They’re No Laughing Matter

I may have mentioned a time or two (or ten) that I was recently hospitalized again. This time it was for an abdominal incision hernia. Usually, this is outpatient surgery. However, the surgeon who made the original abdominal incision wanted to take no chances and arranged for me to stay in the hospital overnight. And that turned into five nights since he discovered another hernia under the one he’d expected to repair and then I kept running fevers. 

You probably know that you’re expected to start walking the day of (or the day after) surgery these days. It hastens your recovery. So, I walked the halls with the aid of a nurse and a walker, which fast became annoying although necessary (the walker, not the nurse). Apparently, I didn’t walk enough since for the time in her life, this 73 year developed bed sores.   

Photo by tegh 93 on Pexels.com

Bedsores? Certainly, that’s nothing to be ashamed of. Right? But there was that teeny little kernel of shame, as if I’d done something wrong and was being punished. Did it have to do with Chronic Kidney Disease? Why didn’t this happen during my other hospitalizations this last year? Of had I been just too out of it to realize I had bedsores during those hospitalizations?  

Come along with me as I figure this out. First of all, what are bedsores? The first thing I learned from my all-time favorite dictionary, The Merriam-Webster, at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bedsores is that it’s one compound word, not two separate words as I’d always believed. Here’s their definition: 

“an ulceration of tissue deprived of adequate blood supply by prolonged pressure 

— called also decubitus ulcer” 

Wait a minute. What’s an ulcer? According to the same dictionary, but this time at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ulcer

“a break in skin or mucous membrane with loss of surface tissue, disintegration and necrosis of epithelial tissue, and often pus” 

Okay, got it. Anyone know what “decubitus” means? I don’t. Back to the dictionary, guys. Well, will you look at that? The joke’s on us. That means “bedsore.” No kidding. Check it out for yourself at  https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/decubitus.  

Now that we know what a bedsore is, let’s see if it has anything to do with CKD. Just keep in mind that diabetes is the foremost cause of CKD. This is from Beacon Health System at https://www.beaconhealthsystem.org/library/diseases-and-conditions/bedsores-pressure-ulcers/ , 

“Medical conditions affecting blood flow. Health problems that can affect blood flow, such as diabetes and vascular disease, can increase the risk of tissue damage such as bedsores.” 

Uh-oh, Type 2 diabetic here. 

Did you know there are stages of bedsores? I didn’t, but emedicine at  

https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/190115-overview educated me: 

” Stage 1 pressure injury – Nonblanchable erythema [Gail here: that means reddening.] of intact skin 

Stage 2 pressure injury – Partial-thickness skin loss with exposed dermis 

Stage 3 pressure injury – Full-thickness skin loss 

Stage 4 pressure injury – Full-thickness skin and tissue loss 

Unstageable pressure injury – Obscured full-thickness skin and tissue loss 

Deep pressure injury – Persistent nonblanchable deep red, maroon or purple discoloration” 

We know that dermis is skin, but “nonblanchable”? We can figure this out. If you remember your high school French, you know that ‘blanch’ means white. Add ‘non’ and we get ‘not white.’ That’s what nonblachable means; your skin does not turn white if you press on it.  

Wow! Lots of new information today. Okay, so how do you know if you have a bedsore? For me, it was the pain. I didn’t even have to look. 

The Mayo Clinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/bed-sores/symptoms-causes/syc-20355893 tells us other symptoms: 

“Unusual changes in skin color or texture 

Swelling 

Pus-like draining 

An area of skin that feels cooler or warmer to the touch than other areas 

Tender areas” 

Come to think of it, the area in question was swollen, tender, and unusually warm. 

Now what? We know what bedsores are, what they have to do with CKD, that they are staged, and what the symptoms are. Ah, of course. What do you do once you have them? 

I was fortunate to come upon Johns Hopkins Medicine at https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/bedsores for the answer to my question. 

  • “Removing pressure on the affected area 
  • Protecting the wound with medicated gauze or other special dressings 
  • Keeping the wound clean 
  • Ensuring good nutrition 
  • Removing the damaged, infected, or dead tissue (debridement) 
  • Transplanting healthy skin to the wound area (skin grafts) 
  • Negative pressure wound therapy 
  • Medicine (such as antibiotics to treat infections)” 

I’m thankful that removing the pressure on the affected area and a local antibiotic were all I needed. However, those were uncomfortable days for me and I’d like to avoid going through them again. 

Here’s what I should have been doing in the hospital according to Victoria State Government’s Better Health Channel (Canada),  

“Skin care in hospital 

During a stay in hospital, your skin may be affected by the hospital environment, staying in bed or sitting in one position for too long, whether you are eating and drinking enough and your physical condition. Ask hospital staff to regularly check your skin, particularly if you feel any pain. 

There are some things that you can do to look after your skin, including: 

Keep your skin clean and dry.  

Avoid any products that dry out your skin. This includes many soaps, body washes and talcum powder. Ask for skin cleansers that are non-drying. Ask nursing staff or your pharmacist to give you options. 

Use a water-based moisturiser daily. Be careful of bony areas and don’t rub or massage them. Ask staff for help if you need it. 

Check your skin every day or ask for help if you are concerned. Let a doctor or nurse know if there are any changes in your skin, especially redness, swelling or soreness. 

If you are at risk of pressure sores, a nurse will change your position often, including during the night. 

Always use any devices given to you to protect your skin from tearing and pressure sores. These may include protective mattresses, seat cushions, heel wedges and limb protectors.  

Drink plenty of water (unless the doctor has told you not to). 

Eat regular main meals and snacks. Sit out of bed to eat if you can. 

Try to maintain your regular toilet routine.  

If you have a wound, a plan will be developed with you and your family or carers before you leave hospital. It will tell you how to dress and care for the wound.”  

And here I’d been priding myself on sitting the chair from day one. I should have changing my position in that chair more often. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! 

Giving Credit Where Credit is Due

I’ve been feeling awfully thankful these past few weeks. Nothing like a health challenge or two to make you realize just how much you have to be grateful for. 

I’m not sure if you know it or not, but my husband – Paul Garwood, better known as Bear – has been my photographer for over a decade. Periodically I’ll think to mention it but, to be honest, haven’t mentioned that I am amazed by how he’s continued to do this (and do it well) despite his own health challenges. Thank you, Bear. 

But let’s not stop there. I’ve been highly active in the Chronic Kidney Disease Awareness Movement for over a decade. During that time, I’ve met others on the same path. The American Association of Kidney Patients has honored one of our own with a National Award and I’d like to honor him, too. 

“Organization Category: Urban Kidney Alliance, a Baltimore-based non-profit, focused on advocating, and empowering individuals in urban cities at-risk for chronic kidney disease (CKD) and other conditions. Award accepted by Founder, Steven Belcher, RN” 

Steve not only interviewed me on his show May 20th of this year, but guest blogged while I was laid up. Thank you, Steve. 

There are others, many in fact, that I’ve omitted. To you, I offer my apologies.   

My final gratitude for today’s blog goes to our kidneys. I’ve just learned that they produce glucose. Is that common knowledge? It was new to me and I wanted to know exactly how they do that. This is what sparked my interest: 

“…traditionally, the kidneys have not been considered an important source of glucose (except during acidosis or after prolonged fasting), with most clinical discussions on glucose dysregulation centering on the intestine, pancreas, liver, adipose tissue, and muscle…. More recently, however, the full significance of the kidneys’ contribution to glucose homeostasis, under both physiologic and pathologic conditions, has become well recognized, and is thought to involve functions well beyond glucose uptake and release. Besides the liver, the kidney is the only organ capable of generating sufficient glucose (gluconeogenesis) to release into the circulation, and it is also responsible for filtration and subsequent reabsorption or excretion of glucose…. These findings have provided considerable insight into the myriad of pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in the development of hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) ….”  

The above is from AJMC at https://www.ajmc.com/view/ace005_12jan_triplitt_s11 and can probably use some explanation. First of all, AJMC is The American Journal of Managed Care and is actually for research outcomes. However, we find the information we need wherever we can. Let’s get to some of the explanations we may need. 

I started out by checking the glossary in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Diseasethe first book I wrote about CKD way back in 2010. 

Glucose: The main sugar found in the blood. In diabetes, the body doesn’t adequately control natural and ingested sugar.” 

That helps, but we need more definitions. Thank goodness for my all-time favorite dictionary,The Merriam-Webster Dictionary: 

“acidosis: an abnormal condition characterized by reduced alkalinity of the blood and of the body tissues 

adipose tissue: connective tissue in which fat is stored and which has the cells distended by droplets of fat 

homeostasis: a relatively stable state of equilibrium or a tendency toward such a state between the different but interdependent elements or groups of elements of an organism, population, or group 

hyperglycemia: excess of sugar in the blood 

pathologic(al): … altered or caused by disease; also, indicative of disease 

pathophysiology: the physiology of abnormal states, specifically the functional changes that accompany a particular syndrome or disease 

physiologic(al): … characteristic of or appropriate to an organism’s healthy or normal functioning 

type 2 diabetes mellitus: a common form of diabetes mellitus that develops especially in adults and most often in obese individuals and that is characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from impaired insulin utilization coupled with the body’s inability to compensate with increased insulin production — called also non-insulin-dependent diabetes, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, type 2 diabetes mellitus” 

Can you hear me laughing? I’m beginning to feel like I’m back in the classroom teaching a vocabulary lesson. 

Okay, so what happens if we apply all these definitions to the AJMC quote? For one thing, the one that I found so surprising, we discover that the kidneys do generate glucose. Why is that so surprising, you ask. Well, if you’re like me, all you’ve known is that the kidneys regulate glucose. Hmmm, and how do they do that? 

According to Medscape.com at https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/983678-overview#a4

“Under normal circumstances, the kidney filters and reabsorbs 100% of glucose, approximately 180 g (1 mole) of glucose, each day. The glucose transporters expressed in the renal proximal tubule ensure that less than 0.5 g/day (range 0.03-0.3 g/d) is excreted in the urine of healthy adults. More water than glucose is reabsorbed resulting in an increase in the glucose concentration in the urine along the tubule. Consequently the affinity of the transporters for glucose along the tubule increases to allow for complete reabsorption of glucose from the urine.” 

I know, I know. We need to take a look at these tubules they talk about. That’s what Wikipedia is for. Take a look at https://bit.ly/3pqlF5k for more specific information. 

“The proximal tubule is the segment of the nephron in kidneys which begins from the renal pole of the Bowman’s capsule to the beginning of loop of Henle.” 

This goes back to basic kidney anatomy, but if you’re anything like me, you need a reminder every once in a while. Keep in mind, also, that ‘renal’ is another way of saying kidney. Rather than explain what the Bowman’s capsule and the loop of Henle are, I’ve included a good illustration above. So, the kidneys regulate the glucose in our blood just as they regulate waste products. 

Again and again, readers ask me questions to which I need to respond, “I’m not a doctor and have never claimed to be one. You really need to ask your nephrologist.” That’s the truth. When I write a blog about a topic – especially a reader requested topic – I’m learning, just as you are. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life!  

Have You Heard of This?

Fabry’s Disease. I’ve noticed some posts on Facebook about this and now I’ve been invited to join the Kidneys and Fabry’s Disease group on Facebook. It’s amazing timing since I had decided the day before being asked to join the group that I’d be writing about it for today’s blog. The fun part for me is that I know absolutely nothing about this disease, so I get to explore it. 

The first thing I learned is that it has multiple names. The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) at https://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/fabry-disease/ lists them as: 

  • “alpha-galactosidase A deficiency 
  • Anderson-Fabry disease 
  • angiokeratoma corporis diffusum 
  • angiokeratoma diffuse 
  • GLA deficiency” 

We’ll use the name Fabry’s Disease for this blog. 

Let’s start at the beginning with an explanation of what it is. You’re going to have to read this slowly and carefully… or, at least, I did. It’s from The National Fabry Disease Organization at https://www.fabrydisease.org/index.php/about-fabry-disease/what-is-fabry-disease

“Fabry disease is a rare genetic disorder caused by a defective gene (the GLA gene) in the body. In most cases, the defect in the gene causes a deficient quantity of the enzyme alpha-galactosidase A. This enzyme is necessary for the daily breakdown (metabolism) of a lipid (fatty substance) in the body called globotriaosylceramide abbreviated GL-3 or GB-3. When proper metabolism of this lipid and other similar lipids does not occur, GL-3 accumulates in the majority of cells throughout the body. The resulting progressive lipid accumulation leads to cell damage. The cell damage causes a wide range of mild to severe symptoms including potentially life-threatening consequences such as kidney failure, heart attacks and strokes often at a relatively early age. Fabry disease is a progressive, destructive and potentially life-threatening disease. Fabry disease can affect males and females of all ethnic and cultural backgrounds.” 

That does not sound good. I wondered if there were symptoms. Remember that sometimes – like in my case – Chronic Kidney Disease doesn’t have symptoms. WebMd at https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/fabry-disease#1 tells us you may experience the following: 

“Pain and burning in your hands and feet that get worse with exercise, fever, hot weather, or when you’re tired 

Small, dark red spots usually found between your bellybutton and knees 

Cloudy vision 

Hearing loss 

Ringing in the ears 

Sweating less than normal 

Stomach pain, bowel movements right after eating” 

This is definitely something I wouldn’t want to play around with. Remember we discovered earlier in the blog that it’s genetic. That means you inherit it. Cedars-Sinai, a Los Angeles nonprofit academic healthcare organization at https://www.cedars-sinai.org/health-library/diseases-and-conditions/f/fabrys-disease.html informs us: 

“There is no cure for Fabry’s disease. However, in some cases the disease can be stopped from progressing if treated early enough. The first treatment generally is an enzyme replacement therapy which works to normalize the body’s ability to break down the fat.” 

Healthline (Yes, that Healthline) at https://www.healthline.com/health/fabry-disease explains that Fabry’s Disease can be very serious: 

“…. It’s progressive and can be life-threatening. People with FD have a damaged gene that leads to a shortage of an essential enzyme. The shortage results in a buildup of specific proteins in the body’s cells, causing damage to the: 

heart 

lungs 

kidneys 

skin 

brain 

stomach 

The disease affects both men and women in all ethnic groups, but men are usually more severely affected.” 

Hopefully, you noticed ‘kidneys’ in the list above. That is why I’ve included this disease in the kidney disease blogs. I want to remind you that this is a rare disease and that the purpose of the blog is to inform, not frighten. 

Further complicating our explanation is that there are two kinds of Fabry’s Disease. I turned to Fabry Disease News at https://fabrydiseasenews.com/type-2-fabry-disease/ for more information. 

“Fabry disease primarily has two recognized forms — type 1 (classical form) is the most severe and is associated with very little or no alpha-galactosidase activity, while type 2 (late-onset form) is milder with some residual enzyme activity.” 

This makes me think of Diabetes. Type 1 occurs when there is no insulin produced, while Type 2 occurs when there is insulin resistance and is a milder form of Diabetes. 

I wanted more about kidney disease and Fabry’s Disease so I kept poking around and I found it on The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Institutes of Health’s National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences’ Genetic and Rare Disease Information Center (That is one long title.) at https://bit.ly/325QD8K,  

ACE inhibitors may be used to treat decreased kidney function (renal insufficiency). ACE inhibitors can reduce the loss of protein in the urine (proteinuria). If kidney function continues to decrease dialysis and/or kidney transplantation may be necessary. A kidney transplanted successfully into a person with Fabry disease will remain free of the harmful build up of the fatty acid GL3 and therefore will restore normal kidney function. However it will not stop the buildup of GL3 in other organs or systems of the body. In addition, all potential donors that are relatives of the person with known Fabry disease should have their genetic status checked to make sure they do not have a pathogenic variant (mutation) in the GLA gene (even if they do not have symptoms).” 

Does this sound familiar? It’s also what can happen in CKD without involving the other organs, of course. 

The National Institute of Health’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke at https://bit.ly/35RQ6Ze offers opportunities to join clinical trials and provides Fabry Disease patient organizations. The organizations listed presently are: 

Fabry Support & Information Group 

 
National Fabry Disease Foundation 

 
National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) 

 
National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association 

My head is spinning with all this new information right now and I suppose yours is, too. Maybe it’s time to stop and let us both digest it. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! 

Stress Is as Stress Does

I have been so stressed lately. It’s the usual: Covid-19, the elections, etc. But then there are the personal reasons: my upcoming surgery, Bear’s cataract surgery and being his caretaker, the third under-the-slab water leak in our house, and my brother’s ill health come to mind right away. I do take time to quietly read, play Word Crush, or watch a movie, but the stress is still there… and my blood glucose numbers are going up. “Is there a correlation?” I wondered. 

You may remember (I certainly do) that Healthline included this blog in the Best Kidney Disease Blogs for 2016 & 2017. They like my work; I like theirs, so I went to their website to see what I could find about stress and diabetes. I have diabetes type 2, by the way. That’s the type in which you produce insulin, but your body doesn’t use it well. 

Okay, now let’s see what Healthline at https://bit.ly/2TIHwWZ has to say: 

“… But there’s a problem. The body can’t differentiate between danger and stress. Both trigger fight-or-flight. 

So today’s most common ‘danger’ isn’t wild animals. It’s the letter from the IRS. There’s no quick resolution — no violent fight, no urgent need to run for miles. Instead, we sit in our sedentary homes and workplaces, our bodies surging with sugar, with no way to burn it off. 

That’s how stress messes with diabetes. Acute stress floods us with unwanted (and un-medicated) sugar. Chronic stress is like a leaking faucet, constantly dripping extra sugar into our systems. The impact on blood sugar caused by stress is so significant that some researchers feel it serves as a trigger for diabetes in people already predisposed to developing it.” 

Wait a minute here. “Acute stress floods us with unwanted (and un-medicated) sugar.” How does it do that? The answer I liked best is from Lark at https://bit.ly/3ebZU4b. Yes, Lark is a company that produces electronic aids for various stages of diabetes, but it also offers short, easy to understand explanations of what’s happening to your diabetes during different situations. 

“Cortisol signals your brain and body that it is time to prepare to take action. You may be able feel this as your heart pounds and muscles tense. At the same time, what you may not feel is that cortisol signals a hormone called glucagon to trigger the liver to release glucose (sugar) into your bloodstream. The result: higher blood sugar. 

Cortisol’s role in preparing your body for action goes beyond mobilizing glucose stores. Cortisol also works to make sure that the energy that you might spend (whether fighting a bear or running to stop your toddler from toddling into the street) gets replenished. That means you may feel hungry even when you do not truly need the food – and that can lead to weight gain. Again, the result is an increase in blood sugar.” 

Quick reminder: 

“Think of cortisol as nature’s built-in alarm system. It’s your body’s main stress hormone. It works with certain parts of your brain to control your mood, motivation, and fear. 

Your adrenal glands — triangle-shaped organs at the top of your kidneys — make cortisol. 

It’s best known for helping fuel your body’s ‘fight-or-flight’ instinct in a crisis, but cortisol plays an important role in a number of things your body does. For example, it: 

  • Manages how your body uses carbohydrates, fats, and proteins 
  • Keeps inflammation down 
  • Regulates your blood pressure 
  • Increases your blood sugar (glucose) 
  • Controls your sleep/wake cycle 
  • Boosts energy so you can handle stress and restores balance afterward” 

Thank you to WebMD at https://wb.md/35RaDgr for the above information. 

Let’s get back to how we end up with excess sugar in our blood due to both acute (sudden) and/or chronic (long term) stress. Diabetes Education Online, part of the Diabetes Teaching Center at the University of California, San Francisco, offers the following explanation. You can find out more by going to their website at https://bit.ly/3oNXgqi.    

“During stressful situations, epinephrine (adrenaline), glucagon, growth hormone and cortisol play a role in blood sugar levels. Stressful situations include infections, serious illness or significant emotion stress. 

When stressed, the body prepares itself by ensuring that enough sugar or energy is readily available. Insulin levels fall, glucagon and epinephrine (adrenaline) levels rise and more glucose is released from the liver. At the same time, growth hormone and cortisol levels rise, which causes body tissues (muscle and fat) to be less sensitive to insulin. As a result, more glucose is available in the blood stream.” 

Now I’m stressed about being stressed… and that’s after trying to keep my stress levels down so I don’t make my Chronic Kidney Disease worse… now I find it’s also making my diabetes worse. What, in heaven’s name, will happen if I continue to be this stressed? 

I went right to The National Kidney Foundation at https://bit.ly/2HQVsvs for an answer I could trust. 

“The combined impacts of increased blood pressure, faster heart rate, and higher fats and sugar in your blood can contribute to a number of health problems, including high blood pressure, diabetes, and heart disease (also known as cardiovascular disease). 

Stress and uncontrolled reactions to stress can also lead to kidney damage. As the blood filtering units of your body, your kidneys are prone to problems with blood circulation and blood vessels. High blood pressure and high blood sugar can place an additional strain or burden on your kidneys. People with high blood pressure and diabetes are at a higher risk for kidney disease. People with kidney disease are at higher risk for heart and blood vessel disease. If you already have heart and blood vessel disease and kidney disease, then the body’s reactions to stress can become more and more dangerous.” 

Oh, my! I think I’d better quietly read, play Word Crush, or watch a movie right now.  

Before I leave, I did want to let you know a $10 million Kidney Prize competition has been launched. If you’re seriously interested, go to https://akp.kidneyx.org. According to their website, KidneyX is 

“The Kidney Innovation Accelerator (KidneyX), a public-private partnership between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the American Society of Nephrology (ASN), is accelerating innovation in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of kidney diseases.” 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! 

Getting Ready  

As I mentioned last week, I am lucky enough to be cancer free now and have returned to my other specialists. But we are experiencing the Covid-19 pandemic which means most of my doctors are conducting telemedicine appointments.

What are those? Let’s go to my favorite dictionary, The Merriam-Webster Dictionary, and see what we can see. I found this at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/telemedicine:

“the practice of medicine when the doctor and patient are widely separated using two-way voice and visual communication (as by satellite or computer)”

Surprisingly, I also discovered this has been in use since 1968. Maybe that’s why the phone and/or iPad type devices weren’t mentioned in the definition.

Of course, if you need to be examined physically, you’ll have to go to the doctor’s office. For example, poor Bear needed several mole biopsies last week. Obviously, he had to present himself at his dermatologist’s office to have these procedures carried out.

But I’ve been fortunate to be able to stick with telemedicine. Yet, you’ve got to be prepared for such doctor appointments. Do you have a thermometer? You’ll be asked for your temperature. We use both the DTT (digital temple thermometer) and Target’s talking thermometer (for those days when neither of us can find our glasses… really.) It seems the DTT we use is no longer manufactured, but the updated one is only about $15.00. The talking ear digital thermometer is more expensive. That one runs about double the price of the DTT. I did discover that digital mouth thermometers can be as low as $8.00. Non-digital oral thermometers start at about $6.00 You can compare prices online for the best deal. However, we are apparently old fashioned. The newest form of temperature assessment is the no contact digital scan thermometer. This one starts at about $50.

So, you have your temperature reading ready. What else will you need? I’ve always been asked for my blood pressure and pulse. I use an arm, rather than a wrist, device since my family doctor explained to me that the wrist device takes a reading through two bones. Those are the radius and ulna. The arm device takes your reading through only one bone, the humerus. She feels a reading through only one bone is more accurate. What device do I use? No matter which ones I’ve experimented with, I always return to Omron. It’s easy to use and accurate. These run from about $33 to over $100, depending upon how fancy you want to go. This description is from Amazon’s mid-price Omron:

Platinum (new version)

  • Trusted brand – Omron is the #1 recommended home blood pressure monitor brand by doctors and pharmacists for clinically-accurate home monitoring, and the #1 selling manufacturer of home blood pressure monitors for over 40 years.
  • Unlimited memory and users with the free app – The Omron gold wrist monitor stores 200 total blood pressure readings for 2 users (100 per user, most of any Omron wrist blood pressure monitor). Memory and users are unlimited with the Omron connect free app which works with amazon alexa-enabled devices (on select IOS & android devices).
  • High morning average indicator – Among Omron Amazon-exclusive blood pressure monitors, this feature is unique to the Gold and Platinum monitors. The indicator alerts the user if systolic or diastolic measurements are out of normal range in the morning, when there is a higher risk for heart attack or stroke.
  • Dual display with backlight – The Omron Platinum monitor features a backlit dual-display LCD monitor with easy navigation that allows the user to immediately compare the current reading to the previous reading. The backlight feature is only available with the Platinum Monitor.
  • AC adapter included – The Omron Ac Adapter eliminates the worry of changing batteries in your Omron Blood Pressure Monitor. The convenient AC adapter helps make sure your monitor is ready whenever you are.”

What else now? Let me think for a minute. Of course, if you are prediabetic or diabetic, you’ll be asked for your latest blood sugar readings. Believe it or not, I prefer WalMart’s no nonsense, no frills ReliOn Prime blood glucose monitor. In case you didn’t know, WalMart also operates as Sam’s Club. For my non-U.S.A. readers, according to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walmart, Walmart International operates in these countries:

Let’s keep in mind that anyone can edit in Wikipedia, so be certain to check before you bank upon going.

My family doctor did prescribe another brand which is a bit fancier in that it has a nicer looking case, lancet ejector, and meter. It was also more expensive and a prescription was needed.

If this is all new to you, you need to know you not only need this kit (which contains the monitor, a lancing device for your lancets, and spaces to store both your test strips and needles), but also the afore mentioned test strips and lancing device. You can buy 100 ultra-thin lancets for under $3.00. I suggest ultra-thin because I’ve found the thinner the lancet, the less the poke to get that one drop of blood needed for testing hurts.

The test strips are another story. These are expensive. They usually cost a little less than $18.00 for 100. And the lancing device? That’s about $6.00. The monitor itself is $9.00. The case comes with your starter kit. I haven’t found one sold separately by Walmart, although Amazon has a few for other brands. The number of times you need to test your blood glucose daily determines the weekly cost of your supplies.

You’ll also be asked for your height and weight. I have to admit I’m partial to digital devices and so have a digital scale from Amazon. Their scales run from $18.00 to $35.00. Of course, non-digital will be less expensive.

As for the height, I guess I cheated. I looked up the most recent height recorded on my last doctor’s appointment and used that.

Conclusion: You’ll need your temperature, blood pressure, height, weight, – if you’re prediabetic or diabetic – your blood glucose, and a phone, iPad sort of device, or computer for your telemedicine appointment.  Now you’re ready.

May you only have good results.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Is it Blood Sugar or the Pancreas?

We all know diabetes raises your risk of developing Chronic Kidney Disease. But why? What’s the mechanism behind the fact? As far as I’m concerned, it’s time to find out.

Let’s start with diabetes. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which in turn is part of The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services at https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/diabetes/overview/what-is-diabetes offers this explanation.

“Diabetes is a disease that occurs when your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Blood glucose is your main source of energy and comes from the food you eat. Insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas, helps glucose from food get into your cells to be used for energy. Sometimes your body doesn’t make enough—or any—insulin or doesn’t use insulin well. Glucose then stays in your blood and doesn’t reach your cells.

Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause health problems. Although diabetes has no cure, you can take steps to manage your diabetes and stay healthy.

Sometimes people call diabetes ‘a touch of sugar’ or ‘borderline diabetes.’”

Having just had a tumor removed from my pancreas, I’m well aware that it produces insulin as well as digestive enzymes. Without a pancreas to produce insulin, you would need insulin injections several times a day.

I got what diabetes is, but how it causes CKD was still not clear.

Well, not until I read the following from The American Diabetes Association at https://www.diabetes.org/diabetes/complications/kidney-disease-nephropathy.

“When our bodies digest the protein we eat, the process creates waste products. In the kidneys, millions of tiny blood vessels (capillaries) with even tinier holes in them act as filters. As blood flows through the blood vessels, small molecules such as waste products squeeze through the holes. These waste products become part of the urine. Useful substances, such as protein and red blood cells, are too big to pass through the holes in the filter and stay in the blood.

Diabetes can damage this system. High levels of blood sugar make the kidneys filter too much blood. All this extra work is hard on the filters. After many years, they start to leak and useful protein is lost in the urine. Having small amounts of protein in the urine is called microalbuminuria.

When kidney disease is diagnosed early, during microalbuminuria, several treatments may keep kidney disease from getting worse. Having larger amounts of protein in the urine is called macroalbuminuria. When kidney disease is caught later during macroalbuminuria, end-stage renal disease, or ESRD, usually follows.

In time, the stress of overwork causes the kidneys to lose their filtering ability. Waste products then start to build up in the blood. Finally, the kidneys fail. This failure, ESRD, is very serious. A person with ESRD needs to have a kidney transplant or to have the blood filtered by machine (dialysis).”

Hmmm, now that we know what diabetes is and how it can cause CKD, maybe we need to look at ways to attempt to avoid diabetes.

  • Losing weight and keeping it off. Weight control is an important part of diabetes prevention. You may be able to prevent or delay diabetes by losing 5 to 10 percent of your current weight. For example, if you weigh 200 pounds, your goal would be to lose between 10 to 20 pounds. And once you lose the weight, it is important that you don’t gain it back.
  • Following a healthy eating plan. It is important to reduce the amount of calories you eat and drink each day, so you can lose weight and keep it off. To do that, your diet should include smaller portions and less fat and sugar. You should also eat a variety of foods from each food group, including plenty of whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. It’s also a good idea to limit red meat, and avoid processed meats.
  • Get regular exercise. Exercise has many health benefits, including helping you to lose weight and lower your blood sugar levels. These both lower your risk of type 2 diabetes. Try to get at least 30 minutes of physical activity 5 days a week. If you have not been active, talk with your health care professional to figure out which types of exercise are best for you. You can start slowly and work up to your goal.
  • Don’t smoke. Smoking can contribute to insulin resistance, which can lead to type 2 diabetes. If you already smoke, try to quit.
  • Talk to your health care provider to see whether there is anything else you can do to delay or to prevent type 2 diabetes. If you are at high risk, your provider may suggest that you take one of a few types of diabetes medicines.”

This is a list from NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases posted on MedLinePlus at https://medlineplus.gov/howtopreventdiabetes.html. Notice it’s mentioned that this is for type 2 diabetes.

There are 11 different kinds of diabetes. Types 1 and 2 are the most common. WebMD at https://www.webmd.com/diabetes/guide/types-of-diabetes-mellitus#1 explains what type 1 and 2 are.

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition. It’s caused by the body attacking its own pancreas with antibodies. In people with type 1 diabetes, the damaged pancreas doesn’t make insulin…. With Type 2 diabetes, the pancreas usually produces some insulin. But either the amount produced is not enough for the body’s needs, or the body’s cells are resistant to it. Insulin resistance, or lack of sensitivity to insulin, happens primarily in fat, liver, and muscle cells.”

This is all starting to make sense.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!