It’s the Heat AND the Humidity

Hawaii is so beautiful… and Maui so healing. There was just one thing, though. I somehow managed to forget how humid it is. As you may or may not remember, after we’d come back from the Caribbean and from San Antonio last year, I vowed never to go to a humid climate during the summer again. Well, Maui was Bear’s 71st birthday present so maybe that’s why I so conveniently forgot my vow.

Here’s why I shouldn’t have. This is updated from SlowItDownCKD 2016.

ResearchGate at https://www.researchgate.net/publication/263084331_Climate change and Chronic Kidney Disease published a study from the Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research from February of 2014 (That’s over three years ago, friends.) which included the following in the conclusion:

“Our data suggest that burden of renal diseases may increase as period of hot weather becomes more frequent. This is further aggravated if age advanced and people with chronic diseases like diabetes and hypertension.”

That makes sense, but how will this happen exactly? I included this June, 2010, article in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1. Apparently, heat (and humidity) has been an acknowledged threat to our kidneys for longer than we’d thought.

“.…Dr. HL Trivedi of the Institute of Kidney Diseases and Research Centre (IKDRC) said, ‘…. Rapid water loss causes the kidney’s functioning to slow down, resulting in temporary or permanent kidney failure.’ Extreme heat causes rapid water loss, resulting in acute electrolyte imbalance. The kidney, unable to cope with the water loss, fails to flush out the requisite amount of Creatinine and other toxins from the body. Coupled with a lack of consistent water intake, this brings about permanent or temporary kidney failure, explain experts.”

The article can be viewed directly at http://www.dnaindia.com/health/report_heat-induced-kidney-ailments-see-40pct-rise_1390589 and is from “Daily News & Analysis.”

By the time this book’s twin, The Book of Blogs: Moderate Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2, was ready for publication, the (then) spokesman for The National Kidney Foundation – Dr. Leslie Spry – had this to say about heat and humidity:

“Heat illness occurs when body temperature exceeds a person’s ability to dissipate that heat and is commonly diagnosed when the body temperature approaches 104 degrees Fahrenheit and when humidity is greater than 70 percent. Once the humidity is that high, sweating becomes less effective at dispersing body heat, and the core body temperature begins to rise.”

The entire article is at http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leslie-spry-md-facp/heat-illness_b_1727995.html.

Oh, so humidity affects sweating and body heat rises. Humidity greater than 70%. That covers almost the entire time we were in the Caribbean and Texas (and now Hawaii). Well, what’s the connection between heat illness and CKD then?

The CDC offers the following advice to avoid heat illness:

“People with a chronic medical condition are less likely to sense and respond to changes in temperature. Also, they may be taking medications that can worsen the impact of extreme heat. People in this category need the following information.
• Drink more water than usual and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink.
• Check on a friend or neighbor, and have someone do the same for you.
• Check the local news for health and safety updates regularly.
• Don’t use the stove or oven to cook——it will make you and your house hotter.
• Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
• Take cool showers or baths to cool down….”

Uh-oh, we’re already in trouble. Look at the first suggestion: our fluid intake is restricted to 64 oz. (Mine is, check with your nephrologist for yours.) I know I carefully space out my fluids – which include anything that can melt to a liquid – to cover my entire day. I can’t drink more water than usual and, sometimes – on those rare occasions when I’ve been careless – have to wait until I’m thirsty to drink.

Diabetes is the foremost cause of CKD. I was curious how heat affected blood sugar so I popped over to Information about Diabetes at http://www.informationaboutdiabetes.com/lifestyle/lifestyle/how-heat-and-humidity-may-affect-blood-sugar and found this:

1. If our body is low on fluids, the kidneys receive less blood flow and work less effectively. This might cause blood glucose concentrations to rise.
2. If someone’s blood sugar is already running high in the heat, not only will they lose water through sweat but they might urinate more frequently too, depleting their body’s fluids even more.

There’s more at the website if this interests you.

According to the U.S. Department of Veterans’ Affairs at https://www.visn9.va.gov/VISN9/news/vhw/summer07/humidity.asp,
“Hot weather can lead to dehydration, heat exhaustion and heat stroke, but the dangers increase when you add humidity to the mix. When the temperature rises above 70F and the humidity registers more than 70 percent, you need to be on the alert.

Who’s most at risk?
People with high blood pressure, heart disease, lung disease or kidney disease (I made that bolded.) are most vulnerable to the effects of humid conditions, as are those over age 50. Other risk factors that can affect your body’s ability to cool itself include being obese; having poor circulation; following a salt-restricted diet; drinking alcohol; having inefficient sweat glands; and taking diuretics, sedatives, tranquilizers or heart or blood pressure medication.”

So, pretty much, the way to deal with heat and humidity having an effect on your (and my) CKD is to avoid it. That doesn’t mean you have to move, you know. Staying in air conditioning as long as you can so your body is not overheated and can better handle this kind of weather will help. Wearing a hat and cool clothes will also help. I certainly relearned the value of wearing cotton this past week. It’s a fabric that breathes. I’ll bet that this is how those CKD patients who live in humid areas deal with it. Feedback, anyone? Robin? Mark?

Now for some great, unrelated news: One of our daughters gave Bear the best birthday present. She and her husband FaceTimed us in Maui on Bear’s birthday to tell us we’re going to be grandparents. This is a first for them… and for us. To make this even better – as if that were possible – little one is expected on our anniversary. I love the ebb and flow of the universe, don’t you?

Until next week,
Keep living your life!

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Recreating Creatinine

I throw a lot of terms around as if we all understood them. Sorry for that. One reader made it clear he needed more information about creatinine. In another part of my life, I belong to a community that calls reviewing or further explanation of a certain topic recreating… and today I’m going to recreate creatinine.

Let’s start in the beginning. This is what I wrote in the beginning of my CKD awareness advocacy in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease :

“Creatinine is a waste product of muscle activity. What actually happens is that our bodies use protein to build muscles and repair themselves. This used protein becomes an amino acid which enters the blood and ends up in the liver where it is once again changed.  This time it’s changed into urea which goes through the kidneys into the urine.

The harder the muscles work, the more creatinine that is produced and carried by the blood to the kidneys where it also enters the urine.  This in itself is not toxic, but measuring the urea and creatinine shows the level of the clearance of the harmful toxins the body does produce.  These harmful toxins do build up if not voided until a certain level is reached which can make us ill. Working kidneys filter this creatinine from your blood.  When the blood levels of creatinine rise, you know your kidneys are slowing down.  During my research, I discovered that a non-CKD patient’s blood is cleaned about 35 times a day. A CKD patient’s blood is cleaned progressively fewer times a day depending upon the stage of the patient’s disease.”

Got it. Well, I did have to read it a couple of times to get it straight in my mind. Now what? Let’s see what more information I can find about what this means to a CKD patient. The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 contains the following explanation from DaVita,

“Because there are often no symptoms of kidney disease, laboratory tests are critical. When you get a screening, a trained technician will draw blood that will be tested for creatinine, a waste product. If kidney function is abnormal, creatinine levels will increase in the blood, due to decreased excretion of creatinine in the urine. Your glomerular filtration rate (GFR) will then be calculated, which factors in age, gender, creatinine and ethnicity. The GFR indicates the person’s stage of Chronic Kidney Disease which provides an evaluation of kidney function.”

I thought you might want to know more about this test, so I turned to The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2 since I remembered including The National Kidney Disease Education Program at The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ information (including some reminders about definitions) concerning the process of being tested for CKD.

  1. “A blood test checks your GFR, which tells how well your kidneys are filtering.…

2. A urine test checks for albumin. Albumin is a protein that can pass into the urine when the kidneys are damaged.

If necessary, meaning if your kidney function is compromised, your PCP will make certain you get to a nephrologist promptly.  This specialist will conduct more intensive tests that include:

Blood:

BUN – BUN stands for blood urea nitrogen.

Creatinine The creatinine blood test measures the level of creatinine in the blood. This test is done to see how well your kidneys work.

Urine:

Creatinine clearance – The creatinine clearance test helps provide information about how well the kidneys are working. The test compares the creatinine level in urine with the creatinine level in blood.”

Aha! So there are two different creatinine readings: blood or serum and urine. By the way, MedicineNet at http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=5470 defines serum as “The clear liquid that can be separated from clotted blood. Serum differs from plasma, the liquid portion of normal unclotted blood containing the red and white cells and platelets. It is the clot that makes the difference between serum and plasma.”

This is starting to get pretty complex. It seems that yet another test for CKD can be conducted with a urine sample. This is from SlowItDown 2015.

“In recent years, researchers have found that a single urine sample can provide the needed information. In the newer technique, the amount of albumin in the urine sample is compared with the amount of creatinine, a waste product of normal muscle breakdown. The measurement is called a urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR). A urine sample containing more than 30 milligrams of albumin for each gram of creatinine (30 mg/g) is a warning that there may be a problem. If the laboratory test exceeds 30 mg/g, another UACR test should be done 1 to 2 weeks later. If the second test also shows high levels of protein, the person has persistent proteinuria, a sign of declining kidney function, and should have additional tests to evaluate kidney function.

Thank you to the National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse, A service of the NIH, at http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseases/pubs/proteinuria/#tests for that information.”

Is there more to know about creatinine? Uh-oh, this savory little tidbit was reprinted in SlowItDownCKD 2016 from an earlier book.

“.…Dr. HL Trivedi of the Institute of Kidney Diseases and Research Centre (IKDRC) said, ‘…. Rapid water loss causes the kidney’s functioning to slow down, resulting in temporary or permanent kidney failure.’

Extreme heat causes rapid water loss, resulting in acute electrolyte imbalance. The kidney, unable to cope with the water loss, fails to flush out the requisite amount of Creatinine and other toxins from the body. Coupled with a lack of consistent water intake, this brings about permanent or temporary kidney failure, explain experts.”

This seems to be calling for a Part 2. What do you think? There’s still BUN and albumin to deal with. Let me know what else you’d like to see included in that blog.

Have I mentioned that I’ll be presenting a display about CKD Awareness at Landmark’s Conference for Global Transformation? Or that both an article and an update about CKD Awareness will be included in their journal?

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Women and Water (Men, too)

Welcome to March: National Kidney Month and Women’s History Month. I’m going to fudge a bit on the ‘History’ part of that as I did last month with Black History Month. I don’t often have guest bloggers, but this month will feature two women as guest bloggers in honor of Women’s History Month. The first is Jessica Walter, who sent me the following email last month:

Hi There,

I am a freelance health and food writer, I have teamed up with a small senior lifestyle advice site, I worked with them to develop a complete guide on how to eat better and be healthier from a dietary point of view. This includes detailed information on why being hydrated is so important. … you can check out the article here:

https://www.senioradvisor.com/ blog/2017/02/7-tips-on- developing-better-eating- habits-in-your-senior-years/.

I liked what Jessica had to say and how easily it could be adapted not only for senior Chronic Kidney Disease patients, but all Chronic Kidney Disease patients.

In addition, she sent me this short article about hydration and CKD. It’s easy to read and has some information we constantly need to be reminded of.

Staying Hydrated When You Have Chronic Kidney Disease

We all know that drinking water is important for our health, and monitoring fluid intake is critical for those with chronic kidney disease. Too much water can be problematic, but so can too little. Dehydration can be serious for those with chronic kidney disease. If you are suffering from vomiting, diarrhea, fever, or diabetes, or if you urinate frequently, you may become dehydrated because you are losing more fluid than you are taking in. For those without chronic kidney disease, the solution is to increase the intake of water until the body is sufficiently hydrated.

Since dehydration can decrease blood flow to the kidneys, and as fluid intake must be controlled in patients with chronic kidney disease, it’s important to closely monitor their fluid intake and loss in these circumstances.

Recognizing The Signs

The first step is to recognize the physical signs of dehydration. You may have a dry mouth or dry eyes, heart palpitations, muscle cramps, lightheadedness or fainting, nausea, or vomiting. You may notice a decrease in your urine output. Weight loss of more than a  pound or two over a few days can also be an indicator of dehydration. If you are taking ACE inhibitors and ARBs, such as lisinopril, enalapril, valsartan, or losartan, or water pills or diuretics, these medications can harm your kidneys if you become dehydrated. It is doubly important to be aware of signs of dehydration if you are on any of these medications.

Steps to Take

To rehydrate your body, start by increasing your intake of water and ensure that you are eating plenty of fruits and vegetables. (Me here: remember to stay within your renal diet guidelines for fruits, vegetables, and fluids.)If you cannot keep water down, or if increased consumption doesn’t alleviate the signs of dehydration, contact your health care provider  immediately.

They may also recommend a different fluid than plain water since electrolytes and minerals can also be reduced if you are dehydrated, but you may still need to watch your intake of potassium, phosphorus, protein, and sodium. Your doctor may recommend an oral rehydration solution that will restore your body to a proper level of hydration. If you have a fluid restriction because you are on dialysis, you should consult your healthcare provider if you have issues with or questions about hydration. Taking in or retaining too much fluid when you have these restrictions can lead to serious complications, including headaches, swelling, high blood pressure and even stroke. Carefully monitoring your fluid intake and watching for signs of dehydration will help you to avoid the consequences of dehydration.

I’ve blogged many times over the last six years about hydration. I’m enjoying reading this important material from another’s point of view. I’m sorry Jessica’s grandmother had to suffer this, but I’m also glad Jessica chose to share her writing about it with us.

 

This June, 2010, article included in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 furthers explains:

“.…Dr. HL Trivedi of the Institute of Kidney Diseases and Research Centre (IKDRC) said, ‘…. Rapid water loss causes the kidney’s functioning to slow down, resulting in temporary or permanent kidney failure.’

Extreme heat causes rapid water loss, resulting in acute electrolyte imbalance. The kidney, unable to cope with the water loss, fails to flush out the requisite amount of Creatinine and other toxins from the body. Coupled with a lack of consistent water intake, this brings about permanent or temporary kidney failure, explain experts.”

The article can be viewed directly at http://www.dnaindia.com/health/report_heat-induced-kidney-ailments-see-40pct-rise_1390589 and is from “Daily News & Analysis.”

The CDC also offers advice to avoid heat illness:

“People with a chronic medical condition are less likely to sense and respond to changes in temperature. Also, they may be taking medications that can worsen the impact of extreme heat. People in this category need the following information.

  • Drink more water than usual and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Check the local news for health and safety updates regularly.
  • Don’t use the stove or oven to cook——it will make you and your house hotter.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Take cool showers or baths to cool down.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you or someone you know experiences symptoms of heat-related illness(http://www.cdc.gov/extremeheat/warning

It’s clear we need to keep an eye on our hydration. While we’re doing that, keep the other eye out for SlowItDownCKD 2016 purposely available on World Kidney Day on Amazon.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Deep in the Heart of Texas

Last week I wrote that I’d tell you about our Texas trip this week and that’s just what I’ll do… sort of. We were in San Antonio for the Air Force Basic Training Graduation of a close family friend. I hadn’t wanted to go. The rest of the family was driving 14 hours straight. I thought they were insane.

It turned out I was right about that, but I am glad I went anyway.  The next day, our friend proposed to his girlfriend – who just happened to be our daughter – at The Riverwalk’s Secret Waterfall, Airmen escort and all. THAT was worth the ride. And we got to know his family better, understand them more, and value their company.  As they say in the ad, secret“Priceless.”

There was only one fly in the ointment. While the temperature was manageable for us since we live in Arizona, the humidity was not for the same reason. For my other than U.S. readers (and there are quite a few of them since I have 107,000 readers in 106 countries), Arizona’s usual humidity is low, very low. We do have a three minute rainy season in August (Okay, maybe it’s a teensy bit more than three minutes.) when it rises, but that’s not the norm.

Last week, the humidity in San Antonio, Texas, was between 68% and 72%. Even the air conditioning in the hotel bowed before it.  Our Airman had Air Force logoscheduled the entire weekend for us: The Airman’s run on an open field, late lunch at a restaurant with no available indoor seating, graduation on the parade field, an afternoon on The Riverwalk. There’s more, but you get the idea.  All of it outdoors, all of it in 68% to 72% humidity, all of it uncomfortable as can be.

And, it turns out, all of it not great for a Chronic Kidney Disease patient. Why? Well, that’s the topic of today’s blog. ResearchGate at https://www.researchgate.net/publication/263084331_Climate_change_and_Chronic_Kidney_Disease published a study from the Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research from February of 2014 (That’s over two years ago, friends.) which included the following in the conclusion:

“Our data suggest that burden of renal diseases may increase as period of hot weather becomes more frequent. This is further aggravated if age advanced and people with chronic diseases like diabetes and hypertension.”DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAIL

That makes sense, but how will this happen exactly? I included this June, 2010, article in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1. Apparently, heat (and humidity) has been an acknowledged threat to our kidneys for longer than we’d thought.

“.…Dr. HL Trivedi of the Institute of Kidney Diseases and Research Centre (IKDRC) said, ‘…. Rapid water loss causes the kidney’s functioning to slow down, resulting in temporary or permanent kidney failure.’

Extreme heat causes rapid water loss, resulting in acute electrolyte imbalance. The kidney, unable to cope with the water loss, fails to flush out the requisite amount of Creatinine and other toxins from the body. Coupled with a lack of consistent water intake, this brings about permanent or temporary kidney failure, explain experts.”

The article can be viewed directly at http://www.dnaindia.com/health/report_heat-induced-kidney-ailments-see-40pct-rise_1390589 and is from “Daily News & Analysis.”

By the time this book’s twin, The Book of Blogs: Moderate Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2, was ready for publication, the (then) NKF-logo_Hori_OBspokesman for The National Kidney Foundation – Dr. Leslie Spry – had this to say about heat and humidity:

“Heat illness occurs when body temperature exceeds a person’s ability to dissipate that heat and is commonly diagnosed when the body temperature approaches 104 degrees Fahrenheit and when humidity is greater than 70 percent. Once the humidity is that high, sweating becomes Digital Cover Part 2 redone - Copyless effective at dispersing body heat, and the core body temperature begins to rise.”

The entire article is at http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leslie-spry-md-facp/heat-illness_b_1727995.html

Oh, so humidity affects sweating and body heat rises.  Humidity greater than 70%. That covers almost the entire time we were in Texas. Well, what’s the connection between heat illness and CKD then?

The CDC offers the following advice to avoid heat illness:

“People with a chronic medical condition are less likely to sense and respond to changes in temperature. Also, they may be taking medications that can worsen the impact of extreme heat. People in this category need the following information.

  • Drink more water than usual and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Check the local news for health and safety updates regularly.
  • Don’t use the stove or oven to cook——it will make you and your house hotter.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Take cool showers or baths to cool down.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you or someone you know experiences symptoms of heat-related illness(http://www.cdc.gov/extremeheat/warning.html).”

bottled waterUh-oh, we’re already in trouble. Look at the first suggestion: our fluid intake is restricted to 64 oz. (Mine is, check with your nephrologist for yours.) I know I carefully space out my fluids – which include anything that can melt to a liquid – to cover my entire day. I can’t drink more water than usual and, sometimes – on those rare occasions when I’ve been careless – have to wait until I’m thirsty to drink.

Diabetes is the foremost cause of CKD. I was curious how heat affected blood sugar so I popped over to Information about Diabetes at http://www.informationaboutdiabetes.com/lifestyle/lifestyle/how-heat-and-humidity-may-affect-blood-sugar and found this:

  1. If our body is low on fluids, the kidneys receive less blood flow and work less effectively. This might cause blood glucose concentrations to rise.
  2. If someone’s blood sugar is already running high in the heat, not only will they lose water through sweat but they might urinate more frequently too, depleting their body’s fluids even more.

There’s more at the website if this interests you.

So, pretty much, the way to deal with heat and humidity having an effect on your (and my) CKD is to avoid it. That doesn’t mean you have to move, you know.  Stay in air conditioning as long as you can so your body is not overheated and can better handle this kind of weather. Wearing a hat and cool clothes will also help. I certainly learned the value of wearing cotton this past week. It’s a fabric that breathes.

What is itUntil next week,SlowItDownCKD 2015 Book Cover (76x113)

Keep living your life!

Not ON the Water, IN It

It’s hot, 112 degrees already and summer has just started. Much as I’d love to, I can’t stay in the house writing all day, every day. I also need to exercise on a daily basis… as do you if you have Chronic Kidney Disease.

What’s that? Why do you have to exercise if you have CKD, you ask? Let’s go back to What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, page 100, for the answer to that one. (Digital book owners, don’t forget to use the search document function instead of the page number.)Book Cover

“I knew exercise was important to control my weight. It would also improve my blood pressure and lower my cholesterol and triglyceride levels. The greater your triglycerides, the greater the risk of increasing your creatinine. There were other benefits, too, although you didn’t have to have CKD to enjoy them: better sleep, and improved muscle function and strength. But, as with everything else you do that might impinge upon your health, check with your doctor before you start exercising.

I researched, researched and researched again. Each explanation of what exercise does for the body was more complicated than the last one I read. Keeping it simple, basically, there’s a compound released by voluntary muscle contraction. It tells the body to repair itself and grow stronger. The idea is to start exercising slowly and then intensity your activity.”

I’ve mentioned water walking as an exercise and gotten quite a few questions about it. I have to admit I’d never heard of it before I moved to Arizona and met Bear. His house is in a senior citizen community that has a community center with a water walking pool.

It was exciting to be doing something I’d never done before and questioned him unmercifully, although he kept telling me you get in a pool that has lanes and walk. I could not visualize it, so I went online to see what it looked like. Then I couldn’t imagine what it would feel like, especially for someone who always wants to be near water rather than in it.

The pool was enormous to my water walking pool virgin eyes. There were shady parts and sunny parts. Uh-oh, I was going to have to get a hat with a bigger brim to protect my neck and shoulders from the sun, too. Oh, and water soluble sunscreen.sun hat

I couldn’t make sense of the arrows on the pool floor and the curvy shoulder high dividing walls between lanes until I was actually in the pool. I started out in waist high water following the arrows and keeping in the lanes they pointed to on different sides of the dividers until I found myself in chin high water when we completed our first circuit.

water walkingNow it all made sense. It was just like traffic lanes and directional markings on the road when you drive! Of course, waist and chin high are relative. I’m 5’5’, so Bear’s 5’10” meant the water was not as high on him.

There’s another benefit to water walking if you have arthritis. You’ve read my complaints about arthritis here and even in the Wall Street Journal column by Laura Landro about CKD Awareness activists (I still prefer being called an advocate). If you missed it, you can read that article in the January 20th, 2014 blog.

I went to the site of The Arthritis Foundation at http://www.arthritistoday.org/what-you-can-do/staying-active/activity-types/water-walking.php and read the following:

“Like all water exercises, water walking is easy on the joints. ‘The water’s buoyancy supports the body’s weight, which reduces stress on the joints and minimizes pain,’ says Jones [an aquatic coordinator]. ‘And it’s still a great workout. Water provides 12 times the resistance of air, so as you walk, you’re really strengthening and building muscle.’ You do not bear weight while swimming and walking, however, so you’ll still need to add some bone-building workouts to your routine.”

My almost constantly complaining knees were quiet in the water walking pool. My slightly painful hip didn’t seem to hurt. And, best of all, my elbows weren’t aching. I’m sold. What makes it even better is that water walking strengthens your muscles.

The bottom of the pool is purposely rough to prevent slips. After one circuit without water shoes, I knew I’d have to get some. While they were not severely damaged, I did notice annoying little scraps and cuts on the soles of my feet, especially my toes.water walking shoes

That probably means I was walking on my toes, something the Mayo Clinic at http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/fitness/multimedia/aquatic-exercise/sls-20076730 suggests you NOT do.

“In water that’s about waist-high, walk across the pool swinging your arms like you do when walking on land. Avoid walking on your tiptoes, and keep your back straight. Tighten your abdominal muscles to avoid leaning too far forward or to the side.”

I’ll also have to work on tightening my abdominals since I walked into the wall or the dividers a few times. I knew I wasn’t drunk (I don’t drink), so now I know why this happened.

A non-medical site, Ask.com, had some information about how you can water walk in any water. After all, not everyone has access to a water walking pool.

• Walk forward and backward with short steps, long steps, average steps, or step kicks.

• Move in a pattern of a circle or square. Be sure to go in both directions to balance the demands on your body.

There are more suggestions about technique at their site: http://spas.about.com/od/exercise/a/waterwalking.htm

SlowItDown business card

The big news here these days is that SlowItDown and What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease are combining their Facebook and Twitter accounts. When you want to catch up with SlowItDown, just go to What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease’s Facebook and Twitter accounts. There will still be a daily tidbit about our disease on both. It occurred to me that I was doing double duty (Say that three times fast!) since both deal with the same issue.

Until next week,
Keep living your life!

Baby, It’s Hot Outside

I just caught up to the fact that it’s June.  No, it wasn’t the calendar that told me, but the temperature.  We live in Arizona and its hot, dry heat or not.  That means cooling off any way you can. IMG_0584

This weekend, we finally took the three hour round trip drive to visit my friend and her family.  Her five year old daughter proudly showed off the family’s new addition since I’d been there last – a wonderful, cooling swimming pool.  I was tempted, but the 105% temperature kept me inside with the air conditioning.

That’s when I was offered some filtered water.  Did I want ice? I was asked.  I immediately shook my head.  “CKD, no ice, please.”

My friend cocked her head.  Her father had had a kidney transplant so she was well aware of the renal diet.  True, her father was treated in Korea, so there might have been some differences in treatment, but ice?

She asked me why and I immediately knew what I was going to blog about today.

For years, I’ve misunderstood something my nephrologist said.  I heard, “Don’t use ice.”  What he really said was something like, “If you use ice, you need to count the cubes in your fluid intake.”

I’ve spent time since Saturday researching the ice question and found nothing about avoiding ice.  I did find one warning about cold beverages from DaVita at http://www.davita.com/kidney-disease/overview/living-with-ckd/seven-summertime-precautions-for-people-with-kidney-disease/e/4894 : “Be careful of very cold beverages, which can cause stomach cramps.”

The lesson I learned from this misunderstanding of what I thought I heard is to recheck what you think you know every once in a while.  After all, I thought I had the diet down pat.

Hah!  I forgot that I was terrified when I was first diagnosed and thinking I was going to die imminently. I adhered strictly to what I heard and, apparently, adhered just as strictly to what I thought I’d heard.

sun-graphic1Wait a minute… maybe I need not have avoided the heat, either.  I researched that, too.  Just as with ice, I found a general warning about the elderly, but nothing specific to CKD.

““With the elderly, the heat accumulates in their bodies over hours to days. If you have a long heat spell, the elderly person accumulates heat through each of those days because they can’t really eliminate or dissipate the heat,” explains Dr. Crocker. “Sometimes it’s because of a medication, sometimes it’s a lack of mobility, or in some cases the older you get, the less active your sweat glands are, so it becomes harder and harder for you to eliminate heat.”

This is from The Austin Diagnostic Clinic at http://www.adclinic.com/2012/08/hot-summer-days-challenging-dangerous/#.U5X-ZKROUY0.

By the way, National Public Radio (NPR) has a fascinating blog about the term ‘elderly’ at http://www.npr.org/2013/03/12/174124992/an-age-old-problem-who-is-elderly.  While 65 was the accepted age for elderly here in the USA for quite some time, this is now under debate.  I, however, still envision an elderly person as frail and delicate… something I’m not.

But, again, there was nothing specific to CKDers in the quote above.  In thinking about it, I began to wonder if the risk of dehydration from the summer heat is the problem for us.

According to The National Kidney Fund at http://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/kidneysnottowork.cfm

“Kidneys can become damaged if they are not getting good blood flow. This can happen if you become dehydrated or seriously ill.”

Aha!  This was starting to make sense.  WebMD at http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/tc/dehydration-topic-overview explains this for us.

“Usually your body can reabsorb fluid from your blood and other body tissues. But by the time you become severely dehydrated, you no longer have enough fluid in your body to get blood to your organs, and you may go into shock, which is a life-threatening condition.”ice water

Okay, so we know we need to drink fluids, especially in hot water. Our kidneys are already having a hard time cleaning our blood effectively and we are reabsorbing ineffectively cleaned blood prior to this point of dehydration.

But how do we know if we’re becoming dehydrated? What are the symptoms? I turned to my standby, the Mayo Clinic at http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/dehydration/basics/symptoms/CON-20030056 for the symptoms of mild dehydration:

  • Dry, sticky mouth
  • Sleepiness or tiredness — children are likely to be less active than usual
  • Thirst
  • Decreased urine output
  • No wet diapers for three hours for infants
  • Few or no tears when crying
  • Dry skin
  • Headache
  • Constipation
  • Dizziness or lightheadedness

And then I laughed.  I experience one or more of those symptoms at one time or another.  The clinic does make the extremely helpful point that the color of your urine is a good indicator of dehydration. If it’s clear or light in color, you’re fine.  If it’s dark, start drinking!  Interestingly enough, having CKD is already a risk factor for dehydration so let’s not make it worse for ourselves.

So how do we prevent dehydration?  What can we do if we can see if starting?

Obviously, drinking more fluids will help. I’m limited to 64 ounces in a day, but I get creative in summer. Sometimes, I will have that half cup of ice cream.  Watermelon magically (hah!) appears on the table.  Now that I realize I don’t have to avoid ice, they too will become part of both the anti-dehydration campaign and the anti-dehydration campaign in our house.watermelon

I’m not sure if this is common knowledge, but dehydration can also cause kidney stones.  If you don’t have the fluid in your body to prevent crystallization, crystallization is more apt to happen.  Kidney stones are,

“Stones caused in the urinary tract and kidney when crystals adhere to each other.  Most of those in the kidneys are made of calcium.”

(Love this author’s style).  That’s from What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, p. 133.

Talking about the book, it’s clear that digital outsells print and that in foreign markets, England outsells other countries.  I wonder if it’s the languages.  I’d thought about translations, but how would I be able to edit the texts if I don’t know the languages myself?  I’ve tried online translation, but the results are never quite what I originally wrote in English.

May you stay cool and hydrated.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!Book Cover

March and National Kidney Month are Hare, I Mean Here.

My wake up alarm is the song ‘Good Morning,’ and that’s exactly what this is.  The sun is out, it’s warm but not hot, I’m listening to some good music, and I’m alone in the house for the first time since Bear’s October surgery.  I am thankful that he is driving himself to his doctors’ appointments. That is progress!   desktop

Talking about progress, it’s National Kidney Month and you know what that means… a recap of many of the organizations listed in What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease that may help with your Chronic Kidney Disease.  Ready?  Let’s start.

{I’m only including online addresses since this is on online blog.}

 

American Association of Kidney Patients (AAKP) 

https://www.aakp.org

MARCH IS NATIONAL KIDNEY MONTH (from AAKP’s website)

This is an advocacy group originally started by several dialysis patients in Brooklyn in 1969.  While they are highly involved with legislation, I see their education as the most important aspect of the group for my readers.

“Take some time and browse through our educational resources including our Resource Library that contains past and present published information from the American Association of Kidney Patients. Educate yourself on specific conditions, medicine, lifestyle improvement and get the latest news and information from the renal community.”

kidney-month-2014-v1  The American Kidney Fund

     http://www.kidneyfund.org/

While they work more with end stage Chronic Kidney Disease patients, they also have an education and a get tested program.

“The mission of the American Kidney Fund is to fight kidney disease through direct financial support to patients in need; health education; and prevention efforts.”

National Kidney Disease Education Program

www.nkdep.nih.gov

This is an example of the many videos available on this site.  They are also available in Spanish.

What is chronic kidney disease? Approach 1 A doctor explains what chronic kidney disease (CKD) is and who is most at risk. Learn more about diabetes, high blood pressure, and other kidney disease risk factors. Length 00:53  Category CKD & Risk

One of my favorites for their easily understood explanations and suggestions.  Their mission? “Improving the understanding, detection, and management of kidney disease.”  They succeed.

National Kidney Foundation

www.kidney.org

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s2U2iZQxkqI#t=1 (This is the link to their National Kidney Month Rap with Sidney the Kidney)

I have guest blogged for them several times and been glad to work with them whenever they need me.  The website is thoroughly helpful and easy to navigate. This is what you find if you click on ‘Kidney Disease’ at the top of their home page. What I really like about this site is that it’s totally not intimidating.  Come to think of it, none of them are, but this one feels the best to me.  (I can just hear my friends now, “Oh, there she goes with that spiritual stuff again.”  One word to them: absolutely!) Notice the Ask the Doctor function.

National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC)

www.kidney.niddk.nih.gov  National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Logo.

“Just the facts, ma’am,” said Sergeant Friday on an old television show and that’s what you get here.

This is their mission statement:

The National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC) is a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). The NIDDK is part of the National Institutes of Health of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Established in 1987, the Clearinghouse provides information about diseases of the kidneys and urologic system to people with kidney and urologic disorders and to their families, health care professionals, and the public. The NKUDIC answers inquiries, develops and distributes publications, and works closely with professional and patient organizations and Government agencies to coordinate resources about kidney and urologic diseases.

And let’s not forget

 Renal Support Network

www.rsnhope.org

This was initiated by a Chronic Kidney Disease survivor.  The part I like the best is the Hopeline.  While I have not called myself, I have referred people who were newly diagnosed and, well, freaking out.  I couldn’t tell them what the experience of dialysis is like, but these people can.

Renal Support Network (RSN) is a nonprofit, patient-focused, patient-run organization that provides non-medical services to those affected by chronic kidney disease (CKD)….  Call our Hopeline (800) 579-1970 (toll-free) Monday through Friday from 10am to 6pm (PT) to talk to a Person who has lived kidney disease.

Baxter Healthcare Corporation.

http://www.renalinfo.com/us

“… web site designed and developed to provide information and support to those affected by kidney failure. Renalinfo.com is supported through and educational grant from Baxter Healthcare Ltd, a company that supplies dialysis equipment and services to kidney patients worldwide.

They have all the information a newly diagnosed CKD patient could want and, while funded by a private company, do not allow paid advertisements.  Their site map is proof of just how comprehensive they are.

While many of the other sites offer their information in Spanish as well as English, if you click through the change language function here, you’ll notice there are many languages available.

Rest assured that these are not the only organizations that offer support and education.  Who knows?  We may even decide to continue this next week, although that’s so close to March 13th’s World Kidney Day that we’ll probably blog about that for next week.

I interrupt myself here to give you what I consider an important commercial message.  Remember that game I play about using the money from the book to pay off what I paid to produce the book so I can put more money into donations of the book?  There was a point when sales covered the cost of publishing.  Now they’ve covered the cost of digitalizing the book so it could be sold as an e-book.  Another milestone!  (Now there’s just about $15,000 worth of donations to pay off.)54603_4833997811387_1521243709_o

While I’m at it, I find I cannot recommend Medical Surgical Nursing: Critical Thinking for Collaborative Care, 4th Ed. but only because it was published in 2002.  The world of nephrology has changed quite a bit since then and continues to change daily. While I enjoyed the information, I’m simply not convinced it’s still applicable.

For those of you who are newly diagnosed, I sincerely wish these websites give you a starting point so you don’t feel so alone. (I’m sorry the book isn’t interactive.)

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Book It!

With the holidays over and more time to think about what I’d like to write, I decided this would be a good time to update you about whatever other books are available that also concern Chronic Kidney Disease.

You know there are many out there, too many to mention here, so I eliminated any book that couldn’t be understood by a lay person (those without specific training in a certain field – in this case, medical) and renal diet books.  You can easily find those for yourself by going to Amazon.com and B&N.com. I also excluded those I found to be dubious… the spelling errors were a dead give-away that these were not professional.

I’m not going to tell you about What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease since you already know about it from this blog.  Let’s change that, I will tell you one or two things.  First, the books included in ‘Additional Resources’ (Chapter 13) won’t appear here, as good as they are.Book Cover

And – pay attention – students, be aware that both Campus Book Rentals and Chegg are attempting to rent the book to you for more than it costs to buy it.  The digital edition – when I was teaching college, my students always seemed to prefer the digital edition – is even less expensive.

Don’t forget about The KindleMatchBook program which allows you to buy the digital version at 70% discount if you’ve ever bought the print copy. Gather your classmates: pool your money so you can save. One of you buy the print edition, then the others can get the digital edition at deep discount (I have no idea why, but I love that phrase).

Disclaimer:  I am not a doctor, have never have claimed to be one , AND am not endorsing the following books, simply letting you know they exist. For the most part, the descriptions were written by the author. The ‘Look Inside!’ function only works if you follow the link to Amazon.com – sorry! I have been dreaming about this list, so let’s get it out of my dreams and on the blog:

510smylYevL._SL160_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-dp,TopRight,12,-18_SH30_OU01_AA160_Ford, Mathea A., RD (Registered Dietician) Kidney Disease: Common Labs and Medical Terminology: The Patient’s Perspective (Renal Diet HQ IQ Pre-Dialysis Living) (Volume 4)

New to kidney failure? Have no idea what your physician just said about your kidneys? Kidney disease labs and terminology can quite often be a challenge to understand and digest. Did your doctor use the “stages of kidney disease”? Did you physician refer to “eGFR”? What does all this mean for your health and future with kidney disease, lifestyle and nutrition choices. This book is the basic platform for understanding all the common labs and terminology that your doctors and nurses will use. This book with give you and your caregivers the confidence to manage your condition knowing that you have an understanding of all the ins and outs of the nephrology jargon. (Mrs. Mathea seems to have an entire series of books about CKD.)

Hunt, Walter A. Kidney Disease: A Guide for Living. 

When Hunt learned he had kidney disease, he was overwhelmed by the prospect of facing kidney failure. He had so many questions: Why are my kidneys failing? Is there anything I can do to save them? How will I know when my kidneys have failed? What will it feel like? 41nNk5SdqIL._AA160_What treatments are available for me? Is there a cure for kidney failure? The good news, as Hunt found out, is that kidney failure is highly treatable. People with the disease can lead full and productive lives, and Hunt’s readable and empathetic book will help them do just that. It discusses the latest scientific and medical findings about kidney disease, including what kidneys do; the underlying diseases that cause failure; diagnosis, treatment, and prevention; dietary factors; clinical trials; and the future direction of research on kidney failure. Kidney disease is difficult, but as Hunt’s narrative reveals, people living with it can take control of their health and their future. By understanding kidney failure — what causes it, how it may affect their lives, and what treatment options they have — people with the disease can improve their quality of life and achieve the best possible outcome.

51nUIkG8kSL._AA160_Lewis, Dr. Robert. Understanding Chronic Kidney Disease: A guide for the Non-Specialist.

This is meant for primary care physicians, but can be easily understood by the layman. I looked under the covers of this one and was delighted to see that the information we, as patients with CKD, need to know is also what our primary care physicians need to know. (I wrote this description.)

National Kidney Foundation of Southern California. Living Well With Kidney Disease.

The first edition of “Living Well With Kidney Disease” was developed and published by the National Kidney Foundation of Southern California. Based on the handbook “When Your Kidneys Fail” (originally published in 1982), this new and 41jxZoYLGzL._AA160_updated edition provides detailed information specifically intended for people coping with Kidney Disease and other renal failure, as well as their friends and families. The question and answer format provides a clear and manageable guide for those seeking support and answers. Among the topics covered are the principles of kidney function, methods of treatment, transplantation, and financial resources available to patients. With all of the ramifications of kidney failure and the rise of Chronic Kidney Disease and Type 2 Diabetes, there is a growing population of people afflicted with kidney failure. Although it was written with the patient in mind, family members, friends and health care professionals will also find this handbook a valuable resource.

517GaXFXNPL._SL160_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-dp,TopRight,12,-18_SH30_OU01_AA160_Synder, Rich DO (Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine) What You Must Know About Kidney Disease: A Practical Guide to Using Conventional and Complementary Treatments

The book is divided into three parts. Part One provides an overview of the kidneys’ structure and function, as well as common kidney disorders. It also guides you in asking your doctor questions that will help you better understand both status and prognosis. Part Two examines kidney problems and their conventional treatments. Part Three provides an in depth look at the most effective complementary treatments, from lifestyle changes to alternative healing methods. The diagnosis of kidney disease is the first step of an unexpected journey.

*Yes, this is the same Dr. Rich Snyder who interviewed me on his radio show twice since What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease was published.

It’s always hard to find good books about CKD that non-medical personnel can understand.  I hope this four (and mine!) help you feel more comfortable and knowledgeable about your diagnosis.

Here’s a little hint about your own health.  I’m back to no sweets or desserts and, I hate to admit it, but I’m feeling better.  Don’t you just hate when that happens?sugar

Until next week (when I’ll in in Culver City for a weekend of Landmark),

Keep living your life!

Let The Sun Shine…

Here we are in lovely, warm, sunny Florida.  But you just left lovely, warm, sunny Arizona, you may say and you’d be right.  We’re here to see family and friends, one of whom is over 65 and has dropped over 60 pounds via exercise and diet.  Jo is my inspiration!

I’ve wanted Bear to meet my brothers for a bunch of years now. This is an opportunity for him to meet one of them, Paul Peck, and his gracious wife, Judy.  Come to think of it, I haven’t seen them since Abby’s college graduation.

Then there’s my New York cousin, Nina Peck and her partner, Sandra, who just happened (ha ha) to move five minutes away from my brother.  That’s another one I haven’t seen in a bunch of years.

Of course, I get to bring the book to Florida, too.  Some of the medical departments of the colleges there are following me on Twitter, but I don’t think any clinics or private sector doctors are.  Good, another way for me to spread the word. The Table

Oh, right, hot weather and CKD. The rules for CKD patients in potentially hot weather are the same anywhere in the world.

According to Dr. Leslie Spry, a National Kidney Foundation spokesperson, “Heat illness occurs when body temperature exceeds a person’s ability to dissipate that heat and is commonly diagnosed when the body temperature approaches 104 degrees Fahrenheit and when humidity is greater than 70 percent. Once the humidity is that high, sweating becomes less effective at dispersing body heat, and the core body temperature begins to rise.” The entire article is at: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leslie-spry-md-facp/heat-illness_b_1727995.html

We don’t worry about humidity in Arizona, but this is Florida.  No disrespect meant, but I clearly remembering telling my mother, Belle Peckolick, that Florida felt like taking a shower and not drying off.  She was living there at the time and just laughed.  She’d been a New Yorker, so the humidity was a higher dose of what she was used to.

Now’s the time to wear the hat you (meaning I) bought for just that purpose, but forgot was in the trunk of the car.  Otherwise, melanoma just might be a possible drawback of a day in the sun.  Melanoma.com tells us,

“Melanoma is the most serious type of skin cancer. It begins in skin cells called melanocytes. Though melanoma is predominantly found on the skin, it can even occur in the eye (uveal melanoma).

Melanocytes are the cells that make melanin, which gives skin its color. Melanin also protects the deeper layers of the skin from the sun’s harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays.

melanomaWhen people spend time in the sunlight, the melanocytes make more melanin and cause the skin to tan. This also happens when skin is exposed to other forms of ultraviolet light (such as in a tanning booth). If the skin receives too much ultraviolet light, the melanocytes may begin to grow abnormally and become cancerous.”

You are not only heating up your body by being out in hot weather, but exposing yourself to the sun’s ultraviolet light. Use that hat to shade some of your body.

DaVita reminds us to use sunscreen with at least 15 spf.  Don’t forget if you’re swimming – which this aqua-phobe won’t be although I’m looking forward to walking on the beach – you need to slather more on after each dip. You can read more of their hot weather tips, some for dialysis patients, at http://www.davita.com/kidney-disease/overview/living-with-ckd/seven-summertime-precautions-for-people-with-kidney-disease/e/4894

You know you need to drink water during hot weather, but is there a difference among waters?  Yes, there is.  As a CKD patient, your fluid intake is probably restricted (mine is 64 oz. which includes coffee, tea, juice, ice cream, sherbet, and Jell-O.  You get the picture: anything liquid or liquid in a frozen or jelled form.)

Mary Ellen Herndon, a renal nutritionist warns us, “Many drinks labeled as water are loaded with sugar and empty calories. Even though these drinks have ‘water’ in their name, drinking them regularly may cause weight gain and may increase your risk of obesity.”  For the rest of the article, go to http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2012/08/6-tips-choosing-water-drink.html?utm_medium=twitter&utm_source=twitterfeed

According to WebMD at http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/chronic-kidney-disease-home-treatment, we also need to be careful about exercising during the hot weather.  I don’t mean stop, simply make certain you are not becoming dehydrated.  Stay away from energy drinks!  As an older adult, I’ve become aware that I can dehydrate more easily when I exercise – especially since my kidneys are not working at top capacity.

Don’t be intimidated by the sun.  We can benefit from the sun if we’re cautious about it. Fifteen minutes or so a day of sunshine can elevate your vitamin D naturally.  Wearing a shirt to cover some of your body can help you protect yourself from the ultraviolet rays while you’re indulging in some free vitamin D production.

Be sure to protect your eyes, too.  This is a direct quote from the DaVita site mentioned above: “Sunglasses protect your eyes in the same way that sunscreen protects your skin from harmful sun damage. Your sunglasses should block at least 99% of UVB rays and 50% of UVA rays. Wraparound sunglasses and other styles that completely cover the eyes are best.” This information is good for anyone, chronic kidney disease sufferer or not.wraparound sunglasses

Excuse me while I see if I can interest any of my friends or family into visiting Epcot with  me.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Triple Digit Temperature Warning

Yesterday was our first triple digit day this year in sunny Arizona.  It was also the day I decided to test drive cars in the middle of the afternoon.  Not smart.  The heat got me so badly that I couldn’t even blog.  And I got to thinking about what this kind of heat does to the kidneys. I found the following article, e-published last summer online.  It explained quite a bit to me.
 

Heat-induced kidney ailments see 40% rise

Published: Tuesday, Jun 1, 2010, 15:41 IST
By Priya Adhyaru-Majithia | Place: Ahmedabad | Agency: DNA

 

 

Adversity is known to hit the down-trodden the most, but this summer, with its scorching sun and long list of heat-induced ailments, has spared no one. The latest development, say docs, is a massive increase in kidney failure and other kidney ailments, all caused by the heat.

A whopping 40% rise was noted in cases of kidney ailments in private hospitals, while government hospitals pegged the rise at 25%. Dr HL Trivedi of the Institute of Kidney Diseases and Research Centre (IKDRC) said, “There has been a manifold rise in cases of heat-induced temporary kidney failures this month. Rapid water loss causes the kidney’s functioning to slow down, resulting in temporary or permanent kidney failure.”

IKDRC confirmed about 25% rise in the number of cases this month. Priyadarshini Shah from IKDRC-ITS, said, “We usually get about 150 dialysis cases every day.However, a jump of about 25% has been noted this month.” And this figure does not include more than half of the total heat-induced temporary kidney ailment cases that are corrected either with oral medication or intravenous treatments.

Extreme heat causes rapid water loss, resulting in acute electrolyte imbalance. The kidney, unable to cope with the water loss, fails to flush out the requisite amount of Creatinine and other toxins from the body. Coupled with a lack of consistent water intake, this brings about permanent or temporary kidney failure, explain experts.

Dr Shailesh Shah, a urologist with Kidneyline hospital, said, “Due to heatstroke and water imbalance, an increase of about 20% has been noted in cases referred for dialysis, and of about 40% in heat-induced temporary kidney failure requiring intensive care.” Complaints of kidney blockage due to stones and bleeding while passing urine, have also registered a rapid rise, informed Shah.

Commenting on this sudden increase, Dr. Himanshu Patel, a nephrologist, said, “The heat has also caused cases of Myoglobinuria – the presence of myoglobin in the urine, usually associated with muscle destruction, to increase.”

Experts explain that symptoms of chronic kidney ailments and heat-induced kidney problems are different. Dr. Pranjal Modi, a kidney specialist, said, “Without adequate water intake, kidneys cannot function. Excessive perspiration and faster water loss due to exposure to the heat can cause diarrhoea, nausea and electrolyte imbalance, which often results in heat-induced kidney ailments. Here, a basic symptom of chronic kidney failure i.e. swelling, is not present.” 

 

The article can be viewed directly at:  http://www.dnaindia.com/health/report_heat-induced-kidney-ailments-see-40pct-rise_1390589 and is from “Daily News & Analysis.”
 
While this is not India, there are still parts of the country that will experience extreme heat so be careful to avoid it as much as possible by staying in air conditioning, out of direct sunlight and being sure to drink your 64 ounces each day.  Although heat induced kidney failure and CKD are not the same, both require that you drink  enough water.  To quote Dr. Modi from the article, “Without adequate water intake, kidneys cannot function.”
 
Enjoy your weekend, stay out of the sun, keep drinking and until Tuesday,
Keep living your life.
Published in: on May 14, 2011 at 10:30 am  Leave a Comment