Cellulitis, CKD, and Diabetes

My uncle-in-law had it. My children’s father had it. My husband had it. Now the question is what is cellulitis? 

WebMd at https://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/guide/cellulitis#1 answers: 

“Cellulitis is a common infection of the skin and the soft tissues underneath. It happens when bacteria enter a break in the skin and spread. The result is infection, which may cause swelling, redness, pain, or warmth.” 

Alright, but what does that have to do with Chronic Kidney Disease. By the way, only one of the men mentioned in the first paragraph has CKD.  

According to the NHS (National Health Service) in the United Kingdom at https://bit.ly/2IJJrbT: 

“You’re more at risk of cellulitis if you: 

  • have poor circulation in your arms, legs, hands or feet – for example, because you’re overweight 
  • find it difficult to move around 
  • have a weakened immune system because of chemotherapy treatment or diabetes [Gail here: I bolded that.] 
  • have bedsores (pressure ulcers) 
  • have lymphoedema, which causes fluid build-up under the skin 
  • inject drugs 
  • have a wound from surgery 
  • have had cellulitis before” 

Two of the men above were overweight, but one of these did not have CKD. The overweight man who had CKD also had diabetes. One had a wound from surgery which was the cause of his cellulitis. Another had had cellulitis before. (Does this sound like one of those crazy math word questions?) 

CKD is not a cause? Whoa! Whoa! Whoa! Wait just a minute here. Let’s remember that CKD gives you the lovely present of a compromised immune system. A compromised immune system means it doesn’t do such a great job of preventing illnesses and infections. 

Also remember that diabetes is the leading cause of CKD and diabetes can also weaken your immune system. I needed more information about diabetes doing that and I got it from The University of Michigan’s Michigan Medicine at https://www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/uq1148abc:    

“High blood sugar from diabetes can affect the body’s immune system, impairing the ability of white blood cells to come to the site of an infection, stay in the infected area, and kill microorganisms. Because of the buildup of plaque in blood vessels associated with diabetes, areas of infection may receive a poor blood supply, further lowering the body’s ability to fight infections and heal wounds.” 

Remember that cellulitis is an infection. Reading the above, I became aware that I didn’t know anything about plague in the blood vessels and diabetes, so I went right to what I consider the source for vascular information, Vascular.org. This time at https://bit.ly/31dZ0yI:  

“Peripheral artery (or arterial) disease, also known as PAD, occurs when plaque builds up in the arteries and reduces blood flow to the feet and legs. Fairly common among elderly Americans, PAD is even more likely among those with diabetes, which increases plaque buildup.” 

All three of these men were elderly, if you consider in your 70s elderly. Of course, I don’t since I’m in my 70s, but we are talking science here. 

Hmmm, we don’t know yet how cellulitis is treated, do we? Let’s find out. I turned to my old buddy, The MayoClinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/cellulitis/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20370766:  

“Cellulitis treatment usually includes a prescription oral antibiotic. Within three days of starting an antibiotic, let your doctor know whether the infection is responding to treatment. You’ll need to take the antibiotic for as long as your doctor directs, usually five to 10 days but possibly as long as 14 days. 

In most cases, signs and symptoms of cellulitis disappear after a few days. You may need to be hospitalized and receive antibiotics through your veins (intravenously) if: 

Signs and symptoms don’t respond to oral antibiotics 

Signs and symptoms are extensive 

You have a high fever 

Usually, doctors prescribe a drug that’s effective against both streptococci and staphylococci. It’s important that you take the medication as directed and finish the entire course of medication, even after you feel better. 

Your doctor also might recommend elevating the affected area, which may speed recovery…. 

Try these steps to help ease any pain and swelling: 

Place a cool, damp cloth on the affected area as often as needed for your comfort. 

Ask your doctor to suggest an over-the-counter pain medication to treat pain. [Gail again: no NSAIDS, you have CKD.] 

Elevate the affected part of your body.” 

Now the obvious question is how, as CKD patients and possibly diabetics, do we avoid that infection in the first place? 

“Cellulitis cannot always be prevented, but the risk of developing cellulitis can be minimised by avoiding injury to the skin, maintain [sic] good hygiene and by managing skin conditions like tinea and eczema. 

A common cause of infection to the skin is via the fingernails. Handwashing is very important as well as keeping good care of your nails by trimming and cleaning them. Generally maintaining good hygiene such as daily showering and wearing clean clothes may help reduce the skin’s contact with bacteria. 

If you have broken skin, keep the wound clean by washing daily with soap and water or antiseptic. Cover the wound with a gauze dressing or bandaid every day and watch for signs of infection. 

People who are susceptible to cellulitis, for example people with diabetes or with poor circulation, should take care to protect themselves with appropriate footwear, gloves and long pants when gardening or bushwalking, when it’s easy to get scratched or bitten. Look after your skin by regularly checking your feet for signs of injury, moisturising the skin and trimming fingernails and toenails regularly.” 

Thank you to Australia’s HealthDirect at https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/cellulitis-prevention for these common sense reminders. Actually, we need to keep washing our hands while Covid-19 is at our door anyway, so we’ve already got that part of the prevention covered. I suspect that many of us don’t bother to deal with small wounds, but it looks like we’d better start. 

What if you do develop cellulitis? How will you be treated? My old buddy, The Mayo Clinic at https://mayocl.in/2FDxUtf tells us: 

“Cellulitis treatment usually includes a prescription oral antibiotic. Within three days of starting an antibiotic, let your doctor know whether the infection is responding to treatment. You’ll need to take the antibiotic for as long as your doctor directs, usually five to 10 days but possibly as long as 14 days. 

In most cases, signs and symptoms of cellulitis disappear after a few days. You may need to be hospitalized and receive antibiotics through your veins (intravenously) if: 

Signs and symptoms don’t respond to oral antibiotics 

Signs and symptoms are extensive 

You have a high fever 

Usually, doctors prescribe a drug that’s effective against both streptococci and staphylococci. It’s important that you take the medication as directed and finish the entire course of medication, even after you feel better. 

Your doctor also might recommend elevating the affected area, which may speed recovery.” 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! (Safely, please) 

 

Oh, S**T!

Cute, huh? Especially since I’ll be writing about feces or, as it’s commonly called these days, poo. Defecation (or pooing, if you’d rather) is an important topic for those of us with Chronic Kidney Disease. Did you know CKD can lead to constipation? 

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Well, how do you know if you have constipation? The Mayo Clinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/constipation/symptoms-causes/syc-20354253 explains: 

  • “Passing fewer than three stools a week 
  • Having lumpy or hard stools 
  • Straining to have bowel movements 
  • Feeling as though there’s a blockage in your rectum that prevents bowel movements 
  • Feeling as though you can’t completely empty the stool from your rectum 
  • Needing help to empty your rectum, such as using your hands to press on your abdomen and using a finger to remove stool from your rectum” 

Sometimes, medication can be the cause of constipation. According to the International Foundation of Gastrointestinal Disorders at https://www.iffgd.org/diet-treatments/medications/medications-that-can-affect-colonic-function.html

“Constipation can be caused by a variety of medications. These medications affect the nerve and muscle activity in the large intestine (colon) and may also bind intestinal liquid. This may result in slowed colonic action (slow and/or difficult passing of stool).” 

Maybe we need to know what happens in your body during constipation? This is what the Cleveland Clinic at https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/4059-constipation has to say: 

“Constipation happens because your colon absorbs too much water from waste (stool/poop), which dries out the stool making it hard in consistency and difficult to push out of the body. 

To back up a bit, as food normally moves through the digestive tract, nutrients are absorbed. The partially digested food (waste) that remains moves from the small intestine to the large intestine, also called the colon. The colon absorbs water from this waste, which creates a solid matter called stool. If you have constipation, food may move too slowly through the digestive tract. This gives the colon more time – too much time – to absorb water from the waste. The stool becomes dry, hard, and difficult to push out.” 

Photo by August de Richelieu on Pexels.com

We’re Chronic Kidney Disease patients. That means some of the foods recommended to alleviate constipation may not be allowed on our renal diets. For instance, dried raisin, apricots, and prunes are too high in potassium for CKD patients, although they are helpful if you’re experiencing constipation. You need to speak with your renal dietitian before changing your diet. 

I turned to a new site, BMC at https://rrtjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s41100-019-0246-3 for information about constipation that is particular to CKD patients. BMC has “an evolving portfolio of some 300 peer-reviewed journals, sharing discoveries from research communities in science, technology, engineering and medicine,” as stated on their website.   

“Accumulating evidence has revealed a relationship between constipation and cardiovascular disease and CKD. The pathogenesis of constipation in CKD patients is multifactorial: decreased physical activity, comorbidities affecting bowel movement, such as diabetes mellitus, cerebrovascular disease, and hyperparathyroidism, a restricted dietary intake of plant-based fiber-rich foods, and multiple medications, including phosphate binders and potassium-binding resins, have all been implicated. CKD is associated with alterations in the composition and function of the gut microbiota, so-called gut dysbiosis.” 

Oh goody, a term I don’t know. Remember VeryWell Health? This is their definition of gut dysbiosis at https://www.verywellhealth.com/what-is-intestinal-dysbiosis-1945045#:~:text=Overview,the%20microorganisms%20within%20our%20intestines

“Gut microbiota dysbiosis, also known as intestinal or gastrointestinal dysbiosis, refers to a condition in which there is an imbalance of the microorganisms within our intestines. These microorganisms, collectively known as gut flora, consist predominantly of various strains of bacteria, and to a lesser extent include fungi and protozoa. The gut flora are essential for digestion and immune functioning….  A state of dysbiosis, therefore, will result in digestive and other systemic symptoms.” 

Photo by Anna Shvets on Pexels.com

Aha, so that’s why I take probiotics. I not only have CKD, but Diabetes Type 2, and have had chemotherapy which is known to cause this problem. I always wondered what the probiotics did for me. We’ll find out right now. WebMD at https://www.webmd.com/digestive-disorders/what-are-probiotics was helpful here: 

“Researchers are trying to figure out exactly how probiotics work. Some of the ways they may keep you healthy: 

  • When you lose ‘good’ bacteria in your body, for example after you take antibiotics, probiotics can help replace them. 
  • They can help balance your ‘good’ and ‘bad’ bacteria to keep your body working the way it should.” 

Prebiotics are also recommended. I get it that ‘pre’ is a suffix (group of letters added before a word to change its meaning) indicating ‘before,’ but still, what do they do for us?  Here’s what the Mayo Clinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/prebiotics-probiotics-and-your-health/art-20390058 has to say about prebiotics, 

“Prebiotics are specialized plant fibers. They act like fertilizers that stimulate the growth of healthy bacteria in the gut. 

Prebiotics are found in many fruits and vegetables, especially those that contain complex carbohydrates, such as fiber and resistant starch. These carbs aren’t digestible by your body, so they pass through the digestive system to become food for the bacteria and other microbes.” 

To sum it all up: 

“Constipation is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) partly because of their sedentary lifestyle, low fiber and fluid intake, concomitant medications (e.g., phosphate binders), and multiple comorbidities (e.g., diabetes). Although constipation is usually perceived as a benign, often self-limited condition, recent evidence has challenged this most common perception of constipation. The chronic symptoms of constipation negatively affect patients’ quality of life and impose a considerable social and economic burden. Furthermore, recent epidemiological studies have revealed that constipation is independently associated with adverse clinical outcomes, such as end-stage renal disease (ESRD), cardiovascular (CV) disease, and mortality, potentially mediated by the alteration of gut microbiota and the increased production of fecal metabolites. Given the importance of the gut in the disposal of uremic toxins and in acid-base and mineral homeostasis with declining kidney function, the presence of constipation in CKD may limit or even preclude these ancillary gastrointestinal roles, potentially contributing to excess morbidity and mortality….” 

Thank you to the National Institutes of Health’s U.S. Library of Medicine’s National Center for Biotechnology Information at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7000799/ for their summary of the problem. Before I end this blog, I ask you to make sure you notice the mention of “the disposal of uremic toxins” above. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! 

“klot” + “id” 

No, that’s not the result of misplacing my fingers on the keyboard. According to https://youglish.com/pronounce/clotted/english, this is the correct two syllable pronunciation of the word clotted. My all-time favorite dictionary, the Merriam-Webster, at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/clotted defines the adjective (word describing a noun) clotted as:

“1: a portion of a substance adhering together in a thick nondescript mass (as of clay or gum)

2 a: a roundish viscous lump formed by coagulation of a portion of liquid or by melting

b: a coagulated mass produced by clotting of blood”

You’re right – it’s the second definition we’ll be dealing with today. Why? A long-time reader was telling me about his blood clot when I suddenly realized I had no idea if there were any connection at all between Chronic Kidney Disease and blood clots.

As it turns out, there is.  The following is from the National Kidney Foundation at https://www.kidney.org/sites/default/files/Blood_Clots_And_CKD_2018.pdf:

“CKD may put you at higher risk for VTE. The reasons for this are not well understood. The connection may depend on what caused your CKD and how much kidney damage you have. No matter the reason, CKD may make it easier for your body to form blood clots. The risk for VTE is seen more often in people with nephrotic syndrome (a kidney problem that causes swelling, usually of the ankles, a high level of protein in the urine, and a low level of a protein called albumin in the blood).”

I have a question already. What is VTE? I found World Thrombosis Day’s explanation at www.worldthrombosisday.org › issue › vte the most helpful.

“Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a condition in which a blood clot forms most often in the deep veins of the leg, groin or arm (known as deep vein thrombosis, DVT) and travels in the circulation, lodging in the lungs (known as pulmonary embolism, PE).”

How could I have CKD for over a dozen years and not know this? Many thanks to my reader and online friend for bringing it up. 

Well, it’s back to the beginning for us. How is VTE diagnosed? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) at www.cdc.gov › ncbddd › dvt › diagnosis-treatment was helpful here.

“Duplex ultrasonography is an imaging test that uses sound waves to look at the flow of blood in the veins. It can detect blockages or blood clots in the deep veins. It is the standard imaging test to diagnose DVT. A D-dimer blood test measures a substance in the blood that is released when a clot breaks up.”

Let’s take a closer look at the D-dimer blood test. That’s another new one for me. My old standby, MedlinePlus (This time at https://medlineplus.gov/lab-tests/d-dimer-test/.) offered the following which more than satisfactorily answered my question.

“A D-dimer test looks for D-dimer in blood. D-dimer is a protein fragment (small piece) that’s made when a blood clot dissolves in your body.

Blood clotting is an important process that prevents you from losing too much blood when you are injured. Normally, your body will dissolve the clot once your injury has healed. With a blood clotting disorder, clots can form when you don’t have an obvious injury or don’t dissolve when they should. These conditions can be very serious and even life-threatening. A D-dimer test can show if you have one of these conditions.”

By the way, MedlinePlus is part of the U.S. National Library of Medicine which, in turn, is part of the National Institutes of Health.

This brings me to another question. How would you or your doctor even know you may need this test?

“According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about half of people with DVT don’t have symptoms. Any symptoms that do occur will be in the affected leg or the area where the clot is found. Symptoms can include:

pain

redness of the skin

warmth of the skin

swelling of the area

If the clot moves into the lungs and you develop PE, you may have symptoms such as:

chest pain, which may get worse when you breathe deeply or cough

coughing

coughing up blood

dizziness or even fainting

rapid shallow breathing, or tachypnea

rapid heartbeat

irregular heartbeat

shortness of breath”

Thank you to Healthline at https://www.healthline.com/health/dvt-vs-pulmonary-embolism for the above information.

Now we know what VTE is, what symptoms you may experience, and the test to take to confirm that you do, indeed, have VTE. You know what comes next. How do we treat VTE once it’s confirmed?

These are some, but not all, of the treatments that may be recommended. I discovered them on WebMD’s site at https://www.webmd.com/dvt/what-is-venous-thromboembolism.

“Blood thinners. These drugs don’t break up the clot, but they can stop it from getting bigger so your body has time to break it down on its own. They include heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, apixaban (Eliquis), edoxaban (Savaysa), rivaroxaban (Xarelto), and warfarin (Coumadin).

Clot-busting drugs. These medicines are injections that can break up your clot. They include drugs like tPA (tissue plasminogen activator).

Surgery. In some cases, your doctor may need to put a special filter into a vein, which can stop any future clots from getting to your lungs. Sometimes, people need surgery to remove a clot.

Even after you recover from a VTE and you’re out of the hospital, you’ll probably still need treatment with blood thinners for at least 3 months. That’s because your chances of having another VTE will be higher for a while.”

I’m still wondering how to avoid VTE. This is what The National Blood Clot Alliance at https://www.stoptheclot.org/learn_more/prevention_of_thrombosis/ suggested:

“Ask your doctor about need for ‘blood thinners’ or compression stockings to prevent clots, whenever you go to the hospital

Lose weight, if you are overweight

Stay active

Exercise regularly; walking is fine

Avoid long periods of staying still

Get up and move around at least every hour whenever you travel on a plane, train, or bus, particularly if the trip is longer than 4 hours

Do heel toe exercises or circle your feet if you cannot move around

Stop at least every two hours when you drive, and get out and move around

Drink a lot of water and wear loose fitted clothing when you travel

Talk to your doctor about your risk of clotting whenever you take hormones, whether for birth control or replacement therapy, or during and right after any pregnancy

Follow any self-care measures to keep heart failure, diabetes, or any other health issues as stable as possible”

And we have yet another reason to be extra cautious if you have CKD.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!