Almost the End of National Kidney Month 

Today we have the fifth National Kidney Month blog. You know, it’s also National Women’s Month. What better way to celebrate both than to write about women in nephrology?  I had intended to complete multiple searches for this information, but it looks like Martín-Gómez MA, García Agudo R, and Arenas Jiménez MD beat me to it with their paper El papel de la mujer a lo largo de la historia de la Nefrología which appeared in Nefrologia. 2019;39:15–17.  

In English rather than its original Spanish, the title is The role of women throughout the history of Nephrology. As a woman and a Chronic Kidney Disease writer, I owe them a huge debt of gratitude. Here are the parts of their paper pertaining to individual women in nephrology: 

“Dr Josephine Briggs, responsible for research at the US National Institutes of Health in the 1990s on the renin-angiotensin system, diabetic nephropathy, blood pressure and the effect of antioxidants in kidney disease. 

Dr Renée Habib (France), a pioneer of nephropathology [Gail here: that means disease or damage of the kidneys.] in Europe. She worked with the founders of the ISN to establish nephrology as a speciality. 

Dr Vidya N Acharya, the first female nephrologist in India inspiring the study of kidney diseases, dedicating her research to urinary infections and heading a Nephrology department in Mumbai. 

Dr Hai Yan Wang, head of department and professor of Nephrology at the Peking University First Hospital since 1983, president of the Chinese Society of Nephrology and editor of Chinese and international nephrology journals. 

Dr Mona Al-Rukhaimi, co-president of the ISN and leader of the working group on the KDIGO guidelines in the Middle East, as well as a participant in the Declaration of Istanbul on Organ Trafficking and Transplant Tourism. 

Dr Saraladevi Naicker, who created the first training programme [sic]for nephrologists in Africa and the Kidney Transplant Unit at Addington Hospital. 

Dr Batya Kristal, the first woman to lead a Nephrology department in Israel and founder of Israel’s National Kidney Foundation. She conducts her current research in the field of oxidative stress and inflammation. 

Dr Priscilla Kincaid-Smith, head of Nephrology at Melbourne Hospital, where she promoted the relationship between hypertension and the kidney and analgesic nephropathy. The first and only female president of the ISN, she empowered many other women, including the nephrologist Judy Whitworth, chair of the World Health Organization committee…. 

Dr M. Teresa D’Ocón Asensi, the first female head of the Nephrology Department at the Hospital San Carlos in Madrid since it was founded in 1962 and designer of a conservative prosthesis of the peritoneal catheter tract based on urological plugs. She was the only female member of the board of directors of the SEN (Sociedad Española de Nefrología [Spanish Society of Nephrology]) since its formation in 1964, until 1976.  

Women were not represented again in the management of the Spanish society until 1987, with the figure of Dr M. Dolores Jarillo Ibáñez (1987–1993)…. 

Dr María Teresa González, creator of the first nephrology and diabetes clinic at the Hospital de Bellvitge, in 1978. 

Dr Dolores Prats, who promoted peritoneal dialysis and studies on permeability and duration of the peritoneal membrane at the Hospital Clínico in Madrid. She succeeded her female predecessor as head of department, following said predecessor’s death in 1981. 

Dr Ana Gonzalo Fondona, who performed the first studies on complement activation in glomerulopathies at the Hospital de Bellvitge…. 

Isabel Entero, creator of the Fundación Renal Íñigo Álvarez de Toledo, founder of ALCER (Asociación para la Lucha Contra las Enfermedades de Riñón [Spanish Association for the Fight Against Kidney Diseases]) in 1976 and participant in the Transplant Act in 1979 

Dr Blanca Miranda, who replaced Isabel Entero as director of said Foundation from 1982, formed part of the drafting committee of the journal Nefrología from 1995 and coordinator of the Spanish National Transplant Organisation between 1996 and 2004. 

The journal Nefrología, which was created in 1981 by Dr Luis Hernando, did not include women on the editorial board until 1989: Dr Nieves Gallego, Dr Emma Huarte and Dr Dolores Jarillo….” 

You’ll notice the paper was printed in the beginning of 2019, so I decided to add more current women in nephrology. 

Dr. Vanessa Grubb first approached me when she was considering writing a blog herself. I believe she’s an important woman nephrologist since she has a special interest in the experiences of Black kidney patients. Here is what University of California’s Department of Medicine’s Center for Vulnerable Populations lists for her: 

“Dr. Vanessa Grubbs is an Associate Professor in the Division of Nephrology at UCSF and has maintained a clinical practice and research program at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital since 2009. Her research focuses on palliative care for patients with end-stage kidney disease. She is among the 2017 cohort for the Cambia Health Foundation Sojourns Scholar Leadership Program, an initiative designed to identify, cultivate and advance the next generation of palliative care leaders; and the 2018 California Health Care Foundation’s Health Care Leadership Program. 
 
Her clinical and research work fuel her passion for creative writing. Her first book, HUNDREDS OF INTERLACED FINGERS: A Kidney Doctor’s Search for the Perfect Match, was released June 2017 from Harper Collins Publishers, Amistad division and is now in paperback.” 

I think Dr. Li-li Hsiao should also be included in today’s blog since she has a special interest in the Asian community and their experiences with kidney disease. The following is from the Boston Taiwanese Biotechnological Association:  

“…. She is the Director of Asian Renal Clinic at BWH; the co-program director and Co-PI of Harvard Summer Research Program in Kidney Medicine. She is recently appointed as the Director of Global Kidney Health Innovation Center. Dr Hsiao’s areas of research include cardiovascular complications in patients with chronic kidney disease; one of her work published in Circulation in 2012 has been ranked at the top 1% most cited article in the Clinical Medicine since 2013. Dr. Hsiao has received numerous awards for her outstanding clinical work, teaching and mentoring of students including Starfish Award recognizing her effective clinical care, and the prestigious Clifford Barger Mentor Award at HMS. Dr. Hsiao is the founder of Kidney Disease Screening and Awareness Program (KDSAP) at Harvard College where she has served as the official advisor. KDSAP has expanded beyond Harvard campus. Dr. Hsiao served in the admission committee of HMS; a committee member of Post Graduate Education and the board of advisor of American Society of Nephrology (ASN). She was Co-Chair for the ‘Professional Development Seminar’ course during the ASN week, and currently, she is the past-president of WIN (Women In Neprology [sic]).   

I don’t believe we, as women, will continue to be underrepresented in the nephrology community for very much longer. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life!