All of Me, uh, Us

When I was a little girl, I liked to listen to my father whistle ‘All of Me,’ written by Marks and Simon in 1931 when Charlie, my father, was just 16. Only a few years later, it became a sort of love language for my mother and him. Enter a former husband of my own and my children. When my folks visited from Florida and my then husband’s side of the family journeyed over to Staten Island from Brooklyn to visit them, they all sang the song with great emotion. (By then, Bell’s palsy had robbed my father of the ability to whistle.)

To this day, I start welling up when I hear that song. But then I started thinking about the lyrics:

“All of me
Why not take all of me?”

Suddenly, it popped. For us, those with chronic kidney disease, it should be:

“All of us

Why not take all of us?”

For research purposes. To “speed up health research breakthroughs.” For help in our lifetime. To spare future generations whatever it is we’re suffering… and not just for us, but for our children… and their children, too.

The National Institutes of Health has instituted a new research program for just that purpose, although it’s open to anyone in the U.S. over the age of 18 whether ill with any disease or perfectly healthy. While only English and Spanish are the languages they can accommodate at this time, they are adding other languages.

I’m going to devote most of the rest of this blog to them. By the way, I’m even more inclined to be in favor of this program because they launched on my first born’s birthdate: May 6. All of Us has its own inspiring welcome for you at https://launch.joinallofus.org/

This is how they explain who they are and what they intend to do:

“The goal is to advance precision medicine. Precision medicine is health care that is based on you as an individual. It takes into account factors like where you live, what you do, and your family health history. Precision medicine’s goal is to be able to tell people the best ways to stay healthy. If someone does get sick, precision medicine may help health care teams find the treatment that will work best.

To get there, we need one million or more people. Those who join will share information about their health over time. Researchers will study this data. What they learn could improve health for generations to come. Participants are our partners. We’ll share information back with them over time.”

You’ll be reading more about precision medicine, which I’ve written about before, in upcoming blogs. This is from All of Us’s website at https://www.joinallofus.org/en, as is most of the other information in today’s blog, and makes it easy to understand just what they are doing.

How It Works

Participants Share Data

Participants share health data online. This data includes health surveys and electronic health records. Participants also may be asked to share physical measurements and blood and urine samples.

Data Is Protected

Personal information, like your name, address, and other things that easily identify participants will be removed from all data. Samples—also without any names on them—are stored in a secure biobank.

Researchers Study Data

In the future, approved researchers will use this data to conduct studies. By finding patterns in the data, they may make the next big medical breakthroughs.

Participants Get Information

Participants will get information back about the data they provide, which may help them learn more about their health.

Researchers Share Discoveries

Research may help in many ways. It may help find the best ways for people to stay healthy. It may also help create better tests and find the treatments that will work best for different people.

I’m busy, too busy to take on even one more thing. Or so I thought. When I read the benefits of the program (above) and how easy it is to join (below), I realized I’m not too busy for this and it is another way to advocate for Chronic Kidney Disease awareness. So I joined and hope you will, too.

Benefits of Taking Part

Joining the All of Us Research Program has its benefits.

Our goal is for you to have a direct impact on cutting-edge research. By joining the program, you are helping researchers to learn more about different diseases and treatments.

Here are some of the benefits of participating in All of Us.

Better Information

We’re all human, but we’re not all the same. Often our differences—like age, ethnicity, lifestyle habits, or where we live—can reveal important insights about our health.

By participating in All of Us, you may learn more about your health than ever before. If you like, you can share this information with your health care provider.

Better Tools

The goal of the program is better health for all of us. We want to inspire researchers to create better tools to identify, prevent, and treat disease.

You may also learn how to use tools like mobile devices, cell phones and tablets, to encourage healthier habits.

Better Research

We expect the All of Us Research Program to be here for the long-term. As the program grows, the more features will be added. There’s no telling what we can discover. All thanks to participants like you.

Better Ideas

You’re our partner. And as such, you are invited to help guide All of Us. Share your ideas and let us know what works, and what doesn’t.

Oh, about joining:

Get Started – Sign Up

Here’s a quick overview of what you’ll need to do to join.

1

Create an Account

You will need to give an email address and password.

2

Fill in the Enrollment and Consent Forms

The process usually takes 18-30 minutes. If you leave the portal during the consent process, you will have to start again from the beginning.

3

Complete Surveys and More

Once you have given your consent, you will be asked to complete online health surveys. You may be asked to visit a partner center. There, you’ll be asked to provide blood and urine samples and have your physical measurements taken. We may also ask you to share data from wearables or other personal devices.

Before I leave you today, I have – what else? – a book give away. The reason? Just to share the joy that’s walked into my life lately. It’s easy to share the troubles; why not the joys? If you haven’t received one of my books in a giveaway before, all you have to do is be the first person to let me know you want this copy of SlowItDownCKD 2017.

 

I need to get back to that online health survey for All of Us now.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

 

Published in: on May 21, 2018 at 10:38 am  Leave a Comment  
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The Elusive Diet Plan

I find it amazing, absolutely amazing, how limited my diet has become in the last decade. It’s not just the renal diet, or even the renal diet with the prediabetes way of eating added. I had some testing done and found ‘food sensitivities’ as well as out and out allergies that needed attention. And now? It turns out I have Irritable Bowel Syndrome or IBS, which requires I change my eating habits yet again.

When I was first diagnosed with Chronic Kidney Disease, I was introduced to the Northern Arizona Council on Renal Nutrition Diet. I reproduced that in SlowItDownCKD 2015 and here it is again…still crooked. (Can I blame that on macular degeneration? No? Oh well.) Unfortunately for me, I can’t just “limit,” which is what the second column on each page suggests, so I have to avoid. One exception leads to a second and then a third, so to me, “limit” means Do.not.eat.

I understood I had to limit my phosphorous, potassium, protein, and sodium to preserve my kidney function and was scared enough by my diagnosis to follow this diet religiously, recording the amounts I ate in a little notebook. Nowadays, there are apps that will help you track these electrolytes. I listed a few in SlowItDownCKD 2016, but that list surely needs updating a full year or more later. Perhaps I should write about that next week.

Back to the renal diet. This meant changes for me, lots of them. My staple – bread – would now be limited, as would potatoes. I am so the grandchild of my grandfather, a Russian miller. I am also lactose intolerant so those limitations were not a problem since I didn’t eat dairy in the first place. The measuring is what I had to get used to in all categories… and I did, to the point where I can eye measure just about all the foods.

Then came the pre-diabetes dietary changes. My A1C was continually elevated. I didn’t want to develop diabetes, so I knew this test that measures blood glucose had to start registering lower readings. Hmmm, I was able to adhere to the renal diet. I’ll just modify that with these new changes, I thought.

Writing The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2  helped me  understand how to do this:

“Ahh! So all carbohydrates, whether from starches or sugars break down into sugar glucose. This is starting to sound familiar. When I brought my pre-diabetes to the nutritionist at my nephrologist’s office, she gave me quite a bit of information and a handout from DCE, a dietetic practice group of the American Dietetic Association. Did you know that starchy vegetables, fruits, juices and milk also contain carbohydrates? It hadn’t occurred to me…. The Mayo Clinic has a good diet plan for diabetes, but it won’t work for Chronic Kidney Disease patients as it is. For example, whole wheat flour raises your blood glucose less than white flour, but has too much phosphorous for us, so we are warned to avoid it. Yoghurt, cheese, beans, and nuts are no-nos on my renal diet, but are often recommended in diabetes diets.”

My diet became noticeably more limited. But I was still willing to work on it. I remembered that CKD can cause diabetes, just as diabetes can cause CKD. I had enough trouble without diabetes, thank you very much.

Boom! Enter food allergies and sensitivities. Lettuce? I was living on salads at this point, but no more unless I could get a spinach salad. I wouldn’t necessarily miss lima beans, brazil nuts, buckwheat, celery, cherries, corn, cucumbers, lamb (ugh), oranges, red raspberries, and watermelon. Whine: some of my staples were on the list, too: rice, shellfish, vanilla, and yeast. Oh yeah, the little bit of mustard I cheatingly ate every once in a while was on the allergy list, too. *sigh*

It took quite a bit of telling myself I could do this and referring to this NEW list constantly to get my now three purpose diet under control. It was especially hard during sad times in my life.

As happens (thank goodness), the sad times with their emotional eating passed and I could get back to doing what my body needed. So why was I feeling so unwell? Was it a UTI? An ulcer? Something worse?

Welcome to eating modification number four. It’s Irritated Bowel Syndrome… and stress can be the source. The stress was caused by sadness in my case: my brother’s death, a bad outcome for testing on another family member, a third one’s hospitalization, a friend’s death, another’s illness. Now that my sad times were ended, at least temporarily, I had to deal with the aftermath.

While the disease is self-explanatory and the causes apparent, I still needed to know how to treat it. The MayoClinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/irritable-bowel-syndrome/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20360064 was helpful, but also informed me that each person with IBS may need different treatments and that there were different kinds of IBS and different tests for each kind. This is the information I found most helpful, although two more of my staples – broccoli and cauliflower – are no longer available to me.

“Your doctor might suggest that you eliminate from your diet:

• High-gas foods. If you experience bloating or gas, you might avoid items such as carbonated and alcoholic beverages, caffeine, raw fruit, and certain vegetables, such as cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower.
• Gluten. Research shows that some people with IBS report improvement in diarrhea symptoms if they stop eating gluten (wheat, barley and rye) even if they don’t have celiac disease.
• FODMAPs. Some people are sensitive to certain carbohydrates such as fructose, fructans, lactose and others, known as FODMAPs — fermentable oligo-, di-, and monosaccharides and polyols. FODMAPs are found in certain grains, vegetables, fruits and dairy products. Your IBS symptoms might ease if you follow a strict low-FODMAP diet and then reintroduce foods one at a time.”

I’m laughing right now. This could not get more complicated. Uh, maybe I shouldn’t say that. Don’t want to draw attention from the diet gods, do I? At any rate, I see this as a challenge. Until I get tired, that is. Then it’s a formidable task.

Until next week,
Keep living your life!