Diabetic Neuropathy or Not: I WILL Dance Again

I come from a family of dancers. My parents and their siblings were all light on their feet and danced from the time they were teens right up until just before their deaths. It was a delight to watch them. The tradition continued with me… and my youngest who actually taught blues dancing for several years.

Ah, but then my neuropathy appeared. This was years before the diabetes diagnosis. Hmmm, there’s still a question as to whether or not the diabetes was caused by the pancreatic cancer. After all, the pancreas does produce insulin.

I just reread the above two paragraphs and see so much that needs some basic explanation. Let’s start with those explanations this week. How many of you know what neuropathy is? I didn’t either until I was diagnosed with it. According to my favorite dictionary since college a million years ago, The Merriam-Webster Dictionary at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/neuropathy defines neuropathy as:

“damage, disease, or dysfunction of one or more nerves especially of the peripheral nervous system that is typically marked by burning or shooting pain, numbness, tingling, or muscle weakness or atrophy, is often degenerative, and is usually caused by injury, infection, disease, drugs, toxins, or vitamin deficiency “

If you clicked though on ‘peripheral nervous system’ in the dictionary definition, you know it means,

“the part of the nervous system that is outside the central nervous system and comprises the cranial nerves excepting the optic nerve, the spinal nerves, and the autonomic nervous system”

Since the neuropathy was so minor before the pancreatic cancer, I wasn’t even aware of it until my neurologist did some testing. I knew my feet were tingly sometimes, but I thought they had fallen asleep. It did sort of feel like that.

Then, I started chemotherapy in March. The tingling became so bad that I couldn’t feel my feet under me and had to rely on a cane to keep my balance. We thought it was the chemo drugs causing the neuropathy. Uh-oh, that was just about when my hands became affected, too, and my A1C (Remember that one? It’s the blood test for the average of your blood glucose over a three month period.) rose all the way to 7.1.

Healthline at https://www.healthline.com/health/type-2-diabetes/ac1-test#understanding-the-results tells us,

“Someone without diabetes will have about 5 percent of their hemoglobin glycated [Gail here: that means glucose bonded to hemoglobin]. A normal A1C level is 5.6 percent or below, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

A level of 5.7 to 6.4 percent indicates prediabetes. People with diabetes have an A1C level of 6.5 percent or above.”

Mind you, during chemotherapy I’d been ordered to eat whatever I could. Getting in the calories would cut down on the expected weight loss. In all honesty, I’m the only person I know what gained weight while on chemotherapy.

Now, what is this about the pancreas producing insulin? Might as well get a definition of insulin while we’re at it. MedicineNet at https://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=3989 offered the simplest explanation:

“A natural hormone made by the pancreas that controls the level of the sugar glucose in the blood. Insulin permits cells to use glucose for energy. Cells cannot utilize glucose without insulin.”

That would explain why my energy is practically nil, but it also seems to indicate that I won’t be able to do anything about it until after the surgery to remove the tumor. Although, when I start radiation next week, I may be able to go back to the diabetic diet. By the way, after following the Chronic Kidney Disease diet for 11 years, none of the new – off the CKD diet – foods I tried are appealing to me.

But I digress. So, what now? I need to dance; it’s part of who I am. My oncologist referred me to Occupational Therapy. Now I have exercises and tactile surfaces to explore that may be helpful. But what about those who are not going through chemotherapy, but do have diabetic neuropathy? Remember diabetes is the number cause of CKD.

Oh, my goodness. It looks like there are as many ways to treat neuropathy as there are different kinds of neuropathy. I hadn’t expected that. EverydayHealth at https://www.everydayhealth.com/neuropathy/guide/treatment/ gives us an idea of just how complicated choosing the proper treatment for your neuropathy can be:

What Are the Main Ways That Neuropathy Is Treated?

Treating neuropathy in general focuses first on identifying and then addressing the underlying condition to help prevent further damage and give nerves the time they need to heal to the extent that they can.

“The treatment for the neuropathy is to reverse whatever it is that is causing the neuropathy,” says Clifford Segil, DO, a neurologist at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, California. “We try to reverse the insult to the nerves first and then do symptomatic control.”

For people with diabetic neuropathy, the first step physicians take is getting the person’s blood glucose level under control, says Matthew Villani, DPM, a podiatrist at Central Florida Regional Hospital in Sanford, Florida.

This treatment approach aims to remove the “insult” created by the excess sugar to peripheral nerves throughout the body — but especially the extremities, Dr. Segil explains.

Here are some other ways diabetic neuropathy may be treated:

  • Numbness or complete loss of sensation can lead to complications such as ulcers, sores, and limb amputations. It is addressed by monitoring the affected areas — often the feet — for injuries and addressing wounds before they become more serious, as well as prescribing protective footwear and braces.
  • Orthostatic hypotension (a drop in blood pressure upon standing up), which is an autonomic symptom, can be treated with increased sodium intake, a vasopressor such as ProAmatine (midodrine) to constrict blood vessels, a synthetic mineralocorticoid such as fludrocortisone to help maintain the balance of salt in the body, or a cholinesterase inhibitor such as pyridostigmine, which affects neurotransmitters.
  • Gastroparesis, a delayed emptying of the stomach, is another autonomic symptom, which can be treated with medication to control nausea and vomiting, such as Reglan (metoclopramide), Ery-Tab (erythromycin), antiemetics, and antidepressants, as well as pain medication for abdominal discomfort.
  • Motor neuropathy symptoms can include weakness and muscle wasting, particularly in the lower extremities, as well as deformities of the feet and loss of the Achilles’ heel tendon reflex. Treatments can include physical therapy to regain strength, as well as braces and orthotics.

I’ve got to think about this. Any questions? Well, then,

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

To Continue…

National Kidney Month is just flying by. This is actually the last week and I doubt I’ll be able to post the rest of the 1in9 chapter before next month. But then again, it’s always Kidney Month for those of us with Chronic Kidney Disease. By the way, thank you to the reader who made it a point of telling me she can’t wait to read the rest of the chapter. Sooooo, let’s get started!

***

Nephrologist switch. The new one was much better for me. He explained again and again until I understood and he put up with a lot of verbal abuse when this panicky new patient wasn’t getting answers as quickly as she wanted them. Luckily for me, he graciously accepted my apology.

After talking to the nephrologist, I began to realize just how serious this disease was and started to wonder why my previous nurse practitioner had not caught this. When I asked her why, she responded, “It was inconclusive testing.” Sure it was. Because she never ordered the GFR tested; that had been incidental! I feel there’s no sense crying over spilled milk (or destroyed nephrons, in this case), but I wonder how much more of my kidney function I could have preserved if I’d known about my CKD earlier.

According to the Mayo Clinic, there are 13 early signs of chronic kidney disease. I never experienced any of them, not even one. While I did have high blood pressure, it wasn’t uncontrollable which is one of the early signs. Many, like me, never experienced any noticeable symptoms. Unfortunately, many, like me, may have had high blood pressure (hypertension) for years before CKD was diagnosed. Yet, high blood pressure and diabetes are the two leading causes of CKD. I find it confusing that uncontrollable high blood pressure may be an early sign of CKD, but hypertension itself is the second leading cause of CKD.

Here’s the part about my researching. I was so mystified about what was happening and why it was happening that I began an extensive course of research. My nephrologists did explain what everything meant (I think), but I was still too shocked to understand what they were saying. I researched diagnoses, descriptions of tests, test results, doctors’ reports, you name it. Slowly, it began to make sense, but that understanding only led to more questions and more research.

You’ve probably already guessed that my world changed during that first appointment. I began to excuse myself for rest periods each day when I went back East for a slew of family affairs right after. I counted food groups and calories at these celebrations that summer. And I used all the errand running associated with them as an excuse to speed walk wherever I went and back so I could fit in my exercise. Ah, but that was just the beginning.

My high blood pressure had been controlled for 20 years at that time, but what about my diet? I had no clue there was such a thing as a kidney diet until the nutritionist explained it to me. I’m a miller’s granddaughter and ate anything – and I do mean anything – with grain in it: breads, muffins, cakes, croissants, all of it. I also liked lots of chicken and fish… not the five ounces per day I’m limited to now.

The nutritionist explained to me how hard protein is on the kidneys… as is phosphorous… and potassium… and, of course, sodium. Out went my daily banana—too high in potassium. Out went restaurant burgers—larger than my daily allowance of protein. Chinese food? Pizza? Too high in sodium. I embraced an entirely new way of eating because it was one of the keys to keeping my kidneys functioning in stage 3.

I was in a new food world. I’d already known about restricting sodium because I had high blood pressure, but these other things? I had to keep a list of which foods contain them, how much was in each of these foods, and a running list of how much of each I had during the day so I knew when I reached my limit for that day.

Another critical piece of slowing down CKD is medication. I was already taking meds to lower my blood pressure when I was first diagnosed with CKD. Two more prescriptions have been added to this in the last decade: a diuretic that lowers my body’s absorption of salt to help prevent fluid from building up in my body (edema), and a drug that widens the blood vessels by relaxing them. I take another drug for my brand new diabetes. (Bye-bye, sugars and most carbs.) The funny thing is now my favorite food is salad with extra virgin olive oil and balsamic vinegar. I never thought that would happen: I was a chocoholic!

Exercise, something I loved until my arthritis got in the way, was also important. I was a dancer. Wasn’t that enough? Uh-uh, I had to learn about cardio and strength training exercise, too. It was no longer acceptable to be pleasantly plumb. My kidneys didn’t need the extra work. Hello to weights, walking, and a stationary bike. I think I took sleep for granted before CKD, too, and I now make it a point to get a good night’s sleep. A sleep apnea device improved my sleep—and my kidney function rose.

I realized I needed to rest, too. Instead of giving a lecture, running to an audition, and coming home to meet a deadline, I slowly started easing off until I didn’t feel like I was running on empty all the time. The result was that I ended up graciously retiring from both acting and teaching at a local college, which gave me more time to work on my CKD awareness advocacy.

***

There’s so much more to tell you about my personal CKD journey… and you’ll read more of it next week. Although, I should remind you that the entire book is available in print and digital on both Amazon.com and B&N.com, just as the entire SlowItDownCKD series of books is.

Until next week,
Keep living your life!

World Kidney Day, 2019

Will you look at that? The world keeps moving on no matter what’s going on in our personal lives. And so, I recognize that Thursday of this week is World Kidney Day. In honor of this occasion, I’ve chosen to update last year’s World Kidney Day blog… so sit back and enjoy the read.

…World Kidney Day? What’s that? I discovered this is a fairly new designation. It was only thirteen years ago that it was initiated.

 

According to http://worldkidneyday.org,

World Kidney Day is a global awareness campaign aimed at raising awareness of the importance of our kidneys.”

Sound familiar?  That’s where I’m heading with What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease; SlowItDownCKD 2011; SlowItDownCKD 2012; SlowItDownCKD 2013; SlowItDownCKD 2014; SlowItDownCKD 2015; SlowItDownCKD 2016; SlowItDownCKD 2017; Facebook; Instagram; LinkedIn; Pinterest; Twitter; and this blog. We may be running along different tracks, but we’re headed in the same direction.

The 59 year old International Society of Nephrology (ISN) – a non-profit group spreading over 155 countries – is one part of the equation for their success.  Another is the International Federation of Kidney Foundations with membership in over 40 countries. Add a steering committee and The World Kidney Day Team and you have the makings of this particular concept….

According to their website at https://www.theisn.org/advocacy/world-kidney-day :

“The mission of World Kidney Day is to raise awareness of the importance of our kidneys to our overall health and to reduce the frequency and impact of kidney disease and its associated health problems worldwide.

Objectives:

  • Raise awareness about our ‘amazing kidneys’
  • Highlight that diabetes and high blood pressure are key risk factors for Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)
  • Encourage systematic screening of all patients with diabetes and hypertension for CKD
  • Encourage preventive behaviors
  • Educate all medical professionals about their key role in detecting and reducing the risk of CKD, particularly in high risk populations
  • Stress the important role of local and national health authorities in controlling the CKD epidemic.”

While there are numerous objectives for this year’s World Kidney Day, the one that lays closest to my heart is this one: ‘Encourage systematic screening of all patients with diabetes and hypertension for CKD.’

Back to World Kidney Day’s website at https://www.worldkidneyday.org  now, if you please.

This year’s theme is Kidney Health for Everyone Everywhere.

Their site offers materials and ideas for events as well as a map of global events. Prepare to be awed at how wide spread World Kidney Day events are.

Before you leave their page, take a detour to Kidney FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) on the toolbar at the top of the page.  You can learn everything you need to know from what the kidneys do to what the symptoms (or lack thereof) of CKD are, from how to treat CKD to a toolbox full of helpful education about your kidneys to preventative measures.

If only my nurse practitioner had been aware of National Kidney Month or World Kidney Day, she could have warned me immediately that I needed to make lifestyle changes so the decline of my kidney function could have been slowed down earlier. How much more of my kidney function would I still have if I’d known earlier? That was a dozen years ago. This shouldn’t still be happening… but it is.

I received a phone call a few years ago that just about broke my heart.  Someone very dear to me sobbed, “He’s dying.” When I calmed her down, she explained a parent was sent to a nephrologist who told him he has end stage renal disease and needed dialysis or transplantation immediately.

I pried a little trying to get her to admit he’d been diagnosed before end stage, but she simply didn’t know what I was talking about. There had been no diagnose of Chronic Kidney Disease up to this point. There was diabetes, apparently out of control diabetes, but no one impressed upon this man that diabetes is the foremost cause of CKD.

What a waste of the precious time he could have had to do more than stop smoking, which he did (to his credit), the moment he was told it would help with the diabetes.  Would he be where he was then if his medical practitioners had been aware of National Kidney Month or World Kidney Day, especially since this man was high risk due to his age and diabetes?  I fervently believe so.

I have a close friend who was involved in the local senior center where she lives.  She said she didn’t know anyone else but me who had this disease.  Since 1 out of every 7 people does nationally (That’s 15% of the adult population) and being over 60 places you in a high risk group, I wonder how many of her friends were included in the 96% of those in the early stage of CKD who don’t know they have CKD or don’t even know they need to be tested.  I’d have rather been mistaken here, but I’m afraid I wasn’t. National Kidney Month or World Kidney Day could have helped them become aware.

For those of you who have forgotten (Easily read explanations of what results of the different items on your tests mean are in What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease.), all it takes is a blood test and a urine test to detect CKD.  I have routine blood tests every three months to monitor a medication I’m taking.  It was in this test, a test I took anyway, that my family physician uncovered Chronic Kidney Disease as a problem.

There is so much free education about CKD online. Maybe you can start with the blogroll on the right side of the blog or hit “Apps” on the Topics Dropdown. None of us needs to hear another sorrowful, “If only I had known!”

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Eating Makes Me Hungry

I couldn’t figure it out. I had my renal diet down pat (That only took ten years, she thought snidely.) When the foods I’m sensitive to had to be removed from that diet, I worked the new-reduced-possibilities-for-food-choices diet out pretty quickly, too. But then I noticed that I was hungry pretty much only after I ate.

I’d prefer to eat only if I’m hungry, but some of my medications require food first. Okay, so I knew I had to eat at least twice a day and graze several times during the day to keep my blood glucose level. I thought I took care of that by eating a small breakfast, lunch as my main meal when I got hungry, and a much smaller, almost snack type meal for dinner.

So why did eating make me hungry? Was I not taking enough food in? Nope. I counted calories to check and was not much under my allotted 1,200 per day. So what was it?

Women’s Health at https://www.womenshealthmag.com/food/g19920742/foods-that-make-you-hungrier/ named the following seven foods that make you hungrier:

  1. Whole wheat bread
  2. Fruit juices
  3. Egg whites
  4. Green smoothies
  5. Non-fact dairy
  6. Pickles
  7. Whole wheat crackers

Hmmm, between the renal diet and my food sensitivities I don’t eat any of these. Wait, I do eat whole eggs which contain egg whites, but I think Dr. Caspero meant only the whites for the purposes of this list.

Of course, I wanted to know why these foods make you hungrier. This quote is from the same article.

“For the most part, fat, fiber, and protein help with satiation,” says Alex Caspero, R.D. “So foods without those components will likely leave you searching for your next meal in no time.”

Reminder: R.D. means registered dietician.

I don’t eat whole wheat anything because I have sensitivity to it, but doesn’t it have fiber? That’s a yes and no answer. It does have fiber, but is more processed than regular flour which means less fiber. Fiber helps to fill you up. Side bar here:  Did you know that flour of any kind has wheat in it since it’s made from one or more of the three parts of the grain? That’s mean no bread for me.

Nope, Dr. Caspero didn’t answer my question as fully as I wanted it to be answered. Back to the drawing board, boys and girls.

Wait a minute. This from the BBC at http://www.bbc.co.uk/guides/zt22mp3 looks like it’s getting close to answering my question.

“Different types of food we eat affect the brain in various ways. For example, fatty foods trick the brain into believing that you have eaten fewer calories than you actually have, causing you to overeat. This is because fatty foods such as butter and fried foods contain a lot of densely packed energy.

However, other foods give a lasting sense of fullness. Fibre triggers the release of gut hormones that make you feel full. A low fibre diet though, with little or no wholemeal produce or fruit and vegetables, may leave you open to feelings of hunger.

Foods with a low GI (glycaemic index) such as nuts, vegetables and beans release energy more slowly than high GI food such as white bread and sugar. Eating more low GI foods will suppress your hunger by increasing levels of gut hormones that help you feel fuller for longer.”

Foods with a low GI, huh? This brings me back to the lessons from the Diabetes Nutritionist my family doctor sent me to when she discovered I was (and still am four years later) pre-diabetic. Okay, I can take a hint. What are some of these low GI foods?

The American Diabetes Association at http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/what-can-i-eat/understanding-carbohydrates/glycemic-index-and-diabetes.html  was able to help us out here:

“Low GI Foods (55 or less)

  • 100% stone-ground whole wheat or pumpernickel bread
  • Oatmeal (rolled or steel-cut), oat bran, muesli
  • Pasta, converted rice, barley, bulgar
  • Sweet potato, corn, yam, lima/butter beans, peas, legumes and lentils
  • Most fruits, non-starchy vegetables and carrots

Medium GI (56-69)

  • Whole wheat, rye and pita bread
  • Quick oats
  • Brown, wild or basmati rice, couscous

High GI (70 or more)

  • White bread or bagel
  • Corn flakes, puffed rice, bran flakes, instant oatmeal
  • Shortgrain white rice, rice pasta, macaroni and cheese from mix
  • Russet potato, pumpkin
  • Pretzels, rice cakes, popcorn, saltine crackers
  • melons and pineapple”

According the renal diet I follow, the Northern Arizona Council on Renal Nutrition Diet, I could eat all of these foods. According to my food sensitivities, I could only eat oatmeal, some fruits, and vegetables. Maybe that’s why eating makes me hungry.

Take a look at this. Redbook (and to think I smirked at my mom for reading this magazine when I was a teenager) at https://www.redbookmag.com/body/healthy-eating/g2819/foods-that-make-you-hungry/?slide=1 explains about fruit making you feel hungrier:

“’Fruit juice may already be on your no-go list, but if you’re eating more than one serving of the whole variety (i.e. one banana or one cup of berries), you may want to scale back. It may have nutritional benefits, but fruit is not going to help suppress your appetite,’ says Perlmutter. ‘It contains both fructose and glucose, which won’t signal insulin, causing your appetite to rage on.’”

Perlmutter is David Perlmutter, MD, a board-certified neurologist and author of Brain Maker.

Got it: More fiber, less sugar. Now the only question is can I get myself to adhere to that… and can you if you choose to stop being hungrier after eating than you were before.

Talking about magazines, Arizona Health and Living at https://issuu.com/arizonahealthandliving/docs/arizona_health_and_living_magazine__9a2d374f4dffc2 is helping me spread awareness of Chronic Kidney Disease. This is in their June 2018 issue.

 

Guess what I found when I was preparing my non-CKD book for last Thursday night’s reading at our local The Dog Eared Pages Used Book Store. You’re right. It’s a copy of the newly minted (um, printed) SlowItDownCKD 2017. Would you like it? All that I require is your address and that you haven’t received a free book from me before.

Random thought: I cannot believe I just chose a Father’s Day gift for my son-in-law’s first Father’s Day. Add my youngest’s upcoming nuptials and this is a very happy world I live in. Here’s hoping yours is a happy one, too.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

All of Me, uh, Us

When I was a little girl, I liked to listen to my father whistle ‘All of Me,’ written by Marks and Simon in 1931 when Charlie, my father, was just 16. Only a few years later, it became a sort of love language for my mother and him. Enter a former husband of my own and my children. When my folks visited from Florida and my then husband’s side of the family journeyed over to Staten Island from Brooklyn to visit them, they all sang the song with great emotion. (By then, Bell’s palsy had robbed my father of the ability to whistle.)

To this day, I start welling up when I hear that song. But then I started thinking about the lyrics:

“All of me
Why not take all of me?”

Suddenly, it popped. For us, those with chronic kidney disease, it should be:

“All of us

Why not take all of us?”

For research purposes. To “speed up health research breakthroughs.” For help in our lifetime. To spare future generations whatever it is we’re suffering… and not just for us, but for our children… and their children, too.

The National Institutes of Health has instituted a new research program for just that purpose, although it’s open to anyone in the U.S. over the age of 18 whether ill with any disease or perfectly healthy. While only English and Spanish are the languages they can accommodate at this time, they are adding other languages.

I’m going to devote most of the rest of this blog to them. By the way, I’m even more inclined to be in favor of this program because they launched on my first born’s birthdate: May 6. All of Us has its own inspiring welcome for you at https://launch.joinallofus.org/

This is how they explain who they are and what they intend to do:

“The goal is to advance precision medicine. Precision medicine is health care that is based on you as an individual. It takes into account factors like where you live, what you do, and your family health history. Precision medicine’s goal is to be able to tell people the best ways to stay healthy. If someone does get sick, precision medicine may help health care teams find the treatment that will work best.

To get there, we need one million or more people. Those who join will share information about their health over time. Researchers will study this data. What they learn could improve health for generations to come. Participants are our partners. We’ll share information back with them over time.”

You’ll be reading more about precision medicine, which I’ve written about before, in upcoming blogs. This is from All of Us’s website at https://www.joinallofus.org/en, as is most of the other information in today’s blog, and makes it easy to understand just what they are doing.

How It Works

Participants Share Data

Participants share health data online. This data includes health surveys and electronic health records. Participants also may be asked to share physical measurements and blood and urine samples.

Data Is Protected

Personal information, like your name, address, and other things that easily identify participants will be removed from all data. Samples—also without any names on them—are stored in a secure biobank.

Researchers Study Data

In the future, approved researchers will use this data to conduct studies. By finding patterns in the data, they may make the next big medical breakthroughs.

Participants Get Information

Participants will get information back about the data they provide, which may help them learn more about their health.

Researchers Share Discoveries

Research may help in many ways. It may help find the best ways for people to stay healthy. It may also help create better tests and find the treatments that will work best for different people.

I’m busy, too busy to take on even one more thing. Or so I thought. When I read the benefits of the program (above) and how easy it is to join (below), I realized I’m not too busy for this and it is another way to advocate for Chronic Kidney Disease awareness. So I joined and hope you will, too.

Benefits of Taking Part

Joining the All of Us Research Program has its benefits.

Our goal is for you to have a direct impact on cutting-edge research. By joining the program, you are helping researchers to learn more about different diseases and treatments.

Here are some of the benefits of participating in All of Us.

Better Information

We’re all human, but we’re not all the same. Often our differences—like age, ethnicity, lifestyle habits, or where we live—can reveal important insights about our health.

By participating in All of Us, you may learn more about your health than ever before. If you like, you can share this information with your health care provider.

Better Tools

The goal of the program is better health for all of us. We want to inspire researchers to create better tools to identify, prevent, and treat disease.

You may also learn how to use tools like mobile devices, cell phones and tablets, to encourage healthier habits.

Better Research

We expect the All of Us Research Program to be here for the long-term. As the program grows, the more features will be added. There’s no telling what we can discover. All thanks to participants like you.

Better Ideas

You’re our partner. And as such, you are invited to help guide All of Us. Share your ideas and let us know what works, and what doesn’t.

Oh, about joining:

Get Started – Sign Up

Here’s a quick overview of what you’ll need to do to join.

1

Create an Account

You will need to give an email address and password.

2

Fill in the Enrollment and Consent Forms

The process usually takes 18-30 minutes. If you leave the portal during the consent process, you will have to start again from the beginning.

3

Complete Surveys and More

Once you have given your consent, you will be asked to complete online health surveys. You may be asked to visit a partner center. There, you’ll be asked to provide blood and urine samples and have your physical measurements taken. We may also ask you to share data from wearables or other personal devices.

Before I leave you today, I have – what else? – a book give away. The reason? Just to share the joy that’s walked into my life lately. It’s easy to share the troubles; why not the joys? If you haven’t received one of my books in a giveaway before, all you have to do is be the first person to let me know you want this copy of SlowItDownCKD 2017.

 

I need to get back to that online health survey for All of Us now.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

 

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The Elusive Diet Plan

I find it amazing, absolutely amazing, how limited my diet has become in the last decade. It’s not just the renal diet, or even the renal diet with the prediabetes way of eating added. I had some testing done and found ‘food sensitivities’ as well as out and out allergies that needed attention. And now? It turns out I have Irritable Bowel Syndrome or IBS, which requires I change my eating habits yet again.

When I was first diagnosed with Chronic Kidney Disease, I was introduced to the Northern Arizona Council on Renal Nutrition Diet. I reproduced that in SlowItDownCKD 2015 and here it is again…still crooked. (Can I blame that on macular degeneration? No? Oh well.) Unfortunately for me, I can’t just “limit,” which is what the second column on each page suggests, so I have to avoid. One exception leads to a second and then a third, so to me, “limit” means Do.not.eat.

I understood I had to limit my phosphorous, potassium, protein, and sodium to preserve my kidney function and was scared enough by my diagnosis to follow this diet religiously, recording the amounts I ate in a little notebook. Nowadays, there are apps that will help you track these electrolytes. I listed a few in SlowItDownCKD 2016, but that list surely needs updating a full year or more later. Perhaps I should write about that next week.

Back to the renal diet. This meant changes for me, lots of them. My staple – bread – would now be limited, as would potatoes. I am so the grandchild of my grandfather, a Russian miller. I am also lactose intolerant so those limitations were not a problem since I didn’t eat dairy in the first place. The measuring is what I had to get used to in all categories… and I did, to the point where I can eye measure just about all the foods.

Then came the pre-diabetes dietary changes. My A1C was continually elevated. I didn’t want to develop diabetes, so I knew this test that measures blood glucose had to start registering lower readings. Hmmm, I was able to adhere to the renal diet. I’ll just modify that with these new changes, I thought.

Writing The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2  helped me  understand how to do this:

“Ahh! So all carbohydrates, whether from starches or sugars break down into sugar glucose. This is starting to sound familiar. When I brought my pre-diabetes to the nutritionist at my nephrologist’s office, she gave me quite a bit of information and a handout from DCE, a dietetic practice group of the American Dietetic Association. Did you know that starchy vegetables, fruits, juices and milk also contain carbohydrates? It hadn’t occurred to me…. The Mayo Clinic has a good diet plan for diabetes, but it won’t work for Chronic Kidney Disease patients as it is. For example, whole wheat flour raises your blood glucose less than white flour, but has too much phosphorous for us, so we are warned to avoid it. Yoghurt, cheese, beans, and nuts are no-nos on my renal diet, but are often recommended in diabetes diets.”

My diet became noticeably more limited. But I was still willing to work on it. I remembered that CKD can cause diabetes, just as diabetes can cause CKD. I had enough trouble without diabetes, thank you very much.

Boom! Enter food allergies and sensitivities. Lettuce? I was living on salads at this point, but no more unless I could get a spinach salad. I wouldn’t necessarily miss lima beans, brazil nuts, buckwheat, celery, cherries, corn, cucumbers, lamb (ugh), oranges, red raspberries, and watermelon. Whine: some of my staples were on the list, too: rice, shellfish, vanilla, and yeast. Oh yeah, the little bit of mustard I cheatingly ate every once in a while was on the allergy list, too. *sigh*

It took quite a bit of telling myself I could do this and referring to this NEW list constantly to get my now three purpose diet under control. It was especially hard during sad times in my life.

As happens (thank goodness), the sad times with their emotional eating passed and I could get back to doing what my body needed. So why was I feeling so unwell? Was it a UTI? An ulcer? Something worse?

Welcome to eating modification number four. It’s Irritated Bowel Syndrome… and stress can be the source. The stress was caused by sadness in my case: my brother’s death, a bad outcome for testing on another family member, a third one’s hospitalization, a friend’s death, another’s illness. Now that my sad times were ended, at least temporarily, I had to deal with the aftermath.

While the disease is self-explanatory and the causes apparent, I still needed to know how to treat it. The MayoClinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/irritable-bowel-syndrome/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20360064 was helpful, but also informed me that each person with IBS may need different treatments and that there were different kinds of IBS and different tests for each kind. This is the information I found most helpful, although two more of my staples – broccoli and cauliflower – are no longer available to me.

“Your doctor might suggest that you eliminate from your diet:

• High-gas foods. If you experience bloating or gas, you might avoid items such as carbonated and alcoholic beverages, caffeine, raw fruit, and certain vegetables, such as cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower.
• Gluten. Research shows that some people with IBS report improvement in diarrhea symptoms if they stop eating gluten (wheat, barley and rye) even if they don’t have celiac disease.
• FODMAPs. Some people are sensitive to certain carbohydrates such as fructose, fructans, lactose and others, known as FODMAPs — fermentable oligo-, di-, and monosaccharides and polyols. FODMAPs are found in certain grains, vegetables, fruits and dairy products. Your IBS symptoms might ease if you follow a strict low-FODMAP diet and then reintroduce foods one at a time.”

I’m laughing right now. This could not get more complicated. Uh, maybe I shouldn’t say that. Don’t want to draw attention from the diet gods, do I? At any rate, I see this as a challenge. Until I get tired, that is. Then it’s a formidable task.

Until next week,
Keep living your life!

CKD and the VA or It’s Not Alphabet Soup at All

Today is Memorial Day in the United States. It is not a day to say Happy Memorial Day since it is a day commemorating those who gave their lives for our freedom. Lots of us have bar-b-ques or go to the park or the beach to celebrate. No problem there as long as we remember WHO we are celebrating. I promise: no political rant here, just plain appreciation of those who serve(d) us both living and dead. Personally, I am honoring my husband, my step son-in-law, and all those cousins who just never came home again.

I explained the origins of this day in SlowItDownCKD 2015 (May 25), so won’t re-explain it here. You can go to the blog and just scroll down to that month and year in the drop down menu on the right side of the page under Archives. I was surprised to read about the origins myself.

We already know that Chronic Kidney Disease will prevent you from serving your country in the military, although there are so many other ways to serve our country. This is from The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2:

‘The Department of Defense’s Instruction for Medical Standards for Appointment, Enlistment, or Induction in the Military Services establishes medical standards, which, if not met, are grounds for rejection for military service. Other standards may be prescribed for a mobilization for a national emergency.

As of September 13, 2011, according to Change 1 of this Instruction, the following was included.

‘Current or history of acute (580) nephritis or chronic (582) Chronic Kidney Disease of any type.’

Until this date, Chronic Kidney Disease was not mentioned.”

You can read the entire list of The Department of Defense’s Instruction for Medical Standards for Appointment, Enlistment, or Induction in the Military Services at http://dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/613003p.pdf. You’ll also find information there about metabolic syndrome, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, and pre-diabetes as conditions for non-enlistment.

This got me to thinking. What if you were had already enlisted when you developed CKD. Yes, you would be discharged as medically unfit, but could you get help as a veteran?

According to the Veterans Administration at https://www.research.va.gov/topics/Kidney_disease.cfm#research4,

“In 2012, VA and the University of Michigan began the work of creating a national kidney disease registry to monitor kidney disease among Veterans. The registry will provide accurate and timely information about the burden and trends related to kidney disease among Veterans and identify Veterans at risk for kidney disease.

VA hopes the kidney disease registry will lead to improvements in access to care, such as kidney transplants. The department also expects the registry will allow VA clinicians to better monitor and prevent kidney disease, and will reduce costs related to kidney disease.”

That’s what was hoped for five years ago. Let’s see if it really came to fruition.

Oh, this is promising and taken directly from The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

“VA eKidney Clinic

The VA eKidney Clinic is now available! The eKidney Clinic offers patient education through interactive virtual classrooms where Veterans can learn how to take care of their kidneys and live a good life with kidney disease. Please visit the VA eKidney Clinic website or click on the picture below. For additional information see the eKidney Clinic Patient Information Brochure.”

The Veterans Health Administration doesn’t just provide information, although I must say I was delighted to see the offer of Social Work Services. There is also treatment available. Notice dialysis mentioned in their mission statement.

Mission: The VHA Kidney Program’s mission is to improve the quality and consistency of healthcare services delivered to Veterans with kidney disease nationwide. The VHA Kidney Program provides kidney-related services to dialysis centers throughout VA’s medical centers. Professional guidance and services are available in the form of consultation and policies developed by VA kidney experts. These experts are dedicated to furthering the understanding of kidney disease, its impact on Veterans, and developing treatments to help patients manage disease symptoms. In addition, the VHA Kidney Program provides VA healthcare professionals with clinical care, education, research, and informatics resources to improve healthcare at local VA dialysis facilities.”

I did find it strange that there was a cravat on the Veterans Administration site that they do not necessarily endorse the VHA Kidney Program, especially since it is so helpful.

 

 

 

How involved is the VA with CKD patients? Take a look for yourself at this 2015 statistics by going to https://www.va.gov/HEALTH/services/renal/documents/Kidney_Disease_and_Dialysis_Services_Fact%20Sheet_April_2015.pdf

  • All Veterans enrolled in VA are eligible for services, regardless of service connection status
  • Enrolled Veterans can receive services from the VA or from community providers under the Non-VA Care Program if VA services are unavailable
  • 49 VA health care facilities offer kidney disease specialty care (nephrology services)
  • 96 VA facilities offer inpatient and/or outpatient dialysis; 25 centers are inpatient-only. Of the 71 VA outpatient dialysis centers, 64 are hospital based units, 2 are joint VA/DoD units, 4 are freestanding units, and one is within a community based outpatient clinic (CBOC)
  • VA enrollees must be offered the option of home dialysis provided either directly by the VA or through the Non-VA Care Program
  • 36 outpatient hemodialysis centers offer home dialysis care directly.
  • 5 VA medical centers host kidney transplantation programs.
  • VA Delivered Kidney Care (Calendar Year 2013) 13,794 Unique Veterans receiving dialysis paid for by VA; representing an annual increase of 13% since 2008. 794 Veterans received home dialysis; 55percent (434) by VA facilities and 45percent (360) under the Non-VA Care Program.
  • Increasing use of telehealth services to increase Veteran access to kidney specialty care Secure messaging: 7,319 messages, Clinical video telehealth: 4,977 encounters
  • VA Kidney Research (FY ’14) the research budget for the study of kidney disease has been $18.5 million per year for the past 5 years (FY ’10-FY ’14). The VA Cooperative Studies Program has supported national clinical trials addressing the best treatment of Veterans with CKD since at least 1998.

It seems to me our veterans are covered. Now if we could only make sure the rest of us stay covered no matter what bills the current administration signs into law.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Getting Juiced

I have the gentlest nephrologist in the world! Well, I think so anyway. He has been cautioning me about my weight for years. Yes, there it is again: my weight. Here I was finally coming to terms with being a chubby since nothing I was doing seemed to work to lose the weight. That’s when he tossed out a bombshell.

We all know that increased weight can raise your blood pressure which, in turn, negatively affects your kidneys. I was so pleased with myself for having raised my GFR another three points on my last blood test that I didn’t understand how I could be leaking protein into my urine at the same time. Wasn’t protein in the urine simply an indication that you have Chronic Kidney Disease? Didn’t I already know that? So why was protein leaking into my urine to the tune of 252 mg. when the norm was between 15-220 mg?

I know, I know: back up a bit. Thanks for the reminder. GFR is defined in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease this way:

“GFR: Glomerular filtration rate [if there is a lower case ‘e’ before the term, it means estimated glomerular filtration rate] which determines both the stage of kidney disease and how well the kidneys are functioning.”

Oh, and just in case you’ve forgotten, this excerpt from The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2 is a good reminder about the stages of CKD.

“Different stages require different treatment or no treatment at all.  There are five stages with the mid-level stage divided into two parts. The higher the stage, the worse your kidney function.

Think of the stages as a test with 100 being the highest score.  These are the stages and their treatments:

STAGE 1: (normal or high) – above 90 – usually requires watching, not treatment, although many people decide to make life style changes now: following a renal diet, exercising, lowering blood pressure, ceasing to smoke, etc.

 STAGE 2: (mild) – 60-89 – Same as for stage one

STAGE 3A: (moderate) – 45-59 – This is when you are usually referred to a nephrologist [Kidney specialist]. You’ll need a renal [Kidney] dietitian, too, since you need to be rigorous in avoiding more than certain amounts of protein, potassium, phosphorous, and sodium in your diet to slow down the deterioration of your kidneys. Each patient has different needs so there is no one diet.  The diet is based on your lab results.  Medications such as those for high blood pressure may be prescribed to help preserve your kidney function.

STAGE 3B: (moderate) – 30-44 – same as above, except the patient may experience symptoms.

STAGE 4:  (severe 15-29) – Here’s when dialysis may start. A kidney transplant may be necessary instead of dialysis [Artificial cleansing of your blood]. Your nephrologist will probably want to see you every three months and request labs before each visit.

STAGE 5: (End stage) – below 15 – Dialysis or transplant is necessary to continue living.

Many thanks to DaVita for refreshing my memory about each stage.”

Okay, back to the connection between spilling protein into your urine (called proteinuria) and CKD. This is from the recently published SlowItDownCKD 2016:

“In The Book of Blogs: Moderate Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1, The National Institutes of Health helped me explain why this combination of excess weight and pre-diabetes was a problem for CKD patients:

‘High blood glucose and high blood pressure damage the kidneys’ filters. When the kidneys are damaged, proteins leak out of the kidneys into the urine. The urinary albumin test detects this loss of protein in the urine. Damaged kidneys do not do a good job of filtering out wastes and extra fluid. Wastes and fluid build up in your blood instead of leaving the body in urine.’”

Let’s say you don’t have pre-diabetes, but do have CKD. Does proteinuria still make it worse? Damn! It does. This explanation is from SlowItDownCKD 2015:

“The problem is that antibodies are made up of protein. Antibodies is defined by Dictionary.com at http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/antibodies as

‘A protein substance produced in the blood or tissues in response to a specific antigen, such as a bacterium or a toxin, that destroys or weakens bacteria and neutralizes organic poisons, thus forming the basis of immunity.’

Lose lots of protein into your urine and you’re losing some of your immunity. In other words, you’re open to infection.”

I guess that explains why I magically developed a UTI after years of not having any.

I have gone so far afield from what I intended to write about on this last Monday of National Kidney Month. What was that, you ask? It was my nephrologist’s strong suggestions for immediate weight loss: juicing. I was so surprised.

After all that writing about eating the raw vegetables for roughage and sticking to only three specified amount servings of each daily, this expert in his field was telling me to ignore all that and throw myself into juicing for the immediate future. But you can bet I’ll try it; no way I’m throwing nine years of keeping my kidneys healthier and healthier out the window.

I can’t tell you if it works since I only started yesterday, but I can tell you it doesn’t taste bad. I’m learning how to use this fancy, dancy blender we got three years ago that had just been sitting on the shelf. Experimenting with the consistency has caused a mess here and there, but oh well.

My first juicing experience included kale, celery, lemons, cucumbers, and ginger. I definitely need to play with my combinations. I also think I made far too much. Luckily Bear was in the house and shouted out that the machine was making that noise because I didn’t add enough water. Water? You’re supposed to add water?

I’ll keep you posted on these experiments if you’ll get yourself tested for CKD. It’s just a blood and urine test. Fair deal?

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

CKD Treatment Interruptus

Recently, someone close to me experienced a major burglary.  After calling the police, he called me. That’s what my friends do and I’m thankful they do. I kept him on the phone while I threw on some clothes and sped over to his house. This is a strong, independent man who was shocked at the intimacy of the invasion of his home. When I got there, we walked from room to room, astonished at how much had been stolen.

That night, I couldn’t leave – not even to go home for my evening medications and supplements. That night, I couldn’t sleep while my buddy was in such turmoil. So we sat up staring at the empty space where the TV had been.  He’s not on the renal diet and all he had that I could eat was some chicken, no fruit, no vegetables. And I was too busy being with him to exercise. This was my good buddy of over 30 years standing.

The next morning, another friend came over to help with security devices and spend time with our mutual friend.  I got to go home, take my morning medications, and crawl into bed for ½ an hour. But then our mutual friend had to go to work, so I went back to my buddy’s house and spent the day helping him try to list what was missing, what to do about the insurance, how to handle going to work, etc. The word spread, and, suddenly, a third friend was coming to spend the night with him and another couple joined them to make dinner.  I could go home again.    friends

But I was exhausted. I ate stupidly: Chinese restaurant food with all that sodium. I even ate rice, and here I am on a low carbohydrate diet. I sat in the living room like a zombie while Bear waited on me hand and foot.

Even with all this help, my buddy needed to see me daily. I was his strength. So we ran around rummaging up some receipts he’d need for the insurance. But I could see he was feeling better. Our mutual friends were amazing, including those who couldn’t leave work to come so kept phoning and texting instead. A different someone else stayed with him overnight again.  Then he only needed to see me for a quick hug… and yet another someone else stayed with him overnight again. He didn’t really need me anymore, which is great because I started breaking down.

sad faceI have Chronic Kidney Disease. I need to sleep adequately – and with my BiPap. I need to follow the renal diet. I need to exercise. I need to rest.  I did very little of any of this during the trauma itself, and that’s alright. This is my long term buddy – as grown up and mature as he is – and he needed me. But what did I do to myself?

You guessed it. Right away, my blood pressure shot up and that’s a bad thing. Why? Let me tell you… or you can go to What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, page 9.  FullSizeRender (2)

“Through my research, I began to understand what high blood pressure [HPB] has to do with renal disease.  HPB can damage small blood vessels in the kidneys to the point that they cannot filter the waste from the blood as effectively as they should. Nephrologists may prescribe HBP medication to prevent your CKD from getting worse since these medications reduce the amount of protein in your urine.  Not too surprisingly, most CKD related deaths are caused by cardiovascular problems.”

FullSizeRender (3)What about the stress?  What was that doing to my poor overworked kidneys?  I went to The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2 for the answer to that one:

“First you feel the fight or flight syndrome which means you are releasing hormones.  The adrenal glands which secrete these hormones lay right on top of your kidneys. Your blood sugar raises, too, and there’s an increase in both heart rate and blood pressure.  Diabetes {Blood sugar} and hypertension {Blood pressure} both play a part in Chronic Kidney Disease.”

That’s two strikes against me. I almost hesitate to think about exercise… or the lack of it for several consecutive days.  This is one of the points about treating prediabetes (which I have and so do so many of you) from the Mayo Clinic at http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/prediabetes/basics/treatment/con-20024420 which was included in SlowItDownCKD 2015:IMG_2980

“Losing excess pounds. If you’re overweight, losing just 5 to 10 percent of your body weight — only 10 to 20 pounds (4.5 to 9 kilograms) if you weigh 200 pounds (91 kilograms) — can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. To keep your weight in a healthy range, focus on permanent changes to your eating and exercise habits. Motivate yourself by remembering the benefits of losing weight, such as a healthier heart, more energy and improved self-esteem.”

And the renal diet? We mustn’t forget about the renal diet. In The Book of Blogs: Moderate Kidney Disease, Part 1 I quoted from http://www.yourkidneys.com/kidney-education/Treatments/Living-a-full-life-after-a-chronic-kidney-disease-diagnosis/3189 which is part of Yourkidneys.com from DaVita:

“Depending on what stage of Chronic Kidney Disease you’re in, your renal dietitian will adjust the amounts of protein, sodium, phosphorus and potassium in your diet. In addition, carbohydrates and fats may be controlled based on conditions such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The IMG_2982CKD non-dialysis diet includes calculated amounts of high quality protein. Damaged kidneys have a difficult time getting rid of protein waste products, so cutting back on non-essential protein will put less stress on your kidneys.”

Have I done more permanent damage to my kidneys? I’m hoping not since it was just a few days and I made the conscious decision to be with my buddy instead of tending to myself. Let’s consider this a cautionary tale instead.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

The American Kidney Fund Blog

AKF logoI was honored that The American Kidney Fund (www.kidneyfund.org) asked me to write a blog for them. This is that blog. Once it was published last Thursday, I started thinking. If you share the blog and ask those you shared with to share it, too, and they asked their friends to share it, too… image how many people would become aware of Chronic Kidney Disease. Will you do that?

Slowing Down CKD—It Can Be Done

When a new family doctor told me nine years ago that I had a problem with my kidneys—maybe chronic kidney disease (CKD)–my first reaction was to demand, “What is it and how did I get it?”

No doctor had ever mentioned CKD before.

I was diagnosed at stage 3; there are only 5 stages. I had to start working to slow it down immediately. I wanted to know how medication, diet,stages of CKD exercise and other lifestyle changes could help. I didn’t want to be told what to do without an explanation as to why… and when I couldn’t get an explanation that was acceptable to me, I started researching.

I read just about every book I could find concerning this problem. Surprisingly, very few books dealt with the early or moderate stages of the disease.  Yet these are the stages when we are most shocked, confused, and maybe even depressed—and the stages at which we have a workable chance of doing something to slow down the progression in the decline of our kidney function.

I’ve learned that 31 million people—14 percent of the population—have CKD, but most don’t know they have it. Many, like me, never experienced any noticeable symptoms. Many, like me, may have had high blood pressure (hypertension) for years before it was diagnosed. Yet, high blood pressure and diabetes are the two leading causes of CKD.

I saw a renal dietician who explained to me how hard protein is on the kidneys… as is phosphorous… and potassium… and, of course, sodium. Out bananawent my daily banana—too high in potassium. Out went restaurant burgers—larger than my daily allowance of protein. Chinese food? Pizza? Too high in sodium. I embraced an entirely new way of eating because it was one of the keys to keeping my kidneys functioning in stage 3.

Another critical piece of slowing down CKD is medication. I was already taking meds to lower my blood pressure when I was first diagnosed with CKD. Two more prescriptions have been added to this in the last nine years: a diuretic that lowers my body’s absorption of salt to help prevent fluid from building up in my body (edema), and a drug that widens the blood vessels by relaxing them.

For a very short time, I was also taking a drug to control my pre-diabetes, but my doctor and I achieved the same effects by changing my diet even more. (Bye-bye, sugars and most carbs.) The funny thing is now my favorite food is salad with extra virgin olive oil and balsamic vinegar. I never thought that would happen: I was a chocoholic!

Exercise, something I loved until my arthritis got in the way, was also important. I used to dance vigorously several nights a week; now it’s once a week with weights, walking, and a stationary bike on the other days. I think I took sleep for granted before CKD, too, and I now make it a point to blues dancersget a good night’s sleep each day. A sleep apnea device improved my sleep—and my kidney function rose another two points.

I realized I needed to rest, too. Instead of giving a lecture, running to an audition, and coming home to meet a deadline, I slowly started easing off until I didn’t feel like I was running on empty all the time. I ended up happily retiring from both acting and teaching at a local college, giving me more time to work on my CKD awareness advocacy.

I was sure others could benefit from all the research I had done and all I had learned, so I wrote my first book, What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, in 2011. I began a blog after a nephrologist in India told me he wanted his newly diagnosed patients to read my book, but most of them couldn’t afford the bus fare to the clinic, much less a book. I published each chapter as a blog post. The nephrologist translated my posts, printed them and distributed them to his patients—who took the printed copies back to their villages. I now have readers in 106 different countries who ask me questions I hadn’t even thought of. I research for them and respond with a blog post, reminding them to speak with their nephrologists and/or renal nutritionists before taking any action… and that I’m not a doctor.

What is itEach time I research, I’m newly amazed at how much there is to learn about CKD…and how many tools can help slow it down. Diet is the obvious one. But if you smoke or drink, stop, or at least cut down. If you don’t exercise, start. Adequate, good quality sleep is another tool. Don’t underestimate rest either; you’re not being lazy when you rest, you’re preserving whatever kidney function you have left. I am not particularly a pill person, but if there’s a medication prescribed that will slow down the gradual decline of my kidney function, I’m all for it.

My experience proves that you can slow down CKD. I was diagnosed at stage 3 and I am still there, nine years later. It takes knowledge, commitment and discipline—but it can be done, and it’s worth the effort. I’m sneaking up on 70 now and know this is where I want to spend my energy for the rest of my life: chronic kidney disease awareness advocacy. I think it’s just that important.

IMG_1398SlowItDownCKD 2015 Book Cover (76x113)

 

SlowItDownCKD is the umbrella under which Gail Rae-Garwood writes her CKD books and blog, offers talks, participates in book signings, is interviewed on podcasts and radio shows, and writes guest blogs. Her website is www.gail-raegarwood.com.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Bridging the Gap…

Which gap? The anion. What’s that, you say.

“The anion gap deals with the body’s acidity. A high reading for the anion gap could indicate renal failure.”

Book CoverThat’s what I wrote in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease. But you know what? It’s just not enough information any more. Why? I’m glad you asked.  Oh, by the way, if you want to check your own reading look in the Comprehensive Metabolic Panel part of your blood tests, but only if your doctor requested it be tested.

I mentioned a few blogs back that I returned to a rheumatologist I hadn’t seen in years and she chose to treat me as a new patient. Considering how much had happened medically since I’d last seen her, that made sense to me and I agreed to blood tests, an MRI, and a bone density test.

The only reading that surprised me was an abnormally high one for anion gap. The acceptable range is 4 – 18. My reading was 19.  While I have Chronic Kidney Disease, my kidneys have not failed (Thank goodness and my hard work.) In addition, I’ve become quite aware of just how important acidity and alkaline states are and have been dealing with this, although apparently not effectively.

MedFriendly at http://www.medfriendly.com/anion-gap.html – a new site for me written by Dr. Dominic Carone for the express purpose of simplifying complex medical terms for the lay person – explains it this way:diabetes equipment

“…. Too high of an anion gap level can mean that there is acidosis (too much acid in the blood) due to diabetes mellitus. The high anion gap level can also be due to lactic acidosis, in which the high level of acid is due a buildup of a substance called lactic acid. … A high anion gap can also be due to drug poisoning or kidney failure. …When the anion gap is high, further tests are usually needed to diagnose the cause of the problem.”

Ah, I remember writing a bit about acidosis in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1. It had to do with DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAILfruits and vegetables.

“’After three years, consuming fruits and vegetables or taking the oral medication reduced a marker of metabolic acidosis and preserved kidney function to similar extents. Our findings suggest that an apple a day keeps the nephrologist away,’ study author Dr. Nimrit Goraya, of Texas A&M College of Medicine, said in a university news release.

Apparently, some CKD suffers have metabolic systems that are severely acidic. Fruits and vegetables are highly alkaline.  This may counteract the acidity in the patients mentioned above AND those that have less metabolic acidosis (acid in the body).

You can find the complete article at http://kidneygroup.blogspot.com/2012/11/eating-fruits-and-vegetables-may-help.html

Okay, I like fruit and I like vegetables. Ummm, will my limitation of three servings of each within the kidney friendly fruit and vegetable lists do the trick, I wonder. Looks like I’ll be questioning both the rheumatologist and the renal dietician about that.

Recently I’ve written about alkaline being the preferred state of a CKD patient’s body. That is the antithesis of an acid body state. Years ago, Dr. Richard Synder was a guest blogger here and also interviewed me on his radio show. He is the author of What You Must Know about Kidney Disease and a huge proponent of alkaline water.  Here’s what he had to say about that (also from Part 1):

“I have taken alkaline water myself and I notice a difference in how I feel. Our bodies are sixty percent water. Why would I not want to put the best517GaXFXNPL._SL160_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-dp,TopRight,12,-18_SH30_OU01_AA160_ type of water into it? Mineralized water helps with bone health.  In alkalinized water, the hydroxyl ions produced from the reaction of the bicarbonate and the gastric acid with a low pH produce more hydroxyl ions which help buffer the acidity we produce on a daily basis. (Me interrupting here: During our visit last Monday, I noticed that my extremely health conscious, non-CKD, Florida friend drinks this.)

Where are these buffers? In the bones and in the cells, as well as some extracellular  buffers. You  are  helping lower  the  total  body  acidity  and decreasing the inflammation brought on by it. You do this early on so that you don’t have a problem with advanced acidosis later. Why wait until you are acidotic before doing something?”

Notice his comment about lowering body acidity and decreasing inflammation.  We already know CKD is an inflammatory disease.  There was Digital Cover Part 2 redone - Copysomething to this. I went back to The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2 to tease it out.

“‘Belly fat is also much more inflammatory than fat located elsewhere in the body and can create its own inflammatory chemicals (as a tumor would).’

You can read the entire article at http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/21/body-fat-facts_n_2902867.html

Inflammatory?  Isn’t CKD an inflammatory disease? I went to The National Center for Biotechnology Information, which took me to the National Library of Medicine and finally to a National Institute of Health study at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3332073/   for the answer.

‘The persistent inflammatory state is common in diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD).

This is a lot to take in at once.  What it amounts to is that another way to possibility prevent the onset of CKD is to lower your phosphorous intake so that you don’t accumulate belly fat.’”

Phosphorous? Once we have CKD, we do have phosphorous restrictions. But I have never had high phosphorous readings.  Maybe I should be exploring an abundance of lactic acid as a cause of the high anion gap reading instead.

According to Heathline.com,

adam_liver_8850_jpg“Lactic acidosis occurs when there’s too much lactic acid in your body. Many things can cause a buildup of lactic acid. These include chronic alcohol use, heart failure, cancer, seizures, liver failure, prolonged lack of oxygen, and low blood sugar. Even prolonged exercise can lead to lactic acid buildup.”

I’m definitely barking up the wrong tree here.

Wait a minute. I recently started using a BiPAP since I have sleep apnea and wasn’t exhaling enough CO2. That could cause acidosis, but it would be respiratory acidosis. Say, a basic metabolic panel would expose that. Nope, that’s not it either since my CO2 levels were normal.

It looks like this is going to be one of those blogs that asks more questions than it answers. I do have an appointment with the rheumatologist on the 20th and will ask for answers then.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!SlowItDownCKD 2015 Book Cover (76x113)

Maybe This One?

Hi y’all! I’m still deep in the heart of Texas and will tell you about it next week . My friend Beth, a fellow Landmark graduate and the originator Texasof the Facebook page Morning Gratitude, offers a product  I am eager to explore this week. She is excited about its health and weight loss benefits. This seems to be the national pastime these days, but I must say each person I’ve spoken with is delighted with the results of their products… but they don’t have Chronic Kidney Disease.

You might remember that last November I spent the month writing about different products. They sounded good, healthy, and I wondered if I could use them. The answer? No, no, no, and no. They were either way out of the guidelines for phosphorous, protein, potassium, and/or sodium on my renal diet or they were out of guidelines for the pre-diabetic diet I’ve incorporated with my renal diet.  That incorporation took me over a year to figure out so there was no way I was going to violate it. I have been having some success slowly losing weight and bringing my blood sugar in line by cutting out sugar and most complex starches, as well as continuing to exercise. (Yes, that’s a not at all veiled hint.)

Beth, a friend for three years is so happy with her brand – Plexus Worldwide – that she’s become a distributor. Similar to some of the other brands I explored for CKD patients in SlowItDownCKD 2015, Plexus Worldwide offers many different products. I took an in-depth look at the one that seemed to be the basic product: Plexus 96.

According to Beth’s Plexus website at http://shopmyplexus.com/bethbetcher/products/block.html, this particular product contains alpha lipoic acid, chlorogenic acid, garcina cambogia, whey protein, green lipped mussel, aloe vera, and grape seed extract. Stop. What is chlorogenic acid? Anyone? No one knows? Let’s find out together then.

Plexus96 VanillaThis ingredient is a miracle according to the internet. It supposedly helps you lose weight, is an antioxidant, cleanses the liver… shall I go on? I liked almost everything I read about it except that it is not yet approved by the Food and Drug Administration. I never used to care about that. Now I have CKD, so I do.  Why? If a supplement is not approved, there’s no way to know how to adjust the dosage for your (and my) poorly performing kidneys.

In addition, the UK Medicines Information (UKMi) pharmacists for NHS healthcare professionals published the following finding on April 8, 2013:

“Limited laboratory studies appear to suggest that chlorogenic acid can cause liver or kidney changes. Until more is known, it would be prudent to avoid GCE in patients with pre-existing liver or kidney disease.” *GCE is Green Coffee Extract, the source of chlorogenic acid.

Right out of the gate, this is not a product for people with CKD. I would go on, but I think it might be better to explore another of Plexus’s products. You know what they say, ‘One bad apple doesn’t spoil the bunch.’

I liked the sound of the Plexus Slim. When I looked at the ingredient list, the first thing I saw was chlorogenic acid. We know we can’t have this, but plexus slimlet’s look at one more ingredient just for the heck of it. Here’s one I often hear about: garcinia cambogia. I went directly to their website at http://garciniacambogia.org/garcinia-cambogia-side-effects/ to look for possible side effects. Uh-oh:

“Increases risk for rhabdomyolysis, a skeletal muscle disease that causes the muscles to release proteins into the bloodstream leading to kidney malfunction.”

Ladies and gentlemen, our protein intake is restricted because we have CKD. Why would we take a chance on increasing the protein in our bodies? What is itHere’s a reminder from What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease about why we need to limit our protein.

“So, why is protein limited? One reason is that it is the source of a great deal of phosphorus. Another is that a number of nephrons were already destroyed before you were even diagnosed. Logically, those that remain compensate for those that are no longer viable. The remaining nephrons are doing more work than they were meant to. Just like a car that is pushed too hard, there will be constant deterioration if you don’t stop pushing. The idea is to stop pushing your remaining nephrons to work even harder in an attempt to slow down the advancement of your CKD.  Restricting protein is a way to reduce the nephrons’ work.”

Beth did tell me she didn’t know if Plexus would be good for Chronic Kidney Disease patients. Okay, we’ll look at just one more product before we call it a day. The name drew me to the product and the ingredient silica turned me away again. I’m referring to Plexus X Factor which is described on the website in the following manner.

“Plexus X Factor is a turbocharged multivitamin and antioxidant supplement with a never-before-seen formulation of a patented aloe blend and New Zealand Blackcurrant of which results in vastly improved absorption and assimilation for optimal nutrition and wellness protection.”

Wait a minute. I remember having read something about silica. It wasn’t complimentary. Found it! It was listed under Side Effects and Precautions Label-XFactorof Silica Supplements along with a warning that this is not FDA approved. The address for the article is http://www.newhealthguide.org/Silica-Supplements.html.

“Kidney Function. Some medical teams have also expressed concerns that using silica supplements for a prolonged period of time may cause severe kidney trouble. People who take these supplements have reported kidney stones and medical professionals believe it may be because of a buildup of extra silica within the body as only small quantities are required for proper bodily functions. General kidney deterioration can also occur over time if there is excess silica in the body and this condition is irreversible.”

Are you getting the feeling that none of these new products for health improvement and/or weight are acceptable for CKD patients? I am and it has to do with the unregulated herbs that may cause or worsen kidney damage. What do you say we quit while we’re ahead? Of course, those without CKD need to decide for themselves if this is something they’d like to try.IMG_1398

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

How Sweet It Was

I’ve had an interesting turn around in my health this last week of National Kidney Month. You did know it’s still National Kidney Month, right?  National Kidney MonthYou did go get yourself tested for Chronic Kidney Disease, didn’t you? Hurry up! There’re only four more days left to National Kidney Month. You know I’m joking about this month being the time to get yourself tested, but I’m serious (unfortunately, sometimes dead serious) about getting yourself tested.

I know, I know, I’m preaching to the choir. But how many of you have told your friends, neighbors, family, and co-workers about just how simple – and important – these tests are. Let’s not let them become one of the 31 million with Chronic Kidney Disease or worse, one of those that don’t know they have it.

Excuse me while I step off my soap opera. Now, where was I? Oh, yes, the – ahem – interesting turn around in my health this month.

Okay, this is twofold. The first part is the weight. You think I’ve been having trouble keeping that in check since I started blogging four years ago, don’t you? I mean because I write about it so much. The truth is it’s been much, much longer than that.  Even way back in college when I was a size 7 for one day, I weighed more than ‘the charts’ said I should by 20 pounds or so. I looked good, I felt good, and my mom kept telling me I had ‘heavy bones,’ so I let it go.  Who knew any better back then?sorry face

What’s so bad about the extra weight you ask? You do know obesity is one of the causes of CKD, don’t you? Don’t feel bad if you didn’t. I didn’t. I just started noticing it showing up in the research in the last couple of years. That doesn’t mean it wasn’t there. It just means I never saw it if it was.

I mentioned weight in passing a few times in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease. This is from my first nephrologist’s report:

“The report, of course, ended with a one – two punch: I would need to exercise for at least 30 minutes a day and possibly decrease food portions, so I could lose weight (all right already!  I got it!) for better blood pressure and renal function.”

What is itBetter blood pressure and renal function? That’s when my battle with the numbers became real. And that’s when weighing and measuring food according to the renal diet allotments worked for a while… until I thought I could eye measure. So I went back to weighing and measuring… and it worked…until bomb shell number two fell in my lap: pre-diabetes.

In The Book of Blogs: Moderate Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1, The National Institutes of Health helped me explain why this combination of excess weight and pre-diabetes was a problem for CKD patients:

“High blood glucose and high blood pressure damage the kidneys’ filters. When the kidneys are damaged, proteins leak out of the kidneys into the urine. The urinary albumin test detects this loss of protein in the urine. Damaged kidneys do not do a good job of filtering out wastes and extra fluid. Wastes and fluid build up in your blood instead of leaving the body in urine.”DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAIL

Let’s backtrack just a bit here. What does high blood glucose have to do with this? Well, that’s what tested to measure your A1C, which determines whether or not you have diabetes… or even pre-diabetes.

Back to The Book of Blogs: Moderate Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2 this time, in which I decry my A1C woes:

“This time I went to WebMD for a simple explanation.  In addition to learning that pre diabetes means your glucose, while not diabetic, is higher than normal, I found this interesting statement.

Part 2When glucose builds up in the blood, it can damage the tiny blood vessels in the kidneys, heart, eyes, and nervous system.

What I learned from my primary care physician on my last visit is that the A1C is not the only measure of diabetes. Although my blood glucose readings are still in the pre-diabetes range according to the A1C, my daily readings have sometimes gone over the 126 that’s considered diabetes. My head is spinning here. No one ever mentioned that magic number to me before.

I decided to conduct a little experiment last night. We know that high blood glucose is the result of sugar, but did you know that most carbohydrates turn into sugar? Last night I ate a chocolate bar and devoured at least half a dozen Saltines. This morning, when I pricked my finger and tested the blood, the reading was 129. Damn! Someone had to be the guinea pig and I volunteered myself… but all I’d proven was that sugar and carbs raise your blood sugar pretty quickly.

Now here’s the kicker. This is from SlowItDownCKD 2015 which is presently available digitally and should be out in print later this week:

“The Brits do a masterful job of explaining this effectively.  The following is from Patient.SlowItDownCKD 2015 Book Cover (76x113)

‘A raised blood sugar (glucose) level that occurs in people with diabetes can cause a rise in the level of some chemicals within the kidney. These chemicals tend to make the glomeruli (Me here inserting my two cents: what filters the blood in your kidneys) more ‘leaky’ which then allows albumin to leak into the urine. In addition, the raised blood glucose level may cause some proteins in the glomeruli to link together. These ‘cross-linked’ proteins can trigger a localised scarring process. This scarring process in the glomeruli is called glomerulosclerosis. It usually takes several years for glomerulosclerosis to develop and it only happens in some people with diabetes.’”

My nephrologist told me to cut out sugar and carbs to lose weight. I’d already cut out sugar, so I cut out (or at least drastically down on) carbs. The black breadresult: a very slow weight loss. Of course, this is new to me so I don’t know if that two pound weight loss in a month will continue every month, but I’m willing to give it a try. Say, that’ll have a possible effect on eliminating the diabetes, too!

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Last One

Between my indexing work on The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1  and that of Amy Hall at AmethystHarbor.com (indexer par excellence) on The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2, you can email me at slowitdownckd@gmail.com for an index for the copies of the books you already bought.  I’ll need your email address and which index you need: Part 1 or Part 2 or both. This is my Chanukah gift to you.

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And let’s not forget What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, the twins’ big sister.

What is it

Ready for the blog? This is the last piece in a series on what I call wellness supplement plans. My good buddy, Mary Dale at (480) 415 – 7748 or Mary.Dale@rocketmail.com (love that email address) tried this one and liked it so much that’s she’s recently become a distributor. Note: Mary – thankfully – is not a Chronic Kidney Disease patient. Her information above is not for the purpose of promoting the product to CKD patients, but something to pass on to non-CKD friends should they become interested.it works

The plan Mary uses is called It Works!  You can find information that I may not be including in today’s blog at ItWorks.com. The home page allows you to choose your country and language, but offers no ingredient labels. Rather, the ingredients are listed without percentages or specifics. It struck me as more of a selling and keeping up with new products page. I couldn’t use the information for the blog.

I did find this interesting. (Mark Pentecost is the founder of the company.)

“The more I got into the education of a vitamin, I started learning more about what’s all natural versus synthetic,” says Mark. “A lot of times you’d find that a product might have 100-200 ingredients, but there wasn’t enough of each ingredient for the product to actually do what the clinicals showed they could do. You want something foundational that you know has the key ingredients to help keep us healthy and be the best we can be.”

Okay, all natural is good.  But how much of what was in each product?

Ugh. What was I going to do now? I could change the topic… but wait. Mary’s buddy, Allie Helm, called me with directions as to how to get into the site to a spot where I could see just what I needed. Great timing, ladies.

409px-Glass-of-waterI thought I’d start with Allie’s favorite, which is Greens On The Go {Orange} Alkalizing Drink Powder. The directions say to mix the powder with 8 ounces of water or fruit juice. I started looking at the ingredients when ‘silica’ at the bottom of the page caught my eye. I knew about occupational silica, but what about this in a supplement?

Livestrong.com at http://www.livestrong.com/article/288425-side-effects-of-silica-supplements/#sthash.9dJB8q7k.dpuf tells us,

“The University of Maryland Medical Center says that prolonged use of silica supplements in any form is not recommended. Severe kidney trouble may occur after prolonged use. Kidney stones have been reported in people taking silica supplements, which may be due to a buildup of silica in the body since only a small amount is needed for the body to function properly. Also, general kidney deterioration, which is irreversible, will eventually occur with excess silica in your system.”

Well, that’s out for Chronic Kidney Disease patients. Let’s take a look at Mary’s favorite product. She likes the Advanced Formula Fat Fighter with Carb Inhibitors. The directions read, “Adults take 2 tablets during or up to 60 minutes after each large meal. Drink at least 8 glasses of water daily.” Hmmm. Above the directions, there’s a caution: “Consult your physician if you… have a medical condition.”

We do. We have Chronic Kidney Disease.

I never even got to the ingredient label with this one.  My eye was snagged by the Other Ingredients, one of which was also silica. Another is dicalcium phosphate, better known as phosphate salts. Awwww. As CKD patients, we need to watch both the phosphorous and sodium in our diets without adding any in supplements. Nuts, I really liked the idea of something thatbelly fat

‘…will absorb the fat and carbohydrates from your food so that your body doesn’t.”

Not only that, but here I am doing my best to avoid Type 1 Diabetes and this product also claims that it “Helps balance blood glucose level…”

Dirty words.  I knew it was too good to be true – at least for a Chronic Kidney Disease patient.

I guess we’ve learned our lesson this month, ladies and gentlemen.  While each of the products may or may not be just the ticket for those without CKD, we do have CKD… which means they are not all for us. I am disappointed, but as I always say, “My kidney function comes first.”

Talking about that:

WHAT: Free Community Health ScreeningNKF-logo_Hori_OB
WHEN: Saturday, December 5, 2015 from 8:00am-1:30am (appointments highly encouraged)
WHERE:  First Institutional Baptist Church | 1411 E. Jefferson Street, Phoenix, AZ 85034
WHO: Participants must be 18 years of age or older AND
a) have a family member (father, mother, brother, sister) with diabetes, heart disease or kidney disease
OR b) participant must have a personal history of diabetes or high blood pressure.

TO MAKE AN APPOINTMENT: Please call (602) 840-1644 English / (602) 845-7905 Spanish

Path to Wellness is a free community health screening program provided by the National Kidney Foundation of Arizona in collaboration with the Cardio Renal Society of America and other local health organizations.  Screenings are held throughout the state of Arizona on a sponsored basis, and are open to the public.

They provide free blood and urine testing, which is evaluated on site using point-of-care testing devices to assess for the risk of diabetes, heart and kidney diseases. Those screened are also presented with chronic disease management education, an overall health assessment (weight, blood pressure, etc.) and a one-on-one consultation with a physician. Enrollment opportunities are offered for a follow-up 6-week series of Healthy Living workshops that teach chronic disease self-management skills.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Clogged Up?

That’s a good question and one I received from a reader just recently. Only this time, it doesn’t have to do with your nose or chest during a cold or the flu, but rather with cholesterol in your blood vessels.

For some of us, this is basic information, but for others… well, let’s just say we never bothered to find out about our cholesterol. After all, our doctors were managing this for us, weren’t they?

Ehhh, not my way. I like to be fully informed about what’s happening inside my body where I can’t see it. Let’s make that ‘especially where I can’t see it.’

What is itLet’s start with the basics from What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Early Disease.  This is the definition of cholesterol offered there:

While the basis for both sex hormones and bile, can cause blockages if it accumulates in the lining of a blood vessel.

If that doesn’t ring a bell, here’s the definition of Dyslipidemia:

Abnormal levels of cholesterol, triglyceride or both

Now we know there’s a normal and an abnormal level of cholesterol and that can’t be good.  So? Is that a big deal?

It is if you have Chronic Kidney Disease.  Dr. Joseph Vassalotti of The National Kidney Foundation explained it to reporter Jane Brody in an interview which is included in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1.DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAIL

Good  control  of  blood  sugar, blood pressure, cholesterol levels and body weight can delay the loss of kidney function.

I repeat, “…can delay the loss of kidney function.” That has been your ultimate goal since you were diagnosed, hasn’t it?

You may become confused by the three different kinds of cholesterol readings when you see the results of your blood tests.  I know I was, so I researched them and then wrote about them in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2.

Digital Cover Part 2 redone - Copy HDL is High Density Lipoprotein, the cholesterol that keeps your arteries clear or – as it’s commonly called – the good cholesterol.  VDL is Low Density Lipoprotein or the ‘bad’ kind that can clog your arteries. VLDL is Very Low Density Lipoprotein and one of the bad guys, too. It contains more triglycerides than protein and is big on clogging those arteries.

Wait a minute. Where did triglycerides come into this? According to the Mayo Clinic at http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-cholesterol/in-depth/triglycerides/ART-20048186

Triglycerides and cholesterol are separate types of lipids that circulate in your blood. Triglycerides store unused calories and provide your body with energy, and cholesterol is used to build cells and certain hormones. Because triglycerides and cholesterol can’t dissolve in blood, they circulate throughout your body with the help of proteins that transport the lipids (lipoproteins).

Still with me?  Good, because you can do something about this.

cholestero

Sometimes, it’s as simple as lifestyle changes like adjusting your diet. While I don’t agree with all of this advice, DaVita at http://www.davita.com/kidney-disease/diet-and-nutrition/diet-basics/lowering-cholesterol-with-chronic-kidney-disease/e/5304 can get you started.

  •  Avoid foods high in saturated fat and cholesterol such as whole milk, cheese and fat from meat.
  • Bake, grill, broil and roast your poultry, fish and meat. Choose lean cuts of meat and trim off any fat.
  • Eggs are an excellent source of protein, but the yolks are high in cholesterol. Try egg substitutes like Egg Beaters® or Scramblers®, or substitute two egg whites for a whole egg.
  • Eat at least two servings of fish every week. Salmon, tuna, herring and trout contain good amounts of omega-3 fatty acids that lower your risk of heart disease.
  • Try spreads like Benecol® or Take Control® in place of butter or margarine. Plant sterols and stanols in these spreads help lower cholesterol levels.
  • Choose oils that are high in mono- and polyunsaturated fats: canola, olive, peanut, corn, safflower, soybean and sunflower.
  • Read food labels and try to eliminate foods with trans-fats (found in hydrogenated oils, margarine and many commercially prepared snack foods).
  • Eat kidney-friendly fruits and vegetables.water melon

Of course, if you’re diabetic or prediabetic, you need to modify these suggestions for your diet.  Last week’s blog may help with that.

Exercise will help, too. This is from Everyday Health at http://www.everydayhealth.com/high-cholesterol/fitness-and-cholesterol.aspx   and will give you an idea of how to start… just in case exercise is not in your vocabulary at this time.

       Try these exercise options to help shed pounds and manage high cholesterol:

  • Walking
  • Jogging or running
  • Swimming
  • Taking an aerobics class
  • Biking
  • Playing tennis, basketball, or other sports
  • Using weight machines or lifting free weights to build muscle tone

water walkingPlay around with the list. For example, I am not a water person and simply will not swim, although I’ve been known to water walk at the drop of a hat.  I love to walk and do as much as I can whenever I can.  Of course this is not a complete list.  Consider it a nudge to get started.

If life style changes don’t work for you, your doctor may prescribe a statin.  The Merriam-Webster Dictionary at http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/statin defines this as

 any of a group of drugs (as lovastatin and simvastatin) that inhibit the synthesis of cholesterol and promote the production of LDL-binding receptors in the liver resulting in a usually marked decrease in the level of LDL and a modest increase in the level of HDL circulating in blood plasma

There are substantial arguments against taking statins, but there are also substantial arguments for taking them.  This is something you have to discuss with your doctors since you have a unique medical condition. Is the risk of kidney failure or heart attack so great that you need the drug?  You might want to consider it then. But if it is being prescribed because “That’s protocol,” I would urge a serious heart to heart (good choice of words here) with the prescribing doctor or maybe even a second opinion.

4wedding

I hope you’ve enjoyed your cholesterol primer while I’m on my second attempt at a delayed honeymoon and busily avoiding all those goodies that are just plain bad for my cholesterol levels.

Until next week,

Enjoy your life!

Aha! It is Possible.

What is itI’ve written periodically about the difficulties I was having combining the renal diet and the prediabetes diet. My usual renal dietician was unavailable for this year’s second (Thank you, Medicare.) appointment, so I saw someone else… and am I glad I did!

My first renal dietician introduced me to weights, measures, and what to eat in the first place.  Needless to say, this was all new to me and I wasn’t so happy with all these numbers, but she calmly, patiently kept explaining until I understood.  By the way, she’s quoted in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease.

This is the renal diet she devised for me as a brand new Chronic Kidney Disease patient. It’s based on The Northern Arizona Council on Renal Nutrition’s diet.

Scan0003

(Seems I see things off kilter. Scan0002

Just tilt your head a bit, if you will.)

As you can see, it was very exacting… just what I needed when I was so confused with all this new information and having to completely change the way I ate.

But then it became clear I also suffered from pre-diabetes, so my PCP sent me for diabetic counseling. Yes, I did know quite a bit already, but I did not know everything about diabetes…specifically, how to combine the two diets.  This is something my first renal dietician, good as she was, couldn’t answer. Well, maybe the diabetes counselor could.

Remember, this time we were not dealing with keeping sodium, potassium, and phosphorous under control to spare the kidneys. This time we were concerned with blood sugar.

I got some useful suggestions about herbs and spices I could use instead of salt.  This was not helpful for me since I’d already done some successful experiences with herbs and spices and discontinued the use of salt eight years ago when I was first diagnosed with CKD.

I was warned against hypertension and urged to keep it under 140/80, something I’d already been doing since my CKD diagnose. I was urged to avoid stress and work on weight management.  Again, been doing that for years.  Then I was educated about the value of sleep… again, nothing new here. But what about combining the two diets?

Scan0001Well, we did get to a meal plan. But it was unacceptable with the CKD. I was on a 1200 calorie diet to lose weight. Here I was urged to eat 1500 calories to lose weight and 1843 to maintain. But what really dissuaded me from adopting this meal plan was that it called for over four servings of fruit and four of vegetables when the renal diet limited me to three of each. I wasn’t willing to ingest that much phosphorous/potassium. In addition, it called for six fats a day, whereas the renal diet calls for five.

*sigh* So that wasn’t the way to combine the renal and pre-diabetes diets.

But then I went to the second renal nutritionist just last week and started to understand how to combine the two diets. Finally! She dealt solely with carbohydrates without specifying whether they be fruit, vegetable or grain. She explained that 15 gms. is a carbohydrate portion or choice. She explained that they should be paired with protein or fact to control my blood sugar. Now that was news to me.

While the diabetes counselor offered the same information about eating three meals with two snacks in between, it didn’t work for me because of the amount of food – most with potassium and phosphorous counts that were too high for the CKD – but here I was eating what I could with specific carbohydrate distributions for each meal or snack.

black breadIt was the same portions as the CKD diet, only with the gram count added.  For example, a slice of bread, 1/3 cup cooked pasta, 1/2 cup cooked cereal, or 3 cups of popcorn (no salt) are each one portion of my grain allotment daily just as they are on the prediabetes diet. The three allotments of fruit and vegetable, too. While I don’t care for dairy, I could still have the same amount of milk – if I drank milk, that is.  I had three carb choices at breakfast and lunch, but two at dinner.  There was also a carb unit for each snack.

There were no carb units assigned to meats or fats because they don’t affect blood sugar, but I still needed to pay attention to them for the CKD.  Well, that could be done just as I’d done it since my diagnosis: little or no red meat and keep it to five or six ounces. As for the fats, same cautions as with the CKD diet: avoid saturated fats and eliminate trans fat.

The hardest part about combining the two diets for me is consistency.  For the pre-diabetes, eating at the same time each day is preferable. I was used to eating whenVictorian clock I got hungry… before I saw the diabetes counselor. Then after taking her advice, right after I woke up and no longer than six hours – at the most – between meals or meals and snacks.

While that’s certainly feasible, I’m a writer.  I don’t like to leave the computer when I’m popping.  But now I do.  If I want to keep on being a writer, if I want to keep on being alive (okay, so that’s a bit dramatic), I have to take care of myself. So now I eat more often, try to be consistent about when I eat and sometimes even set an alarm on my phone to remind me to get up and go eat something. I’ll live. Well, that is the point: to live.

By the way, I’m having such fun devising the index for both The Books of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 and The Books of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2 that I wonder if maybe, just maybe, I’m taking a little more time than I need to.  It’s okay to think that’s weird, you know. I’ve heard it before.

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Until next week,

Keep living your life!

 

Proof Positive

Name

Standard Range

 5/29/15  9/4/15
TSH

0.450 – 4.500 uIU/mL

 1.900  3.480

diabetes

Name

Standard Range

5/29/15 9/4/15
Microalbumin, Urine

0.0 – 17.0 ug/mL

29.7 38.9

Glomerulus-Nephron 300 dpi jpg

How’s that for proof positive of what stress can do to you?  Other values also shot up, some past the normal range. While .57 to 1.00 mg/dL is within range for creatinine, I knew mine was a bit beyond this range. Now it’s shot up from 1.02 to 1.12.

My glucose – which I’ve spent over a year getting and keeping in range – went up from 94 to 117 mg/dL. The normal range is 65-99.

And my GFR? Oh no, down to 51 from 56.  So now I’m a stressed, sicker person.

Mind you, this was unavoidable stress. There was a medical emergency in the family (No, it’s not me.) and, by default, I was the one handling it. There simply wasn’t anyone else to do it at the time and it had to be dealt with immediately.  It was that kind of emergency.

There went the carefully orchestrated seven hours of sleep a night.  A 36 hour round trip to New Jersey with snatches of sleep here and there killed that.

There went the carefully orchestrated daily exercise. I couldn’t leave the patient alone long enough to even walk the airports… and the patient was incapable of doing it, anyway.

There went the carefully orchestrated ingestion of 64 fluid oz. It was catch as catch can since you can’t bring water into the gate area and they only had flavored or mineral infused water for sale once you passed the entry area.

There went the carefully orchestrated renal diet.  No, wait, that one I was very, very careful about.  I just drove the restaurant servers nuts with all my modifications. I figured if I could hold on to that, maybe I wouldn’t do as much damage to my kidneys and sugar levels as I feared I might.

Now that I’ve started in medias res (Latin for in the midst of things. Something I remember from long, long ago at Hunter College…even in an emergency.), let’s backtrack a little.  The obvious mystery is mg/dL. I have responded ‘huh?’ to this before. It means milligrams per deciliter.

Convert Deciliters To Fluid Ounces

Quantity Deciliters Fluid Ounces

(Courtesy of http://www.csgnetwork.com/directvolcvtdl2fo.html)

You’re probably familiar with mg. if you take any prescription medication.  As for deciliter? (I love that I remember so much from college almost 45 years ago.) That means 1/10 of a liter or 3.8 ounces. For the sake of full disclosure, I did have to look up the equivalent in ounces. So you see, there wasn’t that much change in my values, but enough for me – and my PCP – to notice.

Book CoverTo be perfectly honest, I had to use What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease as my bible to even understand these results.  Odd how you forget what you spent so much time learning… especially during an emergency.

TSH means Thyroid Stimulating Hormone. This is what I wrote about it.

“Part of the CBC [comprehensive blood test] which measures your triiodothyronine, which is a thyroid hormone that plays an important role in controlling your metabolism.  If the T3 reading is abnormal, then the T4 test is ordered to find out what the problem might be.

So it’s really a test to see if you need another test to check your thyroid function.  Notice how much closer I came to needing that secondary test while I was under stress. Although I was still within normal range, that was a significant jump.  No wonder my metabolism is screwed up. That is governed by your thyroid.

As for the Microalbumin, Urine, I was out of bounds there and, frankly, that worries me. This

“tests for micro, or very small amounts, of albumin in the urine. Ur stands for urine. Albumin is a form of protein that is water soluble. Urine is a liquid, a form of water, so the albumin should have been dissolved. Protein in the urine may be an indication of kidney disease.”

Well, I know I have Chronic Kidney Disease and I don’t like this indication that stress is making it worse. I’ve worked too hard for the last eight years to let this happen.

I’m hoping the renal dietician can help me get back on track when I see her later today. I follow the renal diet that was designed for me, but now I believe it needs some tweaking.food label

I’ve also been declared pre-diabetic since the last time I saw her.  Although I’ve been to see a diabetes counselor for several months, I’m wondering if today’s appointment with the renal nutritionist will give me ideas about how to include the pre-diabetes diet in the kidney disease diet.

I was down at my Primary Care Doctor’s appointment this past week; I won’t deny it. Add these test results to the family medical emergency plus 9/11 (I watched the buildings from my classroom window and went to more memorials that week than any 10 people should have to go to in a year.) and  unexpected death of a neighbor and I really wasn’t myself.  I finally asked her, “What’s the point of all my hard work if I end up with these results?”

Being the kind of person she is and the kind of doctor she is, she reminded me it was my hard work that kept my rising values from rising even more. Funny, but that got me right back on track.  Thank you to my PCP and other concerned doctors like her.

Talking about testing, here’s something locals should know about and it’s this Saturday, folks.

11990439_10204944411870363_4775265224050810062_n

Call me crazy, but I’m having quite a bit of fun indexing The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 and The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2. It seems to me that I’d rather be doing that or researching than working on my fiction.  Hmmmm, what am I telling myself?

IMG_1398

 

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Do I or Don’t I?

cruiseThree weeks ago, Bear and I embarked on my very first cruise.  For years, he’s been asking me to take a cruise.  For years, he’s been asking me to go to Alaska.  For years, he’s been asking me to ride on the Alaska Railroad. This is my second anniversary gift to him.

What makes it even better is that friends and family came together to take care of the wondrous cancer-free Bella in our home for the whole time we were away. There were people in and out at all times of the day and night to be with her.IMAG0269 (1)

Which brings us to today’s topic. Months ago, I wrote about a test my nutritional counselor suggested I take in order to take care of myself. I was warned it would be six weeks or more before I received the results of this blood draw. They’re finally arrived.

The test is Genova Diagnostics’ NutrEval for FMV amino acids. What was tested were antioxidants, B vitamins, minerals, essential fatty acids, digestive support, other vitamins, and amino acids. Pretty comprehensive, huh?

GenovaSince I need to research how Chronic Kidney Disease interplays with what supplements were recommended for me, I thought I’d share the ‘high need’ ones with you. First on our hit parade is in the antioxidant category. I’m glad I don’t need CoQ10 since that was in the normal range. Now I know why I ignore those tablets in the pharmacy. Vitamin A/Carotenoids, Vitamin C (Uh-oh, must have gone overboard avoiding this after the kidney stones), Vitamin E/Tocopherols were all in the borderline range, where I’ll let them stay for now.

a-Lipoic Acid, which is the same as alpha lipoic acid, however was in the high need range… as in a suggested dosage of 200 mg. Apparently the main food sources of this are:

organ meats which are high in phosphorouscpy broccoli.2

spinach which is one of the highest potassium foods

broccoli which I eat like it’s going out of style.

Lesser food sources are tomatoes, peas, Brussels sprouts and brewer’s yeast.

Davita.com has this to say about phosphorous. You can read more about it at http://www.davita.com/kidney-disease/diet-and-nutrition/diet-basics/high-phosphorus?-investigate-the-cause-when-you-have-kidney-disease/e/8003

Phosphorus is the second most common mineral in the body after calcium and is needed for good health. However, people with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have difficulty eliminating extra phosphorus from their bodies.

I’ve only got three servings of vegetables a day on the renal diet so I don’t want to waste them on high potassium choices or vegetables I don’t care for.  As for organ meats, I rarely eat red meat and don’t like the taste of these (Funny how I can remember how they tasted when I’ve lost so many other memories, isn’t it?). I can understand the deficiency.

Now this is peculiar. In researching this, I came across http://www.AlphaLipoicAcid.com which clearly states:

thiaminIf you’re deficient in thiamine (vitamin B1), a condition often associated with alcoholism, you shouldn’t take alpha lipoic acid.

The latest sources listed on their site are from 2007. That’s too long ago.

While I don’t drink, the NutrEval also showed I was deficient in and had a high need for Thiamin – or B1 – to the tune of 50 mg. I’d have to find another source to see if I can take this supplement.

I went to WebMD which is usually helpful to me. Hmmm, their latest source is 2012 but the site warns about taking this supplement with diabetic medication. It’s never easy, is it?

I seem to be going in circles here, so I’ll try this another way. According to my NutrEval Interpretation,

a-Lipoic Acid plays an important role in energy production, antioxidant activity (including the regeneration of vitamin C and glutathione), insulin signaling, cell signaling and the catabolism of a-keto acids and amino acids.

Mind you, this was taken from the Interpretation At-A-Glance for the patient.  The physician’s is even more detailed. I just looked at seven differentIMG_1229 sites, some selling this supplement, and read parts of three different books. Each one declares that a-Lipoic Acid should not be taken if you have a thiamine deficiency.

So do I take the supplement or not? Since I’m still worried about taking it when it’s suggested I not take it while being B1 deficient, I will send the physician report to my nephrologist.

Let’s flip this baby and see if I get anywhere researching thiamin deficiency.

Oh, my goodness!!!! I went to the Mayo Clinic at http://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/thiamine/interactions/hrb-20060129 only to discover that thiamin and Metformin – which I take for pre-diabetes – don’t mix.

Caution is advised when using medications that lower blood sugar. People taking drugs for diabetes by mouth or insulin should be monitored closely by a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist. Medication adjustments may be necessary.

Furthermore, there’s a caution on the site that supplements are not approved nor regulated by the FDA. All that’s offered are approximate dosages by age and length of duration that are LIKELY acceptable.  I’m becoming very uncomfortable with this.

So I am deficient in a-Lipoic Acid – whose supplementation may also affect my blood glucose – but am urged not to take it if I have a thiamin deficiency. Then I am urged not to take thiamin supplementation since it may interfere with the Metformin.  Or is this a hearty suggestion to stop the Metformin?  Sorry, folks, this is something for my nephrologist to help with.  I guess we’ll just have to wait until I can contact him.

It’s not life threatening and we were in Vancouver for five days before boarding the ship which gave me a lot of time to ruminate. I’m wondering if this test is the deciding point between alternative medicine and my nephrologist’s kind of medicine.

VancouverShould push come to shove, I’m not ready to leave my nephrologist and rely on alternative medicine. I’ve done well at keeping my CKD at stage 3A for the last eight years… with the help of my nephrologists. I’m not saying that you should do as I do, simply that this would not be my choice and I’d urge you to think carefully if it’s your choice.

I’m going back to looking at our pictures of Alaska’s Inside Passage.

Until next week,

Keep living your life.Digital Cover Part 2 redone - CopyDIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAIL

Water, Water Everywhere

11194487_10206480685479477_4614482644786730988_oYesterday was Mother’s Day here in the U.S.  Here’s what I posted on that day:

When I grew up, mothers were all married women. Not anymore! Happy Mother’s Day to the moms who are moms in a lesbian relationship, the dads who are moms in a gay relationship, the single dads who are both mother and father, the moms in straight relationships, the older siblings bringing up their brothers and sisters, the single moms and those who have lost their child. You’re all still mothers and I relish enjoying this day with you.

I hope yours was a very happy one, even if your children are far away like my Nima who is in New York. Nima

This mother (two biological daughters, two step-daughters, two significant others) has been writing about sea sickness remedies, both medical and natural, for the past two weeks.  That got me to thinking about another kind of water and why we need it.

I’ve mentioned that I see a nutritional counselor to help me prevent my pre-diabetes from becoming diabetes. We all know I need 64 oz. of fluid intake a day as a Chronic Kidney Disease patient, but it’s not all water.  There’s my beloved 16 ounces – or two cups – of coffee a day plus any solid that turns to a liquid when melted (think ices) and the liquid in fruits such as watermelon.  By the way, did you know that our bodies are 50-75% water depending upon our health and age?diabetes equipment

Debbie, my nutritional counselor, kept hitting the need to hydrate.  Until she realized I already take this into account daily, she asked me to keep count of the number of eight ounce glass of water I drank each day.  That’s how important she felt it was.  We know that; we’re CKD patients.

But, have you ever wondered why it’s so important that we keep hydrated?  That’s one of those questions that was answered when I was first diagnosed, but – being who I am – I don’t remember the answer.  And that got me to wondering if you did.

The most obvious answer is that we need water so that our metabolism can function at its best. This is important so we have energy and build new cell materials. Let’s explore this a bit more.

The Oxford Dictionary defines catabolism (love that name) as

the breakdown of complex molecules in living organisms to form simpler ones, together with the release of energy; destructive metabolism.

In this case, ‘destructive’ is a positive.  No destruction of complex molecules = no release of energy.  Heaven knows we already have enough problems with energy as CKDers.

I used the Medical-Dictionary at http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/anabolism for an explanation of anabolism.

The phase of metabolism in which simple substances are synthesized into the complex materials of living tissue.

So catabolism is the function of metabolism which breaks down complex molecules for energy and anabolism is the function that builds up cell material.metabolism

Oh, almost forgot – metabolism simply means change. How can I remember a college etymology lesson from fifty years ago, but not remember what my nephrologist told me seven years ago????

All right, but why the need to hydrate? While a commercial site, Nestle Waters at http://www.nestle-waters.com/healthy-hydration/water-fonctions-in-human-body (I did wonder about that ‘o’ in fonctions.) lists the five reasons we need water.  Notice number five and remember that toxins need to be eliminated, too.  That’s the job of the kidneys… and they need water to do it.water to cells

  1. Cell life
  2. Chemical and metabolic reactions
  3. Transport of nutrients
  4. Body temperature regulation
  5. Elimination of waste

As I researched, I hit medical sites, sports sites, pregnancy sites, elder care sites, and even pediatric sites.  All included hydration in their how-to-stay-healthy advice.

As CKDers, we know that an excess of sodium, phosphorous, potassium, and protein is not good for us.  Guess what flushes out the excess.  That’s right.  Your kidneys filter it from your blood, it’s converted to urine, and leaves your system.  Of course, you don’t want to overtax your already compromised nephrons by going over your daily limits of each of the above.

We’ll pause for a moment here while you go get a drink of water.

409px-Glass-of-waterRefreshed?  Okay.

Did you know there are different types of water? Many thanks to Consumer Reports for the following chart.

Artesian

Water obtained from a well that taps a confined aquifer, an underground layer of rock or sand that contains water. Example: Fiji Natural Artesian Water.

Distilled

Water that has been boiled and then recondensed from the steam that the boiling produces. Distillation kills microbes and removes minerals, giving water a flat taste. Example: Glacéau Smartwater.

Mineral

Groundwater that naturally contains at least 250 parts per million of dissolved solids. All minerals and other trace elements must be present in the water when it emerges at the source. Example: Calistoga.

P.W.S.

Public water source, also known as municipal water supply, or tap water. Fun fact: Aquafina, one of the top 10 selling domestic brands, used to say “P.W.S.” on its label—but changed that in 2007 under pressure from Corporate Accountability International to make clear that the water came from a public supply and not some pristine mountain spring called P.W.S.

Purified

Water from any source that has been treated to remove chemicals and pathogens according to standards set by the U.S. Pharmacopoeia. Must contain no more than 10 parts per million of dissolved solids. Distillation, deionization, and reverse osmosis are all purification methods. Examples: Aquafina, Dasani. (Note from me: recently, Dasani has started added minerals to their water.)

Sparklingbottled water

Water that contains carbon dioxide at an amount equal to what it contained when it emerged from its source. Carbon dioxide lost during the treatment process may be added back. (Carbonated waters such as soda water and seltzer are considered soft drinks, not bottled waters.) Example: Perrier.

Spring

Water derived from an underground formation from which water flows naturally to the Earth’s surface. Spring water must be collected at the spring or through a borehole tapping the underground formation (aquifer) feeding the spring. Examples: Arrowhead Mountain Spring Water (Nestlé), Evian. (Hmmm, Nestle also has minerals added now.)

I stick to either spring water or osmosis filtered water.  Be wary of any water with minerals added. You don’t really need more of those.

Digital Cover Part 1

 

Book Cover

It’s contest time.  Post a picture of you reading any of my three books in the most unusual place you can think of and win a copy of Part 2The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1.  You can post your pictures at https://www.facebook.com/WhatHowearlyCKD which is SlowItDownCKD’s Facebook page.  Make sure the title and your face are clearly visible. Keep it clean and keep them coming!  The contest ends on May 31.  Thank you to inspired reader, Geo De Angelo, for sparking the idea in my mind. I’m eager to see how creative you can get.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Never Heard of It

Before I write about what I never heard of, let me tell you what I have heard of: The National Kidney Foundation of Arizona Kidney Walk this Kidney Arizonacoming Sunday. Our t-shirts are ready, the banner is on the way, and all we need is you!  Pre-register for Team SlowItDownCKD at kidneywalk.kintera.org or just show up at Chase Stadium to register at 8:00 a.m.  Religious?  No problem; services will be held at the walk if you’d like to attend them.

So what have I never heard of?  The NutrEval (FMV Amino Acids) with Nutrient & Toxic Elements. This is a test my pre-diabetes counselor ordered for me. It consists of a blood drawer and a first void urine sample.

That in itself is interesting.  If you remember, when you have a 24 hour urine test for Chronic Kidney Disease, the first void is not used since this urine has been accumulating in your bladder the whole time you’ve been sleeping.  Apparently, this same accumulated urine is important for this urine containertesting.

You and I are exploring this together today. I hadn’t seen the blood drawer orders yet when I was walked into the lab directly from the counselor’s office.  Luckily, Jody Navarro, the tech on duty that day at this Sonora Quest Lab., pointed out that lipids were being tested  – which meant fasting.  I’d already eaten breakfast and lunch.

With a little mental rearranging, I saw I could just come back the next day.  Then Jody emphasized that I needed to bring the first urine void with me. Surprising, I thought.

The next day, back to the lab I went – although I knew the specimens would be sent out to Genova Diagnostics for the actual testing – with my refrigerated urine sample.  I tend to get up early and knew I wasn’t going to eat within half an hour of waking since this was a fasting test, so I wasn’t hurrying anywhere. Hence, the refrigeration.

Both Jody and Abigail Grimwade, who made the actual blood draw practically painlessly, greeted me and gave me copies of everything I asked for, which was everything.  I’m serious about understanding my health.

Okay, let’s backtrack a bit here. According to Genova Diagnostics’ website at https://www.gdx.net/product/nutreval-fm-nutritional-test-blood-urine, this is what the tests cover:

Metabolic Analysis assessment provides information on 45 key organic acids. These biomarkers are grouped into easy-to-understand categories, and provide insight for functional support in the areas of: malabsorption & dysbiosis; cellular energy & mitochondrial metabolism; neurotransmitter metabolism; vitamin deficiencies; and toxin exposure & detoxification need.protein

Amino Acids analysis features either plasma (37 total) or urine (41 total) amino acids. This assesses nutritionally essential and non-essential amino acids, as well as intermediary metabolites that augment an understanding of B vitamin need, and need for support of protein digestion & absorption.

Essential and Metabolic Fatty Acids Analysis provides a high level overview of the balance of various families of fatty acids in relation to each other: Omega 3, 6 and 9 Fatty Acids; Saturated Fatty Acids; and Monounsaturated Omega 7 and Trans Fats. It also provides key ratios for understanding cardiovascular risk, including the Omega 3 Index.

Elemental Profiles provide information in two categories: Nutrient Elements which evaluates intracellular nutrient status, and Toxic Elements which evaluate short-term toxic element exposure.

Oxidative Stress biomarkers highlight the body’s current state of oxidative stress and reserve capacity. Markers of oxidative injury assess cell membrane (lipid peroxides) and DNA (8-hydroxydeguanosine/8-OHdG) damage, while direct measurement of glutathione and CoQ10 provide insight into antioxidant reserve available to counter free-radical impact. Additional markers are available in our Oxidative Stress 2.0 profile.

Why did we need to know all this? Well, it seems that chronic disease – as in Chronic Kidney Disease – can be caused by nutritional deficiencies… and these tests could find them.  I know my pre-diabetes counselor’s eyes were lit up like the statue of Liberty at night when NYCshe realized she could order this testing for me.

Some of my readers have mentioned that this is state of the art testing that isn’t readily available and that they didn’t know Medicare would pay for this.  Looks like I lucked into this by simply choosing the counselor I did.

I would urge anyone with pre-diabetes to get this kind of nutritional counseling if your insurance covers it.  I have a far better understanding of how my blood glucose works now and what I can do to control it… and then there’s this testing to see what can be done about my chronic health problems.

What I found especially interesting is that the Creatinine, Urine (a CKD marker and stager) is present in this testing. I also noticed Potassium on the list of what’s tested for both deficiencies and toxicities. I am eager to receive my results and have them explained in detail, but that could take up to 14 days total, which means I need to wait for possibly 10 days.

Every time I research the test, I’m directed to Genova Diagnostics or a lab that sends the specimens to them.  While this test formerly cost thousands, the price seems to have come to the high hundreds in recent times. In attempting to plot the history of the test, I drew blank after blank.  This is considered pioneer bio testing.Genova

Maybe the best thing to do here is wait for my results and then explain them to you, so you may see if they have any relevance to your own health.

I was curious about first void urine being tested and speculated that it might be more concentrated. Medical Technology Avenue at http://medicaltechnologyavenue.blogspot.com/2008/12/first-morning-specimen.html confirmed my speculations.

The first morning urine is the ideal screening specimen because it is more concentrated than the random specimen.Part 2Book CoverDigital Cover Part 1

You’ll definitely see another blog about this once I review my test results.  Meanwhile, read my books!  Buy them on Amazon, borrow them, ask your library to order them if you don’t know anyone who has them (What!) and don’t have the money to buy them, but read them… and then write reviews.  The idea is to spread this info.  We all know I’m not going to get rich here, but I would like to see the information out there.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

This Shouldn’t Hurt

Today is our second wedding anniversary, so I took a picture of me in my wedding dress.  While it is a one of a kind, handmade dress, it was far too2 year anniversary small when I bought it.  No problem, I figured.  I’ll just wear those slimming garments underneath.

That worked.  But I think they’re really torture garments. This year, after two years of exercising, renal dieting, and the new addition of high blood sugar dieting (oh, and blissful marriage), I was able to wear the dress without the torture garments.

What’s my point, you ask.  Simply, that there is hope, that exercise and following the correct diet for your health do pay off.  Since I only wear my wedding dress once a year on our anniversary, I got the chance to really see the difference in my body since last year…and, for once, I was pleased.

You know what pleases me. Now here’s what displeases me.  I didn’t know that lancets for testing blood glucose come in sizes.  Actually, I would have laughed had you told me that before I needed them and made some lewd comparison to a personal product that also comes in sizes.

I was working blind.  Now that my informative diabetes counselor told me about ultra-thin lancets, I’m a bit more comfortable sticking myself with them several times a day. But that doesn’t mean I understand the whole deal.  So today’s blog is pretty much about the mechanics of testing your own blood.

As usual, let’s start at the beginning.  Lancet is defined by The Medical Dictionary at http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/lancet as

A surgical knife with a short, wide, pointed double-edged blade, used especially for making punctures and small incisions.

lancetsMine is a little different since it has a cylindrical stem with a detachable, disposable cap.  Under the cap is a sharp, needle looking device that is what pierces my skin. The first few days I used one, I cried. It hurt. Bear was not going to put up with that and went to the pharmacy to find something better for me.  No one had told me these little guys came in ‘ultra-thin.’ I gather my PCP thought my pharmacist would tell me and my pharmacist thought my PCP told me.  Wrong on both accounts.

So, what are the mechanics that allowed the ultra-thin lancets to hurt less than the regular (for lack of a better word)? According to Diabetics Answers at http://diabetes.answers.com/management/blood-glucose-monitoring-how-to-test-your-blood-sugar-at-home

Blood sugar is tested by obtaining a very small blood sample from tiny capillaries under the skin. You do not use a vein to obtain the blood sample. The test is sometimes referred to as a finger stick because the sample is most often obtained from the fingertip with the help of a lancet.

In other words, you’re not creating a deep puncture at all.  That also explains why I can use the ultra-thin lancets; you only need a small drop of blood from the capillaries just under the skin.  Because I can use these, however, doesn’t mean you can.  Each of us is different. The MedSupplyGuide at http://www.themedsupplyguide.com/lancets/ tells us

The higher the gauge, the smaller the perforation the lancet makes. Usually a higher-gauge lancet is less painful to use, but it may be harder to get an adequate amount of blood with a higher-gauge lancet.layers of skin

Okay then, if you can’t get enough blood for the testing with the higher gauge lancet, you’ve got to experiment with lower gauges until you find the right one for you. The lower gauge hurt more for me, but that could be because I didn’t know about the lancet device.

While I was no longer crying with each prick, I was still tearing up.  My loving husband (You don’t need one of these; you can go to the pharmacy yourself which is what I was going to do before he beat me to it.) still wasn’t pleased with my everyday experience, so back to the pharmacy he went and discovered the lancet device. I can only imagine I wasn’t told about this for the same reason I didn’t know about ultra-thin lancets: miscommunication.

lancet devicesThese, my friends, are just plain wonderful. I went to Diabetic Live at https://www.diabeticlive.com/diabetes-101/how-to-use-a-lancet-and-lancing-device/ for help in explaining this one.

This instrument has a spring inside those {sic} forces the lancet to prick or make an incision on your finger. Then it draws back quickly. With a lancing device, you can change how deep or shallow you want the incision to be. Depending on what measurement you choose, it can alleviate additional pain and discomfort.

No more crying; no more tearing up, just the prick I was told I would feel.  Mine has depth settings from 1 to 5.  I’m still on 1 which is the shallowest piercing.  As my device ages and the spring wears out, I may have to use a higher setting to pierce at the same depth.

When you think about it, this is really simple. But who thinks about it if you don’t have to?  For the last month, since I’ve started treatment for the high blood glucose, I have felt like I was in a foreign land and didn’t know the customs. I’m still learning, but am so much more comfortable with the physical part of it.t-shirt

Aha! Talk about being physical… you are joining us for the Kidney Walk in Phoenix, aren’t you?  It’s at Chase Stadium on Sunday,tshirt pix the 19th and you can register there from 7:30 in the morning.  Or, if you’re like me and don’t like to wait for the last minute, you can register early by going to Kidneywalk.kintera.org.  We’re Team SlowItDownCKD.  Can’t make it but want to support us?  You can donate at the same address.  Above are the pictures of the t-shirt I’ve been promising.

Digital Cover Part 1

Many thanks if you wrote reviews for The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 and The Book of Blogs: Part 2Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2. I am asking for an anniversary present: please write a review.  Some people mentioned they don’t want their name posted anywhere; well, you can use a nickname or post a review anonymously.

Until next week,Book Cover

Keep living your life!

The CKD/Diabetes Dance

Welcome to the last blog for National Kidney Month. First thing I want to do is let you know it’s been made abundantly clear to me that I should be promoting my books {never thought of myself as a sales person} as a way to help spread awareness of Chronic Kidney Disease.Digital Cover Part 1

Book Cover

Here goes: What is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, The Books of Blogs, Part 1 and The Book of Blogs, Part 2 are all available in both print and digital on Amazon.com.

Students: do NOT rent any of these for a semester.  The cost for that is much higher than buying the book.  Having been a college instructor, I know you sometimes have to buy your textbooks before the class begins and the instructor has the chance to tell you this.

Everyone else, there are programs available on Amazon to share the books with others, buy a digital copy at minimal cost if you’ve ever bought a print copy, and periodic free days. Oh, and please do write a review once you’ve read the books.Part 2

Another way I’ve been spreading awareness of CKD this month is by guesting on a radio show last Monday night.  Many thanks to Andrea Garrison of Online with Andrea for celebrating National Kidney Month by interviewing me about CKD. Hopefully, you’ve already heard it but here’s the link anyway: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/onlinewithandrea/2015/03/23/chronic-kidney-disease

onlinewithandreaStill uncomfortable with selling my books, although not at all with spreading Chronic Kidney Disease Awareness, I’m glad to move on to the topic of the day which is what does Diabetes, Type 2 do to your kidneys.  I’ve been researching this, and have found quite a bit of information about Diabetes causing CKD, but not that much about developing Diabetes, Type 2 while you have CKD.

blood glucoseThe obvious thing to do here was to start with the American Diabetes Association at http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/type-2/facts-about-type-2.html.

When glucose {blood sugar} builds up in the blood instead of going into cells, it can cause two problems:

Right away, your cells may be starved for energy.

Over time, high blood glucose levels may hurt your eyes, kidneys, nerves or heart.

Okay, that would help explain why I’m so tired most of the time, but I’m more interested in how Diabetes “may hurt your…kidneys….” right now.

DaVita at http://www.davita.com/kidney-disease/diabetes/the-basics/diabetes-and-chronic-kidney-disease/e/427  explained how and effectively:

When there is too much sugar in your blood, the filters in your kidneys (called nephrons) become overworked.

Tiny blood vessels {glomularli}  transport blood that needs to be filtered into the nephrons. Excess blood sugar can damage these tiny vessels, as well as the nephrons themselves. Even though there are millions of nephrons, the healthy nephrons must work harder to make up for the ones that are damaged. Over time, the healthy nephrons will become overworked and damaged if your blood sugar remains high. Your kidneys may lose their ability to filter fluid and wastes and may no longer be able to keep you healthy.

CKDThis sounded awfully familiar to me, especially the last part. Well, no wonder!  On page 82 of What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, I wrote the following.

… a number of nephrons were already destroyed before you were even diagnosed {with CKD}. Logically, those that remain compensate for those that are no longer viable. The remaining nephrons are doing more work than they were meant to. Just like a car that is pushed too hard, there will be constant deterioration if you don’t stop pushing. The idea is to stop pushing your remaining nephrons to work even harder in an attempt to slow down the advancement of your CKD.

Two different diseases, both of them damaging your kidneys in the same way.  Wait a minute here.  I already have kidney damage to the tune of a GFR of 49.  Does this mean I’m in real trouble now with the pre-diabetes that’s been being treated for the last couple of weeks?

Well, no.  The idea of treating the pre-diabetes is so that it doesn’t become Diabetes.  The principle is the same as it is with CKD: catch it early, treat it early, prevent more damage if possible.

But wait.  There are more similarities between CKD and Diabetes, Type 2.  According to The American Kidney Fund at http://www2.kidneyfund.org/site/DocServer/Diabetes_and_Your_Kidneys.pdf?docID=222

African Americans, Native Americans, Latin Americans and Asian Americans are more likely to have Type 2 diabetes.

 Back to What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, page 13 this time.races

Nor was I a Native American, Alaskan Native, Hispanic, Pacific Islander or Afro-American, ethnic groups that have a 15 to 17% higher occurrence of CKD.

No wonder Diabetes can cause CKD.  Now I’m wondering if CKD can cause Diabetes or if the two are simply concurrent most often. While the infograph from Healthline at http://www.healthline.com/health/type-2-diabetes/statistics-infographic didn’t answer this question, the information included was too good to pass up. I urge you to take a look at it for yourself by simply clicking on the address.

The following simple, yet eloquent, sentence leaped out to me as I read a study published in the 2010 American Society of Nephrology Journal at http://cjasn.asnjournals.org/content/5/4/673.full.pdf

CKD prevalence is high among people with undiagnosed diabetes and prediabetes.

 Maybe that’s the key: undiagnosed.  I know I wasn’t particularly worried about the several years of a high A1C test result until I heard the word pre-diabetes.  Whoops! Time for a reminder of what this A1C test is from page 54 of my first book.

insulin resistanceThis measures how well your blood sugar has been regulated for the two or three months before the test.  That’s possible because the glucose adheres to the red blood cells.

While I may not fully understand if CKD can cause pre-diabetes or Diabetes, type 2, it’s very clear to me that the two MAY go hand in hand.  There’s no reason to panic, folks.  But there is plenty of reason to have yourself tested for both pre-diabetes and Diabetes, type 2 via the A1C.  After all, you have CKD.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Not Exactly

Before we start, I want to tell you I’ll be the guest on Online with Andrea tonight at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/onlinewith andrea/2015/03/23/chronic-kidney-disease in honor of National Kidney Month 7:30 EST.  This is a good opportunity to share aNational Kidney Monthwareness of our disease.

Kidney Book CoverYou may have friends, family, co-workers who are still not really sure what CKD is or why it’s important to be tested.  Here’s your chance to have someone else explain it for a change. I haven’t done a radio show in quite a while, but the timing was just too good to pass up this time around.

Now, what’s not exactly?  I’ve been thinking that knowing the definition of something is not the same as knowing whatever it is. {My English teacher senses are tingling right now.}  Specifically, I was thinking about pre-diabetes. We know that ‘pre’ is a prefix – talk about using a word, or in this case a part of a word, to define itself –a group of letters added before a word that changes its meaning. To further complicate this simple explanation, the prefix ‘pre’ means before. So pre-diabetes means before diabetes.

Wait a minute.  Aren’t we all pre-diabetes, or any other condition for that matter, before we actually develop it?  Well, yes.  Something is off here.  Ah, a synonym {The English teachers arises!  That’s a word that means the same as the word you can’t think of.  No, that’s a writer’s definition.  An English teacher will tell you they are words with the same meaning but different spellings and pronunciations.)

The synonym for pre-diabetes is borderline diabetes. That makes sense.  You’re just about there, but not quite.  That’s what my A1C results have blood glucosebeen saying for years.  Reminder: the A1C is the blood test that measures how well your body has been using your blood glucose for the past several months before you take the test.  Mine wasn’t doing so well.

We are CKD patients.  We know what diabetes can do to your kidneys and that diabetes is the number one cause of CKD. In case you’ve forgotten, this is from The National Kidney Foundation at https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/diabetes for information.

With diabetes, the small blood vessels in the body are injured. When the blood vessels in the kidneys are injured, your kidneys cannot clean your blood properly. Your body will retain more water and salt than it should, which can result in weight gain and ankle swelling. You may have protein in your urine. Also, waste materials will build up in your blood.

bladderDiabetes also may cause damage to nerves in your body. This can cause difficulty in emptying your bladder. The pressure resulting from your full bladder can back up and injure the kidneys. Also, if urine remains in your bladder for a long time, you can develop an infection from the rapid growth of bacteria in urine that has a high sugar level.

I’ve repeated this from last week’s blog because you need to understand diabetes so you can understand the importance of not letting your body develop it.

Now borderline diabetes. While WebMD calls that the former name for pre-diabetes, it also talks about insulin resistance at http://www.webmd.com/diabetes/guide/insulin-resistance-syndromeinsulin resistance Insulin is a hormone that controls your blood sugar levels. If you have insulin resistance, your body doesn’t respond as well as it should to the insulin it makes. That leaves your blood sugar levels higher than they should be. As a result, your pancreas has to make more insulin to manage your blood sugar.

What I’ve discovered is that sometimes even that extra insulin produced by the pancreas isn’t enough. The first line of treatment for borderline or pre-diabetes according to the Mayo Clinic at http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/prediabetes/basics/treatment/con-20024420 is

  • Eating healthy foods. Choose foods low in fat and calories and high in fiber. Focus on fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Strive for variety to help you achieve your goals without compromising taste or nutrition. This type of diet may be referred to as a Mediterranean-style diet.
  • Getting more physical activity. Aim for 30 to 60 minutes of moderate physical activity most days of the week. Try not to let more than two blues dancersdays go by without some exercise. Take a brisk daily walk. Ride your bike. Swim laps. If you can’t fit in a long workout, break it up into smaller sessions spread throughout the day. The American Diabetes Association also recommends resistance training, such as weightlifting, twice a week.
  • Losing excess pounds. If you’re overweight, losing just 5 to 10 percent of your body weight — only 10 to 20 pounds (4.5 to 9 kilograms) if you weigh 200 pounds (91 kilograms) — can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. To keep your weight in a healthy range, focus on permanent changes to your eating and exercise habits. Motivate yourself by remembering the benefits of losing weight, such as a healthier heart, more energy and improved self-esteem.

Book CoverPart 2

And then there are the folks like me. Despite a hard won nine pound weight loss, daily physical activity, and a renal healthy diet (Hey, I have Chronic Kidney Disease and have had it for the last seven years!), my body still is insulin resistant. That means medication.

I started out on 500 mg. Metformin daily.  This is controversial for kidney patients since there is a school of thought saying it can harm the kidneys.  That meant lots of discussion with my nephrologist, although my primary care doctor prescribed the drug.  The nephrologist felt that 500 mg. once a day would not harm the kidneys I’ve kept at stage 3 CKD since my diagnose.Metformin

What we hadn’t figured on was the stomach upset, nausea, and lightheadedness I’d feel.  I was at the point of immediately locating the waste paper baskets in any room I entered – just in case, you understand – when my PCP and I decided to halve the dose.  Things are still better as far as blood glucose and sort of getting there as far as the side effects.

This is all new to me.  As with anything else new, it’s foreign right now. But it’s important to me to protect that kidney function so I know I’ll figure out how to deal with the insulin resistance more effectively and soon.  Yet, I’m awfully thankful I also have nutritional counseling once a week for at least two months.

Until next week,Digital Cover Part 1

Keep living your life!