Saving CKD Lives

Last week, I wrote about Covid-19 and a little about precautions explaining why we – as Chronic Kidney Disease patients – need to take extra care. A reader in Ireland was shocked that this was all we had in the way of protecting ourselves (as much as possible) from contacting the virus here in the United States. The precautions weren’t that much different than the precautions for everyone else.

There are a few things going on here. First is that we have no leadership from Mr. Trump who seems to have decided this is not his responsibility. That leaves us with the governors of each of the fifty United States and, in some cases, the mayors of individual cities in each of these states to lead us. They may have very different ideas.

There is this post I found on Facebook that exemplifies our situation in the U.S. Unfortunately, it is not attributed to anyone. I would love to give credit where credit is due.

“WE ARE NOT IN THE SAME BOAT …

I heard that we are all in the same boat, but it’s not like that. We are in the same storm, but not in the same boat. Your ship could be shipwrecked and mine might not be. Or vice versa.

For some, quarantine is optimal. A moment of reflection, of re-connection, easy in flip flops, with a cocktail or coffee. For others, this is a desperate financial & family crisis.

For some that live alone they’re facing endless loneliness. While for others it is peace, rest & time with their mother, father, sons & daughters.

With the $600 weekly increase in unemployment some are bringing in more money to their households than they were working. Others are working more hours for less money due to pay cuts or loss in sales.

Some families of 4 just received $3400 from the stimulus while other families of 4 saw $0.

Some were concerned about getting a certain candy for Easter while others were concerned if there would be enough bread, milk and eggs for the weekend.

Some want to go back to work because they don’t qualify for unemployment and are running out of money. Others want to kill those who break the quarantine.

Some are home spending 2-3 hours/day helping their child with online schooling while others are spending 2-3 hours/day to educate their children on top of a 10-12 hour workday.

Some have experienced the near death of the virus, some have already lost someone from it and some are not sure if their loved ones are going to make it. Others don’t believe this is a big deal.

Some have faith in God and expect miracles during this 2020. Others say the worst is yet to come.

So, friends, we are not in the same boat. We are going through a time when our perceptions and needs are completely different.

Each of us will emerge, in our own way, from this storm. It is very important to see beyond what is seen at first glance. Not just looking, actually seeing.

We are all on different ships during this storm experiencing a very different journey.”

Let’s take a look at the Chronic Kidney Disease boat to see what I can find out for us. I immediately went to the National Kidney Foundation at https://www.kidney.org/coronavirus/kidney-disease-covid-19. If you’ve read last week’s blog, then you already know we are more vulnerable to Covid-19 and why.

Are there special precautions that someone with kidney disease should take?

Older adults and people with kidney disease or other severe chronic medical conditions seem to be at higher risk for more serious COVID-19 illness. If you are at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19, you should:

  • Stock up on supplies
  • Take everyday precautions to keep space between yourself and others
  • When you go out in public, keep away from others who are sick, limit close contact
  • Wash your hands often
  • Avoid crowds as much as possible
  • During an outbreak in your area, stay home as much as possible.

Please remember that if you are on dialysis, you should not miss your treatments. Contact your clinic if you feel sick or have any questions or concerns.

If you have a kidney transplant, it is important to remember to keep taking your anti-rejection medicines, maintain good hygiene and follow the recommendations from your healthcare team. Contact your healthcare team with any questions or concerns….

Should CKD patients wear masks in public?

It is best to stay home, unless you need to attend a dialysis treatment. If you must go out in public, ask your healthcare provider if it is necessary as a CKD patient to wear a face mask since each individual case is different.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends face masks for those who are infected with COVID-19, have symptoms of COVID-19, or taking care of someone with COVID-19.

The CDC also recommends wearing cloth face coverings to slow the spread of COVID-19 in areas where community-based transmission is significant. These homemade cloth face coverings are not masks and do not replace the President’s Coronavirus Guidelines. (Gail here: As you can see, Trump doesn’t have much more to offer than what we already know. To be fair, this site hasn’t been updated since March 16th, over a month ago. Wait a minute! Why isn’t this site updated daily?)

Tips for using a mask include a snug but comfortable fit covering the bridge of the nose and the entire mouth. Also, be sure to be laundered [sic] the cloth mask after use each outdoor use, ideally without damage to the shape or structure of the mask. … The CDC also recommends coffee filters as an alternative. Use of any mask is in addition to practicing social distancing or at least 6 feet from others to limit coronavirus spread. All patients at high risk, such as immunosuppressed transplant recipients or people receiving dialysis should follow the directions of their clinicians regarding the type of face covering that should be used outside of a clinic setting.

When in public it is important to practice social distancing by staying 6 feet away from other people and to also avoid touching your face. Wash your hands immediately after you have been in public.”

This is still paltry information at best. Emedicine at https://www.emedicinehealth.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=228849 gives us just a bit more insight about patients on dialysis according to the CDC:

“The CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) guidance recommends that for medically stable patients facilities give the option of waiting in a personal vehicle or outside the facility and to be contacted by mobile phone when they are ready to be seen.

  • Dialysis facilities should have space allocated to allow patients who are ill to sit separately from other patients by at least 6 feet.
  • Patients experiencing respiratory symptoms should promptly be taken to appropriate treatment areas to reduce time in waiting areas.
  • For those with symptoms, ideally, dialysis treatment should be provided in a separate room from other patients, with the door closed.
  • If a separate room is not available, the masked patient should be treated at a corner or end-of-row station not near the main traffic flow. A separation of at least 6 feet should be maintained between masked, symptomatic patients and other patients during treatment.
  • Use of hepatitis B isolation rooms should only be considered for patients with respiratory symptoms if the patient has hepatitis B or if no patients treated at the facility have hepatitis B.

Healthcare personnel caring for patients with undiagnosed respiratory infections should further observe standard contact and droplet precautions with eye protection unless a suspected diagnosis such as tuberculosis requires airborne precautions, according to the guidance.

Precautions should include using gloves, facemasks, eye protection, and isolation gowns.”

And transplantees? I am so frustrated by the lack of more concrete information that might be more helpful than that given to non-kidney patients. UNOS (United Network for Organ Sharing) at https://optn.transplant.hrsa.gov/governance/policy-notices/ offers the following information:

COVID-19 Policy Actions Implemented

The table below contains information for actions taken to address OPTN operational issues in the COVID-19 crisis.

Policy Summary Documents & supporting resources Effective date
Policy 1.4.F: Updates to Candidate Data during 2020 COVID-19 Emergency This emergency policy will allow transplant programs to refresh candidate clinical data with data obtained through previous testing in order to maintain current waitlist priority.

This policy prevents candidates who cannot undergo routine testing due to the COVID-19 crisis from being adversely affected on the waitlist.

OPTN Policy Notice March 17, 2020
Policy 3.7.D: Applications for Modifications of Kidney Waiting Time during 2020 COVID-19 Emergency This emergency policy allows transplant programs to submit a waiting time modification application to retroactively initiate waiting time for affected candidates.

This policy prevents potential non-dialysis candidates who meet creatinine clearance or glomerular filtration rate (GFR) criteria from being disadvantaged because they cannot obtain other testing required.

OPTN Policy Notice April 3, 2020
Policy 18.1: Data Submission Requirements
Policy 18.2: Timely Collection of Data
Policy 18.5.A: Reporting Requirements after Living Kidney Donation
Policy 18.5.B: Reporting Requirements after Living Liver Donation
This emergency policy change relaxes requirements for follow-up form submission.

The intent of the policy is to prevent unnecessary exposure risk to transplant recipients and living donors, and also to alleviate data burden for centers in the midst of COVID-19 crisis.

 

Longer blog or not today – and it is much longer – I wish you all would adhere to these conditions. Are they restricting? Possibly. Are they uncomfortable? Could be. Are they lifesaving? It seems they are. Be safe.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Saving Lives

Last week, I promised to write about COVID-19 and Chronic Kidney Disease for today’s blog. This topic has touched me personally since one of my daughters was sent to the hospital when it was suspected she’d contacted the virus. Without the COVID-19 test, we still don’t know if she has the virus. We do know she still has the cough. Luckily, an x-ray proved her lungs were clear, so she was sent home with a Z-pack and orders to take Tylenol. No, she doesn’t have CKD, but her treatment at the hospital left me with a lot of questions for those of us who do.

Once again, I’m rushing headlong into the topic. Let’s slow down and start at the beginning. Why is it called COVID-19 anyway? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/faq.html,

“On February 11, 2020 the World Health Organization announced an official name for the disease that is causing the 2019 novel coronavirus outbreak, first identified in Wuhan China. The new name of this disease is coronavirus disease 2019, abbreviated as COVID-19. In COVID-19, ‘CO’ stands for ‘corona,’ ‘VI’ for ‘virus,’ and ‘D’ for disease. Formerly, this disease was referred to as ‘2019 novel coronavirus’ or ‘2019-nCoV.’”

There are many types of human coronaviruses including some that commonly cause mild upper-respiratory tract illnesses. COVID-19 is a new disease, caused be [sic] a novel (or new) coronavirus that has not previously been seen in humans. The name of this disease was selected following the World Health Organization (WHO) best practice for naming of new human infectious diseases.”

I don’t know about you, but I want to know about corona viruses. How did they get that name? So I went to Dictionary.com at https://www.dictionary.com/browse/coronavirus where I hoped to find that information. This is what was there.

“any of various RNA-containing spherical viruses of the family Coronaviridae, including several that cause acute respiratory illnesses.”

To be honest, all I understood was that it “causes acute respiratory illnesses.” Like my daughter’s coughing. But why would she be given a Z-pack for that? Healthcare-Online at www.healthcare-online.org/What-Is-A-Z-Pack.html confirmed my belief that antibiotics are for bacterial infections, not viral ones. Curiouser and curiouser.

Drugs.com at https://www.drugs.com/medical-answers/antibiotics-kill-coronavirus-3534867/ had the answer.

“The World Health Organization (WHO) is very clear that antibiotics do not work against viruses, only bacteria, and yet health care providers are using antibiotics in some patients with COVID-19. This is because:

  • Patients with viral pneumonia can develop a secondary bacterial infection that may need to be treated with an antibiotic, although, this complication is reported to be uncommon early on in the course of COVID-19 pneumonia.
  • Also known as Azithromycin, a Z-pack is a medication used for treating serious and severe infections caused by bacteria. It contains macrolide antibiotic, which helps in stopping all forms of growth caused bantibiotic, although, this complication is reported to be uncommon early on in the course of COVID-19 pneumonia.If treatment is required for a secondary bacterial infection then a range of antibiotics can be used such as penicillins (ampicillin plus sulbactam [Unasyn], piperacillin plus tazobactam [Zosyn]), macrolides (azithromycin), cephalosporins (ceftriaxone [Rocephin]), aminoglycosides (tobramycin) and glycopeptides (vancomycin [Vancocin HCL]) for example. Often a combination of two different antibiotics is used.
  • Azithromycin is also thought to have antiviral and anti-inflammatory activity and may work synergistically with other antiviral treatments. In in vitro laboratory studies azithromycin has demonstrated antiviral activity against Zika virus and against rhinoviruses, which cause the common cold.”

Time to deal with CKD when you have COVID-19. I wanted to understand how CKD could make you more vulnerable to this disease. I turned to Prevention at https://www.prevention.com/health/a31245792/coronavirus-high-risk-groups/ for more information.

“People with underlying health conditions are at a higher-than-normal risk of developing severe forms of COVID-19…. When your body is already dealing with a separate health condition, it has less energy to put toward fighting an acute infection…. The CDC says these conditions include:

  • Blood disorders, such as sickle cell disease or taking blood thinners
  • Chronic kidney disease, as defined by your doctor
  • Chronic liver disease, as defined by your doctor
  • Compromised immune system, including undergoing cancer treatment such as chemotherapy or radiation, having received an organ or bone marrow transplant, or taking     high doses of corticosteroids or other immunosuppressant medications, and HIV or AIDS
  • Current or recent pregnancy in the last two weeks
  • Endocrine disorders, such as diabetes
  • Metabolic disorders
  • Heart disease
  • Lung disease, including asthma
  • Neurological and neurologic and neurodevelopment conditions”

This is definitely not a case of misery loves company. Not only do I have CKD, but I am undergoing chemotherapy. Oh, and I have diabetes. To all others in the high risk group, I’m so sorry we all belong to this particular community right now.

Hmmm, do we need to do something more than everyone else needs to do to avoid COVID-19? After spending more time than usual surfing the web, I admit I was surprised that there were no extra precautions other than those for everyone else. What are those you ask? Back to the CDC for their infograph at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/downloads/COVID19-What-You-Can-Do-High-Risk.pdf which makes it easy for us to understand. It also defines who is higher risk. Unfortunately, it could not be reproduced, so you’ll have to go to the website directly.

I always seem to feel better when I understand what might be a threat to me or anyone in one of my communities. The purpose of today’s blog was to help you understand so that you may also feel better. Make no mistake: This is serious. I only go out to Chemotherapy every other week. Even young, not high risk people from my dancing community are being safe. They are not going out either (unless they are essential workers). Do yourself a favor and save your life by staying in.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Lovely, Lovely Medicinal Food

A few weeks ago, I received some interesting emails from a company called Flavis. I hadn’t heard of them before, so I followed my curiosity and emailed back. It turns out they’re a company that produces low protein, potassium, phosphorous, and sodium carbohydrates. Hmmm, as Chronic Kidney Disease patients we need to keep a lid on our intake of these electrolytes. Could this company and others like them help?

They were kind enough to send samples of their wares. Some of it tasted like medicinal food, but oh those cookies. It would be dangerous for me to keep them in the house. My husband, who doesn’t have CKD, loved them, too. I enjoyed their pasta products, too. Now, lest you get the wrong idea, I am not endorsing this company because I don’t know what others like it are available. However, I wanted to know about their products… which may very well be similar to the products of other such companies and, therefore, helpful to CKD patients.

According to my thinking, logically the first thing to do was look at their website. You can find it at http://www.Flavis.com just as I did. I’m going to copy and paste the parts of their Chronic Kidney Disease material that will help us understand more about this product.

“FLAVIS kidney-friendly foods are starch-based and have reduced protein, phosphorus, sodium, and potassium content. They reduce the kidneys’ workload, and they have the same look, taste, and calorie Content as the foods they replace. These products include pasta, rice, bread, bread products (breadsticks, crostini, rolls, sliced bread, crackers), sweets, and flour. They are suitable for patients in all stages of CKD, especially in the conservative management at stage 3-4.”

I have to admit, the bread was not bad at all and, if Bear had liked the taste more, I would have been perfectly happy using only their pasta products. I liked their taste. Unfortunately, I automatically cooked the rice in the electric rice cooker, apparently a no-no, so I can’t say anything about the taste of the rice.

My goodness! I am endorsing Flavis. Why? Look what I found on the National Kidney Foundation website:

FLAVIS and the NKF Team-Up to Promote Kidney Health Through Diet

FLAVIS, the kidney friendly food brand, and the National Kidney Foundation partner to promote medical nutrition therapy to help maintain residual kidney function among chronic kidney disease patients

New York, NY – April 8, 2019 – Dr. Schar USA’s (Lyndhurst, NJ) kidney friendly food brand, FLAVIS is teaming up with the National Kidney Foundation to promote the benefits of special dietary foods for people with chronic kidney disease (CKD). FLAVIS, offering a wide portfolio of kidney friendly breads, pasta, snacks, and baking products provides nutrition solutions for patients following a diet low in protein, phosphorus, sodium and potassium, and support to kidney healthcare professionals. The National Kidney Foundation is the largest, most comprehensive and longstanding patient-centric organization dedicated to the awareness, prevention and treatment of kidney disease.

CKD affects 15% of the U.S. adult population. This disease progresses to higher stages as kidney function declines. Some studies show that medical nutrition therapy (MNT) using a low protein diet, under the direction of a nephrologist and registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN), may slow this decline. Through this partnership, FLAVIS and the National Kidney Foundation will provide educational outreach to healthcare professionals that promotes the importance of MNT and proper nutrition for CKD patients to improve dietary adherence and quality of life.

Medical nutrition therapy for CKD, as implemented by a registered dietitian nutritionist, emphasizes an individualized diet plan based upon each patient’s clinical status, goals, and preferences.  MNT for CKD patients includes one or more of the following: decreased sodium, phosphorus, and protein intake, along with sufficient energy, high fiber, and decreased saturated fat intake.  Potassium may also be restricted if the patient has high serum potassium levels. The benefits of MNT include decreasing the risk of complications from high blood pressure and diabetes, reduced uremic toxin levels, and preserved kidney function over time. Studies of MNT in Americans with CKD have shown only about 10% of those eligible receive this nutrition counseling support. FLAVIS’ products are a good source of energy and fiber, and are low in protein, sodium, phosphorus and potassium. These products may help people with CKD preserve kidney function and improve disease outcomes. In partnering with the National Kidney Foundation, FLAVIS aims to provide education and awareness about the benefits of MNT to promote improved quality of life in the CKD population.  For more information about this partnership visit kidney.org/FLAVIS.

Kidney Disease Facts

In the United States, 30 million adults are estimated to have chronic kidney disease—and most aren’t aware of it.  1 in 3 American adults are at risk for chronic kidney disease.  Risk factors for kidney disease include diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity, and family history. People of African American, Hispanic, Native American, Asian, or Pacific Islander descent are at increased risk for developing the disease.  African Americans are 3 times more likely than Whites, and Hispanics are nearly 1.5 times more likely than non-Hispanics to develop end stage renal disease (kidney failure).”

 

I am happy to have found this. I remember – even though it was a decade ago – how hard it was to adapt my regular diet to the kidney diet and how often I had to respond, “No, thank you,” after asking the ingredients of a certain meal. Thank you Dr. Shar for helping my fellow CKD sufferers and me enjoy guilt free meals when we feel like having pasta.

By the way, I’m not ignoring COVID-19, I assure you. I’m sifting through all the information I can find before I write about it. As you know, that information changes daily. I’ve ordered my masks and searched out my gloves from the garage. I stay at home except when I have to go out for chemotherapy… and those trips concern me.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

 

re·​ha·​bil·​i·​ta·​tion 

What! As if staying in the hospital for six to thirteen days weren’t enough, it turned out that I would be in a rehabilitation center for an additional six to eight weeks. Again, while this was for pancreatic cancer, many Chronic Kidney Disease patients who have had surgery may require a stay in such places, too. I look for new experiences, but not this kind.

human-438430Let’s go to my favorite dictionary, the Merriam-Webster Dictionary at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/rehabilitation for the definition of the word.

“: to bring (someone or something) back to a normal, healthy condition after an illness, injury, drug problem, etc.

b: to teach (a criminal in prison) to live a normal and productive life

c: to bring (someone or something) back to a good condition”

I hope it’s clear that it’s the first definition we’re dealing with today.

Forgive me for being dense, but I still didn’t get how that’s going to be done. So I searched for help and MedlinePlus, which is part of the U.S. National Library of Congress which, in turn, is part of the National Health Institutes, at https://medlineplus.gov/rehabilitation.html did just that.

What happens in a rehabilitation program?a.d.

When you get rehabilitation, you often have a team of different health care providers helping you. They will work with you to figure out your needs, goals, and treatment plan. The types of treatments that may be in a treatment plan include

  • Assistive devices, which are tools, equipment, and products that help people with disabilities move and function
  • Cognitive rehabilitation therapy to help you relearn or improve skills such as thinking, learning, memory, planning, and decision making
  • Mental health counseling
  • Music or art therapy to help you express your feelings, improve your thinking, and develop social connections
  • Nutritional counseling
  • Occupational therapy to help you with your daily activities
  • Physical therapy to help your strength, mobility, and fitness
  • Recreational therapy to improve your emotional well-being through arts and crafts, games, relaxation training, and animal-assisted therapy
  • Speech-language therapy to help with speaking, understanding, reading, writing and swallowing
  • Treatment for pain
  • Vocational rehabilitation to help you build skills for going to school or working at a job

Depending on your needs, you may have rehabilitation in the providers’ offices, a hospital, or an inpatient rehabilitation center. In some cases, a provider may come to your home. If you get care in your home, you will need to have family members or friends who can come and help with your rehabilitation.”

Personally, I won’t need some of these such as cognitive rehabilitation, speech-language therapy, and vocational rehabilitation. Brain and speaking aren’t involved in pancreatic surgery and I’m retired. You may be in the same situation if you have rehabilitation or you may not. It’s a list that’s made unique for each patient. I’ve got to remind you here that I’m not a doctor; this is a lay person giving her opinion.

IMG_1843(Edited)

Hmmm, it seemed pretty clear that each type of surgery requires its own sort of rehabilitation. Now that we know what’s involved, let’s see who would be involved if you required rehabilitation after a surgery. WebMD at https://www.webmd.com/healthy-aging/rehab-after-surgery#1 offered a succinct, easy to understand answer.

Who Works With You

Different experts help with different parts of your rehab. Some people who might be on your team:

Physiatrist. He’s a doctor who specializes in rehab. He tailors a plan to your needs and oversees the program to make sure it’s going well.

Physical therapist. He teaches you exercises to improve your strength and the range you have when you move your arm, leg, or whatever part of your body had the operation.

Occupational therapist. He helps you regain the skills you need for some basic activities in your everyday life. He might teach you how to cook meals, get dressed, shower or take a bath, and use the toilet. He’ll also show you how to use gadgets that can help you care for yourself more easily, such as a dressing stick or elastic shoelaces. Some occupational therapists will visit your home to make sure it’s safe and easy for you to get around.

Dietitian. He’ll help you plan healthy meals. If your doctor has told you to avoid salt, sugar, or certain foods after your surgery, the dietitian can help you find other choices.

Speech therapist. He helps with skills like talking, swallowing, and memory. Speech therapy can be helpful after surgery that affects your brain.

Nurses. They care for you if you’re staying for a few weeks or months in a rehab center. They may also come to your home to help track your recovery and help you with the transition to life back at home.

Psychologist or counselor. It’s natural to feel stressed out or depressed after your surgery. A mental health professional can help you manage your worries and treat any depression.

It can take many months to recover from an operation, but be patient. A lot depends on your overall health and the kind of procedure you had. Work closely with your rehab team and follow their instructions. Your hard work will pay off.”

Looking over the list, I won’t need a speech therapist and neither would you if you have some kind of kidney related surgery. I’m not so sure about a psychologist or counselor, either. I’m sort of thinking that going through chemotherapy and radiation treatments without one, I won’t need one after surgery. Then again, I’ve never had major surgery before and I’ve been told this is major major surgery. However, should I find myself in a position where my medical team and/or I feel I need counseling, I would not hesitate to ask for it… just as I’ve asked for help with the cancer.ot

Rehabilitation offers so much. I had no idea this was available until my surgeon told me about it. Nor did I know that Medicare will pay for it… sort of. This is from Medicare at https://www.medicare.gov/coverage/inpatient-rehabilitation-care.

 

“You pay this for each benefit period:

  • Days 1-60: $1,364 deductible.*
  • Days 61-90: $341 coinsurance each day.
  • Days 91 and beyond: $682 coinsurance per each “lifetime reserve day” after day 90 for each benefit period (up to 60 days over your lifetime).
  • Each day after the lifetime reserve days: all costs.

*You don’t have to pay a deductible for care you get in the inpatient rehabilitation facility if you were already charged a deductible for care you got in a prior hospitalization within the same benefit period. This is because your benefit period starts on day one of your prior hospital stay, and that stay counts towards your deductible.”

Excuse me while I go check my bank account.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Oh, the Places You’ll Go!

Thank you to Dr. Seuss for lending us the title of today’s blog. Oh, you haven’t heard of him yet? According to Encyclopaedia Britannica at https://www.britannica.com/biography/Dr-Seuss:

“Dr. Seuss, pseudonym of Theodor Seuss Geisel, (born March 2, 1904, Springfield, Massachusetts, U.S.—died September 24, 1991, La Jolla, California), American writer and illustrator of immensely popular children’s books, which were noted for their nonsense words, playful rhymes, and unusual creatures.”

And why begin the blog with the title of his book you ask. Last month, I received an email from booknowmed.com. Now, I’m not endorsing this new company since I’m not on dialysis and so have not made use of their services myself. However, after reading about the difficulties my dialysis readers were having finding a clinic while they traveled, I was intrigued. Could this be another way to lessen the burden of being on dialysis?

This is from that email:

“What is booknowmed.com?

Whether you travel for holidays or for work, with booknowmed.com you can now find dialysis clinics that have availability for your treatment dates and book your treatments on the spot, anywhere in the World. And most importantly, booknowmed.com is FREE for patients.

  • Browse 440+ dialysis centers, in 380 destinations across 5 continents.
  • Find clinics that have availability based on your search criteria.
  • Know the price of treatment, before booking.
  • See ratings and read reviews from previous patients at the clinic.
  • Book your treatments on the spot in safety.
  • No booking fees, no hidden costs.
  • Track the progress of your booking, directly from your account.

Booknowmed.com is supported by the European Union and 60 national Kidney Patient Associations globally.”

Based on this alone, I asked Vassia Efstathiou, the User Experience Manager, if she’d be interested in guest blogging… and she was.  This is what she had to say, with just a bit of editing from me.

“Free booking engine for dialysis treatments? Dream or reality?

Travelling while on dialysis is a challenge on its own. Consider having to research, book and coordinate your dialysis treatments abroad. This process can be particularly stressful for dialysis patients, especially when faced with language barriers, lack of information – like the availability of clinics and cost of treatments- and, of course, safety concerns.

Many dialysis patients know this already but the power of the Internet alone cannot do much in this case. So it is definitely good news to hear that the first booking engine for holiday dialysis is live, and even better news to see that it actually works. Let alone the fact that it is free for patients!

Since its launch, thousands of dialysis patients have used booknowmed.com to book more than 27,000 treatments around the globe.

booknowmed.com allows dialysis patients to browse, find and book their dialysis treatments anywhere in the World. We are talking literally – anywhere.

By visiting booknowmed.com you will be able to browse more than 450 dialysis centers in 380 destinations, across five continents. This includes standard holiday options like Spain, Greece, and Turkey, as well some less ordinary destinations like Bali, Sri Lanka, Miami, Brazil and Argentina. Cuba, Barbados, and Curacao are coming up this month.

Bookings are completely free for patients, meaning there are no booking or other hidden costs. Overall the platform is very user-friendly and the booking process is very simple:

  1. Patients select their treatment dates and desired destination.
  2. They are then presented with a list of the clinics that match their search criteria and – most importantly – have availability for the requested dates.
  3. Booking is completed after a simple registration process, which is there for safety reasons. The process takes three minutes and includes registering the patient’s full name, email, and telephone number.

But let’s examine what differentiates booknowmed.com to the online directories currently available to dialysis patients.

Firstly, we are talking about a booking engine where you can book your treatments on the spot. In contrast to online directories, booknowmed.com allows you to know the availability and price before booking. You can select your exact treatment dates and preferred shift, and complete your booking without picking up the phone or waiting for a reply that takes weeks. Consider that the average booking time on booknowmed.com is six minutes compare to 15 days, the average booking time when you contact the clinic directly or go through a directory service.

Secondly, you have a wide variety of options to choose from, not only in terms of destination but also in terms of the type of the medical facility. booknowmed.com offers the largest network of independent dialysis centers. From global leaders – like Diaverum – to public and private hospitals as well as independent state-of-the-art clinics around the globe.

Thirdly, the simplicity of the booking process itself.

And last, but definitely not least, the great features offered to patients, which promote transparency and allow them to have all the information in hand before booking. These include:

  • Know the price of treatment before booking.
  • Use smart filters to narrow down your research. If you are an EU patient, for example, you can select to be presented with only the clinics that accept the EHIC.
  • See ratings and read reviews written by real patients who have completed treatment at this particular clinic.
  • Track the progress of your booking through your account. All the details of the booking including the exact time frame of the treatment, contact details of the clinic, and even a map with instructions on how to get there can be found in your account.

booknowmed.com was created by professionals with years of expertise in renal healthcare and the goal to serve a true need for patients. It has received the support of the European Union as well as of national kidney patient associations globally.

The company has plans to expand the functionalities of the platform, with the goal to become a 360o platform serving various everyday needs of renal patients, from nutrition and supplements to an online database and the online exchange of medical reports.

booknowmed.com is the living proof that we have entered a new era for dialysis patients, who can now find and book treatments abroad, with no hassle, no risk, and no language barriers.

Gail here, hoping this is exactly what you’ve been looking for to make your travel while on dialysis an easier experience for you.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

 

Kidney Anxiety

I clearly remember writing about how depression, grief, and stress affect your kidneys, but not about anxiety. As Bear’s pain worsens, there’s a lot of that in my house recently. I don’t understand why it’s taking so long for his doctors to decide upon a treatment plan for him, but while they do I am one anxious person.

I went directly to my old friend, the Mayo Clinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/anxiety/symptoms-causes/syc-20350961 for a set of anxiety symptoms:

“Common anxiety signs and symptoms include:

  • Feeling nervous, restless or tense
  • Having a sense of impending danger, panic or doom
  • Having an increased heart rate
  • Breathing rapidly (hyperventilation)
  • Sweating
  • Trembling
  • Feeling weak or tired
  • Trouble concentrating or thinking about anything other than the present worry
  • Having trouble sleeping
  • Experiencing gastrointestinal (GI) problems
  • Having difficulty controlling worry
  • Having the urge to avoid things that trigger anxiety”

While I don’t have all these symptoms, there are at least four or five of them I can identify with.

Wait a minute. Maybe I’m barking up the wrong tree. Is my worry about Bear’s pain really causing anxiety? I popped over to Medical News Today at https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323456.php for some help in figuring out just what it is that causes anxiety.

  • Environmental factors: Elements in the environment around an individual can increase anxiety. Stress from a personal relationship, job, school, or financial predicament can contribute greatly to anxiety disorders. Even low oxygen levels in high-altitude areas can add to anxiety symptoms.
  • Genetics: People who have family members with an anxiety disorder are more likely to have one themselves.
  • Medical factors: Other medical conditions can lead to an anxiety disorder, such as the side effects of medication, symptoms of a disease, or stress from a serious underlying medical condition that may not directly trigger the changes seen in anxiety disorder but might be causing significant lifestyle adjustments, pain, or restricted movement.
  • Brain chemistry: Stressful or traumatic experiences and genetic factors can alter brain structure and function to react more vigorously to triggers that would not previously have caused anxiety. Psychologists and neurologists define many anxiety and mood disorders as disruptions to hormones and electrical signals in the brain.
  • Use of or withdrawal from an illicit substance: The stress of day-to-day living combined with any of the above might serve as key contributors to an anxiety disorder.

There are items on this list which I hadn’t considered before. Years ago, when I was teaching in an old vocational high school, a student holding one of those long, heavy, solid oak window poles to open very high windows quickly spun around to answer a question and accidentally hit me in the head with the pole. That was certainly traumatic and also one of the few times I’ve been hospitalized.

We’ve pretty much figured out that there is an undiagnosed history of anxiety in the family. I’m referring to people from past generations who faced pogroms, the Depression, and even having to give up babies for adoption since that’s what was done with babies from unwed mothers in that generation. Could these folks have had anxiety disorders rather than environmental anxiety? Of course, we’ll never really know since they are long gone from this earth, but it is a thought.

Lightning Bolt!!! I remember visiting my buddy and her mother in San Miguel de Allende in Mexico not long after my own mother died and being anxious. I attributed it to still being in mourning for my mother. San Miguel de Allende has an elevation of 7,000 feet. Was that one of those “low oxygen levels in high-altitude area?” I didn’t know, but Laura Anderson author of the Gunnison Country Times’ article on Acli-Mate at https://acli-mate.com/living-at-altitude-the-pros-and-cons-of-a-high-altitude-lifestyle/ did:

“Low landers generally aren’t affected by altitude until they reach 4,500 to 5,000 feet. But after that, the affects (sic) of altitude are compounded about every 1,000 feet — so the affects (sic) of going from 6,000 feet to 7000 feet can feel the same as jumping from sea level to 4,500 feet.”

What in heaven’s name is this doing to my kidneys, I wondered. I was surprised to find an answer… in reverse. Rather than anxiety causing a kidney problem, it seems that fear of kidney disease can cause anxiety, or at least that’s what Calm Clinic at https://www.calmclinic.com/anxiety/kidney-problems claims. Be aware that they are a business and will try to sell to you if you go to their site.

  • Extra Urination Anxiety can cause more frequent urination. When you experience anxiety, the part of your brain that controls the withholding urination slows down because anxiety requires resources to be sent to other parts of your brain. This can lead to concerns over your renal health, although nothing is wrong.
  • Lower Back Pain Lower back pain is also very common with anxiety. Lower back pain comes from severe stress and tension, and yet it’s associated with some conditions that affect the kidneys as well which can have many people worried about their kidney health.
  • Life Experiences Anyone that suffers from anxiety and has had a friend or family member diagnosed with a terrible kidney condition is at risk for developing anxiety over the idea of poor kidneys. Anxiety can turn life experiences into very real concerns, and so kidney health concerns are one of the issues that can come up when you see it in others.”
  • Urine Color Urine color is another issue that can cause anxiety. Many people check their urine color for diseases habitually, and every once in a while the color of a person’s urine may be very different than what they expect. This can create concerns that the urine color changes are due to kidney problems.”

What I find interesting is that kidney disease can cause frequent urination, too. Kidney disease may also cause lower back pain. If you know any CKD patients, you know we’re always checking the color of our urine to make certain we’re well enough hydrated.

So it seems your fear of kidney disease may cause a symptom of kidney disease… and/or possibly diabetes. All I have to say to that is make sure you take the simple urine and blood test to determine if you do really have Chronic Kidney Disease or diabetes.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!