Giving It Away

Good-bye to National Kidney Month and a belated hello to National Donor Month. I don’t usually write about transplants and don’t know that much about them, so you and I will be learning together today. Restricting this blog to solely kidney transplants, there’s still quite a bit to write about. 

There are many reasons for needing a kidney transplant. The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services’s Health Resources & Services Administration’s Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network provides the following list of reasons: 

Kidney Diagnosis Categories>Kidney Diagnoses
GLOMERULAR DISEASESAnti-GBM; Chronic Glomerulonephritis: Unspecified; Chronic Glomerulosclerosis: Unspecified; Focal Glomerularsclerosis; Idio/Post-Inf Crescentic; Glomerulonephritis; IGA Nephropathy; Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome; Membranous Glomerulonephritis; Mesangio-Capillary 1 Glomerulonephritis; Mesangio-Capillary 2 Glomerulonephritis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Alport’s Syndrome; Amyloidosis; Membranous Nephropathy; Goodpasture’s Syndrome; Henoch-Schoenlein Purpura; Sickle Cell Anemia; Wegeners Granulomatosis
DIABETESDiabetes: Type I Insulin Dep/Juvenile Onset; Diabetes: Type II Insulin Dep/Adult Onset; Diabetes: Type I Non-insulin Dep/Juv Onset; Diabetes: Type II Non-insulin Dep/Adult Onset
POLYCYSTIC KIDNEYSPolycystic Kidneys
HYPERTENSIVE NEPHROSCLEROSISHypertensive Nephrosclerosis
RENOVASCULAR AND OTHER VASCULAR DISEASESChronic Nephrosclerosis: Unspecified; Malignant Hypertension; Polyarteritis; Progressive Systemic Sclerosis; Renal Artery Thrombosis; Scleroderma
CONGENITAL, RARE FAMILIAL, AND METABOLIC DISORDERSCongenital Obstructive Uropathy; Cystinosis; Fabry’s Disease; Hypoplasia/Dysplasia/Dysgenesis/Agenesis; Medullary Cystic Disease; Nephrophthisis; Prune Belly Syndrome
TUBULAR AND INTERSTITIAL DISEASESAcquired Obstructive Nephropathy; Analgesic Nephropathy; Antibiotic-induced Nephritis; Cancer Chemotherapy-Induced Nephritis; Chronic Pyelonephritis/Reflex; Nephropathy; Gout; Nephritis; Nephrolithiasis; Oxalate Nephropathy; Radiation Nephritis; Acute Tubular Necrosis; Cortical Necrosis; Cyclosporin Nephrotoxicity; Heroin Nephrotoxicity; Sarcoidosis; Urolithiasis
NEOPLASMSIncidental Carcinoma; Lymphoma; Myeloma; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Wilms’ Tumor
RETRANSPLANT/GRAFT FAILURERetransplant/Graft Failure
OTHEROther Rheumatoid Arthritis; Other Familial Nephropathy

Quite a few of these reasons should look familiar to you if you’ve been reading the blog regularly since I’ve written about them. You can use the topics dropdown to the right of the blog if you’d like to refresh your memory about specific reasons. 

Let’s take a look at some astounding numbers. Unfortunately, The National Kidney Foundation could only offer statistics from 2014. Very few sources separate donations specifically by organ, so we’re lucky to have even these older numbers.  

“There are currently 121,678 people waiting for lifesaving organ transplants in the U.S. Of these, 100,791 await kidney transplants. (as of 1/11/16) … 

The median wait time for an individual’s first kidney transplant is 3.6 years and can vary depending on health, compatibility and availability of organs … 

In 2014, 17,107 kidney transplants took place in the US. Of these, 11,570 came from deceased donors and 5,537 came from living donors… 

On average: 

Over 3,000 new patients are added to the kidney waiting list each month… 

13 people die each day while waiting for a life-saving kidney transplant… 

Every 14 minutes someone is added to the kidney transplant list… 

In 2014, 4,761 patients died while waiting for a kidney transplant. Another, 3,668 people became too sick to receive a kidney transplant… “ 

Fewer kidney transplants are being performed during the current pandemic. The American Kidney Fund explains why: 

“Because living-donor kidney transplants require two hospital beds and post-surgical recovery care in the hospital, we are hearing that a growing number of transplant centers are temporarily putting living-donor transplants on hold. This both preserves the availability of hospital beds for emergencies and COVID-19 patients, and also keeps non-infected people out of the hospital…. 

The coronavirus spreads easily from person to person, and can be spread by people who do not show symptoms of COVID-19. This puts anyone who has a compromised immune system—including transplant patients who take immunosuppressive drugs—at an increased risk of becoming infected. 
 
Even with social distancing, the virus is still spreading in communities. Newly transplanted patients would be especially vulnerable during their recovery period after transplant surgery. 
 
Another obstacle hospitals face is the need to test deceased donors for the coronavirus. Transplanting an organ from a coronavirus-positive patient could present a grave risk to the recipient. With limited test kits needed for living patients, and the lag time between testing and getting results, some hospitals may have to forgo testing—and procuring organs from—deceased donors…. 

Because COVID-19 is a serious respiratory illness, the most critical patients must be put on ventilators. Ventilators are normally used to keep an organ donor patient alive who is medically brain-dead so that their organs may be removed and transplanted. Those ventilators may be needed for COVID-19 patients instead….” 

Fewer transplants or not, I was curious about how it’s decided who is eligible for a kidney transplant. Nebraska Medicine had the answer in simple terms we can all understand: 

“In order to be eligible to receive a kidney transplant: 

You must have chronic irreversible kidney disease that has not responded to other medical or surgical treatments. You are either on dialysis or may require dialysis in the near future. 

You must qualify for and be able to tolerate major surgery. 

You and your family members/support system must be able to understand the risks and benefits of transplantation, including the long-term need for close medical follow-up and lifelong need for anti-rejection therapy. 

You and your family must be able to accept the responsibilities, including financial, that are part of the long-term care you will need after transplantation. 

Exclusion 

You may not be eligible to receive a kidney transplant due to: 

The presence of some other life-threatening disease or condition that would not improve with transplantation. This could include certain cancers, infections that cannot be treated or cured, or severe, uncorrectable heart disease. 

A history of chronic noncompliance including, but not limited to, medical treatments, medications or other behaviors that would affect your ability to fully care for yourself after transplantation. 

A history of chronic and ongoing drug and/or alcohol abuse that cannot be successfully treated before transplantation, putting you at risk for continued harmful behavior after transplantation. 

A history of serious psychiatric disorders that cannot be successfully treated before transplantation, and that would be considered a high risk for ongoing or increased severity of the psychiatric disorder after transplantation.” 

Note: Weight is included in your tolerability for major surgery. 

There’s so much more to write about re kidney transplant. Next week, we’ll talk about the process itself. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! 

Almost the End of National Kidney Month 

Today we have the fifth National Kidney Month blog. You know, it’s also National Women’s Month. What better way to celebrate both than to write about women in nephrology?  I had intended to complete multiple searches for this information, but it looks like Martín-Gómez MA, García Agudo R, and Arenas Jiménez MD beat me to it with their paper El papel de la mujer a lo largo de la historia de la Nefrología which appeared in Nefrologia. 2019;39:15–17.  

In English rather than its original Spanish, the title is The role of women throughout the history of Nephrology. As a woman and a Chronic Kidney Disease writer, I owe them a huge debt of gratitude. Here are the parts of their paper pertaining to individual women in nephrology: 

“Dr Josephine Briggs, responsible for research at the US National Institutes of Health in the 1990s on the renin-angiotensin system, diabetic nephropathy, blood pressure and the effect of antioxidants in kidney disease. 

Dr Renée Habib (France), a pioneer of nephropathology [Gail here: that means disease or damage of the kidneys.] in Europe. She worked with the founders of the ISN to establish nephrology as a speciality. 

Dr Vidya N Acharya, the first female nephrologist in India inspiring the study of kidney diseases, dedicating her research to urinary infections and heading a Nephrology department in Mumbai. 

Dr Hai Yan Wang, head of department and professor of Nephrology at the Peking University First Hospital since 1983, president of the Chinese Society of Nephrology and editor of Chinese and international nephrology journals. 

Dr Mona Al-Rukhaimi, co-president of the ISN and leader of the working group on the KDIGO guidelines in the Middle East, as well as a participant in the Declaration of Istanbul on Organ Trafficking and Transplant Tourism. 

Dr Saraladevi Naicker, who created the first training programme [sic]for nephrologists in Africa and the Kidney Transplant Unit at Addington Hospital. 

Dr Batya Kristal, the first woman to lead a Nephrology department in Israel and founder of Israel’s National Kidney Foundation. She conducts her current research in the field of oxidative stress and inflammation. 

Dr Priscilla Kincaid-Smith, head of Nephrology at Melbourne Hospital, where she promoted the relationship between hypertension and the kidney and analgesic nephropathy. The first and only female president of the ISN, she empowered many other women, including the nephrologist Judy Whitworth, chair of the World Health Organization committee…. 

Dr M. Teresa D’Ocón Asensi, the first female head of the Nephrology Department at the Hospital San Carlos in Madrid since it was founded in 1962 and designer of a conservative prosthesis of the peritoneal catheter tract based on urological plugs. She was the only female member of the board of directors of the SEN (Sociedad Española de Nefrología [Spanish Society of Nephrology]) since its formation in 1964, until 1976.  

Women were not represented again in the management of the Spanish society until 1987, with the figure of Dr M. Dolores Jarillo Ibáñez (1987–1993)…. 

Dr María Teresa González, creator of the first nephrology and diabetes clinic at the Hospital de Bellvitge, in 1978. 

Dr Dolores Prats, who promoted peritoneal dialysis and studies on permeability and duration of the peritoneal membrane at the Hospital Clínico in Madrid. She succeeded her female predecessor as head of department, following said predecessor’s death in 1981. 

Dr Ana Gonzalo Fondona, who performed the first studies on complement activation in glomerulopathies at the Hospital de Bellvitge…. 

Isabel Entero, creator of the Fundación Renal Íñigo Álvarez de Toledo, founder of ALCER (Asociación para la Lucha Contra las Enfermedades de Riñón [Spanish Association for the Fight Against Kidney Diseases]) in 1976 and participant in the Transplant Act in 1979 

Dr Blanca Miranda, who replaced Isabel Entero as director of said Foundation from 1982, formed part of the drafting committee of the journal Nefrología from 1995 and coordinator of the Spanish National Transplant Organisation between 1996 and 2004. 

The journal Nefrología, which was created in 1981 by Dr Luis Hernando, did not include women on the editorial board until 1989: Dr Nieves Gallego, Dr Emma Huarte and Dr Dolores Jarillo….” 

You’ll notice the paper was printed in the beginning of 2019, so I decided to add more current women in nephrology. 

Dr. Vanessa Grubb first approached me when she was considering writing a blog herself. I believe she’s an important woman nephrologist since she has a special interest in the experiences of Black kidney patients. Here is what University of California’s Department of Medicine’s Center for Vulnerable Populations lists for her: 

“Dr. Vanessa Grubbs is an Associate Professor in the Division of Nephrology at UCSF and has maintained a clinical practice and research program at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital since 2009. Her research focuses on palliative care for patients with end-stage kidney disease. She is among the 2017 cohort for the Cambia Health Foundation Sojourns Scholar Leadership Program, an initiative designed to identify, cultivate and advance the next generation of palliative care leaders; and the 2018 California Health Care Foundation’s Health Care Leadership Program. 
 
Her clinical and research work fuel her passion for creative writing. Her first book, HUNDREDS OF INTERLACED FINGERS: A Kidney Doctor’s Search for the Perfect Match, was released June 2017 from Harper Collins Publishers, Amistad division and is now in paperback.” 

I think Dr. Li-li Hsiao should also be included in today’s blog since she has a special interest in the Asian community and their experiences with kidney disease. The following is from the Boston Taiwanese Biotechnological Association:  

“…. She is the Director of Asian Renal Clinic at BWH; the co-program director and Co-PI of Harvard Summer Research Program in Kidney Medicine. She is recently appointed as the Director of Global Kidney Health Innovation Center. Dr Hsiao’s areas of research include cardiovascular complications in patients with chronic kidney disease; one of her work published in Circulation in 2012 has been ranked at the top 1% most cited article in the Clinical Medicine since 2013. Dr. Hsiao has received numerous awards for her outstanding clinical work, teaching and mentoring of students including Starfish Award recognizing her effective clinical care, and the prestigious Clifford Barger Mentor Award at HMS. Dr. Hsiao is the founder of Kidney Disease Screening and Awareness Program (KDSAP) at Harvard College where she has served as the official advisor. KDSAP has expanded beyond Harvard campus. Dr. Hsiao served in the admission committee of HMS; a committee member of Post Graduate Education and the board of advisor of American Society of Nephrology (ASN). She was Co-Chair for the ‘Professional Development Seminar’ course during the ASN week, and currently, she is the past-president of WIN (Women In Neprology [sic]).   

I don’t believe we, as women, will continue to be underrepresented in the nephrology community for very much longer. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! 

National Kidney Month

The world has acknowledged World Kidney Day. We have had walks in many countries. We have had educational seminars in many countries. We have posted in many countries. All to bring awareness to what our kidneys do for us and the worldwide challenge of kidney disease. Thursday, March 11th, was World Kidney Day. 

But today is Monday. And you know what? It’s still March, National Kidney Month, here in the United States. Each year, I write about National Kidney Month, just as I write about World Kidney Day. Interesting tidbit: the Philippines also has a National Kidney Month which they celebrate in June. I’ll only be writing about the U.S.’s National Kidney Day. 

 As usual, let’s start at the beginning. What is National Kidney Month? Personalized Cause has a succinct explanation for us. While I’m not endorsing them since I usually try to avoid endorsements, I do want to let you know they sell the green ribbons and wristbands for kidney disease awareness that you’ll probably be seeing hither and yon all month. 

“National Kidney Month, observed in March and sponsored by the National Kidney Foundation, is a time to increase awareness of kidney disease, promote the need for a cure, and spur advocacy on behalf of those suffering with the emotional, financial and physical burden of kidney disease. The National Kidney Foundation is the leading organization in the U.S. dedicated to the awareness, prevention and treatment of kidney disease for hundreds of thousands of healthcare professionals, millions of patients and their families, and tens of millions of Americans at risk. 

National Kidney Month is a time to increase awareness about the function of the kidneys and kidney disease. Kidneys filter 200 liters of blood a day, help regulate blood pressure and direct red blood cell production. But they are also prone to disease. One in three Americans is at risk for kidney disease due to diabetes, high blood pressure or a family history of kidney failure. There are more than 26 million Americans who already have kidney disease, and most do not know it because there are often no symptoms until the disease has progressed.” 

That, of course, prompted me to go directly to the National Kidney Foundation’s information about National Kidney Month. This is what I found: 

March 1, 2021, New York, NY — In honor of National Kidney Month which starts today, the National Kidney Foundation’s (NKF) national public awareness campaign, “Are You the 33%?” enters a new phase focusing on the connection between type 2 diabetes (T2D) and kidney disease, also known as chronic kidney disease (CKD). NKF urges everyone to find out if they’re the 1 in 3 at risk for developing kidney disease by taking a one-minute quiz at MinuteForYourKidneys.org

Diabetes is a leading risk factor for developing kidney disease. Over time, having high blood sugar from diabetes can cause damage inside your kidneys. But it doesn’t have to end up this way; because with careful control of glucose (sugar) levels, there is evidence that you can prevent kidney disease in people with diabetes. 

Award-winning actress, Debbie Allen joined the campaign as the T2D Campaign Celebrity Spokesperson in February, Black History Month, to help promote awareness of diabetes as a leading cause for developing chronic kidney disease. Allen has a family history of diabetes and was recently diagnosed with pre-diabetes.” 

Indeed, the National Kidney Foundation has a lot to offer with peer mentoring, community, an information helpline, and transplant, palliative care, dialysis, kidney donation, and research information. 

The American Kidney Fund [AFK] joins in National Kidney Month with their form to pledge to fight kidney disease. I signed up; you can, too, if you’d like to. I’m not comfortable with the word “fight,” but I’m not going to let that stop me from spreading awareness of the disease.  

If you’re inclined to donate to the cause, the American Kidney Fund is doubling your donation this month. They also offer an advocacy program, as well as free screenings, activity days, financial assistance, and kidney education in addition to transplant and kidney donation information, 

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases [NIDDK], part of the National Institutes of Health [NIH], celebrates National Kidney Month with the following post and offerings. 

“Follow these healthy lifestyle tips to take charge of your kidney health. 

  1. Meet regularly with your health care team. Staying connected with your doctor, whether in-person or using telehealth via phone or computer, can help you maintain your kidney health. 
  1. Manage blood pressure and monitor blood glucose levels. Work with your health care team to develop a plan to meet your blood pressure goals and check your blood glucose level regularly if you have diabetes. 
  1. Take medicine as prescribed and avoid NSAIDs like ibuprofen and naproxen. Your pharmacist and doctor need to know about all the medicines you take. 
  1. Aim for a healthy weight. Create a healthy meal plan and consider working with your doctor to develop a weight-loss plan that works for you. 
  1. Reduce stress and make physical activity part of your routine. Consider healthy stress-reducing activities and get at least 30 minutes or more of physical activity each day. 
  1. Make time for sleep. Aim for 7 to 8 hours of sleep per night. 
  1. Quit smoking. If you smoke, take steps to quit. 

It may seem difficult, but small changes can go a long way to keeping your kidneys and you healthier for longer. 

Learn more about managing kidney disease 

As for me, I’ll continue to blog my brains out [just as I declared in last week’s blog] until more and more people are aware of the kidneys and kidney disease. Same goes for the Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and LinkedIn accounts, and the SlowItDownCKD book series. It’s all about kidney disease. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! 

World Kidney Day, 2021

Will you look at that? The world keeps moving on, pandemic or not. And so, I recognize that Thursday of this week is World Kidney Day. In honor of this occasion, I’ve chosen to update whatever I’ve written about World Kidney Day before … now sit back and enjoy the read. 

…World Kidney Day? What’s that? I discovered this is a fairly new designation. It was only fifteen years ago that it was initiated. 

 According to http://worldkidneyday.org

“World Kidney Day is a global awareness campaign aimed at raising awareness of the importance of our kidneys.” 

Sound familiar? That’s where I’m heading with What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney DiseaseSlowItDownCKD 2011SlowItDownCKD 2012

SlowItDownCKD 2013SlowItDownCKD 2014SlowItDownCKD 2015;

 SlowItDownCKD 2016SlowItDownCKD 2017

SlowItDownCKD 2018SlowItDownCKD 2019the soon to be published SlowItDownCKD 2020; Facebook; Instagram; LinkedIn; Pinterest; Twitter; and this blog. We may be running along different tracks, but we’re headed in the same direction. 

According to their website,  

The International Society of Nephrology (ISN) is a global professional association dedicated to advancing kidney health worldwide since 1960 through education, grants, research, and advocacy.  

We do this for all our stakeholders by:  

BRIDGING THE GAPS of available care through advocacy and collaborations with our global partners  

BUILDING CAPACITY in healthcare professionals via granting programs, education and research  

CONNNECTING OUR COMMUNITY to develop a stronger understanding of the management of kidney disease.  

The ISN, through its members and in collaboration with national and regional societies, engages 30,000 health professionals from across the globe to reduce the burden of kidney diseases and provide optimal health care for patients.”  

If you go to Initiatives on the ISN’s website, you’ll find the following: 

“World Kidney Day (WKD) is a joint initiative between the International Society of Nephrology (ISN) and the International Federation of Kidney Foundations (IFKF). 

World Kidney Day is a global campaign that aims to raise awareness of the importance of our kidneys to overall health and to reduce the frequency and impact of kidney disease and its associated health problems. 

World Kidney Day is an annual event that takes place worldwide. Hundreds of organizations and individuals launch initiatives and events on WKD to help raise awareness of kidney disease.” 

Now we just need to know what the International Federation of Kidney Foundations (IFKF) has to say about themselves: 

“Vision 

Better kidney health for all. 

Optimal care for people affected with Kidney Disease or Kidney Failure. 

Mission 

Leading a worldwide movement to 

Promote better kidney health with primary, secondary and tertiary preventive measures. 

Promote optimal treatment and care so as to maximize the health, quality of life, and longevity for people with or at high risk for developing Kidney Disease or Kidney Failure.” 

As of July of last year, the name has been changed to the International Federation of Kidney Foundations – World Kidney Alliance (IFKF-WKA) 

Photo by Karolina Grabowska on Pexels.com

Back to World Kidney Day’s website now, if you please. 

“The World Kidney Day Steering Committee has declared 2021 the year of ‘Living Well with Kidney Disease’. This has been done in order to both increase education and awareness about effective symptom management and patient empowerment, with the ultimate goal of encouraging life participation. Whilst effective measures to prevent kidney disease and its progression are important, patients with kidney disease – including those who depend on dialysis and transplantation – and their care-partners should also feel supported, especially during pandemics and other challenging periods, by the concerted efforts of kidney care communities.” 

Their site offers materials and ideas for events as well as a map of global events. Prepare to be awed at how wide spread World Kidney Day events are. 

Before you leave their page, take a detour to Kidney FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) on the toolbar at the top of the page.  You can learn everything you need to know from what the kidneys do to what the symptoms (or lack thereof) of CKD are, from how to treat CKD to a toolbox full of helpful education about your kidneys to preventative measures. 

Just as this year’s, the previous World Kidney Day themes were all educational and much needed by the CKD community. 

“2020 Kidney Health for Everyone Everywhere – from Prevention to Detection and Equitable Access to Care 

2019 Kidney Health for Everyone, Everywhere 

2018 Kidneys & Women’s Health. Include, Value, Empower 

2017 Kidney Disease & Obesity – Healthy Lifestyle for Healthy Kidneys 

2016 Kidney Disease & Children – Act Early to Prevent It! 

2015 Kidney Health for All 

2014 Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) and aging 

2013 Kidneys for Life – Stop Kidney Attack! 

2012 Donate – Kidneys for Life – Receive 

2011 Protect your kidneys: Save your heart 

2010 Protect your kidneys: Control diabetes 

2009 Protect your kidneys: Keep your pressure down 

2008 Your amazing kidneys! 

2007 CKD: Common, harmful and treatable 

2006 Are your kidneys OK?” 

If only my nurse practitioner had been aware of National Kidney Month [That’s the topic of next week’s blog] or World Kidney Day, she could have warned me immediately that I needed to make lifestyle changes so the decline of my kidney function could have been slowed down earlier. How much more of my kidney function would I still have if I’d known earlier? That was thirteen years ago. This shouldn’t still be happening… but it is. 

Photo by Gabby K on Pexels.com

I received a phone call a few years ago that just about broke my heart.  Someone very dear to me sobbed, “He’s dying.” When I calmed her down, she explained a parent was sent to a nephrologist who told him he has end stage renal disease and needed dialysis or transplantation immediately. 

I pried a little trying to get her to admit he’d been diagnosed before end stage, but she simply didn’t know what I was talking about. There had been no diagnose of Chronic Kidney Disease up to this point. There was diabetes, apparently out of control diabetes, but no one impressed upon this man that diabetes is the foremost cause of CKD. 

What a waste of the precious time he could have had to do more than stop smoking, which he did [to his credit], the moment he was told it would help with the diabetes.  Would he be where he was then if his medical practitioners had been aware of National Kidney Month or World Kidney Day, especially since this man was high risk due to his age and diabetes?  I fervently believe so. 

I have a close friend who was involved in the local senior center where she lives.  She said she didn’t know anyone else but me who had this disease.  Since 1 out of every 7 people does nationally (That’s 15% of the adult population) and being over 65 places you in a high risk group, I wonder how many of her friends were included in the 90% of those in the early stage of CKD who don’t know they have CKD or don’t even know they need to be tested.  I’d have rather been mistaken here, but I’m afraid I wasn’t. National Kidney Month or World Kidney Day could have helped them become aware. Thank you to the CDC for these figures. Please note the figures are as of 2019. 

For those of you who have forgotten [Easily understood explanations of what results of the different items on your tests mean are in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease.], all it takes is a blood test and a urine test to detect CKD.  I have routine blood tests every three months to monitor a medication I’m taking.  It was in this test, a test I took anyway, that my family physician uncovered Chronic Kidney Disease as a problem. 

There is so much free education about CKD online. Maybe you can start with the blogroll on the right side of the blog or hit ‘Apps’ on the Topics Dropdown .Responsum is a good place to start. None of us needs to hear another sorrowful, “If only I had known!” 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! 


One Thing is Not Like the Other

I’d always thought that albuminuria and proteinuria were one and the same since the words are often use interchangeably. Guess who was wrong. While ‘uria,’ means:  

“a combining form with the meanings ‘presence in the urine’ of that specified by the initial element (albuminuria; pyuria), ‘condition of the urinary tract,’ ‘tendency to urinate as specified (polyuria).’’ 

according to Dictionary.com at https://www.dictionary.com/browse/-uria, albumin and protein are two different substances. 

I know they are closely related, but yet… still not the same. Let’s take a look at albumin: 

“Your liver makes albumin. Albumin carries substances such as hormones, medicines, and enzymes throughout your body.” 

Thank you to University of Rochester’s Medical Center’s Health Encyclopedia at bit.ly/3agVUO8 for this information. 

Wait a minute, the liver? I thought we were dealing with the kidneys. Let me think a minute. I know: we’ll go to the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease. This is what I found at bit.ly/3pDfmer

“Albuminuria is a sign of kidney disease and means that you have too much albumin in your urine. Albumin is a protein found in the blood. A healthy kidney doesn’t let albumin pass from the blood into the urine. A damaged kidney lets some albumin pass into the urine. The less albumin in your urine, the better.” 

Oh, so the albumin itself doesn’t harm the kidneys, but is a sign of kidney disease. Got it. But it’s a protein. Let’s take a look at the protein part of proteinuria and see if we can figure this out. 

In What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Kidney Disease, I defined protein as: 

“Amino acids arranged in chains joined by peptide bonds to form a compound, important because some proteins are hormones, enzymes and antibodies.”   

Look at that: hormones and enzymes are mentioned in both definitions. It would make sense to define these two words now. According to my first book on Chronic Kidney Disease, 

“Hormones: Gland produced chemicals that trigger tissues to do whatever their particular job is.” 

I need some examples. Hormone.org has an extensive list.  Some hormones you might recognize are: 

  • Adrenaline 
  • Cortisol 
  • Erythropoietin 
  • Estrogen 
  • Glucagon 
  • Insulin 
  • Melatonin 
  • Oxytocin 
  • Serotonin 
  • Testosterone 
  • Vitamin D 

What about enzymes? The Merriam Webster Dictionary can help us out here. 

“any of numerous complex proteins that are produced by living cells and catalyze specific biochemical reactions at body temperatures” 

I don’t know about you, but I’m better with examples. I took a short list from MedicalNewsToday: 

  • Lipases 
  • Amylase 
  • Lactase 

These terms may look familiar from your quarterly blood tests. 

I still don’t get it. If albumin is a protein, why isn’t it considered proteinuria? MDEdge, a new site for me, but one that seems credible, explains: 

“Proteinuria and albuminuria are not the same thing. Proteinuria indicates an elevated presence of protein in the urine (normal excretion should be < 150 mg/d), while albuminuria is defined as an ‘abnormal loss of albumin in the urine.’…. Albumin is a type of plasma protein normally found in the urine in very small quantities. Albuminuria is a very common (though not universal) finding in CKD patients; is the earliest indicator of glomerular diseases, such as diabetic glomerulosclerosis; and is typically present even before a decrease in the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) or a rise in the serum creatinine…. 

Albuminuria, without or with a reduction in estimated GFR (eGFR), lasting > 3 months is considered a marker of kidney damage. There are 3 categories of persistent albuminuria…. Staging of CKD depends on both the eGFR and the albuminuria category; the results affect treatment considerations.” 

The important part to remember is that both are indicators of Chronic Kidney Disease. 

Switch of topics here. Remember KidneyX? That’s, 

“The Kidney Innovation Accelerator (KidneyX), a public-private partnership between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the American Society of Nephrology (ASN), is accelerating innovation in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of kidney diseases.”   

Well, they have an announcement for you: 

“The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) announced the eight winners of the KidneyX COVID-19 Kidney Care Challenge Round 1. The $300,000 challenge has identified solutions that could reduce the transmission of coronavirus among people with kidney disease and/or reduce the risk of kidney damage among people who contract the virus. 

‘We congratulate the Round 1 winners who have highlighted approaches to patient monitoring, patient education, and vaccine distribution,’ said HHS Acting Assistant Secretary for Health Rear Admiral Felicia Collins, MD, MPH. ‘We look forward to the subsequent round of rapid-response innovation that supports COVID-19 risk reduction in kidney patients and health professionals during the pandemic.’ 

Each winner will receive $20,000 in recognition of their solution…. The KidneyX Round 2 winners will be announced in February, 2021. 

COVID-19 Kidney Care Challenge Round 1 Winners 

The following submissions were selected as winners of the COVID-19 Kidney Care Challenge Round 1: 

  • 9 Remote Monitoring Platform to Reduce COVID-19 Risk for Hemodialysis Patients 
  • Free E-Learning Platform with CKD and COVID-19 Patient Education 
  • Immediate Rooming for Patients 
  • Canopy: the Next Generation, Reusable Respirator 
  • Characterizing and Targeting Vaccine Hesitancy Among End-Stage Kidney Disease (ESKD) Patients 
  • COVID-19 in Translation: Making Patient Education Accessible to Minorities 
  • The ‘Good Humoral’ Immunity Truck and Freezer Project 
  • Development of Telemedicine-Enhanced Peritoneal Dialysis Training Protocols During COVID-1″ 

Did you know that patients were involved in these projects? 

We’ve passed a sort of milestone with SlowItDownCKD: this is the 601st blog. If there were no Covid-19, I would invite you all to my house for a Renal Diet Bar-B-Q. We know that’s not going to happen any time soon, so – please – have a special meal at your home with those you love. Wear your masks, keep six feet apart, wash your hands often, keep it to a very small gathering of those who are in your pod (Our pod is very small, just Bear and me.), but have a good time anyway. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! 

How Rare is This?

I have been hearing about so many different kinds of kidney disease that I’d forgotten which I’d written about. UMOD nephropathy is one that has kept coming up this past week or so. That got me to thinking… yep, I did write about it once before. It seems I had trouble getting any information at that time. Let’s try again. 

To start, here is some of the information about the disease that I included in SlowItDownCKD 2019. 

This is what the U.S. National Library of Medicine at bit.ly/3sykq5O had to say: 

‘Many individuals with uromodulin-associated kidney disease develop high blood levels of a waste product called uric acid. Normally, the kidneys remove uric acid from the blood and transfer it to urine. In this condition, the kidneys are unable to remove uric acid from the blood effectively. A buildup of uric acid can cause gout, which is a form of arthritis resulting from uric acid crystals in the joints. The signs and symptoms of gout may appear as early as a person’s teens in uromodulin-associated kidney disease. 

Uromodulin-associated kidney disease causes slowly progressive kidney disease, with the signs and symptoms usually beginning during the teenage years. The kidneys become less able to filter fluids and waste products from the body as this condition progresses, resulting in kidney failure. Individuals with uromodulin-associated kidney disease typically require either dialysis to remove wastes from the blood or a kidney transplant between the ages of 30 and 70. Occasionally, affected individuals are found to have small kidneys or kidney cysts (medullary cysts).’” 

By the way, the U.S. National Library of Medicine is part of the National Institutes of Health. 

I suspected I could find more information since almost two years have passed and I did. The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD), which is part of the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences which, in turn, is part of the National Institutes of Health (just as the U.S. National Library of Medicine is) at Bit.ly/35KOalW offered the following:   

Autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease due to UMOD mutations (ADTKD–UMOD) is an inherited disorder that causes a gradual loss of kidney function that eventually leads to the need for kidney transplantation or dialysis between the ages of 30 and 70. Patients with ADTKD-UMOD have high blood levels of uric acid before kidney failure develops, and some affected individuals may develop gout. Gout is a form of arthritis (inflammation) that occurs often in the big toe, ankle, knee, or other joints…. ADTKD-UMOD is caused by a mistake (mutation) in the UMOD gene, which leads to the build-up of the altered uromodulin protein in the tubules [Gail here: These are small tubes in your kidneys.] the kidney, leading to slow loss of kidney function. ADTKD-UMOD is inherited in a dominant pattern in families. It is diagnosed based on the symptoms, laboratory testing, family history and genetic testing. Many of the symptoms of ADTKD-UMOD can be treated with medication. For patients whose kidney function worsens to end-stage kidney disease, kidney transplant and dialysis can be used. The long-term outlook for people with ADTKD-UMOD is good, though patients may require dialysis or kidney transplantation between the ages of 30 and 70….” 

I was having a bit of trouble with the different names of the disease, so I turned to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1356/ for clarification: 

“Autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease caused by UMOD pathogenic variants (ADTKD-UMOD) was previously known as familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy type 1 (FJHN1), medullary cystic kidney disease type 2 (MCKD2), and UMOD-associated kidney disease (or uromodulin-associated kidney disease)” 

The NCBI is ultimately also part of (surprise!) the National Institutes of Health. 

Well, that helped but you may also need this definition found in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease’s Glossary: 

Nephropathy: Kidney disease.” 

Hmmm, come to think of it, we could use a few more definitions. Thank you to Medline Plus for the definitions: 

Uremic acid: Uric acid is a chemical created when the body breaks down substances called purines. Purines are normally produced in the body and are also found in some foods and drinks. Foods with high content of purines include liver, anchovies, mackerel, dried beans and peas, and beer. 

UMOD gene: The UMOD gene provides instructions for making a protein called uromodulin. This protein is produced by the kidneys and then excreted from the body in urine. The function of uromodulin remains unclear, although it is known to be the most abundant protein in the urine of healthy individuals. Researchers have suggested that uromodulin may protect against urinary tract infections. It may also help control the amount of water in urine. 

This is quite a bit of information, but we still need the symptoms? According to Wake Forest Baptist Health at bit.ly/3oRN7s8

“There are three common features of this disease: 

Patients develop chronic kidney failure with loss of kidney function beginning in the teenage years and progressing to the need for dialysis or kidney transplantation at an age between 30 and 70 years. Patients have few or no symptoms of kidney disease when they are diagnosed. 

Usually, affected individuals are found to have some loss of kidney function when they undergo blood testing by their doctor as part of a general health screening. A blood test called the serum creatinine level is performed. If the blood creatinine level is above 1, this is usually abnormal and means the kidney is not removing the creatinine from the blood well enough. …. Frequently the doctor does not know why the serum creatinine level is high. Even if a kidney biopsy (the removal of a small piece of kidney tissue) is performed, a correct diagnosis is frequently not made. 

The patient has gout or some member of the family has a history of gout …. Affected individuals have high blood uric acid levels, and this leads to gout. Every affected individual in the family may not have gout, but there are usually at least one or two people in the family who have gout. Gout frequently involves the big toe, the foot, or the knee. The big toe will become extremely tender, and even placing a sheet on the toe will cause pain. In this condition, gout occurs in the late teenage years in both men and women. (In contrast, gout developing in the normal adult population tends to occur in overweight men in their 30’s to 50’s). Family members may develop bumps on their joints called tophi that are deposits of uric acid. 

The disease is likely to be inherited. If a person has the disease, their children have a 1 out of 2 (50%) chance of having the disease. The disease does not skip a generation, though a parent may be less severely affected than their child, and may not have gout or other signs of kidney disease for some time. Therefore, there is usually a strong family history of the condition.” 

Unfortunately, there is no cure for this rare disease – there are medications available to treat the symptoms. Only 400 people worldwide suffer from UMOD Nephropathy. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! 

You Think It’s All in Your Head?

As I was sitting in my allergist’s office last week, I started to wonder if Chronic Kidney Disease had anything to do with my runny nose. I’d thought it was the usual seasonal allergies, but over the last dozen years or so I’ve learned that almost every malady I experience has some kind of relation to my kidneys…  so why not the runny nose? 

The American Kidney Fund at https://bit.ly/3kvpjb9 explains for us: 

“Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), formerly known as Wegener’s granulomatosis, is a disease that causes swelling and irritation of blood vessels in the kidneys, nose, sinuses, throat and lungs. Swollen blood vessels make it harder for blood to get to the organs and tissues that need it, which can be harmful. The disease also causes lumps called granulomas to form and damage the area around them. In some people GPA only affects the lungs. GPA that affects the kidneys can lead to chronic kidney disease and kidney failure.” 

Whoa! Not good. Let’s see how it’s treated. The Cleveland Clinic at https://cle.clinic/3mjudss tells us, 

“People with GPA who have critical organ system involvement are generally treated with corticosteroids [Gail here: commonly just called steroids] combined with another immunosuppressive medication such as cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan ®) or rituximab (Rituxan®). In patients who have less severe GPA, corticosteroids and methotrexate can be used initially. The goal of treatment is to stop all injury that is occurring as a result of GPA. If disease activity can be completely ‘turned off,’ this is called ‘remission.’ Once it is apparent that the disease is improving, doctors slowly reduce the corticosteroid dose and eventually hope to discontinue it completely. When cyclophosphamide is used, it is only given until the time of remission (usually around 3 to 6 months), after which time it is switched to another immunosuppressive agent, such as methotrexate, azathioprine (Imuran®), or mycophenolate mofetil (Cellcept®) to maintain remission. The treatment duration of the maintenance immunosuppressive medication may vary between individuals. In most instances, it is given for a minimum of 2 years before consideration is given to slowly reduce the dose toward discontinuation.” 

If this sounds familiar, you’re right. It’s straight out of this year’s May 25th blog. Aha! Now we see the value of using the category drop down to the right of the blog. 

Anyway, while this is interesting (to me, at least), it’s not answering my question: Can CKD cause sinus problems. What was that? You want to know what a runny nose has to do with your sinuses? Let’s find out.  

I returned to the ever-reliable Cleveland Clinic, this time at https://cle.clinic/2FXOm7Q,  for some information: 

“Sinusitis is an inflammation, or swelling, of the tissue lining the sinuses. The sinuses are four paired cavities (spaces) in the head. They are connected by narrow channels. The sinuses make thin mucus that drains out of the channels of the nose. This drainage helps keep the nose clean and free of bacteria. Normally filled with air, the sinuses can get blocked and filled with fluid. When that happens, bacteria can grow and cause an infection (bacterial sinusitis). 

This is also called rhinosinusitis, with ‘rhino’ meaning ‘nose.’ The nasal tissue is almost always swollen if sinus tissue is inflamed.” 

It seems that you need a runny nose to avoid sinusitis. Is that right? I don’t think so, and neither does MedicineNet at https://www.medicinenet.com/sinusitis/article.htm.  

“Sinusitis signs and symptoms include 

sinus headache, 

facial tenderness, 

pressure or pain in the sinuses, in the ears and teeth, 

fever, 

cloudy discolored nasal or postnasal drainage, [I bolded this symptom.] 

feeling of nasal stuffiness, 

sore throat, 

cough, and 

occasionally facial swelling.” 

So, now it seems that a runny nose can be a symptom of sinusitis. 

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

And how does that fit in with having CKD? Before we answer that, I think we need to straighten out the differences between allergy and cold symptoms since both conditions may cause sinusitis. 

“The symptoms of allergies and sinusitis overlap a lot. Both can give you a stuffy nose. If it’s allergies, you may also have: 

Runny nose and sneezing 

Watery or itchy eyes 

Wheezing 

If it’s sinusitis, besides a stuffy nose, you may have: 

Thick, colored mucus 

Painful, swollen feeling around your forehead, eyes, and cheeks 

Headache or pain in your teeth 

Post-nasal drip (mucus that moves from the back of your nose into your throat) 

Bad breath 

Cough and sore throat 

Fatigue 

Light fever” 

Thank you to WebMD at https://www.webmd.com/allergies/sinusitis-or-allergies for the list above.  

 On to my original question. This is from Vick’s at https://vicks.com/en-us/treatments/how-to-treat-a-cold/how-to-stop-a-runny-nose. (Who better to go to than a trusted friend since childhood?)  

“A runny nose is a discharge of mucus from the nostrils. It’s the result of excess nasal mucus production. The excess nasal mucus leads to watery nasal secretions that flow out of your nostrils or drip down into your throat. A runny nose is a discharge of mucus from the nostrils. It’s the result of excess nasal mucus production. The excess nasal mucus leads to watery nasal secretions that flow out of your nostrils or drip down into your throat. Nasal congestion is due to the inflammation of the linings of the nasal cavity.” 

Did you notice the word “inflammation” in the last sentence? Ahem, an article by Oleh M Akchurin of Weill Cornell Medical College and Frederick J Kaskel of Albert Einstein College of Medicine published by ResearchGate at https://bit.ly/3jtVzKL states: 

“Chronic inflammation should be regarded as a common comorbid condition in CKD and especially in dialysis patients.”   

And there you have it. Your (and my) runny nose can be caused – in part – from having CKD. Inflammation is the name of the game if you have Chronic Kidney Disease. 

Although, in these times, I wonder if Covid-19 might somehow be involved in certain cases. Just remember, I’m not a doctor and never claimed to be one, so this just might be a question for your medical provider. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! (Safely: mask up, wash up, social distance) 
 

It Isn’t  Ain’t; It’s AIN.  

I’ll explain that in a minute, but first – on this Labor Day weekend – I want to thank all the readers who have liked individual blogs. These likes let me know I’m writing about topics that interest you.

Let’s turn to AIN now.  You know it’s not just a word, but an acronym. That’s a word formed by the initials of a term, like ASAP for as soon as possible. By the way, ‘nym’ means name, while ‘acr’ means height, summit, tip, top.  ‘O’ connects the two roots. So, we have the tip of the words or the first letters forming an acronym which becomes a recognized word. Thank you to my college course in Greek and Latin roots. I knew that would come on handy someday and it has again and again.

Well, what does AIN mean? It is the acronym for Allergic Interstitial Nephritis, which is a mouthful itself. ‘Allergic’ we get. That’s a common enough word. ‘Interstitial’, though? I remember the prefix (group of related words before the root word that changes its meaning) ‘inter’ means between, but between what? Merriam-Webster Dictionary at https://bit.ly/3h3cF0H, here we come.

asituated within but not restricted to or characteristic of a particular organ or tissue —used especially of fibrous tissue

 baffecting the interstitial tissues of an organ or part

I wonder if we’ll need both definitions. I think we need to be reminded of what nephritis is before we can tell. Again, I remember from that college course so very long ago (Funny what sticks in your mind, isn’t it?) that ‘itis’ means inflammation. We know from all the writings about Chronic Kidney Disease that ‘neph’ means kidneys. Putting these together, we have inflammation of the kidneys. Let’s take a look at my favorite dictionary again, just to be certain.

Yep, there we have it at www.merriam-webster/dictionary/nephritis:

“acute or chronic inflammation of the kidney caused by infection, degenerative process, or vascular disease”

How do you define the whole term? According the excerpt from Nancy A. Finnigan and Khalid Bashir’s book Statpearls on NCBI’s bookshelf at https://bit.ly/31ZTeS2,

“Allergic interstitial nephritis (AIN) is the most common form of acute interstitial nephritis. It is most often caused by exposure to a drug. AIN is often associated with an acute decline in renal function and may be associated with permanent renal insufficiency.”

Acute? Oh, yes. That’s means sudden. It’s the opposite of chronic, which means long term. Looks like we only needed the second dictionary definition of interstitial after all.

So, this kind of nephritis is usually caused by drugs? Which drugs? I went to UpToDate at https://bit.ly/3i4exHS for the answer:

“The most common drug causes of AIN now include …:

  • Nonsteroidalanti-inflammatoryagents (NSAIDs), including selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors
  • Penicillinsand cephalosporins
  • Rifampin
  • Antimicrobial sulfonamides, including trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole
  • Ciprofloxacin and,perhaps toa lesser degree, other quinolones
  • Diuretics, including loop diuretics such as furosemide and bumetanide, and thiazide-type diuretics
  • Cimetidine (only rare cases have been described with other H-2 blockers such as ranitidine) [24,25]
  • Allopurinol
  • Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) such as omeprazole and lansoprazole [26-29]
  • Indinavir
  • 5-aminosalicylates (eg, mesalamine)”

There are some very common drugs on this list. As Chronic Kidney Disease patients, we are warned away from NSAIDS. I’ve been warned about Ciprofloxacin, too, and PPIs, but diuretics? Most of the other drugs we’d have to ask our doctors about when and if they’re prescribed. Then again, I ask my family doctor to check the effect of the drug on the kidneys when she prescribes a drug. She happily does so.

You should note that many of these drugs do not require a prescription. In that case, speak with your pharmacist about its possible effect on your kidneys before buying any over the counter drug. Another possibility is using Drugs.com or a similar website for possible effects on your kidneys before using any drugs.

What are the symptoms, if any, of AIN? Well, much like Chronic Kidney Disease, there are often no symptoms until it is quite advanced. Then you would notice the acute drop in kidney function. A blood test and urine test will help with the diagnosis, although the urine test will only show the presence of white blood cells. That indicates an infection. Sometimes a kidney biopsy is required to diagnose AIN.

And now the biggie: what do you do if you develop AIN? You stop the medication. It’s common sense. Your doctor will probably suggest that once it’s been determined you have allergic interstitial nephritis. Remember though, there are other causes of AIN such as infections and/or autoimmunity.

Topic switch: While I’ve been laboring over this blog, I’ve also been thinking about the fact that today is Labor Day in the United States. Coming from a union family, I thought I’d tell you a little bit about Labor Day that you may not know.

This, and more information about Labor Day, may be found at https://bit.ly/3jPeaRR

“In the late 1800s, the state of labor was grim as U.S. workers toiled under bleak conditions: 12 or more hour workdays; hazardous work environments; meager pay. Children, some as young as 5, were often fixtures at plants and factories.

The dismal livelihoods fueled the formation of the country’s first labor unions, which began to organize strikes and protests and pushed employers for better hours and pay. Many of the rallies turned violent.

On Sept. 5, 1882 — a Tuesday — 10,000 workers took unpaid time off to march in a parade from City Hall to Union Square in New York City as a tribute to American workers. Organized by New York’s Central Labor Union, It [sic]was the country’s first unofficial Labor Day parade. Three years later, some city ordinances marked the first government recognition, and legislation soon followed in a number of states.”

As many of you already know, my grandfather was an organizer for the Brass Workers Union. Many a time he’d disappear. He was jailed for his activities, but that didn’t stop him.

As you labor to avoid AIN and keep your kidneys functioning properly, enjoy the holiday weekend.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Getting Ready  

As I mentioned last week, I am lucky enough to be cancer free now and have returned to my other specialists. But we are experiencing the Covid-19 pandemic which means most of my doctors are conducting telemedicine appointments.

What are those? Let’s go to my favorite dictionary, The Merriam-Webster Dictionary, and see what we can see. I found this at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/telemedicine:

“the practice of medicine when the doctor and patient are widely separated using two-way voice and visual communication (as by satellite or computer)”

Surprisingly, I also discovered this has been in use since 1968. Maybe that’s why the phone and/or iPad type devices weren’t mentioned in the definition.

Of course, if you need to be examined physically, you’ll have to go to the doctor’s office. For example, poor Bear needed several mole biopsies last week. Obviously, he had to present himself at his dermatologist’s office to have these procedures carried out.

But I’ve been fortunate to be able to stick with telemedicine. Yet, you’ve got to be prepared for such doctor appointments. Do you have a thermometer? You’ll be asked for your temperature. We use both the DTT (digital temple thermometer) and Target’s talking thermometer (for those days when neither of us can find our glasses… really.) It seems the DTT we use is no longer manufactured, but the updated one is only about $15.00. The talking ear digital thermometer is more expensive. That one runs about double the price of the DTT. I did discover that digital mouth thermometers can be as low as $8.00. Non-digital oral thermometers start at about $6.00 You can compare prices online for the best deal. However, we are apparently old fashioned. The newest form of temperature assessment is the no contact digital scan thermometer. This one starts at about $50.

So, you have your temperature reading ready. What else will you need? I’ve always been asked for my blood pressure and pulse. I use an arm, rather than a wrist, device since my family doctor explained to me that the wrist device takes a reading through two bones. Those are the radius and ulna. The arm device takes your reading through only one bone, the humerus. She feels a reading through only one bone is more accurate. What device do I use? No matter which ones I’ve experimented with, I always return to Omron. It’s easy to use and accurate. These run from about $33 to over $100, depending upon how fancy you want to go. This description is from Amazon’s mid-price Omron:

Platinum (new version)

  • Trusted brand – Omron is the #1 recommended home blood pressure monitor brand by doctors and pharmacists for clinically-accurate home monitoring, and the #1 selling manufacturer of home blood pressure monitors for over 40 years.
  • Unlimited memory and users with the free app – The Omron gold wrist monitor stores 200 total blood pressure readings for 2 users (100 per user, most of any Omron wrist blood pressure monitor). Memory and users are unlimited with the Omron connect free app which works with amazon alexa-enabled devices (on select IOS & android devices).
  • High morning average indicator – Among Omron Amazon-exclusive blood pressure monitors, this feature is unique to the Gold and Platinum monitors. The indicator alerts the user if systolic or diastolic measurements are out of normal range in the morning, when there is a higher risk for heart attack or stroke.
  • Dual display with backlight – The Omron Platinum monitor features a backlit dual-display LCD monitor with easy navigation that allows the user to immediately compare the current reading to the previous reading. The backlight feature is only available with the Platinum Monitor.
  • AC adapter included – The Omron Ac Adapter eliminates the worry of changing batteries in your Omron Blood Pressure Monitor. The convenient AC adapter helps make sure your monitor is ready whenever you are.”

What else now? Let me think for a minute. Of course, if you are prediabetic or diabetic, you’ll be asked for your latest blood sugar readings. Believe it or not, I prefer WalMart’s no nonsense, no frills ReliOn Prime blood glucose monitor. In case you didn’t know, WalMart also operates as Sam’s Club. For my non-U.S.A. readers, according to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walmart, Walmart International operates in these countries:

Let’s keep in mind that anyone can edit in Wikipedia, so be certain to check before you bank upon going.

My family doctor did prescribe another brand which is a bit fancier in that it has a nicer looking case, lancet ejector, and meter. It was also more expensive and a prescription was needed.

If this is all new to you, you need to know you not only need this kit (which contains the monitor, a lancing device for your lancets, and spaces to store both your test strips and needles), but also the afore mentioned test strips and lancing device. You can buy 100 ultra-thin lancets for under $3.00. I suggest ultra-thin because I’ve found the thinner the lancet, the less the poke to get that one drop of blood needed for testing hurts.

The test strips are another story. These are expensive. They usually cost a little less than $18.00 for 100. And the lancing device? That’s about $6.00. The monitor itself is $9.00. The case comes with your starter kit. I haven’t found one sold separately by Walmart, although Amazon has a few for other brands. The number of times you need to test your blood glucose daily determines the weekly cost of your supplies.

You’ll also be asked for your height and weight. I have to admit I’m partial to digital devices and so have a digital scale from Amazon. Their scales run from $18.00 to $35.00. Of course, non-digital will be less expensive.

As for the height, I guess I cheated. I looked up the most recent height recorded on my last doctor’s appointment and used that.

Conclusion: You’ll need your temperature, blood pressure, height, weight, – if you’re prediabetic or diabetic – your blood glucose, and a phone, iPad sort of device, or computer for your telemedicine appointment.  Now you’re ready.

May you only have good results.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

I Can’t Eat That 

Now that I’m cancer free, I’ve resumed visits to all the other specialists (Isn’t growing older wonderful?) I had been seeing before the cancer diagnosis. One of these specialists was my immunologist, who had suggested I stop taking my allergy injections while I was doing chemotherapy since the chemo would change many of the conditions in my body. She was right. I no longer need the monthly injections for seasonal allergies, but there are certain foods I can no longer eat.

Why not, you may be asking yourself. Easy answer? I’m allergic to them. Wait just a minute here. What exactly does allergic mean and how will this affect your Chronic Kidney Disease?

The Merriam-Webster dictionary at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/allergy tells us that allergy means,

“1altered bodily reactivity (such as hypersensitivity) to an antigen in response to a first exposure….

2exaggerated or pathological immunological reaction (as by sneezing, difficult breathing, itching, or skin rashes) to substances, situations, or physical states that are without comparable effect on the average individual

3medical practice concerned with allergies

4a feeling of antipathy or aversion”

It’s definition number two for us. Maybe an explanation of those monthly allergy injections would be helpful here, too. The Mayo Clinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/allergy-shots/about/pac-20392876#:~:text=If%20you%20get%20weekly%20or,reaction%2C%20particularly%20a%20local%20reaction had the explanation we needed:

“Allergy shots are regular injections over a period of time — generally around three to five years — to stop or reduce allergy attacks. Allergy shots are a form of treatment called immunotherapy. [Gail here: Hence, the specialist who treats allergies is called an immunologist.] Each allergy shot contains a tiny amount of the specific substance or substances that trigger your allergic reactions. These are called allergens. Allergy shots contain just enough allergens to stimulate your immune system — but not enough to cause a full-blown allergic reaction.

Over time, your doctor increases the dose of allergens in each of your allergy shots. This helps get your body used to the allergens (desensitization). Your immune system builds up a tolerance to the allergens, causing your allergy symptoms to diminish over time.”

Lucky me: no more seasonal allergies. Let’s get back to those food allergies and CKD now… or not. While I found quite a bit of information about drug allergies, I found very little about food allergies. It’s nice to know my allergies to shellfish and vanilla will not harm my kidneys. Come to think of it, I don’t eat these foods because I’m allergic to them, so they’re not in my system anyway.

Hmmm, is it any different with food sensitivities? How’s about a definition first. It’s so nice to have a favorite dictionary. This is what The Merriam-Webster Dictionary at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sensitivity?utm_campaign=sd&utm_medium=serp&utm_source=jsonld has to say:

“the quality or state of being sensitive: such as

athe capacity of an organism or sense organ to respond to stimulation: IRRITABILITY

bthe quality or state of being hypersensitive

cthe degree to which a radio receiving set responds to incoming waves

dthe capacity of being easily hurt

eawareness of the needs and emotions of others”

Definition a is the one we need.

Again, I did not find enough validation that food sensitivities could damage our kidneys to write about it.

Maybe I’m looking at this backwards. Maybe it’s not do food sensitivities and allergies damage our kidneys that I should be dealing with, but rather can they cause kidney damage. Back to the internet. Will you look at that? Again, there was much more information about drug allergies damaging your kidneys and very little about food allergies or sensitivities.

I’ve satisfied myself that, just as with my food allergies, my sensitivity to lactose, wheat, fructose syrup, and acidic foods will not harm my kidneys. Although, they may cause me to read more food labels than I usually do. Hopefully, you’re satisfied that your food allergies and sensitivities will not harm your kidneys. If you’re still concerned, speak with your nephrologist or renal dietitian.

Of course, none of this means we can ignore the kidney diet. That is, not if you want to slow down the progression of the decline of your kidney function. Eat according to your labs. Keep watching your potassium, phosphorous, protein, and sodium restrictions. This is highly individualized, so again: speak with your nephrologist or renal dietitian should you have questions.

While we’re on the subject of food, do you remember when I wrote about Flavis? That’s the low sodium, low phosphorus, low potassium food company. Bear made a beef stew which we decided to eat upon a layer of pasta. We chose Flavis’s fusilli. That’s a kind of short, spiral pasta. I have got to say it was delicious. I like that it tastes so light, especially since I usually find pasta so heavy.   

News! I’ve gotten so many emails asking where readers can buy my books that I’ve made each title clickable. Click on the title and you go directly to the book’s page on Amazon.com. The titles are to the right of the blog itself on the blog roll.

I know, especially now in the time of Covid-19, that money can be an issue and even the $2.99 for the digital version of each of the books can be $2.99 too much. In that case, I suggest you request your library order the book and then you can borrow it for free. Even libraries that have shut down have virtual sites now. I do humbly request reviews from those of you who read the books. You can leave them on the Amazon.com page for each book. Thank you in advance.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!