It’s Like the Sahara in There

I like my dentist, especially when he tells me something I didn’t know. When I went to see him last time, I told him my chemo experience and how dry my mouth was. I thought they might be related. He patiently gave me the same information as the Mayo Clinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/dry-mouth/symptoms-causes/syc-20356048.

“Dry mouth, or xerostomia (zeer-o-STOE-me-uh), refers to a condition in which the salivary glands in your mouth don’t make enough saliva to keep your mouth wet. Dry mouth is often due to the side effect of certain medications or aging issues or as a result of radiation therapy for cancer. Less often, dry mouth may be caused by a condition that directly affects the salivary glands.

Saliva helps prevent tooth decay by neutralizing acids produced by bacteria, limiting bacterial growth and washing away food particles. Saliva also enhances your ability to taste and makes it easier to chew and swallow. In addition, enzymes in saliva aid in digestion.

Decreased saliva and dry mouth can range from being merely a nuisance to something that has a major impact on your general health and the health of your teeth and gums, as well as your appetite and enjoyment of food.

Treatment for dry mouth depends on the cause.”

The joke’s on me. I developed dry mouth before the radiation treatments began. At least my salivary glands weren’t having any issues of their own. It seems we discussed xerostomia at the right time.

Wait a minute. Something is pulling on my memory. Something about Chronic Kidney Disease and dry mouth. Of course, periodontics and CKD. The Journal Of Clinical Periodontology at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/action/doSearch?AllField=chronic+kidney+disease&SeriesKey=1600051x had just what I was trying to remember. By the way, this is a fascinating free online library by John Wiley, a publisher I remember well from when I worked as an educator.

“Periodontitis had significant direct effect, and indirect effect through diabetes, on the incidence of CKD. Awareness about systemic morbidities from periodontitis should be emphasized.”

In other words, if you have CKD or diabetes, make certain your dentist knows so he or she can monitor you for the beginning of periodontic problems. Just as with any other medical issue, the sooner you start treatment, the better. I can attest to this since I caught my pancreatic cancer early, which gave me a much better chance of eradicating it from my body.

The treatment for dry mouth seems simple enough, as explained by Healthline (Thank you again for the two awards!) at https://www.healthline.com/symptom/dry-mouth.

“Dry mouth is usually a temporary and treatable condition. In most cases, you can prevent and relieve symptoms of dry mouth by doing one or more of the following:

  • sipping water often
  • sucking on ice cubes
  • avoiding alcohol, caffeine, and tobacco
  • limiting your salt and sugar intake
  • using a humidifier in your bedroom when you sleep
  • taking over-the-counter saliva substitutes
  • chewing sugarless gum or sucking on sugarless hard candy
  • over- the-counter toothpastes, rinses, and mints

If your dry mouth is caused by an underlying health condition, you may require additional treatment. Ask your doctor for more information about your specific condition, treatment options, and long-term outlook.”

The sugarless gum works well for me and, as an added benefit, quelled the nausea from the radiation treatments, too. While I don’t drink or smoke, I will have an occasional half cup of coffee when I can tolerate it. I didn’t know this was something to be avoided. As both a CKD patient and a type 2 diabetic (Thanks, pancreatic cancer.), I was already avoiding salt and sugar. So, without realizing it, I was already helping myself deal with dry mouth. Lucky me.

That got me to thinking. What other problems could dry mouth cause? I went to NHS Inform at https://www.nhsinform.scot/illnesses-and-conditions/mouth/dry-mouth to look for an answer. Indeed, this is a Scottish website, but a mouth is a mouth no matter where it’s located, right?

  • “a burning sensation or soreness in your mouth
  • dry lips
  • bad breath (halitosis)
  • a decreased or altered sense of taste
  • recurrent mouth infections, such as oral thrush
  • tooth decay and gum disease
  • difficulty speaking, eating or swallowing”

On a personal note, I found the halitosis embarrassing and the altered sense of taste frustrating. And here, I’d been blaming the chemo for that. Maybe it was the chemo, although my age could also be the cause of my dry mouth. I do admit that 72 could be considered “aging.” My husband orders the groceries and we now have a pantry full of food I used to love but all taste, well, funny now. Poor guy, he was just trying to get me to eat when he ordered the food. He knew calorie intake is important when you’re dealing with cancer.

I wondered what the symptoms of dry mouth were… well, other than a dry mouth, that is.

“Common symptoms include:

  • A sticky, dry feeling in the mouth
  • Frequent thirst
  • Sores in the mouth; sores or split skin at the corners of the mouth; cracked lips
  • A dry feeling in the throat
  • A burning or tingling sensation in the mouth and especially on the tongue
  • A dry, red, raw tongue
  • Problems speaking or trouble tasting, chewing, and swallowing
  • Hoarseness, dry nasal passages, sore throat
  • Bad breath

Thank you to WebMD at https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/dental-health-dry-mouth#1 for the above information.

Will you look at that! Just as diabetes can cause CKD and CKD can cause diabetes, bad breath (halitosis), soreness or burning sensation in the mouth can both be symptoms of dry mouth and problems caused by dry mouth.

Let’s see now. What else can I tell you about dry mouth? DentistryIQ at https://www.dentistryiq.com/clinical/oral-cancer/article/16356305/facts-about-dry-mouth is a new site for me. They describe themselves as “… a leading source of information that helps dental professionals achieve excellence in their positions, whether that position is dentist, dental practice owner, dental hygienist, dental office manager, dental assistant, or dental school student.” I went there to find out just how many people suffer from dry mouth.

“It is estimated to affect millions of people in the United States, particularly women and the elderly…. Current research indicates that approximately one in four adults suffer from dry mouth, and this figure increases to 40 percent in populations over the age of 55….”

This was back in 2006, and unfortunately are the most current figures I could find. Please let us know if you can find more current numbers.

Personal note: Tomorrow I will be having surgery to remove the pancreatic cancerous tumor I’ve been dealing with since last February. The blogs will be posted right on time, but comments, emails, etc. probably won’t be answered for a while. I’ve been told this is an arduous surgery with a long, slow recovery period. Keep well until we can communicate again.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

How Will They Know?

Let’s start this month with a guest blog by American Medical Alert IDs. Why? Although I am not endorsing this particular brand, because I clearly remember being give Sulphur drugs in the Emergency Room when I was by myself and unable to let the medical staff there know I have Chronic Kidney Disease. Why? Because I remember that my husband fell when I was out of town. His grown children took him to the emergency room but didn’t know about his latex allergy and he was in no condition to explain.

 

Everything You Need To Know About Medical Alert IDs for Chronic Kidney Disease


Are you debating on getting a medical alert ID for chronic kidney disease? It’s time to take the confusion out of choosing and engraving a medical ID. This post will show you everything you need to know so you can enjoy the benefits of wearing one.

Why Kidney Patients Should Wear a Medical Alert ID

A medical ID serves as an effective tool to alert emergency staff of a patient’s special care needs, even when a person can’t speak for themselves. When every second counts, wearing a medical ID can help protect the kidney and safeguard its remaining function.

In emergencies, anyone diagnosed with chronic kidney disease or kidney failure may require special medical attention and monitoring. It is important that patients are able to communicate and identify their medical condition at all times. This includes individuals who are:

  • Undergoing in-center hemodialysis
  • Undergoing home hemodialysis
  • On Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis (CAPD)
  • On Continuous Cycling Peritoneal Dialysis (CCPD)
  • Transplant recipients
  • Diagnosed with diabetes

Delays in getting the proper treatment needed for chronic kidney disease may lead to the following complications:

  • Fatal levels of potassium or hyperkalemia. This condition can lead to dangerous, and possibly deadly, changes in the heart rhythm.
  • Increased risk of peritonitis or inflammation of the membranes of the abdominal wall and organs. Peritonitis is a life-threatening emergency that needs prompt medical treatment.
  • Anemia or decreased supply in red blood cells. Anemia can make a patient tired, weak, and short of breath.
  • Heart disease, heart attack, congestive heart failure, and stroke
  • High blood pressure which can cause further damage to the kidneys and negatively impact blood vessels, heart, and other organs in the body.
  • Fluid buildup in the body that can cause problems with the heart and lungs.

According to Medscape, the most common cause of sudden death in patients with ESRD is hyperkalemia, which often follows missed dialysis or dietary indiscretion. The most common cause of death overall in the dialysis population is cardiovascular disease; cardiovascular mortality is 10-20 times higher in dialysis patients than in the general population.

Kidney Patients Who Wear a Medical ID Have 62% Lower Risk of Renal Failure

In a study of 350 patients, primarily in CKD stages 2 through 5, those who wore a medical ID bracelet or necklace had a 62% lower risk of developing kidney failure, based on eGFR. Wearing a medical-alert bracelet or necklace was associated with a lower risk of developing kidney failure compared with usual care.

Wearing a medical ID can serve as a reminder to look after your health and make the right choices such as taking medication on time and sticking to proper diet.

6 Things to Engrave on Kidney Disease Medical ID

A custom engraved medical alert jewelry can hold precise information that is specific to the wearer’s health condition. Here are some of the most important items to put on a chronic kidney disease or kidney failure medical ID:

  • Name
  • Medical information – including if you have other medical conditions such as diabetes or high blood pressure
  • Stage of CKD or kidney function
  • Transplant information
  • Current list of medicines
  • Contact person

Some patients have a long list of medications that may not fit on the engraved part of an ID. An emergency wallet card is recommended to use for listing down your medicines and other information or medical history.

 

Click here to enlarge chronic kidney disease infographic

Do you wear or carry a form of medical identification with you? Please share your experience or tips with us by posting a comment.

Ready for a new topic? All right then. Ever have a problem drinking your coffee? I know I have… until I followed these tips from the Cleveland Clinic at https://health.clevelandclinic.org/coffee-giving-you-tummy-trouble-try-these-low-acid-options/:

Here’s hoping that next cup of coffee treats you well.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

 

Where Did This All Come From?

Some people think SlowItDownCKD is a business; it’s not. Some think it’s a profit maker; it’s not. So, what is it you ask? It’s a vehicle for spreading awareness of Chronic Kidney Disease and whatever goes along with the disease. Why do I do it? Because I had no idea what it was, nor how I might have prevented the disease, nor how to deal with it effectively once I was diagnosed.

At that time I was a college instructor. My favorite course to teach was Research Writing. I was also a writer with an Academic Certificate in Creative Non-Fiction and a bunch of publications under my belt. It occurred to me that I couldn’t be the only one who had no clue what this new-to-me disease was and how to handle living with it. I knew how to research and I knew how to write, so why not share what I learned?

I wasn’t sure of what had to be done to share or how to do it. I learned by trial and error. People were so kind in teaching me, pointing out what might work better, even suggesting others that might be interested in what I was doing. I love people.

First came the books. I’d written quite a few how to(s), study guides, articles, and literary guides so the writing was not new to me. I asked for suggestions as to what to do with my writing and that’s when I learned about unscrupulous, price gouging vanity publishers. I’m still paying for that mistake with my first book What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, but it was a learning experience.

You already know the blog was born of necessity when an Indian doctor explained to me that he wanted his new patients to read What Is It and How Did I Early It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, but they couldn’t even afford the bus fare to the clinic. That’s when I got the bright idea of blogging a chapter a week so he could translate and print the blog post, and then the patients that did make it to the clinic could bring the blog back to their villages for others to read.

It would work! But first I had to teach myself how to blog. I made some boo-boos and lost a bunch of blogs until I got it figured out. So why do I keep blogging? There always seems to be more to share about CKD. Each week, I wonder what I’ll write… and the ideas keep coming.

Then my New York daughter, Nima, started teaching me about social media. What???? You could post whatever you wanted to? And Facebook wasn’t the only way to reach the public at large? Hello LinkedIn. A friend who is a professional photographer asked me why I wasn’t using my fun photography habit to promote awareness. What??? You could do that? Hello Instagram. My step-daughters love Pinterest. That got me to thinking…. Then someone I met at a conference casually mentioned she offers Twitter workshops. What kind of workshops? She showed me how to use Twitter to raise CKD awareness.

When I was diagnosed back in 2008, there weren’t that many reader friendly books on anything having to do with CKD. Since then, more and more books on the subject have been published. I’m laughing along with you, but I don’t mean just SlowItDownCKD 2011, SlowItDownCKD 2012 (These two were The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1, until I realized how unwieldy both the book and the title were – another learning experience), SlowItDownCKD 2013, SlowItDownCKD 2014 (These two were formerly The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2), SlowItDownCKD 2015, SlowItDownCKD 2016, and SlowItDownCKD 2017. By the way, I’m already working on SlowItDownCKD 2018. Each book contains the blogs for that year. 

Have you read the guest blogs or book review blogs to get a taste of what’s available now? Last week, Suzanne Ruff guest blogged. She wrote The Reluctant Donor, which I just wrote a review for on Amazon. Her guest blog explains what her book is about. Don’t forget Dr. Mandip S. Kang’s book, The Doctor’s Kidney Diets which also contains so much non-dietary information that we as CKD patients need to know. Another very helpful book is Drs. Raymond R. Townsend and Debbie L. Cohen’s 100 Questions & Answers About Kidney Disease and Hypertension. Neuropharmacologist Dr. Walter Hunt wrote Kidney Disease: A Guide for Living. Renal Dietitian Nina Kolbe wrote from her perspective: 10 Step Diet & Lifestyle Plan for Healthier Kidneys. Dr. Mackenzie Walser wrote Coping with Kidney Disease: A 12 – Step Treatment Program to Help You Avoid Dialysis. I also just wrote an Amazon review for Who Lives, Who Dies With Kidney Disease by Drs. Mohammad Akmal and Vasundhara Raghavan.

While I may or may not agree with all or part of the information in these books, they have either been mentioned, reviewed, or guest blogged on SlowItDownCKD because I want you to be aware of whatever help may be available to you.

That, of course, brings us to the Facebook support groups. I miss my New York daughter and she misses me, so we sometimes have coffee together separately. She has a cup of coffee and I do at the same time. It’s not like being together in person, but it’s something. You can find support the same way via Facebook. Since I’m both running out of room and have periodically reviewed these groups, I’m just going to list a few. You can use the search bar at the top of your Facebook page for others.

Kidney Disease, Dialysis, and Transplant

The Transplant Community Outreach

P2P

Kidney Disease Ideas and Diets1

People on Dialysis

Chronic Kidney Disease in India

Friends Sharing Positive Chronic Kidney Disease

Chronic Kidney Disease Awareness

CKD (Kidney Failure) Support Group International

Kidney Warriors Foundation

Kidney Disease is not a Joke

Kidney Disease Diet Ideas and Help

Sharing your Kidney Journey

Mani Trust

Dialysis & Kidney Disease

Kidneys and Vets

Women’s Renal Failure

I Hate Dialysis

Mark’s Private Kidney Disease Group

UK Kidney Support

Wrap Up Warm for Kidney Disease

Stage 3 ‘n 4 Kidneybeaners Gathering Place

 

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

 

 

All of Me, uh, Us

When I was a little girl, I liked to listen to my father whistle ‘All of Me,’ written by Marks and Simon in 1931 when Charlie, my father, was just 16. Only a few years later, it became a sort of love language for my mother and him. Enter a former husband of my own and my children. When my folks visited from Florida and my then husband’s side of the family journeyed over to Staten Island from Brooklyn to visit them, they all sang the song with great emotion. (By then, Bell’s palsy had robbed my father of the ability to whistle.)

To this day, I start welling up when I hear that song. But then I started thinking about the lyrics:

“All of me
Why not take all of me?”

Suddenly, it popped. For us, those with chronic kidney disease, it should be:

“All of us

Why not take all of us?”

For research purposes. To “speed up health research breakthroughs.” For help in our lifetime. To spare future generations whatever it is we’re suffering… and not just for us, but for our children… and their children, too.

The National Institutes of Health has instituted a new research program for just that purpose, although it’s open to anyone in the U.S. over the age of 18 whether ill with any disease or perfectly healthy. While only English and Spanish are the languages they can accommodate at this time, they are adding other languages.

I’m going to devote most of the rest of this blog to them. By the way, I’m even more inclined to be in favor of this program because they launched on my first born’s birthdate: May 6. All of Us has its own inspiring welcome for you at https://launch.joinallofus.org/

This is how they explain who they are and what they intend to do:

“The goal is to advance precision medicine. Precision medicine is health care that is based on you as an individual. It takes into account factors like where you live, what you do, and your family health history. Precision medicine’s goal is to be able to tell people the best ways to stay healthy. If someone does get sick, precision medicine may help health care teams find the treatment that will work best.

To get there, we need one million or more people. Those who join will share information about their health over time. Researchers will study this data. What they learn could improve health for generations to come. Participants are our partners. We’ll share information back with them over time.”

You’ll be reading more about precision medicine, which I’ve written about before, in upcoming blogs. This is from All of Us’s website at https://www.joinallofus.org/en, as is most of the other information in today’s blog, and makes it easy to understand just what they are doing.

How It Works

Participants Share Data

Participants share health data online. This data includes health surveys and electronic health records. Participants also may be asked to share physical measurements and blood and urine samples.

Data Is Protected

Personal information, like your name, address, and other things that easily identify participants will be removed from all data. Samples—also without any names on them—are stored in a secure biobank.

Researchers Study Data

In the future, approved researchers will use this data to conduct studies. By finding patterns in the data, they may make the next big medical breakthroughs.

Participants Get Information

Participants will get information back about the data they provide, which may help them learn more about their health.

Researchers Share Discoveries

Research may help in many ways. It may help find the best ways for people to stay healthy. It may also help create better tests and find the treatments that will work best for different people.

I’m busy, too busy to take on even one more thing. Or so I thought. When I read the benefits of the program (above) and how easy it is to join (below), I realized I’m not too busy for this and it is another way to advocate for Chronic Kidney Disease awareness. So I joined and hope you will, too.

Benefits of Taking Part

Joining the All of Us Research Program has its benefits.

Our goal is for you to have a direct impact on cutting-edge research. By joining the program, you are helping researchers to learn more about different diseases and treatments.

Here are some of the benefits of participating in All of Us.

Better Information

We’re all human, but we’re not all the same. Often our differences—like age, ethnicity, lifestyle habits, or where we live—can reveal important insights about our health.

By participating in All of Us, you may learn more about your health than ever before. If you like, you can share this information with your health care provider.

Better Tools

The goal of the program is better health for all of us. We want to inspire researchers to create better tools to identify, prevent, and treat disease.

You may also learn how to use tools like mobile devices, cell phones and tablets, to encourage healthier habits.

Better Research

We expect the All of Us Research Program to be here for the long-term. As the program grows, the more features will be added. There’s no telling what we can discover. All thanks to participants like you.

Better Ideas

You’re our partner. And as such, you are invited to help guide All of Us. Share your ideas and let us know what works, and what doesn’t.

Oh, about joining:

Get Started – Sign Up

Here’s a quick overview of what you’ll need to do to join.

1

Create an Account

You will need to give an email address and password.

2

Fill in the Enrollment and Consent Forms

The process usually takes 18-30 minutes. If you leave the portal during the consent process, you will have to start again from the beginning.

3

Complete Surveys and More

Once you have given your consent, you will be asked to complete online health surveys. You may be asked to visit a partner center. There, you’ll be asked to provide blood and urine samples and have your physical measurements taken. We may also ask you to share data from wearables or other personal devices.

Before I leave you today, I have – what else? – a book give away. The reason? Just to share the joy that’s walked into my life lately. It’s easy to share the troubles; why not the joys? If you haven’t received one of my books in a giveaway before, all you have to do is be the first person to let me know you want this copy of SlowItDownCKD 2017.

 

I need to get back to that online health survey for All of Us now.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

 

Published in: on May 21, 2018 at 10:38 am  Leave a Comment  
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The Constant Student

Last week, I was excited about a new word and, boy oh boy, did I learn even more about gastroparesis after my blog was posted on Facebook Kidney Disease Support Pages. This week, it’s a new test that a reader asked me about: the Iothalamate clearance test.

This is what the University of Washington at http://www.uwmedicine.org/health-library/Pages/iothalamate-scan.aspx had to say about the test:

“An Iothalamate study is a diagnostic nuclear medicine procedure used to find out your glomerular filtration rate (GFR) for each kidney….

How Does It Work?

A small amount of a radioactive material, called radiotracer, is injected into the muscle of your upper arm. This material is excreted out of your blood, into your urine, by glomerular filtration. By taking samples of your blood and urine over time, we are able to calculate what your GFR is. This gives your doctor information about the health of your kidneys.

How Do I Prepare?

  • Drink 20 ml of water per kilogram of body weight in the 90 minutes before arriving in the department. For most people, this is about 1 to 2 1-liter bottles of water.
  • Drink lots of fluids throughout the 4-hour study. The study may be continued for more time if more urine is needed.
  • You need to be able to empty your bladder completely.
  • Most patients are required to withhold diuretics the day of the test. Check with your doctor if you take diuretics.
  • Do not consume any caffeine the morning of the study.

How is the study performed?

  1. When you arrive at the lab, the technologist will check your blood pressure. You will need to completely empty your bladder into a container. The technologist will also place an IV into one of your veins and take a sample of your blood.
  2. The radioactive tracer will be injected into your upper arm muscle. The technologist will take another blood pressure reading about 10 minutes later.
  3. You will return every hour, for 4 hours. Each hour, the technologist will take a blood sample and ask you to completely empty your bladder into a container. It is very important that you do not go to the bathroom outside of the department.
  4. Throughout the study, you will be required to drink plenty of fluids, and avoid caffeine. You will be allowed to eat.
  5. After 5 urine and blood samples are collected, the IV will be removed and you are free to leave. This urine will be analyzed and measured.

What will I feel during the study?

Most people feel no different than normal during this study. Some people may feel a little shaky after the injection of the radiotracer. This is because a small amount of epinephrine is added to the radiotracer to improve its absorption. You may also have minor discomfort from holding your bladder….

Whoa, baby! Nuclear medicine? Radioactive material? Epinephrine? I understood why no diuretics, but why no caffeine? Any why was there an IV?

I know, I know. Start slowly. According to RadiologyInfo at https://www.radiologyinfo.org/en/info.cfm?pg=gennuclear,

“​Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material to diagnose and determine the severity of or treat a variety of diseases, including many types of cancers, heart disease, gastrointestinal, endocrine, neurological disorders and other abnormalities within the body. Because nuclear medicine procedures are able to pinpoint molecular activity within the body, they offer the potential to identify disease in its earliest stages as well as a patient’s immediate response to therapeutic interventions.”

Okay, got it. And radioactive?  MedicineNet at https://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=11952 defines the word this way:

“Radioactive: Emitting energy waves due to decaying atomic nuclei. Radioactive substances are used in medicine as tracers for diagnosis and in treatment to kill cancerous cells.”

As a side note, as far as I could tell this test is not used on pregnant women or those who are breastfeeding since a radioactive substance is involved.

I couldn’t decide if I was feeling better or worse about nuclear medicine to diagnose Chronic Kidney Disease. So I looked… and looked…and looked again before I realized it’s contrast dye that may cause injury in those with CKD, not radioactive material. No wonder some nephrologists have no compunction about ordering this test. By the way, radioactive exposure in this test is less than that in a CT scan.

Hmmm, epinephrine sounds familiar. Of course! My buddy back East carries an epi pen just in case she’s stung by a bee. Epinephrine is also known as adrenaline. Ah, so adrenaline “is added to the radiotracer to improve its absorption.” Makes sense.

Now that we know that epinephrine is adrenaline, we can easily understand why no caffeine. Remember that song, “Fly Me to the Moon”? Between the adrenaline and the caffeine, you’d be flying yourself to the moon.

What also makes sense is no diuretics. You wouldn’t want to be urinating more than necessary if your urine is being evaluated. That might dilute the very small amount of radioactive material that was injected into the muscle of your arm.

So, what’s the IV for you ask.  That’s how the radiotracer is injected and/or how the blood samples are obtained. I know I’d rather have one IV instead of four or five needle sticks for individual blood draws. Apparently, there are variations in how the test is administered.

 

Now the biggie: Why use this test at all? This is from the glossary in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease:

“GFR: Glomerular filtration rate [if there is a lower case “e” before the term, it means estimated glomerular filtration rate] which determines both the stage of kidney disease and how well the kidneys are functioning.”

The Iothalamate clearance test is a measured GRF test. It doesn’t estimate, but actually measures your GFR, sort of like real time videos are not replays but live. Your doctor may doubt the results of your eGFR, the routine test, due to your serum creatinine output or some other variable. Age, race, gender, and muscle mass all affect the eGFR. The Iothalamate clearance test will give him an accurate measurement of your GFR so he will know not only what stage of CKD you are in, but how to treat it.

I hope this is helpful to the reader who asked.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Decisions, Decisions

A reader asked me how I choose the articles or studies I include in the blogs. Now you’ve got to remember that researching and I go way back. I was fortunate in that Research Writing was my favorite course to teach before I retired as a community college instructor. I loved it.

I was going to give you my take on researching when I stumbled across Dr. Alicia White’s piece on the United Kingdom’s National Health Services site at https://www.nhs.uk/news/Pages/Howtoreadarticlesabouthealthandhealthcare.aspx. She’s already written what I would have, so I’m dedicating today’s blog to that. I have not reproduced all of it only because I don’t have the room in the blog for that. Oh, those are not typos; they’re the UK spelling. Take it away, Dr. White:

If you’ve just read a health-related headline that has caused you to spit out your morning coffee (“Coffee causes cancer” usually does the trick), it’s always best to follow the Blitz slogan: “Keep Calm and Carry On”. On reading further, you’ll often find the headline has left out something important, such as: “Injecting five rats with really highly concentrated coffee solution caused some changes in cells that might lead to tumours eventually (study funded by The Association of Tea Marketing).”

The most important rule to remember is: don’t automatically believe the headline. …, you need to analyse the article to see what it says about the research it is reporting on….

Does the article support its claims with scientific research?

Your first concern should be the research behind the news article. If an article touts a treatment or some aspect of your lifestyle that is supposed to prevent or cause a disease, but doesn’t give any information about the scientific research behind it, then treat it with a lot of caution. The same applies to research that has yet to be published.

Is the article based on a conference abstract?

Another area for caution is if the news article is based on a conference abstract. Research presented at conferences is often at a preliminary stage and usually hasn’t been scrutinised by experts in the field. Also, conference abstracts rarely provide full details about methods, making it difficult to judge how well the research was conducted. …

Was the research in humans?

Quite often, the “miracle cure” in the headline turns out to have only been tested on cells in the laboratory or on animals. … Studies in cells and animals are crucial first steps and should not be undervalued. However, many drugs that show promising results in cells in laboratories don’t work in animals, and many drugs that show promising results in animals don’t work in humans. If you read a headline about a drug or food “curing” rats, there is a chance it might cure humans in the future, but unfortunately a larger chance that it won’t…..

How many people did the research study include?

In general, the larger a study the more you can trust its results. Small studies may miss important differences because they lack statistical “power”, and are also more susceptible to finding things (including things that are wrong) purely by chance. … When it comes to sample sizes, bigger is usually better. So when you see a study conducted in a handful of people, treat it with caution.

Did the study have a control group?

…. If the question being asked is about whether a treatment or exposure has an effect or not, then the study needs to have a control group. A control group allows the researchers to compare what happens to people who have the treatment/exposure with what happens to people who don’t. …

Also, it’s important that the control group is as similar to the treated/exposed group as possible. The best way to achieve this is to randomly assign some people to be in the treated/exposed group and some people to be in the control group. This is what happens in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) and is why RCTs are considered the “gold standard” for testing the effects of treatments and exposures. … Without either, retain some healthy scepticism.

Did the study actually assess what’s in the headline?

…. For example, you might read a headline that claims: “Tomatoes reduce the risk of heart attacks.” What you need to look for is evidence that the study actually looked at heart attacks. You might instead see that the study found that tomatoes reduce blood pressure. This means that someone has extrapolated that tomatoes must also have some impact on heart attacks, as high blood pressure is a risk factor for heart attacks. Sometimes these extrapolations will prove to be true, but other times they won’t. Therefore if a news story is focusing on a health outcome that was not examined by the research, treat it with a pinch of salt.

Who paid for and conducted the study?

This is a somewhat cynical point, but one that’s worth making. The majority of trials today are funded by manufacturers of the product being tested – be it a drug, vitamin cream or foodstuff. This means they have a vested interest in the results of the trial, which can potentially affect what the researchers find and report in all sorts of conscious and unconscious ways. This is not to say that all manufacturer-sponsored trials are unreliable. Many are very good. However, it’s worth seeing who funded the study to sniff out a potential conflict of interest….

Many thanks to Dr. White for her explanations.

Here we are in the middle of madness, holiday madness that is. Of course, that means we need to remind ourselves to slow down and de-stress. Exercising is one way to de-stress. We all have different ways to do that. The important thing is to do it… and stick to your renal diet if you follow one.

To those of who you celebrate Chanukah, I wish you a happy and a healthy first night tomorrow night. We’ll be lighting the Menorah along with you. It’ll be hard not to eat the chocolate gelt (money), but you can do it.

Until next week,
Keep living your life!

Just Blend In

Well, if that doesn’t beat all! Here I thought I was juicing until a reader asked me if my nephrologist knew the difference between juicing and blending. There’s something called blending? Let’s get my doctor out of the equation right away. He may or may not know the difference between the two, but I certainly didn’t.

I heard juicing and just assumed (and we all know what happens when we assume) it meant tossing 80% vegetables – since this was prescribed for fast weight loss – and 20% fruits in the blender. Hmmm, the name of the machine I used should have tipped me off that there was a difference, but it went right over my head.

Let me tell you what I learned. Juice, according to Dictionary.com at http://www.dictionary.com/browse/juicing, is: “the natural fluid, fluid content or liquid part that can be extracted from a plant or one of its parts…” while juicing is “to extract juice from.” Uh-uh, I wasn’t doing that. There was no pulp left after the vegetables and fruits were processed in the blender. It all sort of mushed – oh, all right – blended together.

The same dictionary tells me blending is: “to mix smoothly and inseparably together.” Yep, that’s what I’ve been doing. By the way, for those of you who asked to be kept posted about any weight loss, I’ve lost five pounds in ten days. To be perfectly candid, there was one day of I’m-going-to-eat-anything-I –want! mixed in there.

Another CKD Awareness Advocate wondered just what I was doing to my electrolyte limits while on this blending (I do know that’s what it is now.) diet. I arbitrarily chose a recipe from a juicing book I got online before I realized I wasn’t juicing. The recipe called for:

2 beets (what a mess to peel and chop)

2 carrots (I used the equivalent in baby ones since my hands were already starting to hurt from dealing with the beets)

8 strawberries

7 leaves of kale – which I learned is also called Tuscan cabbage

I added a cup of water since I wasn’t taking any pulp out, so the mixture was really thick.

All the ingredients were on my renal diet. So far, so good. But the question was about my daily electrolyte limits. My limits are as follows (Yours may be different since the limits usually are based upon your most current labs.):

Calories – 2100

Potassium – 3000 mg.

Phosphorous – 800 mg.

Protein – 5 ounces (141,748 mg.)

Sodium – 2000 mg.

Nutritional Data at http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2348/2 tells me I drank this much of each of those electrolytes in the total of two drinks I had of this concoction… I mean blend. The measurement is milligrams and each drink replaces a meal.

 

 

Protein Phosphorus
Beets  1300   33
Carrots  2700   42
Kale  2200   38
Strawberries  1000   37
Totals  7200 150

 

 

 

Potassium

 

 

Sodium

Beets   267  1300
Carrots   359   2700
Kale   299  2200
Strawberries   233   1000
Totals  1158  7200

 

 Calories
Beets    33
Carrots    42
Kale    38
Strawberries    37
Totals   150

I had to backtrack a little to figure out that 8 baby carrots is the equivalent to 2/3 of a cup or a little over five oz. Thanks to http://www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org/how-much-do-i-need for the help there. They were also the source I used to verify that 8 large strawberries equal 1 cup or 8 oz.

The calculations were the hardest part of this blog for me. I rounded up whenever possible. Also, keep in mind that different sites or books may give you different approximations for the electrolytes in the different amounts of each different food you blend. I discovered that when I was researching and decided to stick with the simplest site for me to understand.

So, did I exceed my limits? I am permitted three different vegetables per day with a serving of half a cup per vegetable. There are only three vegetables in this recipe. I did go over ½ cup with the all of them, yet am under my limitations for each of the electrolytes. This is complicated. As for the fruit, I am also allowed three different ones with ½ cup limit on each. Or can I count the one cup of strawberries as two servings of today’s vegetables? Welcome to my daily conundrum.

Over all, I still have plenty of electrolytes available to me for my third meal today, which is to be a light meal of regular foods (provided they’re on my renal diet). I also have two cups of coffee a day which has its own numbers:

Protein  Phosphorus Potassium  Sodium   Calories

6000              14                232               9               4

Add those in and I still have plenty of food available to me with the electrolytes within the balance limits. The funny part is that I’m not hungry for hours after one of the blended drinks and, bam! all of a sudden I’m ravenous. I usually have the light meal mid-day so I’m not still digesting at bedtime. This is really important: on that I’m-going-to-eat-anything-I –want! day, I was hungier and hungier the more I ate and didn’t recognize when I was full.

The nice part about blending is that the fiber is still in the mixture. Fiber is necessary for a multitude of reasons when you’re a CKD patient. DaVita at https://www.davita.com/kidney-disease/diet-and-nutrition/diet-basics/fiber-in-the-kidney-diet/e/5320 lists those reasons for us:

Benefits of fiber

Adequate fiber in the kidney diet can be beneficial to people with chronic kidney disease (CKD) because it:

  • Keeps GI (gastrointestinal) function healthy
  • Adds bulk to stool to prevent constipation
  • Prevents diverticulosis (pockets inside the colon)
  • Helps increase water in stool for easier bowel movements
  • Promotes regularity
  • Prevents hemorrhoids
  • Helps control blood sugar and cholesterol

Our fourth anniversary is Thursday. We have had numerous health problems to deal with since that date, BUT we’ve also had numerous opportunities for fun…and we’ve taken each one. Did I ever tell you we had the ceremony at 4 p.m. in our backyard and the reception at 6 p.m. in order to help us remember the date? 4/6 = April 6th. Get it?

Anyway, any help offered to make the blending and a light meal work on Saturday when we’ll be celebrating by attending the Phoenix Film Festival (http://www.phoenixfilmfestival.com/) all day and night will be gratefully accepted. Bring your copy of one of my books. I’ll gladly sign it for you.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Never Too Old to Learn

CoffeeCupPopCatalinStockLast week, we were delighted to have an overnight guest we hadn’t seen for a year or two. While we were all waking ourselves up the next morning, I asked him if he’d like some coffee.  Yep, he’s my family; that look of delight on his face when he thought of coffee confirmed it. Then I asked if he took milk in his coffee. Hmmm, more confirmation: he passed on the milk claiming lactose intolerance, another family trait. But when we got to the sugar question, he startled me. His response was something like no thanks, I have high cholesterol. After a moment of stunned silence, I asked why he connected cholesterol and sugar. He said his doctor told him to cut down on sugars to lower his cholesterol. Hmmm, very interesting.

This is the definition of cholesterol from What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Early Disease:FullSizeRender (2)

While the basis for both sex hormones and bile, can cause blockages if it accumulates in the lining of a blood vessel.

If that doesn’t ring a bell, here’s the definition of dyslipidemia:

Abnormal levels of cholesterol, triglyceride or both

Now we know there’s a normal and an abnormal level of cholesterol and that can’t be good. Is that a big deal?

It is if you have Chronic Kidney Disease.  Dr. Joseph Vassalotti, one of leading nephrologists in the U.S., explained it to reporter Jane Brody in an interview which is included in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1.

IMG_2982Good  control  of  blood  sugar, blood pressure, cholesterol levels and body weight can delay the loss of kidney function.

I repeat, “…can delay the loss of kidney function.” That has been your ultimate goal since you were diagnosed, hasn’t it?

You may become confused by the three different kinds of cholesterol readings when you see the results of your blood tests.  I know I was, so I researched them and then wrote about them in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2.

HDL is High Density Lipoprotein, the cholesterol that keeps your arteries clear or – as it’s commonly called – the good cholesterol. LDL is Low Density Lipoprotein or the ‘bad’ kind that can clog your arteries. VLDL is Very Low Density Lipoprotein and one of the bad guys, too. It contains more triglycerides than protein and is big on clogging those arteries.FullSizeRender (3)

Wait a minute. Where did triglycerides come into this? According to the Mayo Clinic at http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-cholesterol/in-depth/triglycerides/ART-20048186

Triglycerides and cholesterol are separate types of lipids that circulate in your blood. Triglycerides store unused calories and provide your body with energy, and cholesterol is used to build cells and certain hormones. Because triglycerides and cholesterol can’t dissolve in blood, they circulate throughout your body with the help of proteins that transport the lipids (lipoproteins).

Still with me?  Good, because you can do something about this.

cholestero

Sometimes, it’s as simple as lifestyle changes like adjusting your diet. While I don’t agree with all of this advice, DaVita at http://www.davita.com/kidney-disease/diet-and-nutrition/diet-basics/lowering-cholesterol-with-chronic-kidney-disease/e/5304 can get you started.

  •  Avoid foods high in saturated fat and cholesterol such as whole milk, cheese and fat from meat.
  • Bake, grill, broil and roast your poultry, fish and meat. Choose lean cuts of meat and trim off any fat.
  • Eggs are an excellent source of protein, but the yolks are high in cholesterol. Try egg substitutes like Egg Beaters® or Scramblers®, or substitute two egg whites for a whole egg.
  • Eat at least two servings of fish every week. Salmon, tuna, herring and trout contain good amounts of omega-3 fatty acids that lower your risk of heart disease.
  • Try spreads like Benecol® or Take Control® in place of butter or margarine. Plant sterols and stanols in these spreads help lower cholesterol levels.
  • Choose oils that are high in mono- and polyunsaturated fats: canola, olive, peanut, corn, safflower, soybean and sunflower.
  • Read food labels and try to eliminate foods with trans-fats (found in hydrogenated oils, margarine and many commercially prepared snack foods).
  • Eat kidney-friendly fruits and vegetables.water melon

Of course, if you’re diabetic or prediabetic, you need to modify these suggestions for your diet.

As was suggested in this Everyday Health article (http://www.everydayhealth.com/high-cholesterol/fitness-and-cholesterol.aspx) included in SlowItDownCKD 2015, exercise will help.

       Try these exercise options to help shed pounds and manage high cholesterol:

  • Walking
  • Jogging or running
  • Swimming
  • Taking an aerobics class
  • Biking
  • Playing tennis, basketball, or other sports
  • Using weight machines or lifting free weights to build muscle tone

statinsIf life style changes don’t work for you, your doctor may prescribe a statin.  The Merriam-Webster Dictionary at http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/statin defines this as:

any of a group of drugs (as lovastatin and simvastatin) that inhibit the synthesis of cholesterol and promote the production of LDL-binding receptors in the liver resulting in a usually marked decrease in the level of LDL and a modest increase in the level of HDL circulating in blood plasma

There are substantial arguments against taking statins, but there are also substantial arguments for taking them.  This is something you have to discuss with your doctors since you have a unique medical condition.

Finally, sugar. What did my cousin’s doctor mean about sugar’s role in lowering his cholesterol? This was news to me, so I researched. Sure enough, my cousin’s doctor was right.  According to Progressive Health at http://www.progressivehealth.com/sugar-may-be-the-cause-of-your-elevated-cholestero.htm:

Sugar is a good example of a carbohydrate with high glycemic index. It can, therefore, increase the amount of small, dense LDL particles in the blood.

Although, health experts used to advocate that we cut the amount of sugar we consume because high blood sugar can cause insulin resistance and increase the risk of diabetes, there is now another reason to cut down on our sugar consumption.sugar

A number of studies show that sugar can affect the kind and amount of cholesterol released into the blood.

So? According to the US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4297703/

That’s a pretty big ‘so.’

Until next week,

Enjoy your life!

It’s Not Lemonade

Why drinking water with lemon is good for you screamed The Chicago Tribune at me today. Hmmm, I’d been wondering about that. Last week, happy birthdayI’d attended the 60th birthday celebration of my friend Naomi. She is studying nutritional counseling. That’s right: studying at age 60. As you can tell, no grass grows under the feet of the people in my social circle.

The celebration was held in one of the beautiful resorts out here in Arizona, The Sanctuary, in The Jade Bar to be exact. It was an odd location since this bar was long and narrow with couches and comfortable chairs lined up, but no place to mingle or chat in small groups. We ended up climbing over each other just to get to the rest room. Yet, my friend came running up to greet us.

Why? She wanted to know if I was drinking the water with lemon first thing in the morning as she’d suggested when I was a test case for one of her classes. She explained to me how important it was to people and her friends Lily and Patty leaned over to verify with their own personal anecdotes.

That, of course, got me to thinking. What was so special about this? Sure, it would warm up the vocal chords if you drank the lemon in warm water, but what else?

According to Tribune’s article at http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/health/sc-one-simple-thing-lemon-water-0420-20160415-story.html,

“Health experts say the acidity of the lemons improves digestion. Lemons contain potent antioxidants, which can also protect against disease, says Dr. Jonny Bowden, a nutritionist and health author. ‘It’s very alkalizing for the system,’ said the Woodland Hills, Calif.-based Bowden, whose lemonsbooks include “Smart Fat” and “The 150 Healthiest Foods on Earth.” Having a healthy alkaline balance helps fight germs.’”

Now this confused me. How can lemon – an acidic fruit – alkalinize your system?  Body Ecology at http://bodyecology.com/articles/acidic-foods-and-acid-forming-foods-do-you-know-the-difference had exactly what I needed:

“To clear up some of the confusion:

  • Acidic and alkaline describe the nature of food before it is eaten.
  • Acidifying foods and acid-forming foods are the same, making the body more acidic.
  • Alkalizing foods and alkaline-forming foods are the same, making the body more alkaline.”

I know, now you’re wondering what each of these terms mean. So am I…and I thought I knew. I turned to Online Biology Dictionary at http://www.macroevolution.net/biology-dictionary-aaaf.html:

“Acid – a sour-tasting compound that releases hydrogen ions to form a solution with a pH of less than 7, reacts with a base to form a salt, and turns blue litmus red…. An acid solution has a pH of less than 7.”

I used the same dictionary for the definition of alkaline, which referred me to the definition of alkali.

“Any metallic hydroxide other than ammonia that can join with an acid to form a salt (or with an oil to form soap).”

I didn’t find that very helpful so I turned to my old buddy The Merriam-Webster Dictionary at http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/alkali

“a soluble salt obtained from the ashes of plants and consisting largely of potassium or sodium carbonate; broadly:  a substance (as a hydroxide or carbonate of an alkali metal) having marked basic properties”

Okay, that’s a little better, but not much. Let’s try this another way. I perused site after site. What I gleaned from these is that lemons are, indeed, acidic before they are eaten, but the body metabolizes them into alkaline. There was plenty of specific science to explain this, but I didn’t understand half of it and prefer to keep it simple.

Of course, then I wanted to know why I was even bothering to research this at all. LifeHacks at http://www.lifehack.org/articles/lifestyle/11-benefits-lemon-water-you-didnt-know-about.html, a new site for me, made it abundantly clear.

  1. Gives your immune system a boost.
  2. Excellent source of potassium.
  3. Aids digestion.
  4. Cleanses your system.CoffeeCupPopCatalinStock
  5. Freshens your breath.
  6. Keeps your skin blemish-free.
  7. Helps you lose weight.
  8. Reduces inflammation.
  9. Gives you an energy boost.
  10. Helps to cut out caffeine.
  11. Helps fight viral infections.

Now, you do have Chronic Kidney Disease, so be aware that lemons are a high potassium food. Potassium is one of the electrolytes we need to limit. Also, if you are prone to kidney stones, you’ll be very interested to know lemons are full of vitamin C, something you may need to avoid.

So far, it sounds like lemon juice in water upon waking is a good thing if you keep the two caveats above in mind but I think I’ll just check into this a bit more.

I looked in my first CKD book, What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, and discovered this succinct explanation of why you want to keep the potassium levels under guard as a CKD patient:What is it

“Potassium is something you need to limit when you have CKD despite the fact that potassium not only dumps waste from your cells but also helps the kidneys, heart and muscles to function normally. Too much potassium can cause irregular heartbeat and even heart attack. This can be the most immediate danger of not limiting your potassium….

Keep in mind that as you age (you already know I’m in my 60s), your kidneys don’t do such a great job of eliminating potassium. So, just by aging, you may have an abundance of potassium. Check your blood tests. 3.5-5 is considered a safe level of potassium. You may have a problem if your blood level of potassium is 5.1-6, and you definitely need to attend to it if it’s above 6.  Speak to your nephrologist (although he or she will probably bring it up before you do).”

If you’re in the normal potassium range on your blood tests as I am, I say go for the lemon juice in water first thing in the morning. Of course, I’m not a doctor and – even if I were – I’m not your doctor, so check with him or her first.

Oh, hopefully by next week, I’ll be able to give you the address for the Edge Podcast I was interviewed on last week. It wasn’t just about CKD, much to my surprise… and maybe that of the Mike G’s (the interviewer), too.SlowItDownCKD 2015 Book Cover (76x113)

Until next week,

Keep living your life!IMG_1398

Is It Really So Bad?

Lately I’ve been experiencing what is commonly referred as interrupted sleep pattern.  According to Wikipedia – which is open to the general public for editing – this is the definition:

Segmented sleep, also known as divided sleepbimodal sleep patternbifurcated sleep, or interrupted sleep, is a polyphasic or biphasic sleep pattern where two or more periods of sleep are punctuated by periods of wakefulness.

I know, I know.  You’re thinking “Well, of course you are with all the excitement that goes along with the publication of The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Dsleepisease this past week and all the celebrations that go along with the holidays.”  You’re right, it is exciting, but that’s not the cause of my interrupted sleep.

No, it’s not worry about my sweet dog’s cancer problems, either.  She has had three operations and is recovering so well that she doesn’t realize she still has an open wound at one of the surgery sites.

Well, yes, it is true I have sleep apnea. According to WebMD at http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/sleep-apnea/sleep-apnea:

Sleep apnea is a serious sleep disorder that occurs when a person’s breathing is interrupted during sleep. People with untreated sleep apnea stop breathing repeatedly during their sleep, sometimes hundreds of times. This means the brain — and the rest of the body — may not get enough oxygen.  . 

But I also have a Mandibular Advancement Device that treats the problem.  This is how the device works as explained at http://www.mandibularadvancementsplint.com/mad

Mandibular advancement is a simple technique for opening the airway, keeping the palate taught and helping your breath to flow during sleep – thereby preventing snoring and relieving mild to moderate OSA. Mandibular advancers work, as the term implies, by advancing the lower mandible forward. This is often done using a malleable mouthpiece that is worn between your upper and lower teeth when sleeping.

While I am not specifically endorsing their product, their explanation is clear.

Restless leg syndrome?  No, I don’t have that.  But here’s what MedicineNet at http://www.medicinenet.com/restless_leg_syndrome/article.htm has to say about it anyway:

Restless leg syndrome (RLS, restless legs syndrome) is a common cause of painful legs. The leg pain of restless leg syndrome typically eases with motion of the legs and becomes more noticeable at rest. Restless leg syndrome also features worsening of symptoms and leg pain during the early evening or later at night.CoffeeCupPopCatalinStock

Hmmm, I’m pretty careful about sleep hygiene.  Let’s go to http://sleepfoundation.org/ask-the-expert/sleep-hygiene for an explanation of just what that is.

  • The most important sleep hygiene measure is to maintain a regular wake and sleep pattern seven days a week.
  • Avoid napping during the day. It can disturb the normal pattern of sleep and wakefulness.
  • Avoid stimulants such as caffeine, nicotine, and alcohol too close to bedtime. 
  • Exercise can promote good sleep. 
  • Food can be disruptive right before sleep.  
  • Ensure adequate exposure to natural light
  • Establish a regular relaxing bedtime routine.  Associate your bed with sleep. 
  • Make sure that the sleep environment is pleasant and relaxing

So what is the problem?  Surprise, well it was a surprise to me.  Chronic Kidney Disease, even “milder degrees of kidney disease” could be the cause.

bluesThis was the headline for a June, 2013, MedScape article about a (then) recent study:

Sleep Problems Common in Chronic Kidney Disease

“We’ve known for a long time that sleep disorders are more common in kidney disease patients than in the general population,” Charles Atwood, MD, associate director of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center’s Sleep Medicine Center in Pennsylvania, who wasn’t involved in the study, told Medscape Medical News. “A lot of studies in the past focused on the dialysis population. It seems like this group focused on people with milder degrees of kidney disease and basically found that they also have sleep disorders and I’m not surprised by that,” he added.

You can read the entire article at http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/805342

By digging deep, far and wide, I finally figured out that toxic waste buildup in our systems (from the imperfect blood filtering by our kidneys) could be the cause of my segmented sleep.  I took a comment from one study, a sentence from another, and unilaterally decided this was the reason.  I am not a doctor – as I keep saying – and I don’t have the facts I’d like to behind this conclusion.  It’s a good thing I’ll be seeing my nephrologist next month because I have loads of questions about whether there is any scientific proof behind my thinking and, if so, what that is.

Oddly enough, while I’m concerned about segmented sleeping, there seems to be a movement espousing it as the healthiest way to sleep. This quote from National Post at http://life.nationalpost.com/2012/07/16/rest-assured-theres-nothing-wrong-with-segmented-sleep/     hit the nail on the head for me:

So my curiosity was piqued when a recent BBC online story, “The myth of the eight-hour sleep,” shone a light on a growing body of research suggesting that “segmented sleep” is perfectly normal. It appears that in centuries past, and in pre-industrial societies, bedtime has meant falling asleep once, then waking for awhile, and then going back to bed for a “second sleep.”     

So now I can drive myself nuts wondering whether this segmented sleep is a good thing for a CKD patient or simply wait to speak to Dr. Atalla since my usual researching is not helping here.  I vote to lay the issue aside until I speak with him.

41DsvandphL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-stThe Book of BlogsOh, but I do want to speak with you.  To celebrate the publication of my second CKD book, The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Amazon.com has been kind enough to allow me to offer the digital copy for 99 cents tomorrow and Wednesday.  Get it?  Two books, two days. Unfortunately, there wasn’t any way to work out offering What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney new blog shotDisease for 99 cents for the same two days.  Wouldn’t that have been perfect!

Amazon has been terrific about offering free samples of the book, arranging for the Look Inside feature, and including the book in both Kindle Unlimited and Kindle Owners’ Lending Library. If you belong to those programs, you can borrow the book for free.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

The Way I See It

There I sat moping because my eyes are getting worse and I didn’t know why.  So I did what I do best (and what brings me right up again, believe it or not) and started researching.  And I found multiple answers!  That’s terrific because I’ve already drunk my two cups of coffee today, so I couldn’t turn to them for solace.

You’ve probably figured out the answers are mostly Chronic Kidney Disease related. This is not something I wrote about in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease. When I researched for the book, macular degeneration never even peeked out at me. (How do you like that play on vision related words?  Macular – peeked?  No?  Oh well.)Book Cover

Anyway…. let’s do our usual back to the basics for a topic we haven’t visited in a while.  Macular degeneration is, “An eye disease that progressively destroys the macula, the central portion of the retina, impairing central vision. Macular degeneration rarely causes total blindness because only the center of vision is affected,”

according MedicineNet at http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=10027

I suppose the part about not causing total blindness should make me feel better, but I need more information first. The retina?  Anyone? No?

It’s, “… a multi-layered sensory tissue that lines the back of the eye. It contains millions of photoreceptors that capture light rays and convert them into electrical impulses. These impulses travel along the optic nerve to the brain where they are turned into images.There are two types of photoreceptors in the retina: rods and cones. The retina contains maculaapproximately 6 million cones. The cones are contained in the macula, the portion of the retina responsible for central vision. They are most densely packed within the fovea, the very center portion of the macula. Cones function best in bright light and allow us to appreciate color. There are approximately 125 million rods. They are spread throughout the peripheral retina and function best in dim lighting. The rods are responsible for peripheral and night vision.”

I had to dig deep for a thorough, yet easily understood definition. Thank you St. Luke’s Cataract and Laser Institute at http://www.stlukeseye.com/Anatomy/retina.html for helping out here.

Well, now you understand why I keep posting all those pictures containing glorious color.  That’s my way of saving up color for when I can’t see it anymore.  Although, it’s really the rods that are causing me most trouble right now.

Dim the lighting and I can’t tell what I’m looking at.  I don’t know where Bear is in a dim room unless he speaks and my poor black and white Bella!  She’s been walked into so often I don’t know why she doesn’t just run when she sees me coming.

However, it’s not as easy as just that.  There are two kinds of macular degeneration: wet and dry. I went back to our old pal Mayo Clinic at http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/wet-macular-degeneration/basics/definition/CON-20043518 for the definitions:

“Wet macular degeneration is a chronic eye disease that causes vision loss in the center of your field of vision. Wet macular degeneration is generally caused by abnormal blood vessels that leak fluid or blood into the region of the macula (MAK-u-luh). The macula is in the center of the retina (the layer of tissue on the inside back wall of your eyeball). Wetmd image macular degeneration is one of two types of age-related macular degeneration. The other type — dry macular degeneration — is more common and less severe. Wet macular degeneration almost always begins as dry macular degeneration. It’s not clear what causes wet macular degeneration.”

Wait a minute.  Did you catch that “age-related macular degeneration”?  That’s what I have and that’s where the Chronic Kidney Disease comes into our equation.

I went to The National Institutes of Health website at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2390960/ to find the conclusions from a Journal of American Society of Nephrology study about the relationship between macular degeneration and Chronic Kidney Disease:

“…persons with moderate chronic kidney disease were 3 times more likely to develop early age-related macular degeneration than persons with no/mild chronic kidney disease.”

Thank you very much, CKD, for another undesired gift.  To be honest, although this has not shown up anywhere else in my family history, I don’t know if I would have developed macular degeneration even if I didn’t have CKD.  Apparently, smoking is another risk factor and that is something I played around with for decades – never becoming a chain smoker, but smoking nervously and socially.  Hey, we didn’t really know what the consequences could be at that time.

WebMD at http://www.webmd.com/eye-health/macular-degeneration/age-related-macular-degeneration-overview tells us the other risk factors:

“… high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity, and being light skinned, female, and having a light eye color are also risk factors for macular degeneration.”

racesUn-oh, I fit every one of these criterion (if light brown eyes are considered light eye color).  Sometimes I wish I had foresight instead of hindsight.  While I couldn’t have done anything about my race, sex, or eye color, there’s quite a bit I could have worked on as far as hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and weight.

Because I am a Pollyanna and need to find hope everywhere, my hope here is that my experience can at least serve as an object lesson for our younger Chronic Kidney Disease sufferers.  Sort of a do-as-I-say, not do-as-I-do example, if you will.

Change of subject:  The digital version of the book continues to sell far better than print copies so I want to remind you of an Amazon.com offer.  If you – or anyone you know – order a print copy, you (or that person) can order the digital copy for $2.99 instead of the usual $9.99.  The program is called Kindle Matchbook. (http://www.amazon.com/What-Is-How-Did-Get/dp/1457502143/ref=pd_rhf_se_p_img_1)

I especially recommend this program to medical students since I have found textbook rental companies trying to rent my book for one semester for more than it costs to buy the book.  Ridiculous!   This program is also valuable because you can share your digital copy with others.

Our Yom Kippur was filled with family and happiness.  If you celebrate, I hope yours was too.  If Eid al-Fitr is what you celebrate as a Muslim, my hope is that breaking the 30 day dawn to dusk fast of Ramadan was a joyous occasion for you. For the Catholics, I hope your celebration of the Feast of St. Francis of Assisi was everything you’d hoped it would be.  All three were celebrated this past Saturday.  I’ll take that as an indication that there are more similarities rather than differences between people of different religions.  For everyone who didn’t celebrate a religious holiday this weekend, as always, I wish you health and happiness.

Until next week,

Keep living your life.

Oh, The Pressure!

We enjoyed a cool, slightly wet, getaway weekend and it was wonderful.  I’m a fan of historical sites and Bear is more than willing to join me in seeing them, so we went to Tumacacori, the Presidio in Tubac, and The Pimeria Alta Museum in Nogales.  I was taken with all of them, but saddened to hear of each of their financial plights. I know this is not the best economy, but this is history.

IMG_0811I was surprised to discover that The Tubac Presidio State Historic Park is manned (and womanned) by a staff of volunteers – except for their director, Shaw Kinsley, who is also the author of the well written Images of America: Tubac. The volunteers do an excellent job, as good as that done by the park rangers at Tumacacori.

That got me to thinking about the pressure they all must be under… which got me to thinking about pressure of all kinds and its effect on blood pressure.  Being on a mini-vacation gave me loads of time to think, but this time I decided to write about just that: blood pressure.

Not only have I written about blood pressure in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, but you’ll notice several blogs about it if you use the topic search on the right side of the blog page.Book Cover

So why write about the same topic again, you ask?  This time, I took a look at how to take your blood pressure and some of the machines on the market.

Have I ever told you that when I am at my sleep apnea doctor’s office, my blood pressure always starts at about 150/89?  That’s high and I tell them it’s not my usual reading. We’re way past the white coat syndrome (blood pressure rising simply because you’re in a doctor’s office) here, so they take it again on the other arm and it’s something about 110/72.  I like that, but it’s not my usual reading, either.  Back to the first arm: 130/79.  Bingo!

I asked my primary care physician why this happens and she asked me to describe the monitor they used.  As I did, she started nodding her head.  Apparently, this type of automatic blood pressure monitor is notorious for being incorrect… yet doctors still use it for its ease.

Then she asked me how they held my arm while taking my blood pressure and slowly shook her head as I answered.  It seems there is a right way and a wrong way to hold the arm and – to further complicate matters – they differ depending upon the type of monitor being used.

Allow me to return to my roots for a second: Oy gevalt!  This is fairly complicated so let’s uncomplicate it.

I went to WebMD at http://www.webmd.com/hypertension-high-blood-pressure/guide/hypertension-home-monitoring for the following:

Before Checking Your Blood Pressure

  • Find a quiet place to check your blood pressure. You will need to listen for your heartbeat.toliet
  • Make sure that you are comfortable and relaxed with a recently emptied bladder (a full bladder may affect your reading).
  • Roll up the sleeve on your arm or remove any tight-sleeved clothing.
  • Rest in a chair next to a table for 5 to 10 minutes. Your arm should rest comfortably at heart level. Sit up straight with your back against the chair, legs uncrossed. Rest your forearm on the table with the palm of your hand facing up.

Were you surprised as I was at the direction to empty your bladder?  Think for a minute.  Have any of your doctors requested you do that before they took your blood pressure reading?  Yet, it makes sense.  Not only will the full bladder itself affect the reading, so will the worry that you need to get to the restroom as soon as possible.

Okay, now we’re ready.  What’s next?

cup-of-coffee-2This time, I went to the Mayo Clinic at http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-pressure/in-depth/high-blood-pressure/art-20047889?pg=2

  • Check your monitor’s accuracy.
  •  Measure your blood pressure twice daily. (Once in the morning before you take any medications, and once in the evening.)
  • Don’t measure your blood pressure right after you wake up.
  •  Avoid food, caffeine, tobacco and alcohol for 30 minutes before taking a measurement
  • Don’t talk while taking your blood pressure.

Whoa!  This simple act of placing your arm, wrist, or finger in a monitor is not simple at all when you break it down into smaller elements. I admit it; I’m a talker and have been told a time or two to stop talking while my blood pressure is being measured.carpal tunnel

I also like to get my chores out of the way as soon as I wake up, but I see I can’t. This makes for a long morning routine for me. First I take off the wrist braces I wear at night for the carpal tunnel.  Then I clean the mandibular advancement appliance I’ve had in my mouth all night for the sleep apnea and brush it and my teeth.  Usually I would drink that delicious first cup of coffee now, but if I do, I have to wait for 30 minutes before taking my blood pressure.  Hmmm, I have to wait 15 minutes to use the bite rim to readjust my mandibular anyway. But where do I fit in the medications?  Oh, I’ll work it out.

wristWell, what about the different kinds of blood pressure monitors? I use a wrist monitor which my PCP is simply not thrilled with.  Her feeling is that I’m taking my pressure through two bones, the radius and the ulna, as opposed to only one bone, the humerus, with an arm device. There’s also the finger monitor, but that could be a problem if you have thin or cold fingers.

There are manual and battery operated versions of these monitors.  If you use an arm monitor, be aware that larger cuffs are available if needed. The one thing most blood pressure sites agree upon is that it’s not a good idea to rely on drug store monitors for your readings.

Most doctors will agree that the old fashioned sphygmomanometer is the best.  You’ll find this defined on page 135 of What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease:

The cuff, the measuring device and the wires that connect the two in a machine used

to measure your blood pressure, commonly called a blood pressure meter.s

I find myself wanting to make some crack about writing this blog raising my blood pressure, but in all honesty, writing the blog is still one of my joys.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Sleepus Interruptus

I just started – and trashed – three different versions of what I thought today’s blog would be about because I didn’t understand the research.  That’s the trouble with not being a doctor, and why I always remind you to speak with your nephrologist before you take anyone’s advice about your Chronic Kidney Disease, even mine.

I finally decided to write about my first choice.  This is yet another indication that our hunches are right.  My hunch after a night of waking up just about every hour was to write about CKD and interrupted sleep.  I should have listened to myself and saved all that time.baby-shots-5

DaVita.com at http://www.davita.com/kidney-disease/overview/living-with-ckd/sleep-issues-and-chronic-kidney-disease/e/4896 tells us there are several reasons CKD patients have sleep problems:

  • restless leg syndrome
  • sleep apnea
  • inadequate dialysis clearance
  • emotions
  • changes in sleep patterns
  • caffeine

We share most of these reasons with those who do not have CKD except for those dealing with dialysis.  This includes the inadequate dialysis clearance.  It also includes restless leg syndrome which is usually associated with hemodialysis session. Since I only write about early stage, I won’t be discussing these causes.

Let’s talk about sleep apnea.  I wrote a blog about on August 12, 2012 that refers to this.  The most important information from that blog is:

“I found a study at http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/538872which clearly links

sleep apnea and hypertension. Dr. John J. Sim makes the connection very clear:

‘We think there may be a causative factor here; that sleep apnea may be causing directGlomerulus-Nephron 300 dpi jpg

 glomerular injury,’ Dr. John J. Sim (Kaiser Permanente, Los Angeles, CA) told renalwire .

‘We already know that sleep apnea causes hypertension and that hypertension causes

kidney disease.’ If some degree of causality can be shown, it’s possible that treating sleep

 apnea may slow the progression of kidney disease, the authors speculate.”

This particular study was conducted in 2005.

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) was also the subject of January 13, 2014’s blog.  That’s where the following information is from:

“Have I ever told you I have sleep apnea?  And that this affects CKD patients? I do and it

does. According to http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20676805, one of the National

Institutes of Health’s sites, sleep apnea can raise blood pressure, which in itself is one of

the problems of CKD.  It can also result in glomerular hyperfiltration.”

This is from a 2010 study.

madOkay, so I have sleep apnea, had a sleep study and started wearing a Mandibular Advancement Device (MAD) at night to correct the problem, yet I still experience interrupted sleep.

Hmmmm, what is this ‘changes in sleep patterns’? Oh, of course.  Because I have CKD, I become more tired and even drowsy during the day.  Maybe I’ll sit on the couch in the family room to read for a bit; maybe I’ll even lay down there; and maybe – just maybe – I’ll fall asleep during the day.  Nothing wrong with naps, but if they’re long naps they could interfere with your sleep pattern.

So can going to bed earlier.  I tried that on really tired days and ended up waking up repeatedly.  I do go right back to sleep, but it just didn’t seem restful. Keep in mind that as you age, your sleep cycles are lighter and shorter.  So I may think I’m getting all the sleep I need, but the waking up interrupts the cycling of the different stages of sleep and then I start the cycles all over again.

WebMD at http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/guide/sleep-101 tells us,

Victorian clock“During the deep stages of NREM sleep, the body repairs and regenerates tissues, builds

bone and muscle, and appears to strengthen the immune system. As you get older, you

sleep more lightly and get less deep sleep. Aging is also associated with shorter time spans

of sleep, although studies show the amount of sleep needed doesn’t appear to diminish

   with age.”

Uh-oh, the deep stages of NREM (non-rapid eye movement) sleep are stages 3 and 4 which I may be missing by constantly waking up.  These are also the stages during which the body restores itself.

Emotions?  I can see that.  I dwell on the family’s medical problems, or someone I know and love who is out of work, or even my sweet Bella’s brush with cancer and I can get myself truly worked up.  So I don’t.  I mean I don’t think about these things at bedtime.  If I can’t seem to get them out of my head, I write a list of things to think about tomorrow.  As simplistic as it sounds, it works for me.  This is one piece of advice you don’t need to check with your nephrologist.

Wait a minute!  Who included my beloved caffeine on this list?????? This is where I get emotional.  Those two cups of caffeine a day are the only item on my renal diet that help me not feel deprived.  Okay, maybe we do need to be a bit rational about this (Don’t you just hate to be a grown up sometimes?).

This is what The National Sleep Foundation at http://sleepfoundation.org/sleep-topics/caffeine-and-sleep has to offer us about caffeine and sleep:

“Caffeine enters the bloodstream through the stomach and small intestine and can

have a stimulating effect as soon as 15 minutes after it is consumed. Once in the body,CoffeeCupPopCatalinStock

caffeine will persist for several hours: it takes about 6 hours for one half of the caffeine

to be eliminated.”

Six hours for only half to be eliminated?  You mean, twelve hours for all of it to be eliminated?  I have got to stop drinking caffeine after noon. Okay, I can learn to live with that.  Heck, it’s better than no coffee at all.

Hopefully these suggestions will take care of my interrupted sleep problems.  Now what about yours?  Remember to speak with your nephrologist if you want to explore any of my suggestions.  As far as the emotions causing sleep problems, if my trick doesn’t work for you and you feel you need professional help with your emotions, please get it.

Here’s my last suggestion: buy a copy of What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease before Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease: The Book of Blogs is published. Then you’ll have the set of two.Book signing

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

A Foggy Day… in Your Brain

Coffee Beans_0I don’t know about you, but I thoroughly enjoy my 16 ounces of coffee a day.  I savor it and draw those two cups out as long as I can.  I relish the taste and adore the aroma.  And, I thought they would cut through what I’ve discovered is called ‘brain fog.’

To be honest, I’d never heard the term before.  Maybe I live too sheltered a life… or maybe I just didn’t realize it had anything to do with me.  After all, I don’t do drugs or drink.  I do get eight hours of sleep a night, follow the renal diet, and exercise just about every day.  So what does brain fog have to do with me or any other renal patient?

You probably know this blog is posted on as many Chronic Kidney Disease Facebook pages as I could find.  These are not for medical advice, but for sharing ideas and information – always with the warning that none of us are doctors.  That’s the same warning I mention in the blog.Book Cover

I receive daily notices of who posted what where.  I noticed a question about brain fog and was surprised at the responses.  The question asked who else suffered this cloudiness of thought and what stage they were in.

Once I understood what brain fog was, I imagined the responses would all mention end stage.  They didn’t.  I saw all stages from 2 through 5 mentioned.  I was grabbed by the fact that no one in stage 1 had responded and that’s when brain fog became the topic of today’s blog.

According to integrative medicine expert Dr. Isaac Eliaz, when experiencing brain fog:

“…people feel as if there is a thick fog dampening their mind. While the medical and mental health establishments don’t generally recognize brain fog as a condition, it’s a surprisingly common affliction that affects people of all ages. Symptoms include pervasive absentmindedness, muddled thought processes, poor memory recall, difficulty processing information, disorientation, fatigue, and others.”

You can read more at http://www.rodalenews.com/brain-fog.brain

Sound familiar?  Maybe that explains why you couldn’t find the tea bags in their usual spot even though they were there.  Or why you didn’t speak with the person you meant to about a certain subject (Yep, me and SlowItDown with a potential community), but just chatted instead.

While this is interesting, what does it have to do with renal disease?  I know there are readers who only want to read about subjects that affect us as sufferers of this disease.  I know because I get a good laugh when they ask what a particular blog has to do with renal disease.  It’s obvious they haven’t read the blog since the blog is ONLY about renal disease, but just commented instead.  But, more importantly, that’s why I write the blog.

So I did what I love to do: researched the topic. Here’s what I found:

www.naturopathconnect.com offered me my first insight into how our kidneys and brain fog are connected.

“Make sure your liver and kidneys are not overloaded or congested. When your liver and kidneys are not functioning well, they are less able to clear your system of the multitude of toxins that float around in your bloodstream. When your body is overloaded with toxins, your brain suffers as well….Dehydration may be a key factor in less-than-optimal kidney function, so water is essential to keep the kidneys in tip-top shape.”

Got it – toxins.  Uh, what toxins?  And how do they affect the brain, I wondered.  Back to researching.blood

Dr. Martin Morrell of healthtap.com offered an explanation. However, this is not an endorsement of him or the site.  I am not a fan of asking online doctors unfamiliar with your particular medical history for advice.

“… if your blood urea increases, which is supposed to be cleared by your kidneys, this ‘poison’ will affect the ability of the brain to work properly.”

Oh, blood urea. Well that explains it. But how can I explain blood urea?  I’ll allow the experts to do that.

http://www.patient.co.uk/health/routine-kidney-function-blood-test has the simplest explanation.

“Urea is a waste product formed from the breakdown of proteins. Urea is usually passed out in the urine. A high blood level of urea (‘uraemia’) indicates that the kidneys may not be working properly, or that you are dehydrated (have a low body water content).”

In the U.S., we call this test B.U.N. or Blood Urea Nitrogen Blood Test.  So as I understand it, if your protein intake is high, more urea is produced.  But since your kidneys are already compromised by CKD,  the toxins remaining in your body are not eliminated as well and are still in the blood that flows through your brain.  That’s logical.

blood_test_vials_QAThe more urea remaining in your system, the more sluggish your brain.  It does sound like a perfectly formed ‘if-then’ equation from probability theory. The only difference here is that this is not a theory, but, rather, what we may encounter as CKD patients.

What to do?  What to do?  Obviously, keeping our protein intake low will help.  My renal diet limits me to five ounces of protein a day. I rarely ingest more protein than that. Well, bully for me!  So how else can I alleviate my sometimes brain fog?

I was all over the web on this one and found that besides what I was already doing for my CKD, I could also avoid heavy metal (and I always thought that was a kind of music) exposure, use a blue light, get myself some natural sun light, check my medication side effects and lots more.  This is the stuff of several blogs.

It’s real.  Brain fog could be affecting you, especially if you have CKD.  And from what I’ve read, once you’ve gotten your CKD slowed down as much as possible, the other ‘fixes’ are easy.

Okay, so coffee’s not going to help here but I’ll drink it anyway.SlowItDown business card

I just got the report from my publishers.  Thanks to all of you who brought the book as Christmas, Chanukah, or Kwanzaa presents.  That was a good month for sales which allows me to donate even more books.

SlowItDown is slowly progressing. Interesting choice of words there. We have new educators in New York and Washington, D.C. and – frankly – need your help in finding the communities that need us.

Sweet 16Between birthday parties (Happy Sweet 16, Olivia Vlasity!) and graduations (Congratulates on that and acceptance to U. of A. College of Medicine, Jordan Mudery), and the chance to spend time doing nothing graduationwith Bear, this was almost the perfect weekend for me.  Here’s to many of those for you!

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Happy Anniversary… Sort Of

4weddingYesterday was our first anniversary. Given my Chronic Kidney Disease complicated bouts of bronchitis and Bear’s surgery, it’s been a medically challenging year for us.  We were glad to start Year Two as a married couple, but not before we celebrated the end of the first year by eating the piece of wedding cake our well-meaning friends had insisted be placed in an airtight plastic bag and frozen for a year.

Of course, that meant to me that we should have the special ground coffee I had ordered for the wedding with the cake, so I saved some of that, too. My daughter, Nima, had been a Starbuck’s barista for a time and carefully explained to me that you don’t freeze or refrigerate coffee.  So I just folded over the top of the bag and clipped it shut.

Those of you clutching your stomachs as you run for the restroom (weird word that) know exactly what happened.  This is ridiculous, I thought.  That’s a long standing tradition.  How could anything so romantic make anyone sick?  Hah!

And that led me to wondering how and when this tradition started. The answer I found left me laughing.  You will too when you remember we had each passed 65 when we married. According to http://www.hudsonvalleyweddings.com/guide/cakehistory.htm, “The tradition has its roots in the late 19th century when grand cakes were baked for christenings. It was assumed that the christening would occur soon after the wedding ceremony, so the two ceremonies were often linked, as were the cakes.”

Hang on and you’ll eventually see what the wedding cake tradition and the coffee have to do with CKD.

Back to the cake:  I scouted around and found this freezing guide at http://www.home-storage-solutions-101.com/freezer-storage-times.html:download (6)

Bread & Desserts TIme
Baked bread and cookies 3 months
Cakes, pastries and doughnuts 3 months
Muffins and quick breads 3 months
Pancakes and waffles 3 months
Cooke or bread dough 1 month
Produce TIme
Fruits 1 year
Juices 1 year
Vegetables 8 months
Nuts 3 months
Dairy & Eggs TIme
Ice cream 2 months
Butter 9 months
Cheese 3 months
Eggs (raw, not in shells) 1 year
Milk 1 month
Meats TIme
Ground beef, pork & stew meats 4 months
Other beef (i.e., roasts, steaks) 1 year
Lamb and veal 9 months
Ham 2 months
Pork chops 4 months
Pork roast or loin 8 months
Bacon and sausage 1 month
Poultry TIme
Chicken and turkey (whole) 1 year
Chicken and turkey (cuts) 6 months
Ground turkey and chicken 4 months
Seafood TIme
Fatty fish (i.e., mackerel, trout) 3 months
Lean fish (i.e., cod, flounder) 6 months
Crab 10 months
Lobster 1 year
Shrimp and scallops (unbreaded) 1 year
Miscellaneous TIme
Casseroles (cooked) 3 months
Paste and rice (cooked) 3 months
Soups and stews 2 months

 

This is not the gospel of freezing food, but I wanted to give you a general guideline.  Did you notice that “3 months” for cakes?  I think I’m beginning to understand the stomach ailment now. (She groaned.)

That, of course, made me wonder how long ground coffee could keep if it wasn’t frozen or refrigerated, which would have made it take on the taste of its neighbors and help destroy its own wonderful flavor. I went to http://www.eatbydate.com/drinks/coffee-tea-shelf-life/coffee-shelf-life-expiration-date/ for this chart.

 

(Unopened/Sealed) Pantry Freezer
Past Printed Date Past Printed Date
Ground Coffee lasts for 3-5 Months 1-2 Years
Whole Bean Coffee lasts for 6-9 Months 2-3 Years
Instant Coffee lasts for 2-20 Years Indefinite
(Opened) Pantry Freezer
Once Opened Once Opened
Ground Coffee lasts for 3-5 Months 3-5 Months
Coffee Beans last for 6 Months 2 Years
Instant Coffee (freeze dried) lasts for 2-20 Years Indefinite

cup-of-coffee-2

 

 

Ugh! A year is substantially more than the 3 to 5 months suggested.  Okay, so now you have the back story.

Book CoverThanks for being patient. Here’s where the CKD comes in. Your kidneys filter toxins and waste products from your blood.  They also regulate electrolyte levels and blood pressure and produce hormones, among their many jobs.  If they’re busy taking care of food poisoning (or whatever you call eating improperly or overly frozen or stored food), they have less time – or is it energy? – to pay attention to their typical jobs.  There’s even a theory that food poisoning can further compromise our already compromised immune systems.  There’s more information at http://www.medic8.com/healthguide/food-poisoning/kidney-failure.html

So much more than this has happened since last week.  On March 25th (okay, so that was over a week ago), we presented at The Salt River Pima Maricopa Indian Community Family Health Fair. That’s where these pictures were taken.  I’m seriously considering using the SlowItDown picture as a business card and welcome your opinion about that.SlowItDown business cardhealth fair.Salt River Great Seal

We were also able to attend my father’s family’s reunion and, more importantly, spend time with my brother, Paul, and sister-in-law, Judy Peck, in Florida which meant I was able to share both the book and SlowItDown with a Boca Raton hospital, a Brandon nephrology practice, and AAKP of Florida.  Public thanks to all of you for your kind reception.

Twitter people have been retweeting and favoriting both SlowItDown and What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease’s tweets like crazy which kidney-book-coverI greatly appreciate.  Hey, we’re still the new kids on the block, you know.

There’s also a profile coming up in the Medicare magazine, but I haven’t received a date for that yet.  Another radio interview – this time for SlowItDown – is in the works for July.  There’s even the possibility of public service announcements for SlowItDown in the Washington, D.C. area.  More on each of these as they’re solidified.

By the way, the first anniversary is traditionally paper.  What better gift (well, maybe that’s stretching it a bit) to give to the first anniversary celebrators of CKD families, friends, and co-workers?  Or send them over to the blog for more education.  If they print it, that’s paper, too.choclate Alex

Ah!  The light bulb goes on over my head!  I just figured out why Bear isn’t feeling the same way I am.  He doesn’t have CKD (thank goodness) and doesn’t have a compromised immune system.  His kidneys are doing a terrific job of getting rid of toxins… bless those two little guys.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Book It!

With the holidays over and more time to think about what I’d like to write, I decided this would be a good time to update you about whatever other books are available that also concern Chronic Kidney Disease.

You know there are many out there, too many to mention here, so I eliminated any book that couldn’t be understood by a lay person (those without specific training in a certain field – in this case, medical) and renal diet books.  You can easily find those for yourself by going to Amazon.com and B&N.com. I also excluded those I found to be dubious… the spelling errors were a dead give-away that these were not professional.

I’m not going to tell you about What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease since you already know about it from this blog.  Let’s change that, I will tell you one or two things.  First, the books included in ‘Additional Resources’ (Chapter 13) won’t appear here, as good as they are.Book Cover

And – pay attention – students, be aware that both Campus Book Rentals and Chegg are attempting to rent the book to you for more than it costs to buy it.  The digital edition – when I was teaching college, my students always seemed to prefer the digital edition – is even less expensive.

Don’t forget about The KindleMatchBook program which allows you to buy the digital version at 70% discount if you’ve ever bought the print copy. Gather your classmates: pool your money so you can save. One of you buy the print edition, then the others can get the digital edition at deep discount (I have no idea why, but I love that phrase).

Disclaimer:  I am not a doctor, have never have claimed to be one , AND am not endorsing the following books, simply letting you know they exist. For the most part, the descriptions were written by the author. The ‘Look Inside!’ function only works if you follow the link to Amazon.com – sorry! I have been dreaming about this list, so let’s get it out of my dreams and on the blog:

510smylYevL._SL160_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-dp,TopRight,12,-18_SH30_OU01_AA160_Ford, Mathea A., RD (Registered Dietician) Kidney Disease: Common Labs and Medical Terminology: The Patient’s Perspective (Renal Diet HQ IQ Pre-Dialysis Living) (Volume 4)

New to kidney failure? Have no idea what your physician just said about your kidneys? Kidney disease labs and terminology can quite often be a challenge to understand and digest. Did your doctor use the “stages of kidney disease”? Did you physician refer to “eGFR”? What does all this mean for your health and future with kidney disease, lifestyle and nutrition choices. This book is the basic platform for understanding all the common labs and terminology that your doctors and nurses will use. This book with give you and your caregivers the confidence to manage your condition knowing that you have an understanding of all the ins and outs of the nephrology jargon. (Mrs. Mathea seems to have an entire series of books about CKD.)

Hunt, Walter A. Kidney Disease: A Guide for Living. 

When Hunt learned he had kidney disease, he was overwhelmed by the prospect of facing kidney failure. He had so many questions: Why are my kidneys failing? Is there anything I can do to save them? How will I know when my kidneys have failed? What will it feel like? 41nNk5SdqIL._AA160_What treatments are available for me? Is there a cure for kidney failure? The good news, as Hunt found out, is that kidney failure is highly treatable. People with the disease can lead full and productive lives, and Hunt’s readable and empathetic book will help them do just that. It discusses the latest scientific and medical findings about kidney disease, including what kidneys do; the underlying diseases that cause failure; diagnosis, treatment, and prevention; dietary factors; clinical trials; and the future direction of research on kidney failure. Kidney disease is difficult, but as Hunt’s narrative reveals, people living with it can take control of their health and their future. By understanding kidney failure — what causes it, how it may affect their lives, and what treatment options they have — people with the disease can improve their quality of life and achieve the best possible outcome.

51nUIkG8kSL._AA160_Lewis, Dr. Robert. Understanding Chronic Kidney Disease: A guide for the Non-Specialist.

This is meant for primary care physicians, but can be easily understood by the layman. I looked under the covers of this one and was delighted to see that the information we, as patients with CKD, need to know is also what our primary care physicians need to know. (I wrote this description.)

National Kidney Foundation of Southern California. Living Well With Kidney Disease.

The first edition of “Living Well With Kidney Disease” was developed and published by the National Kidney Foundation of Southern California. Based on the handbook “When Your Kidneys Fail” (originally published in 1982), this new and 41jxZoYLGzL._AA160_updated edition provides detailed information specifically intended for people coping with Kidney Disease and other renal failure, as well as their friends and families. The question and answer format provides a clear and manageable guide for those seeking support and answers. Among the topics covered are the principles of kidney function, methods of treatment, transplantation, and financial resources available to patients. With all of the ramifications of kidney failure and the rise of Chronic Kidney Disease and Type 2 Diabetes, there is a growing population of people afflicted with kidney failure. Although it was written with the patient in mind, family members, friends and health care professionals will also find this handbook a valuable resource.

517GaXFXNPL._SL160_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-dp,TopRight,12,-18_SH30_OU01_AA160_Synder, Rich DO (Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine) What You Must Know About Kidney Disease: A Practical Guide to Using Conventional and Complementary Treatments

The book is divided into three parts. Part One provides an overview of the kidneys’ structure and function, as well as common kidney disorders. It also guides you in asking your doctor questions that will help you better understand both status and prognosis. Part Two examines kidney problems and their conventional treatments. Part Three provides an in depth look at the most effective complementary treatments, from lifestyle changes to alternative healing methods. The diagnosis of kidney disease is the first step of an unexpected journey.

*Yes, this is the same Dr. Rich Snyder who interviewed me on his radio show twice since What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease was published.

It’s always hard to find good books about CKD that non-medical personnel can understand.  I hope this four (and mine!) help you feel more comfortable and knowledgeable about your diagnosis.

Here’s a little hint about your own health.  I’m back to no sweets or desserts and, I hate to admit it, but I’m feeling better.  Don’t you just hate when that happens?sugar

Until next week (when I’ll in in Culver City for a weekend of Landmark),

Keep living your life!

‘Twas The Night Before The Night Before Christmas

Christmas Tree’Twas the night before the night before Christmas and all through the house…. The night before the night before Christmas?  Where did the time go? Hmmmm, there are no children here to constantly remind us Christmas is coming.  We rarely watch television (although we often watch movies), so we didn’t see the ads that could have reminded us.  Oh, I did know it was coming… just not so quickly.

And that’s often the case when we deal with a chronic illness.  We know that doctor’s appointment is coming up and we’re eager to see the results of our blood tests.  After all, we’ve worked so hard on diet, exercise, sleep, and lack of stress (that’s funny: stressing for lack of stress).  We just didn’t know it was coming so quickly. Did we have enough time to lower our blood pressure?  Was it enough time to lose some weight?  Did we monitor our eating enough in this amount of time that our cholesterol numbers are down?  Time, time, time.  It all comes down to time.

I have a modest proposal (apologies there, Mr. Swift).  What if we ignore time and just always – okay, almost always – watch the diet, exercise, sleep enough, and avoid stress.  Oh right, that’s what we’re supposed to be doing: lifestyle changes.NAFLD

According to an article published in the European Journal of Social Psychology way back in September of 2009, it takes an average of 66 days to form a new habit. The article was written by Phillippa Lally and her colleagues from the Cancer Research UK Health Behaviour Research Centre based at UCL Epidemiology and Public Health, and was based on their research.  You can find more at: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/news-articles/0908/09080401

Since it’s habits that form your life style, I had trouble accepting that number so I kept researching.  Ugh, I kept coming up with the same number although one analysis of this same article did mention that it can take as few as 18 or as many as 254 days to form a habit depending upon the individual.  I’ll take the 18 days option, please.

All right, let’s try something else.  How about getting enough sleep.  How much sleep is enough sleep anyway?  According to Dr. Timothy Morgenthaler on the Mayo Clinic site (http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/how-many-hours-of-sleep-are-enough/AN01487), seven to eight hours is what an adult needs, but then he lists mitigating circumstances under which you might need more:

  • Pregnancy.      Changes in a woman’s body during early pregnancy can increase the need for      sleep.
  • Aging.      Older adults need about the same amount of sleep as younger adults. As you      get older, however, your sleeping patterns might change. Older adults tend      to sleep more lightly and for shorter time spans than do younger adults.      This might create a need for spending more time in bed to get enough      sleep, or a tendency toward daytime napping.
  • Previous      sleep deprivation. If you’re sleep deprived, the amount of sleep you      need increases.
  • Sleep      quality. If your sleep is frequently interrupted or cut short, you’re      not getting quality sleep. The quality of your sleep is just as important      as the quantity.

Victorian clockThose first two weeks after Bear’s surgery when I was his caretaker, I rarely enjoyed more than two hours of sleep at a time and there seemed to be no difference between day and night.  I’m not saying this would be true for everyone, but we paid for it dearly.  I ended up in the emergency room needing a breathing treatment to relieve the bronchial symptoms that were making it so difficult to breathe and I just may have brought home a virus for Bear who soon started running a high fever. We were both run down from lack of sleep.  Of course, Bear was already in recuperative mode, but we proved to me how very important sleep is.

When I was first diagnosed with Chronic Kidney Disease almost six years ago, the value of exercise was brought home again and again by my nephrologist.  Until I researched for What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, I wasn’t clear about why this was important.  This is what I discovered:

I knew exercise was important to control my weight.  It would also improve my blood pressure and lower my cholesterol and triglyceride levels. The greater your triglycerides, the greater the risk of increasing your creatinine.  There were other benefits, too, although you didn’t have to have CKD to enjoy them: better sleep, and improved muscle function and strength. But, as with everything else you do that might impinge upon your health, check with your doctor before you start exercising.

I researched, researched and researched again.  Each explanation of what exercise does for the body was more complicated than the last one I read.  Keeping it simple, basically, there’s a compound released by voluntary muscle contraction.  It tells the body to repair itself and grow stronger. The idea is to start exercising slowly and then intensity your activity.exercising silhouette

Okay, so we know during that 66 days to form a habit, seven to eight hours a night of sleep is one of the habits we should be forming and half an hour of exercise daily is another.  Might as well throw in following the renal diet and avoiding stress as two other habits to get into.  However, considering how long this blog is already, those are topics for another blog.  Who knows?  Maybe even next week’s blog.

KindleAmazon is offering the book in many different countries as well as ours.  It’s also offering the Kindle MatchBook in each of these countries.  Remember?  That’s the program that allows you to buy the digital edition at a 70% discount if you’ve EVER bought a print copy of the book from them.  Why mention it yet again?  It just occurred to me that you can gift the newly diagnosed, their friends and/or family in many different countries! And for those who asked, yes, the book is available on B&N.com, but their digital reader is The Nook, not the Kindle, so there’s no MatchBook discount program on this site.

May you have a Merry Christmas and a Happy Kwanzaa if those are the holidays you celebrate.  Oh my!  Just one more 2013 blog. I think I’ll go back to the earliest ones from this year to see how varied they are.  I’ll bet there’s more than one about the health benefits of coffee.Book signing

By the way, there has been some controversy about the authorship of the poem from which I played upon for the title of this blog, but I’m more than willing to accept Clement Moore as the author of “ ‘Twas The Night Before Christmas.”

Until next year,

Keep living your life!

Coffee, The Elixir of The Gods (Or Did I Just Make That Up?)

With all that’s going on in my life and in the world, I awoke today thinking, “Coffee, today’s blog is going to be about coffee!”  First thing I did was make the coffee (my turn today) and then pop back into bed with Bear and check Facebook.

And there it was, right in front of me.  And now, here it is, right in front of you. Mark Rosen shared MedicalPk’s coffee post (http://www.medicopk.com/health-benefits/some-surprising-health-benefits-of-coffee/).  Mark originated The Kidney Disease Ideas and Help Page I follow on Facebook and MedicalPk is a medical blog for students.Some-surprising-health-benefits-of-COFFEE  Look at all the benefits of coffee mentioned in this chart!  I made that a very large reproduction so you could read it. I wasn’t so sure this could all be true since I remembered the old adage, “If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.” *Notice, the article also mentions the negatives of coffee so look at the website.

Of course, as Chronic Kidney Disease patients, we can’t run wild in our pursuit of the perfect cup of coffee and how often we can have it. It’s 16 ounces (two cups) maximum for me so I want to have the best taste I can. Coffee Masters’ Jamaican Me Crazy is my favorite.  We discovered it while choosing our wedding cake at Bakery-Wee in Glendale and immediately ordered a ten pound bag.  I sort of, maybe, kind of knew that our wedding guests were not going to drink that much coffee.  Hence, almost two months later, there it is – waiting for me – on the kitchen counter next to the coffee machine everyday.

CoffeeCupPopCatalinStockBut it’s become one of those once-in-a-while-heaven-descends treats for me. I haven’t quite figured out how it can have the “richest, sweetest essence of the darkest tropical island rum” without containing alcohol, despite what it says on the package. That’s a topic for another blog.

Going a step further in my coffee research, I found an article at http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/257888.php that explains the benefits of Greek coffee and how that works.  The part that intrigued me was this:

“The endothelium is a layer of cells that lines the blood vessels, which is impacted by lifestyle habits and aging. The researchers focused on coffee because earlier research has proven that moderate coffee intake may decrease the risk of coronary heart disease, they [sic]} wondered whether it could have a positive impact on other areas of endothelial health.”

According to the article based on the findings which were published in Vascular Journal earlier this year, it did. If you look at the chart, you’ll see heart disease mentioned as one the ailments coffee may help prevent there, too.

Another article, this one from Digestive Disease Week, offered more good news about coffee:

“Coffee consumption helped protect against the autoimmune liver disease known as primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), a disorder of the bile ducts that causes inflammation and obstruction and that can lead to transplantation or death.”

This one is discussed on MedpageToday at: http://www.medpagetoday.com/MeetingCoverage/DDW/39292.  On the chart, liver cirrhosis is mentioned as another ailment coffee may help prevent.liver

There’s a wonderful slide show of both the merits and drawbacks of coffee consumption at: http://www.medscape.com/features/slideshow/coffee?src=ptalk#12.  I urge you to see this for yourself. On this slideshow, not only are the benefits mentioned in the chart about Parkinson’s disease, gout, cancer, diabetes, and heart disease also noted, but there are also slides about improving glucose metabolism, promoting weight loss in the overweight (obviously, you need to drink more than the two cups a day I do), lessening of the risk of developing depression, slowing the progress of Hepatitis C, benefitting dry eye syndrome, and preventing MRSA infections (those are the antibiotic resistant ones).Coffee Beans_0

Coffee does initially raise blood pressure, but it also has the potential to lower it long term… one of life’s little dichotomies. Among the other drawbacks of my favorite beverage are the obvious ones: it can contribute to anxiety, insomnia and tremors (so that’s why my mother and her father had these.  Or was it the Parkinson’s disease that seems to run in the family?) Coffee can exacerbate withdrawal symptoms and there is the potential for it increasing the risk of glaucoma.

The article I liked the best during my research is at: http://bodyodd.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/11/20/15309215-coffee-helps-you-see-the-bright-side.  It offers a detailed explanation of how dopamine is elevated by drinking coffee.  In layman’s terms, that means coffee can make you feel good.  As a non-drinker, non-smoker, I can personally attest to the fact that my two cups of coffee per day make me feel great… and not simply in terms of energy.YGCnpYEUFRtlrF00_f9frLXF_JWiNWNHS9AVZmM1PxI

Talking about coffee, yesterday the Transplant Community Outreach from Facebook invited me to a lunch gathering of people from different parts of Arizona and California. I write KIDNEY MATTERS for the group so they knew I wasn’t a transplant.  I marveled as they ate pretty much whatever they wanted.  The conversations centered on their various transplants and other diseases, but it was so definitely not a pity party.  These people realized they were on their second or third chances and were enjoying life tremendously.  Thank you for inviting me, Janet Peralta.

Kidney educators are waiting to start their kidney education classes on the local Native American reservations.  I am still waiting to get them on the reservations.  If you can think of any access at all, please let me know.  There is nothing like saving a life… even indirectly.

The book has been introduced to British Columbia via Patti Telford and Colorado’s Evans Community Army Hospital via Deanna Leclair.  Thank you both for being the cause of these new avenues for getting the information where it’s needed.  And thank you LandmarkEducation for giving me the opportunity to get this information to places I hadn’t even realized it was needed.

Until next week,The Table

Keep living your life!

Eat And Be Well

Here’s hoping all you mothers – and fathers being both mother and father to your children – had a wonderful Mother’s Day. There are just too many such fathers to mention individually here.

I don’t know where the idea originated that you had to give birth to your children to be their mother, but I see examples every day of non-birth mothers being terrific mothers.  That one’s for you, sweet Sharon.

My step-daughter Kelly and her fiancé Sean made a Mother’s Day bar b q and invited her sister Lara, along with Lara’s love, my daughter Abby, and Bear and me.  That’s my kind of Mother’s Day.  The only thing that could have made it better is if my NY daughter, Nima, had been there.download

As usual, Sean asked me first how I needed my chicken seasoned and if the piece he had chosen for me was small enough. That kind of thoughtfulness is a given with this gracious man.  Alex brought the sweetest watermelon… something else I could eat.  Someone brought potato salad which I admit I had a teaspoon of “just to taste,” and someone else brought potato chips.  I had no trouble eating my limited permitted share of those.  Kelly even made a cup of coffee just for me.

I see today’s blog is going to be about food.  Keeping that in mind, I found this general guideline to healthy eating at: http://healthfinder.gov/HealthTopics/Category/health-conditions-and-diseases/diabetes/eat-healthy

The Basics

Your body needs the right vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients to stay healthy. A healthy diet means that you are eating:

  • Vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and fat-free or low-fat milk products
  • Seafood, poultry, lean meats, eggs, beans, peas, seeds, and nuts

Limit foods high in:

  • Cholesterol, sodium (salt), and added sugars
  • Tans fats – Trans fats may be in foods like cakes, cookies, stick margarines, and fried foods.
  • Saturated  fats – These fats come from animal products like cheese, fatty meats, whole milk, and butter.
  • Refined grains – Food products with refined grains include white bread, noodles, white rice, and flour tortillas

 

What I found interesting here is that what the general population is urged to eat is not that much different than what we early stage Chronic Kidney Disease sufferers are told to eat.  We do have to limit the fruits and vegetables to three different sized portions of each.  The portion depends on the particular fruit or vegetable. We also need to cap our limited types of seafood, poultry, lean meats, and eggs to five ounces per day.  As for seeds and nuts, those are no-no’s for us.

Look at the foods the government feels we should avoid.  Look familiar?  Take a look at the renal diet your nutritionist gave you and you’ll find them on that as foods to limit (or avoid), too.glycemic-index

You probably noticed the above information was taken from a website dealing with diabetes.  That’s because diabetes is one of the leading causes of Chronic Kidney Disease and vice-versa. That’s another reason to watch your intake of foods with a high glycemic index – the indicator of how quickly your blood sugar rises after eating the food – which includes not only what we usually consider sweets, but ice cream, too.

P1050446-1024x677You know we need to stay as healthy as possible, including keeping our weight down. One way to do that is NOT skipping breakfast.  Why?  This is how study researcher Dr. Tony Goldstone, M.D., Ph.D. of Imperial College London in the UK explains it:

“Through both the participants’ MRI results and observations of how much they ate at lunch, we found ample evidence that fasting made people hungrier, and increased the appeal of high-calorie foods and the amount people ate.”

You can read more about the study that led him to come to this conclusion at: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/251709.php

You need to understand that skipping breakfast (literally breaking the fast you incur while you sleep) is a form of fasting.  If you take medication that requires food along with it, you’re also delaying the effects of the medication since you’re not taking it until later in the day.

Here’s an interesting finding on a study publicized in The Journal of Renal Nutrition in 2009:

“Long-term fish consumption was independently associated with improved kidney function among elderly individuals, a finding that extends the current knowledge regarding the benefits of fish intake on human health.”

But we knew that, didn’t we?  Take a look at: http://www.jrnjournal.org/article/S1051-2276(12)00181-1/abstract for more, slightly technical, information on this study.

By the way, are you taking Omega 3 (fish oil) supplements?  There’s a theory it helps retard the progress of CKD. I’ll been taking it all five years since my diagnosis and I’m still at stage 3A.

While that’s something I would suggest – and please remember:  I’m not a doctor.  You need to run my suggestions by your nephrologist before you even think of acting on them! – something I will  caution you  about is grapefruit or grapefruit juice.  Let’s go back to Healthfinder.gov at: http://www.healthfinder.gov/News/Article.aspx?id=670988&source=govdelivery#.ULPppKAFqXI.twitter for the information about this: is

“Even small amounts of grapefruit or grapefruit juice have the potential to cause sudden death, acute kidney failure, respiratory failure, gastrointestinal bleeding and other serious side effects when paired with these medications. Included are certain cholesterol-lowering medications, blood pressure drugs, cancer treatments and antibiotics such as erythromycin, the researchers said.”

And star fruit (carambola)!! Avoid it at ALL costs, because the cost could be your life.  It is toxic to people with Chronic Kidney Disease.  It’s a tropical fruit so chances are you’re not going to run into it too often.  I am so glad I wasn’t adventurous enough to try it in Nigeria all those years ago.  My daughter, Nima, did try it when our Nigerian friends (Remi Okunoye and her children Moriyika, Oliaton, and Benga) were living with us back on Staten Island, but she immediately spit it out.  She was a young child, not used to the taste, and it was too strong for her. Now that she’s at risk for CKD since I have it, I’m glad she did that.is (1)

I took the following quote from an article beguilingly entitled It’s not just what you eat, but when you eat it: “When a species’ typical daily rhythm is thrown off, changes in metabolism also happen. For example, in people, night shift workers have an increased prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome, and patients with sleep disorders have a higher risk for developing obesity. Also, less sleep means more weight gain in healthy men and women.”  This is discussed more technically at: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-11/uops-inj110612.php

Enjoy what you do feel safe eating – and there is quite a bit of that type of food available, you know.

Until next week,

Keep living your life.

To Stress Or Not To Stress

I woke up yesterday morning, threw open the windows, and just listened to the birds singing away while the sun shone right in. I was filled with joy that it was Sunday morning, Bear Bearandmewas right next to me, and I could do that.  Then I realized every morning is Sunday morning for me. I live in sunny Arizona and am retired.  The only stress I have is that which I impose upon myself.

I have heard my four grown daughters talk about the stress in their lives and what it seems to be doing to each of them in different ways.  We’re not talking about life or death stress, rather everyday should-I-or-shouldn’t-I stress.  Should I take the new job?  Should I go out with him?  Should I buy a house?  Should I move out of state?  Even (for me) should we have Italian food catered in for our wedding? You know, the usual – and good since so many of them are associated with joyous occasions – life stresses.

Stress?  Hmmm? What does that do to the kidneys? But wait, maybe it would be more prudent to explore just what stress is first.

According to the Free Online Medical Dictionary, “Stress is defined as an organism’s total response to environmental demands or pressures.” The site goes on to explain the description, causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, alternative treatment, prognosis and prevention of stress.  While this was interesting reading, it’s not quite germane to the kidneys.  You can find all this information at: http://medical-dictionary.the freedictionary.com/stress

Alright.  We have those demands or pressures. (I distinctly remember my stress about whether or not to allow my youngest to attend a preforming arts high school across the bay from our Staten Island house in New York City.  It would mean a bus, ferry, and subway ride each way to the tune of an hour and a half… without me!)

But what is our organism’s total response?  You’ve got to remember we respond the same way whether the stress is positive (I always, without fail, experience a few minutes of stress before I go on stage or the cameras start rolling) or negative (like when we were told we need a new air conditioning system and we realized that meant the honeymoon will have to wait).stress

Ready? First you feel the fight or flight syndrome which means you are releasing hormones.  The adrenal glands which secrete these hormones lay right on top of your kidneys. Your blood sugar raises, too, and there’s an increase in both heart rate and blood pressure.  Diabetes (blood sugar) and hypertension (blood pressure) both play a part in chronic kidney disease.

If you still haven’t resolved the stress, additional hormones are secreted for more energy.

Still no resolution?  Not good.  Years, even weeks, of stress can “affect the heart, kidneys  {and doesn’t affecting the heart also affect the kidneys?}, blood pressure  {uh-oh, that also affects the kidneys.} stomach, muscles and joints.”  The comments within the brackets are mine.  Thank you to www.comprehensive-kidney-facts.com/stress-management.html for the rest of the information.

blood pressure 300dpi jpgFor those of you who want more technical explanations, I turned to eHow (I think I’m a little bit of a snob here since I’m surprised when I’m directed there in a medical search). According to www.ehow.com/facts_5929145_effect-stress-hormones-kidney-function.html, “The combination of vasoconstriction {that means ‘the narrowing (constriction) of blood vessels by small muscles in their walls. When blood vessels constrict, the flow of blood is restricted or slowed” http://www.healthscout.com/ency/1/002338.html } and increase in blood volume (because of water retention) raises  blood pressure, which can, over time, translate into chronic hypertension {high blood pressure}.  Persistent water retention as an outcome of prolonged elevations in stress hormones can also produce edema {swelling}.”

And that’s only a part of a total medical explanation.  There’s more that stress does to the kidneys but if you think I explained quite a bit in this part of the explanation, I need to tell you that this was the easiest part of the explanation to understand with some help.

Stress management seems to be part of keeping our already compromised kidneys from deteriorating even more.  Naturally, the next question should be what IS stress management?Book Cover

You’re already exercising half an hour a day (You are, aren’t you?) That’s to control your weight, blood pressure, cholesterol and triglyceride levels. To quote myself from What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, “The greater your triglycerides, the greater the risk of increasing your creatinine.”  Me again: “Keeping it simple, basically, there’s a compound released by voluntary muscle contraction.  It tells the body to repair itself and grow stronger.” So it’s no great surprise that exercise also lowers your blood pressure, even when it’s been raised by stress.

At http://www.holisticonline.com/herb_home.htm, you’ll find dietary suggestions to manage stress.  While I don’t agree with all of them (like caffeine, I am NOT giving up my two allotted cups of coffee a day, no way!  They make me feel far less deprived.) and you need to take your renal diet into account, most of them are well worth adhering to.

Smoking and alcohol (contrary to popular belief) will only increase your stress levels.  I’m wondering if we didn’t get the notion they would decrease stress from the movies or television.

Drinking water, but keeping within your daily fluid limits (mine is 64 ounces, which includes any liquid or frozen liquid such as jello), can also reduce stress as can anything that relaxes you: music, your pet, a warm bath, playing an instrument, etc.

There is stress even with a simple little backyard wedding like ours, which is why I’m so glad to be spending more time than usual with my daughters – a great stress reducer for me – and the new people they’ve been bringing into our lives lately.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!