any of the other topics – you can register at https://aakp.org/programs-and-events/2nd-annual-global-summit-global-kidney-innovations-expanding-patient-choices-outcomes/.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

James’s Kidney Transplant Wasn’t Preemptive

Last week, the third week of National Kidney Month, Kevin Fowler told us his story of the journey to his preemptive kidney transplant. This week, the fourth of National Kidney Month, James will tell us of his journey to a non preemptive kidney transplant. In case you were wondering, James and I met at an AAKP meeting in Tampa several years ago and just never lost contact. But let’s allow Uncle Jim (as he prefers to be called) tell his story.

My name is James Myers. I live in Hammond, IN. I am an ESRD & PKD patient. I was lucky enough to have a transplant on April 27th, 2016. I write to you today to tell you my story, as well as my experiences with polycystic kidney disease. At the age of 25, I went into the hospital with chest pain. From a simple x-ray, I was diagnosed with PKD.

I have lost five members of my family to PKD, including my dad. Because of my family’s history, I was immediately referred to Dr. Hellman, a nephrologist at Indiana University Health. He promptly put me on high blood pressure medication and a renal diet. I faithfully followed up at the kidney clinic every six months and took my medicine. I did the best I could do to stay on the kidney diet. There is no cure for PKD, and at that time, there was very little they could do for me.

I tried to ignore my condition and carry on with my life, but in reality, the fact is that after I was diagnosed with kidney failure, all of my decisions were colored by my impending death, or so I thought. It was a factor in a failed marriage, a legal career being cut short, and two professorships at two different colleges lost. I loved being with the kids.

Every step that I took from the date of my diagnosis was for one reason and one reason only; to avoid dialysis. I was able to do that for over 30 years, but in 2012. I could not delay it any longer. I began passing out, at home, in my classroom, everywhere. Many times after passing out, I was fearful I would be unable to reach the phone and call for help. I lived alone, and this caused a great deal of anxiety. At the age of 58, on July 28th, I started what would be a four year stretch on dialysis. My schedule was three days a week, four hours per session.

I was very, very angry when I first went on dialysis. After watching my dad die, I felt this was the beginning of the end. I had dreaded this for a long time. My dad passed after a short five years on dialysis, and I felt I was on the same life path as he. My days were numbered. I observed that many of my clinic mates came to the center by ambulance, were brought in on a gurney, walker, or wheelchair. Many used a cane. Many were diabetic on top of ESRD, and had suffered amputations. Five people were 90 years old or more. One woman was autistic and had the mentality of a 10 year old.

One of my dearest friends, Maureen O’Brien, looked after me. She forced me to open my eyes. I was able to drive and walk around on my own power. I had a fairly clear mind. I was taking classes toward two MBAs and was teaching other MBA candidates at the same time. Maureen had been dealing with kidney disease since the age of six. Every step along the way she had to argue and fight with healthcare officials. She had three transplants. Maureen provided encouragement and a bright, vivid smile. She provided a light on my path.

I began to understand my role. I made a conscious choice. I wanted to help my fellow Kidney Patients. I wanted to use my loud voice to help others. I wanted to advocate for my clinic mates who could not advocate for themselves. I did not like the way the dialysis clinics, the government, and the care staff pushed around or neglected my fellow Kidney Patients. The last straw for me was when they began to push for the cutting of funds to dialysis patients and clinics. I looked around the room and I realized with my health and skill set, I was the only one who could help. It occurred to me that if i did not accept this responsibility, maybe no one else would.

I joined as many kidney organizations as I could, I applied to be an advocate for as many groups as I could. I became very, very active on social media. I wrote petitions, I blogged, I contacted newspapers, I spoke and visited with my Congressman and Senators. I spoke frequently. To this day, I do whatever I have to do to bring about change for my fellow Kidney Patients. My life has purpose now. I like to think that my dad & Maureen would be proud of me.

I know that many of you are not used to me writing this way. I feel it is my responsibility to lift spirits, so I rarely talk about personal issues anymore. It is my hope to inspire others to likewise advocate for our fellow Kidney Patients. My friend Gail asked me to write my story out. Gail has been very candid with me, so I felt as she advocates for us, I should be just as candid with her & all of you. The point of this Kidney Story is to raise hope and to thank Gail and all of you that advocate for Kidney Patients.

PKD affects approximately 600, 000 Americans and 12.5 million people worldwide. It is one of the most inherited diseases on the planet. Polycystic Kidney Disease is more common than Cystic Fibrosis, Sickle Cell Anemia, Muscular Dystrophy, Hemophilia, Downs Syndrome, and Hodgkins Disease combined. PKD is one of the four leading causes of Kidney Failure. It costs the federal government in excess of $2 Billion annually in Medicare and Medicaid costs for dialysis, transportation and related treatment. There is no cure.

Sincerely,

James Myers
2019 Advocate of the Year for the NKF
BOD and Ambassador for the AAKP
Ambassador for the Chronic Disease Coalition
Ambassador for the NKF of Indiana
Ambassador for the American Kidney Fund
Ambassador for the PKD Foundation
Ambassador for the DPC

Thank you, Uncle Jim, for your generous sharing and even more generous advocacy.

Until next week,
Keep living your life!

Kevin Got His Preemptive Kidney Transplant

Several years ago,  I was invited to a kidney disease meeting. That’s where I first met Kevin Fowler, Principal of The Voice of the Patient, Inc. I liked listening to his ideas. Later, we walked into each other at an AAKP conference. This time I thoroughly enjoyed his company, but had quite a few questions about pre-emptive transplants. Kevin was good enough to explain his story, which answers my questions, in this guest blog during National Kidney Month. Take it away, Kevin! 

Kidney disease has always been a part of my life.  When I was growing up, my mom told me stories about her father who had suffered from Autosomal Polycystic Kidney Disease ( ADPKD), a disease which prompts the growth of cysts on the kidneys. My mom was the oldest of three sisters, and had great love and affection for my grandfather, Hubert Duvall.  I never had a chance to meet him because he died before I was born. It was the late 1950s when he was admitted to the hospital because he was not feeling well. Unknown to him, he was experiencing uremia, the inability of the kidneys to rid themselves of waste products such as urea, as he went into kidney failure. Shortly after his hospital admission he died.  As he neared death, he learned that ADPKD was the cause of his kidney failure. 

My grandfather’s patient journey had a profound impact upon his three daughters: Mary Ann, Ruth, and Laverne in that his genetic disease was passed on to each of them.  My mom, Mary Ann, was diagnosed after the birth of her third child. Imagine the joy of giving birth to a child while being diagnosed with a disease with limited scientific knowledge and a very uncertain future.  My mom and dad faced the unknown with a positive attitude, but with very little professional guidance.

As a young boy, I was very close to my mom.  I felt her unconditional love for me, and her whole life was dedicated to her three children.  As her ADPKD advanced, I saw her suffer with the disease. I saw her experience constant back pain, routine exhaustion and nausea.  All of this physical suffering was difficult to understand as a young child. Moreover, what was really difficult was the look on her face as she faced a nebulous future.

Eventually, my mom’s kidneys failed.  Unlike my grandfather, hemodialysis was available as a treatment option to sustain her life.  She started hemodialysis at the age of 48. While she approached dialysis with optimism, her future was never clear to her or our family.  I saw my mom struggle to survive on dialysis. I saw her return home from dialysis feeling exhausted and tired. I saw that when she had a rough hemodialysis session, it would take her longer to recover from the treatment.  She never bemoaned her fate, and provided us the legacy of her example.

After four and a half years on hemodialysis, my mom died at the age of 52.  Her dialysis experience left an indelible impression upon me. From that point on, I lived in fear that I would face the same fate.  I choose to never determine if I had the same disease. In many ways, it was a rational decision. Interventions were not able to slow down the progression of ADPKD.  If I were diagnosed with ADPKD, I would be penalized. I would face difficulty obtaining health and life insurance. The fear of facing the same patient journey as my mom was always hanging over my head, and I didn’t have the courage to determine if I too had ADPKD.  

I was married to my wife, Kathy, in 1995, and in less than five years we had two children.  During this time, I was being seen by a primary care physician who was aware of my ADPKD family history.  My kidney function was tested on my annual appointments, and he told me that my kidney function was fine. He stated that if I had ADPKD, there was not much that could be done to slow down the progression.  Later that same year near the Christmas season, I experienced deep flank (the side of your body between the bottom rib and the hip) pain. Initially, I attributed it to moving some furniture. The pain persisted, and because of my additional responsibilities as a husband and father, I called my primary care physician requesting an ultrasound test.  The ultrasound test would determine once and for all whether I too had ADPKD.

On a cold and sunny day in January 2001, my physician administered the ultrasound test. Watching his reaction told me all I needed to know.  At the age of 39, I was informed that I would be in kidney failure within the next three to five years. He offered to make a nephrology referral, but I declined.  Since he had not demonstrated competence managing my condition, I intuitively sensed that I could not trust his referral would serve my best interests. 

At that time, I was working in the pharmaceutical industry, so I called a physician friend at Barnes Hospital in St. Louis seeking a nephrology recommendation.  On my mother’s birthday, I met with my nephrologist – who had a profound impact on my life. He informed me that it was not necessary to be on dialysis, and that I could have a preemptive kidney transplant.  Because of my fear, I had never taken the time to learn about the different End Stage Kidney Disease treatment options. I was incredibly fortunate to receive the best treatment option.

On this recently past World Kidney Day, the theme was prevention due to detection.  In the United States approximately 90% of those with Stage 3 Chronic Kidney Disease are unaware of their condition.  This is no longer acceptable. The American Kidney Health Executive Order has initiated a public campaign to detect kidney disease earlier.  In fact, the National Kidney Foundation and CVS Kidney Care launched their public awareness campaign this month, National Kidney Month.  Unlike when I was diagnosed, there are now approved treatments to slow down the progression of kidney diseases.  There are potentially additional treatments in the pipeline for ADPKD, Diabetic Kidney Disease, FSGS, IGAN, etc. For many people there is no longer a need to live in fear.  There is a very real possibility that their patient journey may change for the better.

Thank you, Kevin, for sharing your personal kidney journey with us. Kevin may be reached via email at kevinjohnfowler@gmail.com or on Twitter as @gratefull080504.

 

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Belly Fluid Retention While Taking a Diuretic?

Finally, we get to the question one reader has been waiting to be answered for several months while I dealt with complications from pancreatic cancer surgery. Thank you for your patience. The question has to do with reducing belly fluid retention that seems to be the result of taking the diuretic ethacrynic acid for over two years.

What is ethacrynic acid used for? I don’t know. Let’s find out together. CardioSmart of the American College of Cardiology at https://www.cardiosmart.org/Healthwise/d006/49/d00649 tells us that ethacrynic acid is,

“… a loop diuretic (water pill) that prevents your body from absorbing too much salt, allowing the salt to instead be passed in your urine.”

I get what a diuretic is, but what’s a loop diuretic? Let’s go to Wikipedia at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loop_diuretic for this one, but keep in mind that anyone – medical personnel or not – can edit an entry on this site.

Loop diuretics are diuretics that act at the ascending limb of the loop of Henle in the kidney. They are primarily used in medicine to treat hypertension and edema often due to congestive heart failure or chronic kidney disease. While thiazide diuretics are more effective in patients with normal kidney function, loop diuretics are more effective in patients with impaired kidney function.”

I see. So, as kidney disease patients we are offered loop diuretics instead of thiazide diuretic. The loop diuretic is to prevent too much salt absorption. And we need to limit our salt absorption as CKD patients because???

Thank you to DaVita Kidney Care at https://www.davita.com/diet-nutrition/articles/basics/sodium-and-chronic-kidney-disease for the following:

“… too much sodium can be harmful for people with kidney disease because your kidneys cannot eliminate excess sodium and fluid from your body. As sodium and fluid buildup in your tissues and bloodstream, your blood pressure increases and you feel uncomfortable.

High blood pressure can cause more damage to unhealthy kidneys. This damage further reduces kidney function, resulting in even more fluid and waste build up in the body.

Other sodium-related complications are:

  • Edema: swelling in your legs, hands and face
  • Heart failure: excess fluid in the bloodstream can overwork your heart making it enlarged and weak
  • Shortness of breath: fluid can build up in the lungs, making it difficult to breathe”

Now it makes sense that you don’t want to absorb too much salt if you’re a Chronic Kidney Disease patient.

Wait a minute. If a diuretic is a water pill, why is this reader retaining most of her fluid in her belly. Shouldn’t it be passing out of her body in her urine? I found this explanation on Livestrong at https://www.livestrong.com/article/498477-retaining-fluid-while-taking-diuretics/ :

“In some cases, fluid retention will not respond well to diuretic therapy. Diuretics are not an effective treatment for a type of fluid retention known as idiopathic cyclic edema. In fact, taking diuretics for this condition can make the retention worse. It is not known what causes this condition, but it is associated with hypothyroidism, obesity and diabetes mellitus. This condition often occurs before menstruation and is more common in young women.”

I did see a picture of this reader and didn’t see any signs of obesity, but do not know if she is dealing with diabetes mellitus or hypothyroidism. I’m so sorry, dear reader, but it looks like I’ve hit the same dead end you have in asking your doctors for help.

Change of subject. It’s a new year and the kidney world is reacting to that. For instance, KidneyX, stage 2 is now in effect.

Redesign Dialysis Phase II

Building off the success of KidneyX’s inaugural prize competition, Redesign Dialysis Phase I, Phase II challenges participants to build and test prototype solutions, or components of solutions, that can replicate normal kidney functions or improve dialysis access. Up to 3 winners will each be awarded $500,000.

Submissions are due by 5:00 ET on January 31, 2020.

Who Can Participate?

You can submit a solution even if you did not submit anything in Phase I. Full eligibility rules can be found on page 6 of the prize announcement.

What is KidneyX Looking for in Redesign Dialysis, Phase II?

We are seeking prototype solutions that address any of these categories:

  • Blood Filtration (filtering blood to remove waste and excess fluid)
  • Electrolyte Homeostasis (maintaining appropriate levels of key minerals in the blood)
  • Volume Regulation (regulating the amount of and/or removing excess fluid).
  • Toxin Removal and Secretion (removing, limiting or preventing toxins in the bloodstream).
  • Filtrate Drainage and Connectivity (removing excess filtrate after processing; connectivity issues for filtration, processing, and exterior drainage)
  • Dialysis Access (vascular, peritoneal, blood circuit, or alternative (e.g., GI tract) access)

Specific technical design targets for each category can be found on page 4 of the prize announcement. These design targets, as well as the categories themselves, were developed based on the Kidney Health Initiative’s Technology Roadmap for Innovative Approaches to Renal Replacement Therapy, which is an excellent resource to learn more about technical and scientific needs in this space.

Tests of the prototype’s function or performance should demonstrate rigor, reproducibility, and statistical analysis.

For specific judging criteria, please review the prize announcement.

You can learn more at https://www.kidneyx.org/prizecompetitions/RedesignDialysisPhaseII.

The American Association of Kidney Patients is also looking for participants.

AAKP is pleased to announce an opportunity for individuals with chronic kidney disease, and their caregivers, to participate in a research survey that will help us better understand the impact chronic kidney disease has had on their lives.

To find out whether you qualify, please click on the box below that corresponds with the survey that is most appropriate for you, and complete the brief screening questionnaire. If eligible, you will be directed to the full survey which is expected to take about 15-to-20 minutes to complete. Kindly note, the survey must be completed in one sitting so it is important to start the survey at a time when you feel confident you can allocate enough time to complete the survey in its entirety.

As a show of appreciation for your time and input, participants who complete

the full survey will receive a check for $35!

You can read more about this at https://survey-d.dynata.com/survey/selfserve/53b/1912660?CT=1#?

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Auld Lang Syne Already?

It’s the last few days of 2019 and this year has whizzed by. My dance with pancreatic cancer has been a trip I could have done without, but the birth of my grandson more than made up for it. Now I get to see him all the time and I only have one more regiment of chemotherapy to go.

Oh, there I go again assuming everyone knows what Auld Lange Syne is. According to Classic FM at https://www.classicfm.com/discover-music/auld-lang-syne-lyrics-and-origins/:

What does ‘Auld Lang Syne’ mean?

The most accurate plain English interpretation of the Auld Lang Syne’s famous title is ‘Old long since’, or ‘For the sake of old times’.

The song itself is reflective in nature, and is basically about two friends catching up over a drink or two, their friendship having been long and occasionally distant.

The words were written by Scottish poet Robert Burns in 1788, but Burns himself revealed at the time of composing it that he had collected the words after listening to the verse of an old man on his travels, claiming that his version of ‘Auld Lang Syne’ marked the first time it had been formally written down.

However, an earlier ballad by James Watson, named ‘Old Long Syne’, dates as far back as 1711, and use of the title phrase can be found in poems from as early as the 17th century, specifically works by Robert Ayton and Allan Ramsay.”

The song is usually sung at the stroke of midnight on New Year’s Eve and is closely associated with the ending of one year and the beginning of the next. That’s tomorrow night.

Before we leave 2019, let’s take a look at what’s been happening in the kidney world this year.

The ball got rolling, so to speak, with this announcement:

“The Advancing American Kidney Health initiative, announced on July 10, 2019 by the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), places the kidney community in the national spotlight for the first time in decades and outlines a national strategy for kidney diseases for the first time …. In order to achieve the Advancing American Kidney Health initiative’s lofty goals and make good on the KHI’s commitment to people with kidney diseases, drug and device innovation needs to accelerate.”

You can read the entire announcement from the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology at https://cjasn.asnjournals.org/content/early/2019/12/05/CJN.11060919.

The American Kidney Fund at https://www.kidneyfund.org/advocacy-blog/future-of-dialysis-innovation.html announced prizes for innovations in dialysis. We are now in phase two.

“HHS and ASN collaborated with patients, nephrologists, researchers and others in planning the competition. Several agencies, including the National Institutes of Health, the Food and Drug Administration, and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, are involved in this effort. AKF has provided comments to the KidneyX project, urging a focus on unmet needs and improving patient quality of life.

The KidneyX: Redesign Dialysis competition will have two phases. During phase one (late-October 2018-February 2019), innovators will be asked to come up with ideas to ‘replicate normal kidney functions and improve patient quality of life.’ During phase two (April 2019-January 2020), innovators will be asked to develop prototypes to test their ideas.

The HHS press release detailing the competition can be found here.

You can also read my blog about KidneyX by using the topic dropdown on the right side of the blog.

S.1676/H.R 3912 was passed this year, too. According to Renal Support Network at https://www.rsnhope.org/kidney-disease-advocacy/the-chronic-kidney-disease-improvement-in-research-and-treatment-act-of-2019-s-1676/, this is what the act provides:

“Specifically, the legislation does the following:

  • Medigap available to all ESRD Medicare beneficiaries, regardless of age.
  • Improve care coordination for people on dialysis by requiring hospitals to provide an individual’s health and treatment information to their renal dialysis facility upon their discharge. The individual or dialysis facility may initiate the request.
  • Increase awareness, expand preventative services, and improve coordination of the Medicare Kidney Disease Education program by allowing dialysis facilities to provide kidney disease education service. And it will allow physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and clinical nurse specialists, in addition to physicians, to refer patients to the program. And additionally, provide access to these services to Medicare beneficiaries with Stage 5 (CKD) not yet on dialysis.
  • Incentivize innovation for cutting-edge new drugs, biologicals, devices, and other technologies by maintaining an economically stable dialysis infrastructure. The Secretary would be required to establish a process for identifying and determining appropriate payment amounts for incorporating new devices and technologies into the bundle.
  • Improve the accuracy and transparency of ESRD Quality Programs so patients can make better decisions about their care providers.
  • Improve patient understanding of palliative care usage as well as access to palliative care services in underserved areas.
  • Allow individuals with kidney failure to retain access to private insurance plans as their primary payor for 42 months, allowing people to keep their private plans longer.”

I scooted over to EurekAlert! at https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-04/uoo-bkd041219.php when I realized they were announcing a drug I’d blogged about:

“’A drug like canagliflozin that improves both cardiovascular and renal outcomes has been eagerly sought by both patients with Type 2 diabetes and clinicians caring for them,’ added Kenneth Mahaffey, MD, professor of medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine and co-principal investigator of the trial. ‘Now, patients with diabetes have a promising option to guard against one of the most severe risks of their condition.’

The researchers found the drug canagliflozin, a sodium glucose transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor, was less effective at lowering blood sugar in people with reduced kidney function but still led to less kidney failure, heart failure and cardiovascular events such as heart attacks, strokes and death from cardiovascular disease.

Professor Perkovic said the results were impressive. ‘The substantial benefit on kidney failure despite limited effects on blood glucose suggest that these drugs work in a number of different ways beyond their effects on blood sugar. This is an area of intense ongoing research.’”

These are just a few of the innovations in kidney disease in 2019. I hope to see many more for us – like the FDA approval of the artificial kidney – in 2020.

Until next year,

Keep living your life!

What’s That Got to Do with My Occupation?

I’ve written about neuropathy, but what is this occupational therapy that may treat it? I know about physical therapy and have made use of it when necessary. Remember a few years ago when knee surgery was indicated? Physical therapy helped me avoid the surgery.

This time I was offered gabapentin for the neuropathy. That’s a drug usually used for epilepsy which can also help with neuropathy. I would explain how it works, but no one seems to know. I had two problems with this drug:

  1. Gabapentin became a controlled substance in England as of April of this year. England always seem to be one step ahead of the U.S. re medications.
  2. It is not suggested if you have kidney disease.

My other option was occupational therapy. That’s the one I chose. Let’s backtrack a bit for a definition of occupational therapy. Thank you to my old buddy (since college over 50 years ago) the Merriam-Webster Dictionary at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/occupational%20therapy for the following definition.

“therapy based on engagement in meaningful activities of daily life (such as self-care skills, education, work, or social interaction) especially to enable or encourage participation in such activities despite impairments or limitations in physical or mental functioning”

That got me to wondering just how occupational therapy differed from physical therapy, the kind of therapy with which I was already familiar. I went to my old buddy again, but this time at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/physical%20therapy for any hints I could pick up from the definition for physical therapy.

“therapy for the preservation, enhancement, or restoration of movement and physical function impaired or threatened by disease, injury, or disability that utilizes therapeutic exercise, physical modalities (such as massage and electrotherapy), assistive devices, and patient education and training”

Made sense to me. Physical therapy was for the movement of the body, while occupational therapy was to help you carry out the tasks of your daily life. For example, it takes me longer to write a blog because my tingling, yet numb, fingers often slip into the spaces between the keys on the keyboard. Another example is that I now use a cane since I can’t tell if my tingling, yet numb, feet are flat on the floor as I walk.

Something I found interesting about occupational therapy is that it uses many forms of therapy that were once considered alternative medicine… like electrical energy. What’s that you say? You’d like an example?

Well, here you go. My therapist uses a machine called a Havimat. The following is from the National Stem Cell Institute at https://nsistemcell.com/hivamat-how-it-relieves-edema/  and explains what the Havimat can do and how.

“….The therapist connects an electronic lead to his/her wrist while the patient grasps a small cylinder grip. The vinyl gloves that the therapist wears prevents the circuit of electric current from closing, thus creating the ‘push-pull’ effect that penetrates deeply into tissues. Meanwhile, the patient’s experience is one of a pleasant, deep massage maintained by the therapist’s gentle pressure as he/she directs the deep oscillation.

…. The therapy “un-dams” trapped fluid. Tissues are decongested and edema is significantly reduced. This shrinks swelling in the area being treated. Hivamat has been shown to be exceptionally effective in relieving lymphedema when used by therapists to enhance manual lymphatic drainage.

…. Besides the reduction of edema, therapists use Hivamat for ridding tissues of toxins [Gail here: like chemotherapy.]  When used by a certified therapist during a manipulation technique known as manual lymphatic drainage, the therapy improves lymph fluid movement. This encourages better flow through the lymphatic system, which then carries away metabolic waste and toxins more quickly. Hivamat also promotes the production of lymphocytes, which improve the function of the immune system. [Gail here again: as CKD patients, our immune systems are compromised.]”

There is one thing, though. Apparently, the Havimat is NOT suggested if there is an active tumor. Uh-oh, I had three treatments with the Havimat before I uncovered that fact. I’ll have to speak with my therapist today and find out why she didn’t know that. But it is clear that using electrical energy as treatment is another case of what was formerly considered alternative medicine becoming mainstream medicine.

Topic switch. I’ve written about the American Association of Kidney Patients (AAKP), precision care, and clinical trials many times before. You’re probably already aware of the new initiative for patient care. AAKP wants your help in doing their part as far as patient experience with this survey.

“As part of AAKP’s National Strategy, we have expanded our

capacities to involve a far larger, and more representative, number

of patients in research opportunities and clinical trials. The

results of these research opportunities and clinical trials will help

create a clearer understanding of the patient experience and help

shape the future of kidney disease treatment and care. AAKP is

fully committed to changing the status quo of kidney care

and to better aligning treatment to personal aspirations.

To achieve this goal, the AAKP Center for Patient Research &

Education is working with top researchers to ensure that the

patient voice, patient preferences and patient perceptions are

heard.

AAKP is very pleased to partner with Northwestern University

and University of Pennsylvania on an important research

project organ donation.

Please consider taking part in this online survey and help

shape the future of kidney care for you and those yet to

be diagnosed.

Volunteers Needed for Research Study!

Researchers at Northwestern University and University of Penn-

sylvania invite kidney transplant candidates to participate

in a survey about your opinions of research done on donor

organs. Such research aims to help organs work better and

make more organs available for transplantation.

Your responses will help to improve the informed consent

process for transplant candidates.

You are eligible to participate if you:

•  Are 18+ years old

•  Speak English

•  Are currently a transplant candidate on the waitlist for only

    one organ

This anonymous survey is voluntary, and will take about 45

minutes of your time.

Your decision about participating will not affect your place on

the waiting list. Your participation may help improve the informed

consent process for transplant candidates.

Find out more information and take the survey by clicking

the link below [Gail here yet again: Don’t forget to click

control at the same time.]:

https://redcap.nubic.northwestern.edu/redcap/surveys/index.php?s=TEMXLDLF8A

Thank you to those taking part in the survey for helping

AAKP help those awaiting a transplant.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

The Reluctant Donor

I’m pretty sure I’ve mentioned the exceedingly personable folks I met at the kidney disease think tank and then the AAKP National Patient Meeting earlier this year. Actually, you’ve already heard from one from them. This past July, Cindy Guentert-Baldo guest blogged about being a PKD patient. Today’s guest blog by Suzanne F. Ruff looks at the other side of same kidney disease. Ms. Ruff is no stranger to spreading awareness of kidney disease as you can see by her credentials:

author of The Reluctant Donor

Freelance writer for The Charlotte Observer

Executive Board of Directors American Association of Kidney Patients (AAKP)

Living Donor Council of The National Kidney Foundation (NKF)

Published in Chicken Soup for the Soul: Grieving & Recovery & Say Hello to A Better Body

Before you start reading Suzanne’s guest blog, I feel it only fair to warn you it left me in tears.

Why am I called The Reluctant Donor?  A simple answer is because I cried and whined all the way into the operating room to donate a kidney to my sister.  But it’s really not simple.  It’s complicated.

I really didn’t like my sister.  Okay, okay, I know.  If you have a sibling, you probably know what I’m talking about . . . siblings can drive you crazy.  If you don’t have a sibling, well, it’s complicated.  That’s part of the reason I titled my book, The Reluctant Donor, but not quite the whole reason.

On my journey to become a living kidney donor to a sister I didn’t like, I learned a lot of things.  Probably the most important thing is that although I may not have liked my sister, I discovered how much I love her. When I didn’t like her, it was because she was crabby grouchy and scared.  I learned something from that, too.  My sister was crabby and grouchy because she was ill…very, very ill.  That’s what happens when you don’t feel well, when your kidneys fail, and when you’re scared, terrified and afraid: you are not yourself.

I also learned denial is a powerful thing.  My sister was in denial.  Kidney disease does that to you; my sister and I should know.  We were born into a family chockful of people with kidney disease. Polycystic kidney disease or ADPKD (Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease) to be exact. This is a hereditary disease that causes cysts to grow around both kidneys causing the kidneys to fail.  If one of your parents carries the gene (our mother did), you have a 50% chance of inheriting the disease.   My sister, along with my other sister, inherited that gene from our mother.  Our mother, along with Mom’s two brothers and two sisters, inherited that gene from their mother.

Yes, sirreee, we were chockful of kidney disease. Over twenty-three family members now have or had the disease. We’ve had ten deaths from kidney disease, including our mother.

I did not inherit the gene that causes the disease.  Many people ask me if I feel guilty, sort of like survivor’s guilt, because my sisters have the disease and I don’t. I don’t feel guilty.  A person has no power over what genes they inherit.  But, I do feel a tremendous responsibility to do what I can to eradicate the disease that has ravaged my family.  So, I wrote my book. 

There is no cure for PKD.  Growing up I learned I was named after my grandmother who died of polycystic kidney disease before I was born.  When her kidneys failed, the doctors told her there was nothing the doctors could do for her. Mom described my grandmother’s death: Mom, a teenager then, her father, her brothers and sisters were gathered around my grandmother’s hospital bed, when my grandmother sat straight up and said, “Here I am, Lord!” and died.

The disease then hit five of my grandmother’s six children, including my mother. Through their suffering and deaths, I have learned courage and faith.  One of my aunts diagnosed with PKD in the 1960’s was one of the first to be able to try the new-fangled machine called dialysis. But, alas! There were not enough dialysis machines!!!!!  My aunt was a Roman Catholic nun.  She offered to give up her spot on the waiting list and died a few months later. She was 45 years old.

Presently, my three cousins, all brothers, suffer from polycystic kidney disease.  Their eldest brother, John, passed away from polycystic kidney disease (PKD) in 1996. Two of the three brothers are on dialysis and the other brother will need dialysis soon.    Their sister has offered to be a living donor to one of them, but each of them insists the other brother accept her kidney. A stalemate … as the disease progresses.

I have other stories about my magnificent family, but this blog is near its end.  You might even say none of this explains why I cried, kicked and screamed my way into the operating room to donate one of my kidneys to my sister.

Plain and simple: I was afraid.  I don’t like hospitals.  I hate them.  Growing up, the people I loved most died in hospitals.  I don’t like needles. I don’t like blood.   I was afraid I would die, afraid the surgery wouldn’t be a success, afraid my life would change because I donated.  I was always afraid of polycystic kidney disease as one by one, people I loved suffered and died.

Something happened to me, though, when my sister collapsed in kidney failure.  My faith kicked in and I stepped up.  We are blessed.  The surgery was a success. My sister is now a grandmother. Life is so precious!

Having gained both another son-in-law and my first grandchild this year, I can only agree with Suzanne… and life was precious for me before. I’m reading her book now and enjoying it. Should you decide to read Suzanne’s book (and any and all of mine), be sure to leave a review. Those are what get our books recognized… and in Suzanne and my cases, spreads awareness of kidney disease.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

 

How Does That Work Again?

I’ve had so many questions lately about how clinical trials work that when Antidote asked me if I’d consider including their infograph in a blog, I jumped at the chance. There’s even more information about clinical trials at https://www.antidote.me/what-are-clinical-trial-phases.

I’ve written about Antidote before… and I’ve written about clinical trials before. It seems more and more people are becoming interested in the process for a multitude of diseases, not only Chronic Kidney Disease.

As a newly diagnosed diabetes patient, I’ve noticed clinical trials for diabetes. A family member has Alzheimer’s; his neurologist keeps an eye out for clinical trials for him. Whatever your disease is, you can search for clinical trials.

While this is not everyone’s cup of tea, it is a chance to help others who may develop the same diseases in the future. Who knows, maybe the new treatment will be FDA approved during your own lifetime and help you with your own disease.

In case you are one of those people who have always wondered just what the FDA is, their website is https://www.fda.gov. That’s right: it’s a government site which is part of the U.S. Health and Human Services. What’s that? You’d like a more precise definition?

No problem. This is from the United States of American Government website at https://www.usa.gov/federal-agencies/food-and-drug-administration and offers basic information about the FDA.

Food and Drug Administration

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is responsible for protecting the public health by assuring the safety, efficacy, and security of human and veterinary drugs, biological products, medical devices, our nation’s food supply, cosmetics, and products that emit radiation. The FDA also provides accurate, science-based health information to the public.

                                                                                                                                                      Agency Details

Acronym: FDA

Website: Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

Contact: Contact the Food and Drug Administration

 Report a Problem with a Product

Main Address: 10903 New Hampshire Ave.
Silver Spring, MD 20993

Toll Free: 1-888-INFO-FDA (1-888-463-6332)

Forms: Food and Drug Administration Forms

Government branch: Executive Department Sub-Office/Agency/Bureau

By the way, they are also responsible for both recalls and safety alerts for the treatments they’ve approved.

In the infograph above, you’ll notice, “Sometimes, only healthy volunteers participate.” in Phase 1. Should you decide to apply for a clinical trial, you need to keep this in mind to save yourself a bit of heartache. I firmly believe in paying back for the wonderful things in my life and have applied for several clinical trials for other diseases in an effort to do so. I must have missed the small print because I was rejected for having CKD.

I wanted to help eradicate or ameliorate whatever the disease was. Sometimes it was a disease that was ravaging a loved one. It was just a little bit of a heartbreak not to be able to do so.

As for Phase 2, I went to the blog’s site at gailraegarwood.wordpress.com to use the antidote widget at the bottom of the right side of the page. It’s the turquoise one. You can’t miss it. Face Palm! You can also go directly to www.antidote.me to search for clinical trials.

Why Antidote? It’s simply an easier way to find a clinical trial. This is from SlowItDownCKD 2017:

“Antidote Match™

Matching patients to trials in a completely new way
Antidote Match is the world’s smartest clinical trial matching tool, allowing patients to match to trials just by answering a few questions about their health.

Putting technology to work
We have taken on the massive job of structuring all publicly available clinical trial eligibility criteria so that it is machine-readable and searchable.

This means that for the first time, through a machine-learning algorithm that dynamically selects questions, patients can answer just a few questions to search through thousands of trials within a given therapeutic area in seconds and find one that’s right for them.

Patients receive trial information that is specific to their condition with clear contact information to get in touch with researchers.

Reaching patients where they are
Even the smartest search tool is only as good as the number of people who use it, so we’ve made our search tool available free of charge to patient communities, advocacy groups, and health portals. We’re proud to power clinical trial search on more than a hundred of these sites, reaching millions of patients per month where they are already looking for health information.

Translating scientific jargon
Our platform pulls information on all the trials listed on clinicaltrials.gov and presents it into a simple, patient-friendly design.

You (Gail here: this point is addressed to the ones conducting the clinical trial) then have the option to augment that content through our free tool, Antidote Bridge™, to include the details that are most important to patients – things like number of overnights, compensation, and procedures used. This additional information helps close the information gap between patients and researchers, which ultimately yields greater engagement with patients.

Here’s how Antidote Match works
1. Visit search engine → Patients visit either our website or one of the sites that host our search.
2. Enter condition → They enter the condition in which they’re interested, and begin answering the questions as they appear
3. Answer questions → As more questions are answered, the number of clinical trial matches reduces
4. Get in touch: When they’re ready, patients review their matches and can get in touch with the researchers running each study directly through our tool

Try it from the blog roll. I did. I was going to include my results, but realized they wouldn’t be helpful since my address, age, sex, diseases, and conditions may be different from everyone else’s. One caveat: search for Chronic Renal Insufficiency or Chronic Renal Failure (whichever applies to you) rather than Chronic Kidney Disease.”

Before I sign off, this came in from the American Association of Kidney Patients:

Please join us on Tuesday, October 9, 2018 at 1 p.m. ET for an educational webinar on Making the Perfect Team: Working with Your Dialysis Technician in partnership with National Association of Nephrology Technicians/Technologists (NANT).  Keep in mind that’s tomorrow. Hit this link if you’d like to register https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7744206034004582403

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Backed Up

Granted this is weird, but I have wondered for quite a while what – if anything – constipation has to do with Chronic Kidney Disease. Maybe my memory is faulty (Hello, brain fog, my old friend), but I don’t remember having this problem before CKD entered my life… or did I?

In my attempt to find out if there is a connection, I hit pay dirt on my first search.

“Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are more likely to develop in individuals with constipation than in those with normal bowel movements, according to a new study published online in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

More severe constipation, defined as using more than one laxative, was associated with increasing risks of CKD and its progression.”

You can read the entire Renal and Urology News article at https://www.renalandurologynews.com/chronic-kidney-disease-ckd/constipation-associated-with-ckd-esrd-risk/article/572659/.

Wait a minute. This is not quite as clear as I’d like it to be. For example, what exactly is constipation? The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases at https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/constipation was of help here:

“Constipation is a condition in which you may have fewer than three bowel movements a week; stools that are hard, dry, or lumpy; stools that are difficult or painful to pass; or a feeling that not all stool has passed. You usually can take steps to prevent or relieve constipation.”

Well then, what’s severe constipation? A new site for me, HealthCCM at https://health.ccm.net/faq/267-acute-constipation defines severe or acute constipation as,

“Acute constipation is usually defined by a slowing of intestinal transit generating a decrease in bowel movements and the appearance of dehydration. The person will have difficulty defecating or may not be able to at all.”

This sounds downright painful, so let’s go back to my original query about how constipation and CKD relate to each other.

But first I want to share this very clear explanation of how constipation happens from Everyday Health at https://www.everydayhealth.com/constipation/guide/.

“The GI tract, which consists of a series of hollow organs stretching from your mouth to your anus, is responsible for digestion, nutrient absorption, and waste removal.

In your lower GI tract, your large intestine, or bowel — which includes your colon and rectum — absorbs water from your digested food, changing it from a liquid to a solid (stool).

Constipation occurs when digested food spends too much time in your colon.

Your colon absorbs too much water, making your stool hard and dry — and difficult for your rectal muscles to push out of your body.”

Keep in mind that diabetes is the number one cause of CKD as you read this. According to the Mayo Clinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/constipation/symptoms-causes/syc-20354253

“Hormones help balance fluids in your body. Diseases and conditions that upset the balance of hormones may lead to constipation, including:

  • Diabetes
  • Overactive parathyroid gland (hyperparathyroidism)
  • Pregnancy
  • Underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism)”

Many of the sites I perused suggested drinking more water to avoid or correct constipation. But we’re CKD patients; our fluid intake (Well, mine, anyway) is restricted. I’m already drinking my maximum of 64 ounces a day. In the words of Laurel and Hardy’s Hardy, “Well, here’s another nice mess you’ve gotten me into!” It’s possible constipation contributed to my developing CKD and drinking more may help, but with CKD you’re limited to how much you can drink.

Another suggestion I ran into on many sites was increase your fruit and vegetable intake. Great, just great. I’m already at my maximum of three different fruits and three different vegetables – each of different serving sizes, mind you – daily.

Wikipedia at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constipation#Medications has a great deal of information about constipation. Remember though that anyone can edit any Wikipedia article at any time. Be that as it may, this sentence leaped out at me:

“Metabolic and endocrine problems which may lead to constipation include: hypercalcemiahypothyroidismhyperparathyroidismporphyriachronic kidney diseasepan-hypopituitarismdiabetes mellitus, and cystic fibrosis….”

Thank you, MedicineNet for reminding us that iron can cause constipation. How many of us (meaning CKD patients) are on iron tablets due to the anemia that CKD may cause? I realize some patients are even taking injections of synthetic iron to help with red blood production, something the kidneys are charged with and slow down on when they are in decline.

Apparently, another gift of aging can be constipation since your metabolic system slows down. That’s also what makes it so hard to lose weight once you reach a certain weight. I’m getting a lot of information here, but I’m still not clear as to how one may cause the other. Let’s search some more.

I think I just hit something. We already know that diabetes is the number one cause of CKD. Did you remember that high blood pressure is the second most usual cause of CKD? Take a look at this from Health at https://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20452199,00.html#inflammatory-bowel-disease-3:

“Constipation can be a side effect of some common drugs used to treat high blood pressure, such as calcium channel blockers and diuretics.

Diuretics, for instance, lower blood pressure by increasing urine output, which flushes water from your system. However, water is needed to keep stools soft and get them out of the body.”

Now we’re getting somewhere.

It gets even better. The American Association of Kidney Patients at https://aakp.org/dialysis/relieving-constipation/ not only offered more clarification, but offered a list of high fiber foods without going over most of our potassium and phosphorous limits. Fiber intake is considered another way to both avoid and help with constipation.

“Adults need 20-35 grams of fiber daily. However, for dialysis patients who have to limit their fluid intake, this may be too much since it is thought increased dietary fiber may require an increased fluid intake. Also, all patients are different so the amount of fiber needed to relieve constipation varies from person to person.

High Fiber Foods

Bran muffin                 ½ muffin

Brown rice (cooked)   ½ cup

Broccoli*                    ½ cup

Peach                          1 medium

Prunes*                       3

Prunes*                       3

Spaghetti (cooked)      ½ cup

Turnips*                      ¾ cup

(Each serving contains about 150mg potassium, 20-90mg phosphorus and 1 – 5.4 grams of fiber.) (*Items contains 2 or more grams of fiber per serving.)”

I’ve got the connection between constipation and CKD now; do you?

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Rising to the Challenge

Remember Loyal Reader from a few years ago? He and I are still in touch and toss around ideas here and there. He sent me an article about Chronic Kidney Disease patients being at higher risk for Hepatitis C along with the comment, “Hmmm, I wonder why?” I know a challenge when I see one, so let’s find out.

Back to basics: what is Hepatitis C anyway? As I mentioned in SlowItDownCKD 2013, Hepatitis is from the … Greek word root, hepa, which means liver.” Interesting, but not enough information for our purposes.

According to our old friend the MayoClinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hepatitis-c/symptoms-causes/syc-20354278,

“Hepatitis C is a viral infection that causes liver inflammation, sometimes leading to serious liver damage. The hepatitis C virus (HCV) spreads through contaminated blood.”

The National Kidney Foundation at https://www.kidney.org/sites/default/files/HepC_Infographic.pdf explained why hepatitis C is associated with Chronic Kidney Disease:

“Hepatitis C infection is strongly associated with kidney disease. Hepatitis C is more common in people with kidney disease than the general population. Hepatitis C can be a cause of kidney disease, or make existing kidney disease worse. People receiving a kidney transplant, or donating a kidney, are routinely tested for hepatitis C.

Hemodialysis and Hepatitis C People receiving long-term hemodialysis have a risk of getting hepatitis C through transmission in the dialysis clinic. The risk is small because of strict standard health precautions used in dialysis units today. However, some cases of hepatitis C being spread between patients have been reported.”

By the way, NKF uses infographs which are easy to understand.

In SlowItDownCKD 2017, I explained what KDIGO is. We’re going to need that explanation in just a moment.

“This stands for KIDNEY DISEASE | IMPROVING GLOBAL OUTCOMES. Their homepage at KDIGO.org states, “KDIGO MISSION – Improving the care and outcomes of kidney disease patients worldwide through the development and implementation of global clinical practice guidelines.”

Here’s where KDIGO comes in. Way back in 2008, the following was published in the April issue of the official journal of the International Society of Nephrology, Kidney International, which supports the KDIGO:

“‘HCV infection is associated with an increased prevalence of reduced kidney function, albuminuria, and an increased risk of developing end stage renal disease,’ says Dr. Jaber, who is also vice chair for clinical affairs, Department of Medicine at Caritas St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center, ‘HCV infection is also associated with increased mortality among patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis and among kidney transplant recipients.'”

But, in 2018, KDIGO updated their recommendations: “We recommend screening all patients for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection at the time of initial evaluation of chronic kidney disease (CKD).”

Hmmm, as Loyal Reader would say, I wonder if this has something to do with the albuminuria Dr. Jaber mentioned in 2008.

Let’s see what we can find out. I found this in SlowItDownCKD 2015:

“Albumin is a protein.  It will show up as microalbumin in your urine test.  It may also show up as proteinuria since albumin is a protein.”

We can figure out that microalbumin is extremely small particles of albumin, but what about proteinuria? I went back, back, back to my first CKD book, What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease for the definition:

“Protein in the urine, not a normal state of being.”

Does anyone else feel like we’re going down the rabbit hole here? Of course it’s not normal! It means we have CKD. Now, if there’s any amount   of protein in our urine… and there may be since we do have Chronic Kidney Disease… it looks like Hepatitis C Virus can raise that amount and lower our GFR. Not good, not good at all.

So what do we do about it? WebMD at https://www.webmd.com/hepatitis/digestive-diseases-hepatitis-c#2 held the least medicalese answer about the drugs that all the sites I viewed saw as the best treatment plan:

“Your treatment will depend on many things including what type of hepatitis C virus you have. In the U.S., the most common type is genotype 1, followed by genotypes 2 and 3. Genotypes 4, 5, and 6 are very rare in the U.S. Your doctor will help you figure out what’s right for you, based on your medical needs and insurance coverage. “

I know. I had the same question. What is a genotype? Hello, Dictionary.com, my old friend, at https://www.dictionary.com/browse/genotype.

“the genetic makeup of an organism or group of organisms with reference to a single trait, set of traits, or an entire complex of traits.”

Well, that makes sense. Just one more thing, though. Is it possible to know we have Hepatitis C before we’re diagnosed with CKD – at which time we should be tested for HCV – or even if we don’t have CKD? That is a loaded question. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), fully 80% of those with acute or short term HCV won’t have any symbols. The other 20% may experience mild symptoms you might experience with any illness: fever, joint pain, being tired and/or nauseous, and the like. However with chronic or long term HCV, you might experience dark urine and/or jaundice of the skin and eyeballs. To complicate matters even more, there are three different kinds of hepatitis. You can read much more about hepatitis at https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/hcv/cfaq.htm

There’s one thing that I haven’t yet made clear. Your body rids itself of wastes and excess fluids through either the kidneys or the liver. If you have CKD, your kidneys are already not functioning as well as they should which means you’re not getting rid of either wastes or excess fluids efficiently. Guess what. One of the functions of the liver is to also clean your blood. Having two organs that are not effectively cleansing your blood is not a position you want to be in… ever.

This was a difficult blog to write. There were so many little pieces to link together. But thanks for the challenge, Loyal Reader, I learned a lot.

Switching topics now. Since the weather has been,uh, difficult lately (to say the least), I thought this might be helpful.  Use this link rather than clicking below: https://ecs.page.link/SVpB 

Until next week,

 

Keep living your life!

The Third Kidney

Here I am back from the semiannual vacation with my husband, brother, and sister-in-law. It was sad to realize this was our last cruise, but some of our bodies just can’t handle that anymore. It looks like mine may be one of them since I’m in bed feeling not so great. How was I ever going to be able to write a blog for Monday, I wondered.

And then I remembered that I’d met someone with an idea so old that it’s new again and he’d promised a guest blog for this week.  And there it was, right in my mailbox. I’d met Raymond Keller, Jr. DO at the American Association of Kidney Patients I attended recently. He had an intriguing idea, one I thought should be shared with you.

Take it away, Raymond…

First and foremost, please do not consider any of the following as medical advice. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medical treatment plan.

I’m not the first person to suggest the skin as a “Third Kidney,” but like many others I did independently conceive the idea. For the origin story you can read a recent interview done by the American Association of Kidney Patients. The premise of the Third Kidney is that skin, through the sweat glands, can excrete water, potassium, and urea in amounts that would be clinically useful to patients with chronic kidney disease especially those on dialysis. Before we get into the Third Kidney, let’s take a brief look into the history of dialysis itself.

Willem Johan Kolff is credited with being the inventor of dialysis. He pieced together things that could be found in a contemporary house to create the first dialyzer. The original dialysis membrane was a sausage casing. Crude, but effective. Belding Hibbard Scribner would come to create the “Scribner shunt” which allowed repeated use of the same vascular access. Once long term vascular access was obtained, long term hemodialysis became a reality.

Now let’s get down to the details about how sweating can help dialysis patients. While there are many potential compounds that can build in the body with renal failure, urea, water, and potassium are of particular importance. Let’s take a moment to explore the consequences of each and how sweat therapy can help.

Water is essential to life. So essential, we search for evidence of it on other planets to decide whether life could exist. To most dialysis patients water is a constant enemy. It is the reason they have to spend more than two hours on dialysis per day – to reach their dry weight. The evidence for keeping fluid off is part of the reason why people that do dialysis more than 3 days a week have better outcomes.

As anyone who lives between the Arctic and Antarctic Circle has likely experienced, sweating removes water from your body. Sweating is so interrelated with being human that almost every culture in human history has a tradition of inducing it. The Finns are perhaps the most well-known with their saunas. The Russians have banas, the Turks have hammams, and the Native Americans have sweat lodges. While everyone is different, it is not unreasonable to expect that a 45 minute sauna session could remove between 500-1000mL of fluid from the body. Higher losses are possible with training. To put that into context, a 4 hour dialysis session typically removes 2000mL and removing more than 400mL per hour can cause symptoms of hypotension. Sweating out fluid is a natural process, which is why it can reduce the ultrafiltration required.

In the table 1 below (adapted from https://www.homedialysis.org/life-at-home/articles/fluid-and-solute-removal-part-two) it is very obvious how likely it is for people to develop symptoms from removing fluid from the blood stream rather than the skin. This is especially important when we consider that the skin is where most excess fluid is stored, which is why dialysis patients get puffy.

Now on to potassium. Even though it is a vital nutrient, it has a dark side. Potassium chloride is one of the typically used compounds in lethal injections because it causes the heart to stop beating. As it builds up in the blood of a patient with renal failure it can have the same effect. Similar to fluid overload, keeping potassium levels at an appropriate level are a major reason daily dialysis patients do better than thrice weekly patients. Fortunately, potassium is excreted in sweat at 2-3 times the level it is found in the blood stream. During a regular sauna session the clinically relevant amount of potassium, in upwards of 4.6 grams, can be removed from the body.

And urea? Urea is a controversial molecule is the dialysis community, yet a relatively simple molecule that our bodies use to detoxify ammonia and remove nitrogenous waste from our bodies. We used to think that it freely diffused across cell membranes, like water. But seminal work by my mentor Jeff Sands, MD showed that there are molecular transporters for urea. In the dialysis community, urea rebound is proof that urea is not freely diffusible.

There has been much debate about the toxicity of urea. Regardless of whether urea is toxic, and at what levels it is, blood urea nitrogen is one way we monitor the adequacy of dialysis. Urea is excreted in sweat at about 2-3 times its presence in serum. Understanding how sweat affects the blood urea nitrogen levels will be important in coordinating the combination of sweat therapies with dialysis.

How does all of this relate to SlowItDownCKD? There is value to researching whether sweat based therapies like sauna can be used to reduce the dependence on dialysis. Given the above facts it is useful to ask the question of whether sweat based therapies can reduce the number of days per week or number of hours per day of dialysis. There is also the potential for sweat based therapies to push off dialysis for patients with CKD. Third Kidney currently has IRB (institutional review board, also known as an independent ethics committee) approval to do safety trials with Harvard Medical School professors. After a safety trial, the next step would be a study in patients that have chronic kidney disease.

When it comes to sweat based therapies for CKD I’ll leave you with a few thoughts:

  1. No rational person would say that sweating vis-a-vis exercise is a bad idea for CKD patients.
  2. If fluid balance was better achieved by sweating hours, or even days of dialysis, might be avoided.
  3. If potassium is lost in sweat it would allow people to liberalize their potassium intake, opening up a culinary panoply.

If you are interested in learning more about how sweat based therapies may be beneficial in patients with chronic kidney disease and the research that Third Kidney is doing, you can visit us at ThirdKidney.net.

Wow! Just wow. This is – as we used to say in college decades ago – mind blowing. It’s so simple, yet so complex. With many thanks for this new/old information, I’ll say good bye for now.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Help When You Need It

One of the many people I met at the AAKP Conference who opened my eyes to things I’d never even though of before is Samantha Siegner from the Chronic Disease Coalition. We hit it off right away and I felt comfortable exposing my ignorance to her. Once she explained what the coalition does, I wanted all my readers to know about it. Happily for us, Samatha agreed to write a guest blog for us.

*****

Nearly half of all adults in the United States have one or more chronic health conditions, and the number continues to climb. By 2020, it is projected that over 157 million Americans will battle a chronic disease. While some chronic conditions can be prevented, others are inherited, or may develop as a result of numerous factors. Despite the prevalence of chronic disease, few organizations are specifically dedicated to addressing the needs of patients who battle all types of chronic conditions rather than a single disease.

The Chronic Disease Coalition (CDC) is national nonprofit organization that represents people battling a wide range of chronic conditions, including kidney disease, diabetes, arthritis, multiple sclerosis and more. As patients dealing with kidney disease or other chronic conditions know, it can be difficult to work, attend school or even get adequate health insurance coverage. Our organization works to not only raise awareness and educate the public about chronic conditions, but also to advocate for patients who need better access to care. Our mission is focused on exposing and addressing discriminatory practices and policies that are preventing patients from accessing necessary, often lifesaving care.

Discrimination based on a person having a chronic disease comes in various forms, but we most frequently see it occur in the school, workplace and with health insurance plans.

  1. School: For those looking to complete high school or even college, it can be difficult to regularly attend class or have the energy to complete assignments. For kidney patients, dialysis poses difficulty attending class, as you may be required to dialyze for several hours multiple times a week. It is important to educate yourself on the services offered by the school to ensure that you are receiving reasonable accommodation that support your effort to pursue education.

Our organization works with people to ensure that they are being treated fairly in the school system, read more in one patient’s story here.

  1. Workplace: Many people with chronic conditions may frequently visit the doctor’s office for treatment, response to a flare up or check-ups to ensure that their condition is being managed properly – these actions can require additional time off work. While it is not legal for an employer to ask about your medical history, some patients may disclose it. This can lead to a greater understanding and development of a process for how you miss work, but for others, it may lead to losing their job or being demoted.

The CDC helps patients by supporting legislation that protects the privacy of employee’s medical history and ensures that businesses and corporations cannot discriminate based on their health status. Additionally, we ensure that patients are educated on their rights within the workplace.

  1. Insurance: Unfortunately, insurance discrimination is all too common. Insurers institute a variety of practices to increase their bottom line at the expense of the patients, without consideration for the long-term health consequences. Some of the most common practices include, step-therapy or fail-first, lengthy prior authorization approval times, nonmedical switching and bans on charitable premium and copay assistance, which is a common way for insurers to target kidney patients.

Right now, insurers across the nation are targeting chronic disease patients who rely on charitable premium assistance to help afford the cost of their health care. By utilizing a loophole within a 2014 guideline issued by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, insurers are denying premium and copay payments made by charities, like the American Kidney Fund, on behalf of patients. As a result, patients are forced off their current health plan and left to find other options. This is a commonly used tactic to force patients off of private health plans and onto public plans, because the insurer doesn’t want to cover chronic disease patients that require expensive, regular treatment, like dialysis. While kidney patients are eligible for Medicare before the age of 65, a public plan may not meet their needs or cover services that can help a patient become eligible for a transplant.

The Chronic Disease Coalition is actively working to pass H.R. 3976, the Access to Marketplace Insurance Act to ensure that patients can access charitable premium assistance and choose the health plan that best meets their needs.

So how does the Chronic Disease Coalition work with kidney patients? In addition to advocating on behalf and beside kidney patients to ensure discriminatory policies don’t hinder their ability to access care, we work with patients in their communities to raise awareness and educate the public on kidney disease at an individual level and through our Ambassador Program.

After receiving an initial diagnosis, many people with kidney failure may not know what to expect from treatment, what questions they should ask their medical team and what changes may come to their daily life. Our Ambassador Program was developed on this understanding and is comprised of active advocates who battle chronic diseases and provide guidance, advice and advocate on issues that concern kidney patients. Ambassadors complete advocacy work that is relevant to their specific diseases and communities each month.

If you are interested in learning more about the CDC and how you may be able to become involved, please click here. Change happens when people speak out, share their stories and take action – the CDC is proud to provide a platform for kidney patients and all people with chronic conditions to do so.

*****

Did you click through on all the blue words? I did. I’d had inklings of what each of these meant, but the full explanation made my understanding so much better. All I can say is: Thank you!

SlowItDownCKD 2014 should be out on Amazon.com any day now. B & N takes a few weeks longer. This had formerly been the second half of the unwieldy, small print, indexless The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2. I’d vowed to separate both this book and the equally unwieldy, small print, indexless The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 into two books each… and now I have. Of course, that leaves me with desk copies of each of the Book of Blogs which I no longer need. Want one? Let me know (but only if you haven’t received a free book from SlowItDownCKD before).

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

 

Let Your Voice Be Heard

Someone on a Facebook Chronic Kidney Disease Support Group Page asked how we can make others more aware of what CKD patients want. I’ve been tweeting (exchanging remarks on Twitter) with those who could answer this question just recently. How perfect was that?

The first thing the American Society of Nephrology requested is that those of you who are familiar with Twitter, or are willing to become familiar with this social media, join the monthly #AskASN twitter chats. To join Twitter you simply go to Twitter.com and sign yourself up, no special expertise necessary. That pound sign, or as it’s commonly known now – hashtag, before the words signify that this is a person or group with a Twitter account. What comes after the hashtag is your handle, the name you choose for yourself. Mine is – naturally – #SlowItDownCKD. You can search for me on Twitter.

#AskASN is one of the hashtags of the American Society of Nephrology, the ASN which you’ve often seen me quote. Yes, they are respected. Yes, they are doctors. And, yes, they do want to know what we as kidney disease patients want them to know about our lives as their patients. Big hint: their next Twitter Chat will be in late July.

This year’s May 28th blog was about KidneyX, the same topic as June’s Twitter Chat. Here’s a little reminder of what KidneyX stands for:

“Principles

  • Patient-Centered Ensure all product development is patient-centered
  • Urgent Create a sense of urgency to meet the needs of people with kidney diseases
  • Achievable Ground in scientifically-driven technology development
  • Catalytic Reduce regulatory and financial risks to catalyze investment in kidney space
  • Collaborative Foster multidisciplinary collaboration including innovators throughout science and technology, the business community, patients, care partners, and other stakeholders
  • Additive Address barriers to innovation public/private sectors do not otherwise
  • Sustainable Invest in a diverse portfolio to balance risk and sustain KidneyX”

Did you notice that first principle: patient-centered? Or the fifth one: collaborative? We are included in that; we’re the patients.

IDEA Lab is one of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ partners. This is how they define themselves:

“We test and validate solutions to solve challenging problems in the delivery of health and human services.”

And this is what they had to say during the KidneyX Twitter Chat:

HHS IDEA Lab‏Verified account @HHSIDEALabJun 19

Absolutely. Patients are innovators and we need to recognize that #askASN#KidneyX

Patients. They want to hear from us, patients.

Before reproducing a small part of the @AskASN KidneyX Twitter Chat, I want to introduce the players.

Kevin J. Fowler (@gratefull080504) is a patient who has had a preemptive kidney transplant and is highly involved in the patient voice being heard.

Tejas Patel (@GenNextMD) is a nephrologist with a large social media presence who advocates “for halting the progression of ckd so no dialysis or transplant [is necessary].”

James Myers (@kidneystories) is a fairly recent transplant with a strong advocacy for transplant patients.

I’m me; you already know me.

Now, the excerpt:

Thank you @GenNextMD Me too! #AskASNhttps://twitter.com/GenNextMD/status/1009245134964318209 …

Kevin J. Fowler added,

  • Tejas Patel @GenNextMD

Replying to @kidneystories

I am advocating for halting the progression of ckd so no dialysis or transplant #askasn #moonshot

Replying to @gratefull080504@GenNextMD

@GenNextMD That’s what those of us pre-dialysis want, too. The question is how do we do that? As a lay person, I’m at a loss here.

Replying to @Slowitdownckd@gratefull080504

Major undertaking by medical community, organizations (ASN, AAKP, NKF, RPA) and implementation of breakthrough therapies keeping patient central. Engaging all stakeholders will help prioritize what works for patients. Dialogue via formal & social media helps us understand better.

Replying to @GenNextMD@Slowitdownckd@gratefull080504

We recently had patient editorial in @CJASN by @gratefull080504 and interview https://www.kidneynews.org/kidney-news/features/patient-engagement … Lot of work needs to be done

I read the article. I think you should, too. Kevin makes the point that patient voices need to be heard and the nephrologist who was interviewed with him, Dr. Eleanor D. Lederer, agrees.

From reading my blog alone, you’re already familiar with the oft quoted American Society of Nephrology (ASN), American Association of Kidney Patients (AAKP) which was the subject of June 25th blog, and the National Kidney Foundation (NKF), a staple in the blog. But what is the RPA?

Let’s find out. It turns out that this is the Renal Physicians Association. Their website is at https://www.renalmd.org/. If you go there, you’ll notice four different choices. One of them is Advocacy. That’s the one I clicked. Keep in mind that this site is for physicians.

Become An Advocate for Excellence in Nephrology Practice

It is not only your right but also your obligation to let elected officials and policy makers know how you feel about important issues. It is your responsibility to speak out on matters that affect you directly or no one else will. RPA has developed pathways to allow you to do this.

Recognizing that nephrologists and their practice teams have limited time, an easy way to get involved in federal advocacy is by joining the RPA Political Action Committee (PAC) and Nephrology Coverage Advocacy Program (NCAP).

Take Action Nationally!

RPA’s Legislative Action Center (LAC) facilitates the important communication between RPA members and their members of Congress as well as representatives in their state legislatures. The LAC allows RPA members to track the progress of and search for all current legislation being considered by Congress.”

Our doctors are being asked to speak with the government on our behalf. But how will they know what we want or need, you ask. Easy enough: you tell them when you see them. You have regular appointments; that’s when you can talk with them about legislation you feel is necessary.

I never knew how much my opinion is wanted. I never knew how much YOUR opinion is wanted. Now we all know, so how about speaking out, raising your voice, and advocating for yourself. It’s not that scary if you start by just speaking with your doctor.  Although, I’ll be looking for you on ASN’s #askASN Twitter Chat in late July.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!