Zap!

To my surprise, hair started growing back in unexpected places after I finished chemotherapy. One place was my face. My face! And quite a bit of it, more than a bearded person would have. At least, that’s how it looked to me. I was surprised no one mentioned it to me, but supposed they were just glad I was still alive. I wasn’t worried. I’d just use laser hair removal… or would I? I do have Chronic Kidney Disease.

What did that mean as far as the laser hair removal? I remembered from when I’d had it done on the mustache area about seventeen years ago that it doesn’t work on white hair. No problem with this currently. This facial hair was growing in black and thick.

My goodness, you’d think I’d just be thankful to be alive at this point, too. But as is often attributed to Mr. Shakespeare, “Vanity, thy name is woman.” (Actually, he wrote “Frailty, thy name is woman,” but no one seems to remember that.) So, time to explore what CKD limits there are with laser hair removal.

Let’s start at the beginning with what it is. WebMD at https://www.webmd.com/beauty/laser-hair-removal#1  explained it this way:

“Laser hair removal is one of the most commonly done cosmetic procedures in the U.S. It beams highly concentrated light into hair follicles. Pigment in the follicles absorb the light. That destroys the hair.”

Just in case you need reminders,

“A hair follicle is a tunnel-shaped structure in the epidermis (outer layer) of the skin. Hair starts growing at the bottom of a hair follicle. The root of the hair is made up of protein cells and is nourished by blood from nearby blood vessels.

As more cells are created, the hair grows out of the skin and reaches the surface. Sebaceous glands near the hair follicles produce oil, which nourishes the hair and skin.”

Thank you to Healthline at https://www.healthline.com/health/hair-follicle#anatomy for that information. Notice I specified hair follicles since there are other kinds of follicles.

What else might we need defined. Oh yes, pigment. I used the definition of pigmentation instead since it was less convoluted to my way of thinking. The ‘ation’ part just means the action or process of whatever we’re discussing – in this case pigment. MedicineNet at https://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=9681  tells us it’s:

“The coloring of the skin, hair, mucous membranes, and retina of the eye. Pigmentation is due to the deposition of the pigment melanin, which is produced by specialized cells called melanocytes.”

Now, the limitations with CKD – if any. In the last 17 years, I’ve learned that not only wouldn’t white hair respond to laser hair removal, but gray and blonde won’t either. It will also be less effective on red hair. It all has to do with your melanin.

Whoa! This was unexpected. I not only did NOT find any research warning about CKD and laser hair removal, but found some that endorsed it. For instance, The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), which is part of the U.S. National Library of Medicine, which in turn is part of the National Institutes of Health, which is connected to PubMed at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30005102.

“Laser hair reduction is a well-established modality for a wide range of medical indications. Laser hair reduction can be beneficial for hemodialysis patients who undergo repeated adhesive tape application and removal at their hemodialysis site during hemodialysis sessions. There is a paucity of published literature on efficacious laser hair removal treatments for hemodialysis patients. Herein, we present a case of a 50-year-old male (Fitzpatrick III) with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis, who achieved successful laser hair reduction at his hemodialysis vascular access site with five sessions of a neodymium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser (1064 nm) to improve his quality of life by reducing the hair burden at the adhesive tape site application. We recommend providing this safe and effective hair reduction treatment option for hemodialysis patients given the decreased quality of life associated with end stage renal disease and hemodialysis. J Drugs Dermatol. 2018;17(7):794-795.”

Let me translate the medicalese. This abstract means that using laser hair removal around the patient’s access site for dialysis made his life easier (and less painful) since the tape wasn’t sticking to his arm hair anymore. We all know how painful taking off adhesive anything can be if body hair is involved.

I have dug around in my computer for hours and hours. That’s all I found about laser hair removal and Chronic Kidney Disease. That’s the great thing about keeping an open mind; you find some unexpected information.

Here’s hoping you had a fun Halloween and didn’t eat too much candy, especially if you’re diabetic.

Talking about food, are you aware of Mrs. Dash’s seasonings for use instead of salt? It’s come to the point where I can taste even a teeny bit of salt. After almost a decade of not using salt, I’ve lost my taste for it… but Mrs. Dash? How does lemon pepper seasoning sound to you? Or garlic and herb? There are about 28 different flavors of seasoning. Go to the website at https://www.mrsdash.com/ to see for yourself. They also make marinades which was news to me. I usually choose the less spicy seasonings, but they have some zingers that you spicy food loving CKD patients will probably enjoy more.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

 

But Why?

As Chronic Kidney Disease patients, we all know that proteinuria is one indication of our disease. Would you like a reminder about what proteinuria is? Here’s one from The American Kidney Fund at http://www.kidneyfund.org/kidney-disease/kidney-problems/protein-in-urine.html:

“Healthy kidneys remove extra fluid and waste from your blood, but let proteins and other important nutrients pass through and return to your blood stream. When your kidneys are not working as well as they should, they can let some protein (albumin) escape through their filters, into your urine. When you have protein in your urine, it is called proteinuria (or albuminuria). Having protein in your urine can be a sign of nephrotic syndrome, or an early sign of kidney disease.”

I used to think that’s all it was: an indicator of CKD. That is until my occupational therapist and I got to talking about the edema caused by neuropathy.

Ah! Flash! We did also talk about Havimat which I wrote about last week and I checked on a number of sites to see if it were safe for an active tumor. The consensus of the sites agreed it was safe to use on someone with an active tumor that was being treated as long as it was not used on the location of the tumor itself. I feel better now about having had three sessions with Havimat since the occupational therapist was careful not to use it anywhere near my pancreas – the site of the tumor.

But I digress. Back to the topic at hand: proteinuria. It seems that protein is needed in the body, rather than being excreted in the urine. You guessed it. My question became the topic of today’s blog: But Why?

According to WebMD at https://www.webmd.com/men/features/benefits-protein#1:

“Protein is an important component of every cell in the body. Hair and nails are mostly made of protein. Your body uses protein to build and repair tissues. You also use protein to make enzymes, hormones, and other body chemicals. Protein is an important building block of bones, muscles, cartilage, skin, and blood.”

Okay, got it that protein is very necessary but what does that have to do with the chemotherapy I had that seemed to cause the proteinuria problem?  After looking at bunches of different sites (Today’s blog is taking a very long time to write.), I gleaned a little hint here and a little hint there until I figured out that certain types of chemotherapy may make proteinuria worse if you already have it, or cause it. Boo for me; I lost on that one since I already had proteinuria.

Well, what about the edema from the neuropathy? Was proteinuria affecting that in some way? Or did I have it backwards and it was the neuropathy that was causing the edema. I went to eMedicineHealth at https://www.emedicinehealth.com/neuropathy/article_em.htm#what_is_neuropathy for some help with this.

“Certain drugs and medications can cause nerve damage. Examples include cancer therapy drugs such as vincristine(Oncovin, Vincasar), and antibiotics such as metronidazole (Flagyl), and isoniazid (Nydrazid, Laniazid).”

This little tidbit is from MedicalNewsToday at https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323481.php :

“Chemotherapy can damage nerves that affect feeling and movement in the hands and feet. Doctors call this condition chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). Symptoms can be severe and may affect a person’s quality of life.”

By the way, diabetic neuropathy is another form of peripheral neuropathy.

Uh-oh, now what do I do? The HonorHealth Research Institute in Scottsdale, Arizona, where I’m being treated offered both the gabapentin for the pain (which I skipped since I want to try non-drug treatment first) and occupational therapy. Let’s see what that might do for me. Please note that occupational therapy works at reducing the pain of the neuropathy.

I have a bag of toys. Each has a different sensory delivery on my hands and feet. For example, there’s a woven metal ring that I run up and down my fingers and toes, then up my arms and legs. I do the same with most of the other toys: a ball with netting over it, another with rubber strings hanging from it. I also have a box of uncooked rice to rub my feet and hands in… and lots of other toys. The idea is to desensitize my hands and feet.

I was also given physical exercises to do, like raising my fisted hands above my head and straightening out my fist several times.  This is one of many exercises. Do you remember the old TV show, E.R? It takes me slightly longer than one 43 minute episode to complete the exercises.

When I go to see the therapist, she uses the Havimat (electrical stimulation), another machine that sucks the chemo out (no kidding… and it doesn’t hurt either.), and a third that pulses. I am amazed at how the edema disappears when she uses these. But, unfortunately, the effect doesn’t stay very long. Compression socks have helped and, despite their not-so-pleasing appearance are quite comfortable.

Wow! Proteinuria is so much more than just an indication that you may have Chronic Kidney Disease.

Ready for a topic change? The following is part of an email I received from KDIGO (Kidney Disease – Improving Global Outcomes).

“We … invite your comments at any time.  Suggest topics, look for opportunities for KDIGO to implement its work in your area, bring new ideas to us, and help us become more relevant to the lives of patients like you. As a global organization, we seek to continue to develop communication channels to patients throughout the world.  This is difficult to do from one perspective, but if we work together we can build a robust base of individuals and ideas that will help us plan and carry out our mission.

KDIGO doesn’t have any members or local entities to whom we are accountable.  We only are accountable to you, our patients.  Outcomes of your care are our mission.  We can do it better if you work with us and give us your constructive input.

Again, thanks for letting us know you’d like to be a part of this global effort.  Your ideas are welcome and will be taken into account. “

Keep those comments coming, folks. Their email is kdigocommunications@kdigo.org.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Is it CKD? Or Is It Arizona?

I’ve written about my dismay at thinning hair. By the way, I’ve come to terms with that rather than trying any product other than a new shampoo. What helped me come to that decision was a date day picture. My hair looked like straw in that picture and probably had for a while, although I hairhadn’t taken note of it.

It was dry, terribly dry. Well, I do live in Arizona. Our annual relative humidity index is about 31%. Thank you to Climatemps.com at http://www.phoenix.climatemps.com/humidity.php for this information.  For those of you (like me) who never thought about it before, I found the following excellent explanation of humidity at https://www.britannica.com/science/humidity.

“Care must be taken to distinguish between the relative humidity of the air and its moisture content or density, known as absolute humidity. The air masses above the tropical deserts such as the Sahara and Mexican deserts contain vast quantities of moisture as invisible water vapour. Because of the high temperatures, however, relative humidities are very low.”

sun-graphic1Hmmm, Mexican deserts…high temperatures… yep, that’s us. Wait a minute. My youngest and my step-daughters live here, too. They have beautiful, luxurious hair.  My delightful neighbor is a little older than my daughters, but her hair is always healthy looking and attractive. Okay, I’m older but I also have Chronic Kidney Disease.

Let’s take a look at what age can do to your hair first. (Saving the best for last, of course.) The Natural Society (I do occasionally check these sites.) at http://naturalsociety.com/2-factors-causing-thinning-hair-aging-not-one/ tells us:

“Low level of thyroid hormone can cause hair loss because it slows the metabolic rate throughout the body, a reason that low thyroid and weight gain often go hand in hand. This slowing extends to scalp follicles, resulting in premature release of the hair shaft and root, and a delay in producing replacement hairs. Early graying is another indication of low thyroid, as is the loss of hairs from the temporal edges of the eyebrows.”

Interesting, but it doesn’t talk about dryness, just hair loss… and my thyroid levels have always been fine.

Let’s try again. Prevention.com at http://www.prevention.com/beauty/anti-aging-care-thinning-brittle-hair  hit the nail on the head for me:

“But after you hit 40, the damage begins to go deeper, extending to the hair’s inner cuticle, known as the endocuticle.endocuticle

This type of damage is a result of the body’s reduced ability to repair itself, says Nicole Rogers, MD, assistant clinical professor of dermatology at Tulane University. In your 20s and 30s, the body (including your hair) bounces back from outside damage fairly quickly. But as you hit middle age, hair breaks down more quickly and the outer cuticle is repaired at a slower rate, leaving the inner cuticle vulnerable to the same outside attacks it once was shielded from.”

After you hit 40? That changed my entire outlook. At almost 70, I was actually lucky that I’d had so many years without dry hair. Amazing how information like this can reverse your thinking.

But I have CKD. Was this adding to the dry hair problem? I went to my old standby DaVita at https://www.davita.com/kidney-disease/overview/symptoms-and-diagnosis/hair,-nails-and-chronic-kidney-disease/e/4733 for help:

“… hair can become visibly abnormal when you develop a disease. Some people experience hair breakage or find that their hair falls out, or sometimes both.”

That tickled my memory. Oh, I remember writing this in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early and Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney FullSizeRender (2)Disease.

“… oddly enough, my curly hair would become temporarily straight if I were incubating some illness or other…”

All right, that helps a bit, but – as usual – I wanted to know why. Another old favorite, WebMD at http://www.webmd.com/beauty/dry-hair-causes was helpful in a general, non-CKD, way:

“Your scalp isn’t making enough moisture. Hair has no natural lubrication. It relies on oils made in the hair root to keep your hair moisturized and looking lustrous.

Sometimes, hair doesn’t make enough oil, which leads to dry hair. (Likewise, roots in overdrive lead to oily and greasy hair.) As you age, your hair naturally makes less oil.”

Well, it looks like age, humidity, and disease – including Chronic Kidney Disease – all have something to do with dry hair. I sort of, kind of, remembered hydrating my hair with some home remedy when I was younger and had caused some damage by skiing in the sun or playing in a chlorinated swimming pool too much. Something about mayonnaise.  NaturallyCurley.com (How apt!) at http://www.naturallycurly.com/curlreading/products-ingredients/mayonnaise-hair-treatment-how-to/ explains:

“Mayonnaise does contain some hair healthy ingredients like lemon juice, vinegar and soybean oil which contain fatty acids and vitamins that can boost shine and act to seal in moisture.”

My method was ridiculously simple:

  1. Work the mayonnaise into your hair (It’s fun.).
  2. Plop on a shower cap.
  3. Leave it alone for about half an hour.
  4. Rinse out the by now gooey mess.
  5. Work at washing it out of your hair with a gentle shampoo.

I tried this last night and am very happy with the results. Maybe – in this case – it is just that easy.

I want to remind you that each of the websites I mention will give you more information about the particular topic you’re interested in.

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I had a really nice surprise the other day and wanted to share it with you. A little background is necessary first. I was a high school English teacher in New York City for 34 years before I retired and moved to Arizona. As such, I joined my union – The United Federation of Teachers. Because I did, I’m also a member of the New York State United Teachers. They publish a newspaper which has a section entitled ‘Kudos,’ that applauds the accomplishments of their members. As a retired teacher, I glance through the paper each time it arrives. This is what I found in the Fall 2016 issue:

 

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Thank you, thank you, thank you. These are non-Chronic Kidney Disease people appreciating writings about Chronic Kidney Disease.

Until next time,

Keep living your life!

Hair Today, Gone Tomorrow (Heaven Forbid)

I have noticed my hair coming out in alarming amounts when I wash it in the shower. At first, I thought, “I don’t brush it so this must be the way I shed dead hairs.”  Sure, Gail, keep telling yourself that. I have always had a glorious mane. No more. You can see more and more of my scalp with each shower. OMG! (Forgive the cigarettes in the modeling shot. It was a long, long time ago.)IMG_2944early shots

I’ve read pleas for help from Chronic Kidney Disease patients about just this issue…but they were dialysis patients. I’m Stage 3, more often with a GFR in the low 50s rather than the low 30s. Could it be my Chronic Kidney Disease causing the hair loss – I’ll feel better if we called it ‘hair thinning’ – or simply my almost seventy decades on Earth?

FullSizeRender (2)I can appreciate those of you asking, “Her what is in the low 50s?” Let’s take a peek at What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease for a definition of GFR.

“GFR: Glomerular filtration rate [if there is a lower case “e” before the term, it means estimated glomerular filtration rate] which determines both the stage of kidney disease and how well the kidneys are functioning.”

Of course, now you want to know, and rightfully so, what those numbers mean. In The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2, I included a helpful chart from DaVita along with some of my own comments which explains.

“Think of the stages as a test with 100 being the highest score.  These are the stages and their treatments:FullSizeRender (3)

STAGE 1: (normal or high) – above 90 – usually requires watching, not treatment, although many people decide to make life style changes now: following a renal diet, exercising, lowering blood pressure, ceasing to smoke, etc.

 STAGE 2: (mild) – 60-89 – Same as for stage one

STAGE 3A: (moderate) – 45-59 – This is when you are usually referred to a nephrologist (Kidney specialist). You’ll need a renal (Kidney) dietitian, too, since you need to be rigorous in avoiding more than certain amounts of protein, potassium, phosphorous, and sodium in your diet to slow down the deterioration of your kidneys. Each patient has different needs so there is no one diet.  The diet is based on your lab results.  Medications such as those for high blood pressure may be prescribed to help preserve your kidney function.

STAGE 3B: (moderate) – 30-44 – same as above, except the patient may experience symptoms.

STAGE 4:  (severe 15-29) – Here’s when dialysis may start. A kidney transplant may be necessary instead of dialysis (Artificial cleansing of your blood). Your nephrologist will probably want to see you every three months and request labs before each visit.

STAGE 5: (End stage) – below 15 – Dialysis or transplant is necessary to continue living.”

GFR

As for the hair itself, I wondered what it’s made of so I started googling and came up with Hilda Sustaita, Department Chair of Cosmetology at Houston Community College – Northwest’s, definition. You can read more of her insights about hair at http://www.texascollaborative.org/hildasustaita/module%20files/topic3.htm

“Hair is made of protein which originates in the hair follicle.  As the cells mature, they fill up with a fibrous protein called keratin. These cells lose their nucleus and die as they travel up the hair follicle. Approximately 91 percent of the hair is protein made up of long chains of amino acids.”

keratinUh-oh, Chronic Kidney Disease patients need to lower their protein intake. I’m constantly talking about my five ounce daily limitation. I remembered quoting something about protein limitation in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 and so looked for that quote. This is what I found.

“This is part of an article from one of DaVita’s sites.  You can read the entire article at http://www.yourkidneys.com/kidney-IMG_2982education/Treatments/Living-a-full-life-after-a-chronic-kidney-disease-diagnosis/3189. …

Depending on what stage of Chronic Kidney Disease you’re in, your renal dietitian will adjust the amounts of protein, sodium, phosphorus and potassium in your diet. … The CKD non-dialysis diet includes calculated amounts of high quality protein. Damaged kidneys have a difficult time getting rid of protein waste products, so cutting back on non-essential protein will put less stress on your kidneys.”

But I have friends near my age without CKD whose hair is thinning, too. They’re not on protein restricted diets, so what’s causing their hair thinning?

According to WebMD at http://www.webmd.com/beauty/aging/does-your-hair-make-you-look-old,

“’The diameter of the hair shaft diminishes as we get older,’ explains Zoe Draelos, M.D., clinical associate professor of dermatology at Wake Forest hair follicleUniversity School of Medicine. That means you may have the same number of follicles, but thinner individual strands will make it look like there’s less volume. (They’re also more prone to break, and since hair growth slows as you age, the damage becomes more obvious.)

Even if you do see extra hairs in your brush or in the shower drain, you don’t necessarily need to worry. Although 40 percent of women experience hairsome hair loss by menopause, shedding around 100 strands a day is normal, reports Paul M. Friedman, M.D., clinical assistant professor of dermatology at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston.”

So it may be my CKD that’s causing the hair thinning or it may not. Either way, I wanted to know what to do about it. Dr. Doris Day (I kid you not.) has other suggestions than protein as she discusses in a New York Times article at http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/23/fashion/Hair-Aging-thinning-dry-dull.html.

Dr. Doris Day, a dermatologist in New York, agreed that the right foods are necessary for healthy hair.

‘I believe that inflammation is negative for the hair follicle, that it can accelerate stress shedding and compromise growth,’ she said. She suggests eating pomegranate, avocado, pumpkin and olive oil, and herbs like turmeric, mint and rosemary.”

You do remember that CKD is an inflammatory disease, right? Hmmm, better check with your renal nutritionist before you start eating pomegranates or pumpkin. They’re on my NO! list, but yours may be different from mine.IMG_2980

By the way, I’ve noticed there are no reviews for SlowItDownCKD 2015 on either Amazon.com or B&N.com. Can you help a writer out here? Just click on either site name to leave a review. Thanks.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!