Echo… Echo… Echo…

Remember that golden time I’ve mentioned before? The time when I problem solve and write in my head just as I’m waking up? Well, today the word was echo at that time. Echo? As in echo chamber? Echo Canyon? No, doesn’t feel right. Got it! Echocardiogram.

The English teacher in me is already delighted. Why? I know what most of the word means through my college study of Greek and Latin roots. Card means heart, io is simply a connective, and gram means write. What about echo you ask? I think we all know what that means in common usage, but in conjunction with cardiogram? Yep, time for some help.

The Merriam-Webster Dictionary, still my favorite, at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ echocardiography tells us an echocardiogram is,

“the use of ultrasound to examine the structure and functioning of the heart for abnormalities and disease”

Let’s put in a little reminder of what an ultrasound is here. This is from MedicineNet at https://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=5897:

“A test in which high-frequency sound waves (ultrasound) are bounced off tissues and the echoes are converted into a picture (sonogram).”

Oh, like the picture of my grandson growing in his mom’s womb. Great, now what does this have to do with Chronic Kidney Disease? I just had an echocardiogram because my oncologist was concerned about the great distance between my diastolic (lower) and systolic (upper) numbers on my blood pressure readings. It was fine, but it did get me to thinking about what CKD and the heart have in common.

Here’s a reminder from Healthline at https://www.healthline.com/health/diastole-vs-systole#:~:text=Your%20systolic%20blood%20pressure%20is,bottom%20number%20on%20your%20reading of what the two numbers mean:

“Your systolic blood pressure is the top number on your reading. It measures the force of blood against your artery walls while your ventricles — the lower two chambers of your heart — squeeze, pushing blood out to the rest of your body.

Your diastolic blood pressure is the bottom number on your reading. It measures the force of blood against your artery walls as your heart relaxes and the ventricles are allowed to refill with blood. Diastole — this period of time when your heart relaxes between beats — is also the time that your coronary artery is able to supply blood to your heart.”

Got it. This next quote is a little medicalese, but basically it’s saying there are specific difficulties if you have both CKD and high blood pressure. It’s from Kidney International at https://www.kidney-international.org/article/S0085-2538(19)30276-5/fulltext :

“In CKD and ESKD, risk factors for HF include long-standing hypertension with often worsened blood pressure (BP) control as CKD worsens, salt and water retention causing excessive preload, and cardiomyopathic factors including left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and fibrosis. In addition, there are CKD- and ESKD-specific factors that affect afterload (increased arterial stiffness and high output shunting through arteriovenous fistulae or grafts) as well as load-independent factors (neurohormonal activation, impaired iron utilization, anemia, demand ischemia, profibrotic factors [e.g., fibroblast growth factor 23 {FGF-23}], inflammation, etc.)…. Arteriovenous fistulae or grafts have been reported to worsen right ventricular hypertrophy, increase pulmonary pressures, associate with significant right ventricular dilatation, and reduce right ventricular function, which are closely linked to survival….”

An echocardiogram can show in real time if all the ventricles of your heart are working correctly as far as pumping blood and and/or leaking when your heart should be at rest.

Well, why get an echocardiogram if you already know you have CKD and high blood pressure? Here’s WebMD at https://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/guide/diagnosing-echocardiogram#4’s response.  You can find much more information there, too, as is true of all the sites mentioned.

“An echocardiogram can help your doctor diagnose several kinds of heart problems, including:

  • An enlarged heart or thick ventricles (the lower chambers)
  • Weakened heart muscles
  • Problems with your heart valves
  • Heart defects that you’ve had since birth
  • Blood clots or tumors”

Mayo Clinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/echocardiogram/about/pac-20393856 offers an easily understandable explanation of the actual process. There are many types of echocardiograms, but this is the most usual.

Transthoracic echocardiogram

In this standard type of echocardiogram:

  • A technician (sonographer) spreads gel on a device (transducer).
  • The sonographer presses the transducer firmly against your skin, aiming an ultrasound beam through your chest to your heart.
  • The transducer records the sound wave echoes from your heart.
  • A computer converts the echoes into moving images on a monitor.”

This is yet another reminder of why we need to have both the heart and kidneys functioning well. This one is from Heart.org at https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/high-blood-pressure/health-threats-from-high-blood-pressure/how-high-blood-pressure-can-lead-to-kidney-damage-or-failure#:~:text=The%20:

  • Damaged kidney arteries do not filter blood well. Kidneys have small, finger-like nephrons that filter your blood. Each nephron receives its blood supply through tiny hair-like capillaries, the smallest of all blood vessels. When the arteries become damaged, the nephrons do not receive the essential oxygen and nutrients — and the kidneys lose their ability to filter blood and regulate the fluid, hormones, acids and salts in the body.
  • Damaged kidneys fail to regulate blood pressure. Healthy kidneys produce a hormone called aldosterone to help the body regulate blood pressure. Kidney damage and uncontrolled high blood pressure each contribute to a negative spiral. As more arteries become blocked and stop functioning, the kidneys eventually fail.”

The American Journal of Kidney Disease at https://www.ajkd.org/article/S0272-6386(18)30598-5/fulltext gives us these final words on why an echocardiogram could be necessary for certain CKD patients:

“Abnormal cardiac structure and function are common in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and linked with mortality and heart failure.”

Topic change: We tried Flavis’s high protein spaghetti and found it just as light and delightful as their penne. This, I can endorse.

Oh, before I forget. I like to read… a lot. One of the books I read recently was Ray Flynt’s Transplanted Death. I don’t want to tell you too much about it, except that it is a well-written murder mystery with a good story that revolves around transplant recipients, two of them kidney recipients. I am recommending this book.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

It’s Not Your Hands and Feet; It’s Your Brain.

Here I sit feeling so incredibly pleased that I don’t have pancreatic cancer anymore. Yet, at the same time, I’m so very displeased with the neuropathy that has me using a cane and causing my fingers to hit between the keys on the keyboard instead of on them. I’ve already mentioned in a previous blog that this is a brain connection problem. Today, I’d like to explore that more.

Let’s start with something simple before we wade into what I suspect is going to be complex. Lexico’s English Dictionary at https://www.lexico.com/en/definition/neuropathy tells us neuropathy is,

“Disease or dysfunction of one or more peripheral nerves, typically causing numbness or weakness.”

I get the numbness or weakness, but what are peripheral nerves? I went to WebMD at https://www.webmd.com/brain/understanding-peripheral-neuropathy-basics#1 for help.

“The name of the condition tells you a bit about what it is:

Peripheral: Beyond (in this case, beyond the brain and the spinal cord.)
Neuro-: Related to the nerves
-pathy: Disease

Peripheral neuropathy refers to the conditions that result when nerves that carry messages to and from the brain and spinal cord from and to the rest of the body are damaged or diseased.

The peripheral nerves make up an intricate network that connects the brain and spinal cord to the muscles, skin, and internal organs. Peripheral nerves come out of the spinal cord and are arranged along lines in the body called dermatomes. Typically, damage to a nerve will affect one or more dermatomes, which can be tracked to specific areas of the body. Damage to these nerves interrupts communication between the brain and other parts of the body and can impair muscle movement, prevent normal sensation in the arms and legs, and cause pain.”

Let’s see if we can find out what these nerves are. The Cleveland Clinic at https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/14737-neuropathy has an easily understood answer for us,

“The peripheral nervous system is made up of three types of nerves, each with an important role in keeping your body healthy and functioning properly.

  • Sensory nerves carry messages from your five senses (sight, hearing, smell, taste, touch) through your spinal cord to your brain. For example, a sensory nerve would communicate to your brain information about objects you hold in your hand, like pain, temperature, and texture.
  • Motor nerves travel in the opposite direction of sensory nerves. They carry messages from your brain to your muscles. They tell your muscles how and when to contract to produce movement. For example, to move your hand away from something hot.
  • Autonomic nerves are responsible for body functions that occur outside of your direct control, such as breathing, digestion, heart rate, blood pressure, sweating, bladder control and sexual arousal. The autonomic nerves are constantly monitoring and responding to external stresses and bodily needs. For instance, when you exercise, your body temperatures increases. The autonomic nervous system triggers sweating to prevent your body’s temperature from rising too high.

The type of symptoms you feel depend on the type of nerve that is damaged.”

Now the biggie: What causes neuropathy? MedicineNet at https://www.medicinenet.com/peripheral_neuropathy/article.htm was right there with an answer.

  1. Diabetes mellitus
  2. Shingles (post herpetic neuralgia)
  3. Vitamin deficiency, particularly B12 and folate
  4. Alcohol
  5. Autoimmune diseases, including lupusrheumatoid arthritis or Guillain-Barre syndrome
  6. AIDS, whether from the disease or its treatment, syphilis, and kidney failure
  7. Inherited disorders, such as amyloid polyneuropathy or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease
  8. Exposure to toxins, such as heavy metals, gold compounds, lead, arsenic, mercury, and organophosphate pesticides
  9. Cancer therapy drugs such as vincristine (Oncovin and Vincasar) and other medications, such as antibiotics including metronidazole (Flagyl) and isoniazid
  10. Rarely, diseases such as neurofibromatosis can lead to peripheral neuropathy. Other rare congenital neuropathies include Fabry disease, Tangier disease, hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy, and hereditary amyloidosis.
  11. Statin medications have been linked to peripheral neuropathy, although neuropathy caused by statins only rarely causes symptoms.

While diabetes and postherpetic neuralgia are the most common causes of peripheral neuropathy, oftentimes no cause is found. In these situations, it is referred to as idiopathic peripheral neuropathy.”

Uh-oh, diabetes, Vitamin B12 deficiency, cancer therapy drugs, antibiotics, and statins. Any of these could have caused my neuropathy. Since many Chronic Kidney Disease patients develop diabetes (which is also the foremost cause of CKD), you need to keep your eyes open for the symptoms.

Of course, knowing the symptoms would be helpful. The Mayo Clinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/peripheral-neuropathy/symptoms-causes/syc-20352061 explains:

“Signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy might include:

  • Gradual onset of numbness, prickling or tingling in your feet or hands, which can spread upward into your legs and arms
  • Sharp, jabbing, throbbing or burning pain
  • Extreme sensitivity to touch
  • Pain during activities that shouldn’t cause pain, such as pain in your feet when putting weight on them or when they’re under a blanket
  • Lack of coordination and falling
  • Muscle weakness
  • Feeling as if you’re wearing gloves or socks when you’re not
  • Paralysis if motor nerves are affected

If autonomic nerves are affected, signs and symptoms might include:

  • Heat intolerance
  • Excessive sweating or not being able to sweat
  • Bowel, bladder or digestive problems
  • Changes in blood pressure, causing dizziness or lightheadedness”

Treatment may be any number of things. Medical News Today at https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/147963#treatment elucidates for us:

“Treatment either targets the underlying cause, or it aims to provide symptomatic pain relief and prevent further damage.

In the case of diabetic neuropathy, addressing high blood sugars can prevent further nerve damage.

For toxic causes, removing the exposure to a suspected toxin, or stopping a drug, can halt further nerve damage.

Medications can relieve pain and reduce burning, numbness, and tingling.

Drug treatment for neuropathic pain

Medications that may help include:

  • drugs normally used for epilepsy, such as carbamazepine
  • antidepressants, such as venlafaxine
  • opioid painkillers, for example, oxycodone or tramadol

Opioid painkillers come with warnings about safety risks.

Duloxetine may help people with chemotherapy-induced neuropathy.

Doctors can also prescribe skin patches, such as Lidoderm, for temporary, localized pain relief. This contains the local anesthetic lidocaine. The patches are like bandages, and they can be cut to size.

The choice of drug should take into account medications for other conditions, to avoid unwanted interactions.”

Before I close, do you remember my writing about Flavis’s low protein products? We combined their penne with Bear’s signature ground turkey spaghetti sauce and it was exquisite. I’m not one for heavy pasta, so I really liked how light and delicate it tasted.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Kidney Healthy Food Labels?

How many of you remember the KidneyX competition? Let me refresh your memories, just in case. This is from this year’s January 13th, blog:

“Redesign Dialysis Phase II

Building off the success of KidneyX’s inaugural prize competition, Redesign Dialysis Phase I, Phase II challenges participants to build and test prototype solutions, or components of solutions, that can replicate normal kidney functions or improve dialysis access. Up to 3 winners will each be awarded $500,000.

Submissions are due by 5:00 ET on January 31, 2020.

Who Can Participate?

You can submit a solution even if you did not submit anything in Phase I….

What is KidneyX Looking for in Redesign Dialysis, Phase II?

We are seeking prototype solutions that address any of these categories:

  • Blood Filtration (filtering blood to remove waste and excess fluid)
  • Electrolyte Homeostasis (maintaining appropriate levels of key minerals in the blood)
  • Volume Regulation (regulating the amount of and/or removing excess fluid).
  • Toxin Removal and Secretion (removing, limiting or preventing toxins in the bloodstream).
  • Filtrate Drainage and Connectivity (removing excess filtrate after processing; connectivity issues for filtration, processing, and exterior drainage)
  • Dialysis Access (vascular, peritoneal, blood circuit, or alternative (e.g., GI tract) access)

… design targets, as well as the categories themselves, were developed based on the Kidney Health Initiative’s Technology Roadmap for Innovative Approaches to Renal Replacement Therapy, which is an excellent resource to learn more about technical and scientific needs in this space.

Tests of the prototype’s function or performance should demonstrate rigor, reproducibility, and statistical analysis….

You can learn more at https://www.kidneyx.org/prizecompetitions/RedesignDialysisPhase.”

I was lucky enough to have one of the phase I winners contact me re a two question survey about his entry. That led to a few emails back and forth which resulted in Anthony’s guest blog today….

“My name is Anthony, and I was recently chosen as a winner in the KidneyX, ‘Patient Innovator Challenge’ competition. KidneyX is a recently formed partnership between the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the American Society of Nephrology (ASN).  According to their website, they were established ‘to accelerate innovation in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of kidney disease.’  The competition welcomed the public to submit ideas on how to improve therapeutic options and the quality of life for those living with kidney disease.

As a former employee of a dialysis company, I always thought that there was something more that could be done in terms of the prevention and treatment of people living with kidney disease. The lack of awareness and research around kidney disease was always a concern to me. Quite frankly I never stopped thinking about it, even after my departure from the industry.  Then one day, I came up with an idea that I believe will solve a lot of problems within the CKD community. My solution is ‘Kidney Healthy’ food labels.

Food labels are a major factor in dictating consumer food purchases today. With major food labels such as ‘gluten free’ and ‘organic’ leading the way, many consumers are now allowing food labels to dictate their purchasing decisions. Consumers are now demanding more transparency in the foods they eat, and food labels serve as a driving force for consumers to take control of their health.

The statistics on kidney disease are not very promising. According to the National Kidney Foundation, Chronic Kidney Disease, or CKD affects an estimated 37 million people in the United States, which equates to 15% of the population. 468,000 of those individuals are currently on dialysis (End Stage Renal Disease), a treatment that cost this country $89,000 per patient each year, which equates to a cost of almost $42 billion dollars a year. According to The Kidney Project, ESRD is increasing in the United States by 5% each year, so it’s only inevitable that this cost is going to continue to increase as the years go by. In addition, two million people suffer from ESRD worldwide; this number is increasing by 5-7% each year.

I believe ‘Kidney Healthy’ food labels could serve as a universal solution to slow down the progression, lower the cost, create better patient outcomes, and ultimately bring more awareness to those living with (and without) Chronic Kidney Disease.

I decided to submit my idea to the KidneyX ‘Patient Innovator Challenge’ competition, and was so honored to be chosen as a winner.  Although I do understand that when it comes to kidney disease, there really isn’t a ‘one diet fits all,’ I still would love to live in a world where kidney patients can rely on a universal food label (such as organic or gluten-free). Obviously a food certification process would have to be created to establish this label, or labels for that matter (CKD Stage 1, 2, 3, etc. label), but my goal is to have a more standardized approach to the kidney diet for patients by way of ‘Kidney Healthy’ food labels.

My next step is to get my idea in front of the CKD community. I am currently conducting an independent research project that I need your help with. I believe that creating Kidney Healthy Food labels (similar to organic and gluten-free) will assist in slowing down the progression of Chronic Kidney Disease, and preserve a better quality of life for both CKD and ESRD patients.

As a member of the CKD Community, Please take this 2 Question Survey to help. Your participation is greatly appreciated!

When you are finished, please forward this survey to the CKD community to assist in helping.

Here is the link to the survey:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/KidneyHealthyFoodLabels

 

In other news, those who were interested in Flavis’s low protein, low sodium, low phosphorous products may find their Ditali appealing. We enjoyed the delicate taste of this pasta. By the way, their chocolate chip cookies were pretty good, too.

Keep yourselves as safe as you can during the lock down. Lock down is better than die any day and we are especially open to the virus with our compromised immune systems. Keep that in mind when you start to get restless.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Lovely, Lovely Medicinal Food

A few weeks ago, I received some interesting emails from a company called Flavis. I hadn’t heard of them before, so I followed my curiosity and emailed back. It turns out they’re a company that produces low protein, potassium, phosphorous, and sodium carbohydrates. Hmmm, as Chronic Kidney Disease patients we need to keep a lid on our intake of these electrolytes. Could this company and others like them help?

They were kind enough to send samples of their wares. Some of it tasted like medicinal food, but oh those cookies. It would be dangerous for me to keep them in the house. My husband, who doesn’t have CKD, loved them, too. I enjoyed their pasta products, too. Now, lest you get the wrong idea, I am not endorsing this company because I don’t know what others like it are available. However, I wanted to know about their products… which may very well be similar to the products of other such companies and, therefore, helpful to CKD patients.

According to my thinking, logically the first thing to do was look at their website. You can find it at http://www.Flavis.com just as I did. I’m going to copy and paste the parts of their Chronic Kidney Disease material that will help us understand more about this product.

“FLAVIS kidney-friendly foods are starch-based and have reduced protein, phosphorus, sodium, and potassium content. They reduce the kidneys’ workload, and they have the same look, taste, and calorie Content as the foods they replace. These products include pasta, rice, bread, bread products (breadsticks, crostini, rolls, sliced bread, crackers), sweets, and flour. They are suitable for patients in all stages of CKD, especially in the conservative management at stage 3-4.”

I have to admit, the bread was not bad at all and, if Bear had liked the taste more, I would have been perfectly happy using only their pasta products. I liked their taste. Unfortunately, I automatically cooked the rice in the electric rice cooker, apparently a no-no, so I can’t say anything about the taste of the rice.

My goodness! I am endorsing Flavis. Why? Look what I found on the National Kidney Foundation website:

FLAVIS and the NKF Team-Up to Promote Kidney Health Through Diet

FLAVIS, the kidney friendly food brand, and the National Kidney Foundation partner to promote medical nutrition therapy to help maintain residual kidney function among chronic kidney disease patients

New York, NY – April 8, 2019 – Dr. Schar USA’s (Lyndhurst, NJ) kidney friendly food brand, FLAVIS is teaming up with the National Kidney Foundation to promote the benefits of special dietary foods for people with chronic kidney disease (CKD). FLAVIS, offering a wide portfolio of kidney friendly breads, pasta, snacks, and baking products provides nutrition solutions for patients following a diet low in protein, phosphorus, sodium and potassium, and support to kidney healthcare professionals. The National Kidney Foundation is the largest, most comprehensive and longstanding patient-centric organization dedicated to the awareness, prevention and treatment of kidney disease.

CKD affects 15% of the U.S. adult population. This disease progresses to higher stages as kidney function declines. Some studies show that medical nutrition therapy (MNT) using a low protein diet, under the direction of a nephrologist and registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN), may slow this decline. Through this partnership, FLAVIS and the National Kidney Foundation will provide educational outreach to healthcare professionals that promotes the importance of MNT and proper nutrition for CKD patients to improve dietary adherence and quality of life.

Medical nutrition therapy for CKD, as implemented by a registered dietitian nutritionist, emphasizes an individualized diet plan based upon each patient’s clinical status, goals, and preferences.  MNT for CKD patients includes one or more of the following: decreased sodium, phosphorus, and protein intake, along with sufficient energy, high fiber, and decreased saturated fat intake.  Potassium may also be restricted if the patient has high serum potassium levels. The benefits of MNT include decreasing the risk of complications from high blood pressure and diabetes, reduced uremic toxin levels, and preserved kidney function over time. Studies of MNT in Americans with CKD have shown only about 10% of those eligible receive this nutrition counseling support. FLAVIS’ products are a good source of energy and fiber, and are low in protein, sodium, phosphorus and potassium. These products may help people with CKD preserve kidney function and improve disease outcomes. In partnering with the National Kidney Foundation, FLAVIS aims to provide education and awareness about the benefits of MNT to promote improved quality of life in the CKD population.  For more information about this partnership visit kidney.org/FLAVIS.

Kidney Disease Facts

In the United States, 30 million adults are estimated to have chronic kidney disease—and most aren’t aware of it.  1 in 3 American adults are at risk for chronic kidney disease.  Risk factors for kidney disease include diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity, and family history. People of African American, Hispanic, Native American, Asian, or Pacific Islander descent are at increased risk for developing the disease.  African Americans are 3 times more likely than Whites, and Hispanics are nearly 1.5 times more likely than non-Hispanics to develop end stage renal disease (kidney failure).”

 

I am happy to have found this. I remember – even though it was a decade ago – how hard it was to adapt my regular diet to the kidney diet and how often I had to respond, “No, thank you,” after asking the ingredients of a certain meal. Thank you Dr. Shar for helping my fellow CKD sufferers and me enjoy guilt free meals when we feel like having pasta.

By the way, I’m not ignoring COVID-19, I assure you. I’m sifting through all the information I can find before I write about it. As you know, that information changes daily. I’ve ordered my masks and searched out my gloves from the garage. I stay at home except when I have to go out for chemotherapy… and those trips concern me.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!