Mg or Magnesium to You and Me

We usually think of Mg (mg) as the abbreviation for milligrams. Lately, I’ve been hearing a lot about Mg as the symbol for magnesium. In fact, a friend all the way across the country in Florida sent me an article about it from her local town paper. That got me to thinking. I haven’t written about magnesium in over three years. Has anything new been uncovered about this particular electrolyte? But first we need to know what I wrote about it in SlowItDownCKD 2017.  

“The medical dictionary part of The Free Dictionary by Farlex at http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/magnesium tells us: 

‘An alkaline earth element (atomic number 12; atomic weight 24.3) which is an essential mineral required for bone and tooth formation, nerve conduction and muscle contraction; it is required by many enzymes involved in carbohydrate, protein and nucleic acid metabolism. Magnesium is present in almonds, apples, dairy products, corn, figs, fresh leafy greens, legumes, nuts, seafood, seeds, soybeans, wheat germ and whole grains. Magnesium may be useful in treating anxiety, asthma and cardiovascular disease; it is thought to prevent blood clots, raise HDL-cholesterol, lower LDL-cholesterol, reduce arrhythmias and blood pressure, and to help with depression, fatigue, hyperactivity and migraines.’ 

All this by an electrolyte that constitutes only 1% of extra cellular fluid? I’m beginning to suspect that magnesium is the under explained electrolyte. 

All right then, what happens if you have too little magnesium?

The U.S. Dept. of Health & Human Services of the National Institutes of Health at https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Magnesium-HealthProfessional/ lays it out for us: 

‘Early signs of magnesium deficiency include loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, and weakness. As magnesium deficiency worsens, numbness, tingling, muscle contractions and cramps, seizures, personality changes, abnormal heart rhythms, and coronary spasms can occur …. Severe magnesium deficiency can result in hypocalcemia or hypokalemia (low serum calcium or potassium levels, respectively) because mineral homeostasis is disrupted….’ 

Well, who’s at risk for magnesium deficiency? The same source tells us: 

‘Magnesium inadequacy can occur when intakes fall below the RDA [Gail here today: RDA is the Recommended Dietary Allowances] but are above the amount required to prevent overt deficiency. The following groups are more likely than others to be at risk of magnesium inadequacy because they typically consume insufficient amounts or they have medical conditions (or take medications) that reduce magnesium absorption from the gut or increase losses from the body. 

People with gastrointestinal diseases 
The chronic diarrhea and fat malabsorption resulting from Crohn’s disease, gluten-sensitive enteropathy (celiac disease), and regional enteritis can lead to magnesium depletion over time …. Resection or bypass of the small intestine, especially the ileum, typically leads to malabsorption and magnesium loss …. 

People with type 2 diabetes [Gail again today: That’s me.] 
Magnesium deficits and increased urinary magnesium excretion can occur in people with insulin resistance and/or type 2 diabetes…. The magnesium loss appears to be secondary to higher concentrations of glucose in the kidney that increase urine output …. 

People with alcohol dependence 
Magnesium deficiency is common in people with chronic alcoholism…. In these individuals, poor dietary intake and nutritional status; gastrointestinal problems, including vomiting, diarrhea, and steatorrhea (fatty stools) resulting from pancreatitis; renal dysfunction with excess excretion of magnesium into the urine; phosphate depletion; vitamin D deficiency; acute alcoholic ketoacidosis; and hyperaldosteronism secondary to liver disease can all contribute to decreased magnesium status …. 

Older adults 
Older adults have lower dietary intakes of magnesium than younger adults …. In addition, magnesium absorption from the gut decreases and renal magnesium excretion increases with age …. Older adults are also more likely to have chronic diseases or take medications that alter magnesium status, which can increase their risk of magnesium depletion ….’” 

Okay, that was then. Let’s see if there’s more news now.  Oh, look at that! I found lots of goodies at https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Magnesium-HealthProfessional/ which is one of the same sites I used in 2017. I suggest you check this site for even more information about magnesium and your health. 

Table 1: Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) for Magnesium  

Age Male Female Pregnancy Lactation 
Birth to 6 months 30 mg* 30 mg*   
7–12 months 75 mg* 75 mg*   
1–3 years 80 mg 80 mg   
4–8 years 130 mg 130 mg   
9–13 years 240 mg 240 mg   
14–18 years 410 mg 360 mg 400 mg 360 mg 
19–30 years 400 mg 310 mg 350 mg 310 mg 
31–50 years 420 mg 320 mg 360 mg 320 mg 
51+ years 420 mg 320 mg   

*Adequate Intake (AI) 
 

Table 2: Selected Food Sources of Magnesium  

Food Milligrams 
(mg) per 
serving 
Percent 
DV* 
Pumpkin seeds, roasted, 1 ounce 156 37 
Chia seeds, 1 ounce 111 26 
Almonds, dry roasted, 1 ounce 80 19 
Spinach, boiled, ½ cup 78 19 
Cashews, dry roasted, 1 ounce 74 18 
Peanuts, oil roasted, ¼ cup 63 15 
Cereal, shredded wheat, 2 large biscuits 61 15 
Soymilk, plain or vanilla, 1 cup 61 15 
Black beans, cooked, ½ cup 60 14 
Edamame, shelled, cooked, ½ cup 50 12 
Peanut butter, smooth, 2 tablespoons 49 12 
Potato, baked with skin, 3.5 ounces 43 10 
Rice, brown, cooked, ½ cup 42 10 
Yogurt, plain, low fat, 8 ounces 42 10 
Breakfast cereals, fortified with 10% of the DV for magnesium, 1 serving 42 10 
Oatmeal, instant, 1 packet 36 
Kidney beans, canned, ½ cup 35 
Banana, 1 medium 32 
Salmon, Atlantic, farmed, cooked, 3 ounces 26 
Milk, 1 cup 24–27 
Halibut, cooked, 3 ounces 24 
Raisins, ½ cup 23 
Bread, whole wheat, 1 slice 23 
Avocado, cubed, ½ cup 22 
Chicken breast, roasted, 3 ounces 22 
Beef, ground, 90% lean, pan broiled, 3 ounces 20 
Broccoli, chopped and cooked, ½ cup 12 
Rice, white, cooked, ½ cup 10 
Apple, 1 medium 
Carrot, raw, 1 medium 2” 

As mentioned in my earlier blog on magnesium: 

“Quick, go check your lab results. You’ll notice there’s no magnesium level. If you’d like your magnesium tested, you or your doctor need to order a specific test for that. Some labs will allow you to order your own magnesium test; others will require a doctor’s orders.” 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! 

Close Your Eyes…

One of the first things the oncology nurse cautioned me about was closing my eyes in the shower – except when I was washing my face. How odd, I thought. I’d been closing my eyes in the shower the entire 12 years I’d had Chronic Kidney Disease. It was just so restful.

Being who I am and doing what I do, I asked her why I needed them open. She explained kindly, but as if I were lacking in intelligence. Remember, she and I had just met. She told me that closing your eyes can impede keeping your balance and at 72 (then), the last thing I wanted was to fall and possibly break a hip.

I had been putting myself at such risk for years without knowing it. Have you?

Let’s see if we can figure out the logic, even the science behind this. According to Wikipedia at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sense_of_balance:

“The sense of balance or equilibrioception is one of the physiological senses related to balance. It helps prevent humans and animals from falling over when standing or moving. Balance is the result of a number of body systems working together: the eyes (visual system), ears (vestibular system) and the body’s sense of where it is in space (proprioception) ideally need to be intact. The vestibular system, the region of the inner ear where three semicircular canals converge, works with the visual system to keep objects in focus when the head is moving. This is called the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR)…. The balance system works with the visual and skeletal systems (the muscles and joints and their sensors) to maintain orientation or balance. Visual signals sent to the brain about the body’s position in relation to its surroundings are processed by the brain and compared to information from the vestibular and skeletal systems.”

While Wikipedia is a fine place to start researching when you have no idea how to research a certain subject, you need to keep in mind that anyone can edit any entry at any time… whether or not they have the credentials or knowledge to do so.

That’s a lot of information all at once. Let’s slow this down and go bit by bit. The Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital at https://www.eyeandear.org.au/page/Patients/Patient_information/Balance_Disorders/How_does_the_balance_system_work/ informs us that,

“The vestibular system (inner ear balance mechanism) works with the visual system (eyes and the muscles and parts of the brain that work together to let us ‘see’) to stop objects blurring when the head moves. It also helps us maintain awareness of positioning when, for example, walking, running or riding in a vehicle. In addition, sensors in the skin, joints and muscles provide information to the brain on movement, the position of parts of the body in relation to each other, and the position of the body in relation to the environment. Using this feedback, the brain sends messages to instruct muscles to move and make the adjustments to body position that will maintain balance and coordination.”

I just counted five different parts to our ever present balancing act. Yet, I’d thought it only had to do with the inner ear and wondered why I needed to keep my eyes open in order to keep my balance. Oh my, and each of the five different parts to our ever present balancing act have several parts of their own.

Let’s take a close look at the visual system. I found this information on the blog page of the Shores of Lake Phalen (a senior living community) at https://www.theshoresoflakephalen.com/how-does-vision-affect-balance/:

“The Anatomy of the Eye

First, let’s address the anatomy of the eye. The human eye contains little nerve endings with light-sensitive cells called rods and cones. The rods and cones send signals to the brain through the optic nerve, helping the brain interpret what we see. Those images help us determine how close we are to certain objects – for example, a set of stairs. If your visual system were malfunctioning, you wouldn’t be able to tell how far you needed to raise your foot to reach the next step.”

Okay, fair enough. While this is not particularly a medical site, I like the plain English of the explanation. Now I understand why, when I open my eyes after having closed them to wash the shampoo out of my hair (Yay! I finally have hair again.), I’m not always in the position I’d thought I was.

And the vestibular system? I turned to Vestibular.org at https://vestibular.org/understanding-vestibular-disorder/human-balance-system for help with this one.

“Sensory information about motion, equilibrium, and spatial orientation is provided by the vestibular apparatus, which in each ear includes the utricle, saccule, and three semicircular canals. The utricle and saccule detect gravity (information in a vertical orientation) and linear movement. The semicircular canals, which detect rotational movement, are located at right angles to each other and are filled with a fluid called endolymph. When the head rotates in the direction sensed by a particular canal, the endolymphatic fluid within it lags behind because of inertia, and exerts pressure against the canal’s sensory receptor. The receptor then sends impulses to the brain about movement from the specific canal that is stimulated. When the vestibular organs on both sides of the head are functioning properly, they send symmetrical impulses to the brain. (Impulses originating from the right side are consistent with impulses originating from the left side.)”

But this is the one we grew up thinking was responsible for balance. As a child, I had no idea that vision was involved. Did you? Hmmm, the joints are involved, too, as is the brain. We haven’t even touched proprioception and won’t be able to for lack of room, but do click through to the word in this sentence for more information about that. It will take you back to the Wikipedia entry.

Keep those eyes open in the shower as much as possible. That may be easier now that you understand how it will help your balance.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!