Baby, It’s Cold Outside. I Mean Inside.

As a diabetic, I have my feet checked and my toenails cut every nine weeks. When I was at my podiatrist’s recently, we both made mention of my slightly blue skin at the same time. I thought it was just thin skin showing the veins underneath. That’s when she mentioned a syndrome I’d heard of many times, but had never explored: Raynaud’s Syndrome, named after the Frenchman who discovered it. 

Hmmm, I wondered. Could this be related to Chronic Kidney Disease? So, of course, I looked for answers to my questions. Let’s get the basics down first… like what is it? 

Circulation Foundation at http://bit.ly/37yxSy4 answers that question.  

“Raynaud’s is a common condition where the blood supply to the extremities is interrupted or reduced. This usually affects the fingers and toes, but occasionally the nose or ears. 

Attacks are usually provoked by cold or a sudden change in temperature. During an attack the affected body part first becomes white, then turns blue as the tissues use up the oxygen and finally bright red as the arteries relax and fresh blood rushes in. 

Raynaud’s can vary in form, from very mild to severe cases – which can require treatment. 

Anyone of any age can suffer from Raynaud’s, but younger women are affected more commonly. It seems to be a change in temperature, rather than just exposure to cold that precipitates an attack, so although worse in winter, it can occur in summer too. 

Stress or anxiety can also provoke a Raynaud’s attack. Some cases of Raynaud’s are associated with some other diseases (called secondary Raynaud’s).” 

Uh, secondary Raynaud’s? What’s that? Back to the drawing board or, in this case, the researching mode. Let’s try WebMD. Bingo! 

“Secondary Raynaud’s (Raynaud’s syndrome, Raynaud’s phenomenon) happens as a result of another illness. It’s often a condition that attacks your body’s connective tissues, like lupus or rheumatoid arthritis. It’s less common, but it’s more likely to cause serious health problems. This can include things like skin sores and gangrene. These happen when cells and tissue in your extremities die from lack of blood.” 

Then, according to WebMD at http://wb.md/3h3fznI, IF I have Raynaud’s, it’s probably secondary Raynaud’s. But what about the terms Raynaud’s syndrome and Raynaud’s phenomenon in the quote above? Are they interchangeable? 

Hello, my favorite dictionary. The Merriam-Webster Medical Dictionary at http://wb.md/3h3fznI tells us that Raynaud’s phenomenon is the same as Raynaud’s syndrome: 

“the symptoms associated with Raynaud’s disease 

— called also Raynaud’s syndrome” 

Of course, that brings up another question. Symptoms are mentioned in the definition. What are the symptoms of Secondary Raynaud’s? I’ll bet the Mayo Clinic at http://mayocl.in/3pn9fur can help us out here. 

“Cold fingers or toes 

Color changes in your skin in response to cold or stress 

Numb, prickly feeling or stinging pain upon warming or stress relief 

During an attack of Raynaud’s, affected areas of your skin usually first turn white. Then, they often turn blue and feel cold and numb. As you warm and your circulation improves, the affected areas may turn red, throb, tingle or swell. 

Although Raynaud’s most commonly affects your fingers and toes, it can also affect other areas of your body, such as your nose, lips, ears and even nipples. After you warm up, the return of normal blood flow to the area can take 15 minutes.” 

I should mention here that severe cases of Secondary Raynaud’s are rare. Also, I can honestly say that I have each of these symptoms at times. As far as the cold, I figured it was just anemia. Wrong. 

We know what Secondary Raynaud’s is, what the symptoms are, and that it need not be serious, but how do you treat it? 

Wait, wait, wait. I just found this from the Merck Manual, Consumer Edition at http://bit.ly/38oZwwr

“Raynaud syndrome, a functional peripheral arterial disease, is a condition in which small arteries (arterioles), usually in the fingers or toes, narrow (constrict) more tightly than normal in response to exposure to cold.” 

It’s a PAD? Oh, excuse me, that means “peripheral arterial disease,” as mentioned above. Let’s get a definition. Back to the Merriam Webster Medical Dictionary. This time at http://bit.ly/37CdR9P:  

“damage to or dysfunction of the arteries outside the heart resulting in reduced blood flow” 

Hmmm, the podiatrist did mention spasms in the arteries at the extreme ends of my body, meaning my fingers and toes. This is all starting to make sense now. 

But we were going to see what we could find out about treatment before I made the PAD discovery. Let’s go back to that.  MedicalNewsToday at https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/176713 had quite a bit of information: 

“There is no cure for Raynaud’s disease, but there are ways to manage symptoms. 

For mild forms of Raynaud’s disease, covering exposed skin before leaving the house can help. If an attack occurs, soaking the affected parts in warm, not hot, water can alleviate symptoms and prevent them from worsening. 

If stress is a factor, learning to manage stress can help. 

For moderate to severe cases, medication may be necessary. 

Alpha-1 blockers can counter the effect of norepinephrine, which constricts blood vessels. Examples include doxazosin and prazosin. 

Dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers relax the smaller blood vessels of the hands and feet. Examples include amlodipine, nifedipine, and felodipine. 

Topical nitroglycerin ointment applied to the affected area appears to relieve the symptoms by improving blood flow and cardiac output and decreasing blood pressure. 

Other vasodilators dilate the veins, easing symptoms. Examples include losartan, sildenafil (Viagra), fluoxetine (Prozac), and prostaglandin.” 

They also talk about surgery and/or chemical injections for severe cases. 

The funny thing is I live in Arizona. We have winter… sort of, but nothing drastic like snow and ice. I also take losartan for high blood pressure and to protect my kidneys. As for stress, that is present now with me just recovered from the double hernia surgery, my bother in a health care facility for Parkinson’s dementia, my husband’s Alzheimer’s and someone extremely close to my children in ICU with Covid-19 and other illnesses. (Reading this, I wonder why I’m not depressed!) 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! 

They’re No Laughing Matter

I may have mentioned a time or two (or ten) that I was recently hospitalized again. This time it was for an abdominal incision hernia. Usually, this is outpatient surgery. However, the surgeon who made the original abdominal incision wanted to take no chances and arranged for me to stay in the hospital overnight. And that turned into five nights since he discovered another hernia under the one he’d expected to repair and then I kept running fevers. 

You probably know that you’re expected to start walking the day of (or the day after) surgery these days. It hastens your recovery. So, I walked the halls with the aid of a nurse and a walker, which fast became annoying although necessary (the walker, not the nurse). Apparently, I didn’t walk enough since for the time in her life, this 73 year developed bed sores.   

Photo by tegh 93 on Pexels.com

Bedsores? Certainly, that’s nothing to be ashamed of. Right? But there was that teeny little kernel of shame, as if I’d done something wrong and was being punished. Did it have to do with Chronic Kidney Disease? Why didn’t this happen during my other hospitalizations this last year? Of had I been just too out of it to realize I had bedsores during those hospitalizations?  

Come along with me as I figure this out. First of all, what are bedsores? The first thing I learned from my all-time favorite dictionary, The Merriam-Webster, at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bedsores is that it’s one compound word, not two separate words as I’d always believed. Here’s their definition: 

“an ulceration of tissue deprived of adequate blood supply by prolonged pressure 

— called also decubitus ulcer” 

Wait a minute. What’s an ulcer? According to the same dictionary, but this time at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ulcer

“a break in skin or mucous membrane with loss of surface tissue, disintegration and necrosis of epithelial tissue, and often pus” 

Okay, got it. Anyone know what “decubitus” means? I don’t. Back to the dictionary, guys. Well, will you look at that? The joke’s on us. That means “bedsore.” No kidding. Check it out for yourself at  https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/decubitus.  

Now that we know what a bedsore is, let’s see if it has anything to do with CKD. Just keep in mind that diabetes is the foremost cause of CKD. This is from Beacon Health System at https://www.beaconhealthsystem.org/library/diseases-and-conditions/bedsores-pressure-ulcers/ , 

“Medical conditions affecting blood flow. Health problems that can affect blood flow, such as diabetes and vascular disease, can increase the risk of tissue damage such as bedsores.” 

Uh-oh, Type 2 diabetic here. 

Did you know there are stages of bedsores? I didn’t, but emedicine at  

https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/190115-overview educated me: 

” Stage 1 pressure injury – Nonblanchable erythema [Gail here: that means reddening.] of intact skin 

Stage 2 pressure injury – Partial-thickness skin loss with exposed dermis 

Stage 3 pressure injury – Full-thickness skin loss 

Stage 4 pressure injury – Full-thickness skin and tissue loss 

Unstageable pressure injury – Obscured full-thickness skin and tissue loss 

Deep pressure injury – Persistent nonblanchable deep red, maroon or purple discoloration” 

We know that dermis is skin, but “nonblanchable”? We can figure this out. If you remember your high school French, you know that ‘blanch’ means white. Add ‘non’ and we get ‘not white.’ That’s what nonblachable means; your skin does not turn white if you press on it.  

Wow! Lots of new information today. Okay, so how do you know if you have a bedsore? For me, it was the pain. I didn’t even have to look. 

The Mayo Clinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/bed-sores/symptoms-causes/syc-20355893 tells us other symptoms: 

“Unusual changes in skin color or texture 

Swelling 

Pus-like draining 

An area of skin that feels cooler or warmer to the touch than other areas 

Tender areas” 

Come to think of it, the area in question was swollen, tender, and unusually warm. 

Now what? We know what bedsores are, what they have to do with CKD, that they are staged, and what the symptoms are. Ah, of course. What do you do once you have them? 

I was fortunate to come upon Johns Hopkins Medicine at https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/bedsores for the answer to my question. 

  • “Removing pressure on the affected area 
  • Protecting the wound with medicated gauze or other special dressings 
  • Keeping the wound clean 
  • Ensuring good nutrition 
  • Removing the damaged, infected, or dead tissue (debridement) 
  • Transplanting healthy skin to the wound area (skin grafts) 
  • Negative pressure wound therapy 
  • Medicine (such as antibiotics to treat infections)” 

I’m thankful that removing the pressure on the affected area and a local antibiotic were all I needed. However, those were uncomfortable days for me and I’d like to avoid going through them again. 

Here’s what I should have been doing in the hospital according to Victoria State Government’s Better Health Channel (Canada),  

“Skin care in hospital 

During a stay in hospital, your skin may be affected by the hospital environment, staying in bed or sitting in one position for too long, whether you are eating and drinking enough and your physical condition. Ask hospital staff to regularly check your skin, particularly if you feel any pain. 

There are some things that you can do to look after your skin, including: 

Keep your skin clean and dry.  

Avoid any products that dry out your skin. This includes many soaps, body washes and talcum powder. Ask for skin cleansers that are non-drying. Ask nursing staff or your pharmacist to give you options. 

Use a water-based moisturiser daily. Be careful of bony areas and don’t rub or massage them. Ask staff for help if you need it. 

Check your skin every day or ask for help if you are concerned. Let a doctor or nurse know if there are any changes in your skin, especially redness, swelling or soreness. 

If you are at risk of pressure sores, a nurse will change your position often, including during the night. 

Always use any devices given to you to protect your skin from tearing and pressure sores. These may include protective mattresses, seat cushions, heel wedges and limb protectors.  

Drink plenty of water (unless the doctor has told you not to). 

Eat regular main meals and snacks. Sit out of bed to eat if you can. 

Try to maintain your regular toilet routine.  

If you have a wound, a plan will be developed with you and your family or carers before you leave hospital. It will tell you how to dress and care for the wound.”  

And here I’d been priding myself on sitting the chair from day one. I should have changing my position in that chair more often. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! 

Keep It Where It Belongs 

You’ve all read about my cancer dance in one blog or another. Thank goodness, that’s over. But there are residual effects like hand and foot neuropathy, chemo brain (akin to CKD’s brain fog), and – to my great surprise – abdominal incisional hernia after surgery. How did that happen, I wondered.

Get ready for this: those with Chronic Kidney Disease have a 12.8% higher incidence of abdominal incisional hernia according to a PubMed 2013 study published on ResearchGate’s site available at https://bit.ly/3kdvxfl,

“Chronic kidney disease is associated with impaired wound healing and constitutes an independent risk factor for incisional hernia development.”

(The percentage of abdominal incisional hernia among CKD patients was taken from the cohort in this abstract.)

According to the same study:

“Elevated uremia toxins may inhibit granulation tissue formation and impair wound healing, thereby promoting incisional hernia development.”

As Chronic Kidney Disease patients, we know the accumulation of uremia toxins as uremia. On to my favorite dictionary, the Merriam-Webster at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/uremia for a definition of uremia:

“1: accumulation in the blood of constituents normally eliminated in the urine that produces a severe toxic condition and usually occurs in severe kidney disease

2: the toxic bodily condition associated with uremia”

It gets worse. First, you have to know that I am considered ‘elderly,’ another surprise.  According to The World Health Organization at https://bit.ly/32sQq05:

“Most developed world countries have accepted the chronological age of 65 years as a definition of ‘elderly’ or older person….”

I’m 73 and here’s why you needed this information that I am of advancing age.

“The risk factors for incisional hernia following abdominal surgery include (ranked by relative risk):

Emergency surgery

Emergency surgery carries double the risk of elective surgery.

Wound type

BMI >25

Obese patients are more likely to develop an incisional hernia

Midline incision

There is a 74% risk increase compared to non-midline

Wound infection

This increases incisional hernia risk by 68%.

Pre-operative chemotherapy

Intra-operative blood transfusion

Advancing age

Pregnancy

Other less common risk factors include chronic cough, diabetes mellitus, steroid therapy, smoking, and connective tissue disease.”

Thank you TeachMeSurgery at https://bit.ly/2GYrOUH for this risk factor information.

I have so many risks factors. Foremost for me, of course, is Chronic Kidney Disease as demonstrated earlier in this blog, but also advancing age. Oh no, we’ll have to add obesity since my oncologist just told me my BMI is higher than 25 and must be lowered in order to keep the possibility of cancer reoccurrence to a minimum.  Then there’s midline incision. My scar runs down the middle of my front from the breasts to below the belly button. Oh, and let’s not forget pre-operative chemotherapy. I had plenty of that. Then there’s intra-operative blood transfusion… to the tune of six for me. I almost forgot to include diabetes mellitus. Hmm, I do believe I had steroid therapy during my chemotherapy treatments, too.

Now what? The hernia is right there, visibly noticeable along the scar line and I understand all the possible reasons it’s there. We all know I have to do something about it, but why? Healthline at https://www.healthline.com/health/hernia#complications answers that question for us.

“Sometimes an untreated hernia can lead to potentially serious complications. Your hernia may grow and cause more symptoms. It may also put too much pressure on nearby tissues, which can cause swelling and pain in the surrounding area.

A portion of your intestine could also become trapped in the abdominal wall. This is called incarceration. Incarceration can obstruct your bowel and cause severe pain, nausea, or constipation.

If the trapped section of your intestines doesn’t get enough blood flow, strangulation occurs. This can cause the intestinal tissue to become infected or die. A strangulated hernia is life-threatening and requires immediate medical care.”

Uh-oh. What can I do? My oncologist suggested a wait and see approach with a twist. I’m now wearing something similar to the belly band that pregnant women wear. The differences are that this is worn around my body to cover the hernia and is very tight in an attempt to have the hernia heal itself. Will this work? That remains to be seen.

What if it doesn’t? Well, there’s always surgery. The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) at https://bit.ly/3hsFHae tells us,

“The treatment options for incisional hernias are open surgery or minimally invasive surgery. Minimally invasive surgery is also called ‘keyhole surgery,’ or ‘laparoscopic’ surgery if it is performed on the abdomen.”

Wait a minute, laparoscopic surgery. What’s that? Let’s go to MedlinePlus to see what we can find out. This explanation was at https://bit.ly/2RmkS5R.

“Laparoscopic surgery is a surgical technique in which short, narrow tubes (trochars) are inserted into the abdomen through small (less than one centimeter) incisions. Through these trochars, long, narrow instruments are inserted. The surgeon uses these instruments to manipulate, cut, and sew tissue.”

That does seem less invasive, but it’s still surgery. Let’s take a look at recovery time for laparoscopic surgery vs. open surgery. Open surgery is just what it sounds like: you’re cut open.

“When the surgeons are equally skilled and a procedure is available as both an open procedure and a minimally invasive one, the minimally invasive technique almost always offers a lower risk of infection, shorter recovery times and equally successful outcomes.”

Mind you, sometimes keyhole or laparoscopic surgery is not a choice since the surgeon needs to work on a larger area. For example, I had open cancer surgery since not only the tumor, but also my gall bladder and spleen, needed to be removed. Sometimes, what starts out as minimally invasive surgery becomes open surgery when the surgeons run into a problem or realize they need to work on a larger internal area than they’d originally thought.

I still find it amazing how connected all parts of our body are… like Chronic Kidney Disease adding to affecting a scar to the point that a hernia develops.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!