“klot” + “id” 

No, that’s not the result of misplacing my fingers on the keyboard. According to https://youglish.com/pronounce/clotted/english, this is the correct two syllable pronunciation of the word clotted. My all-time favorite dictionary, the Merriam-Webster, at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/clotted defines the adjective (word describing a noun) clotted as:

“1: a portion of a substance adhering together in a thick nondescript mass (as of clay or gum)

2 a: a roundish viscous lump formed by coagulation of a portion of liquid or by melting

b: a coagulated mass produced by clotting of blood”

You’re right – it’s the second definition we’ll be dealing with today. Why? A long-time reader was telling me about his blood clot when I suddenly realized I had no idea if there were any connection at all between Chronic Kidney Disease and blood clots.

As it turns out, there is.  The following is from the National Kidney Foundation at https://www.kidney.org/sites/default/files/Blood_Clots_And_CKD_2018.pdf:

“CKD may put you at higher risk for VTE. The reasons for this are not well understood. The connection may depend on what caused your CKD and how much kidney damage you have. No matter the reason, CKD may make it easier for your body to form blood clots. The risk for VTE is seen more often in people with nephrotic syndrome (a kidney problem that causes swelling, usually of the ankles, a high level of protein in the urine, and a low level of a protein called albumin in the blood).”

I have a question already. What is VTE? I found World Thrombosis Day’s explanation at www.worldthrombosisday.org › issue › vte the most helpful.

“Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a condition in which a blood clot forms most often in the deep veins of the leg, groin or arm (known as deep vein thrombosis, DVT) and travels in the circulation, lodging in the lungs (known as pulmonary embolism, PE).”

How could I have CKD for over a dozen years and not know this? Many thanks to my reader and online friend for bringing it up. 

Well, it’s back to the beginning for us. How is VTE diagnosed? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) at www.cdc.gov › ncbddd › dvt › diagnosis-treatment was helpful here.

“Duplex ultrasonography is an imaging test that uses sound waves to look at the flow of blood in the veins. It can detect blockages or blood clots in the deep veins. It is the standard imaging test to diagnose DVT. A D-dimer blood test measures a substance in the blood that is released when a clot breaks up.”

Let’s take a closer look at the D-dimer blood test. That’s another new one for me. My old standby, MedlinePlus (This time at https://medlineplus.gov/lab-tests/d-dimer-test/.) offered the following which more than satisfactorily answered my question.

“A D-dimer test looks for D-dimer in blood. D-dimer is a protein fragment (small piece) that’s made when a blood clot dissolves in your body.

Blood clotting is an important process that prevents you from losing too much blood when you are injured. Normally, your body will dissolve the clot once your injury has healed. With a blood clotting disorder, clots can form when you don’t have an obvious injury or don’t dissolve when they should. These conditions can be very serious and even life-threatening. A D-dimer test can show if you have one of these conditions.”

By the way, MedlinePlus is part of the U.S. National Library of Medicine which, in turn, is part of the National Institutes of Health.

This brings me to another question. How would you or your doctor even know you may need this test?

“According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about half of people with DVT don’t have symptoms. Any symptoms that do occur will be in the affected leg or the area where the clot is found. Symptoms can include:

pain

redness of the skin

warmth of the skin

swelling of the area

If the clot moves into the lungs and you develop PE, you may have symptoms such as:

chest pain, which may get worse when you breathe deeply or cough

coughing

coughing up blood

dizziness or even fainting

rapid shallow breathing, or tachypnea

rapid heartbeat

irregular heartbeat

shortness of breath”

Thank you to Healthline at https://www.healthline.com/health/dvt-vs-pulmonary-embolism for the above information.

Now we know what VTE is, what symptoms you may experience, and the test to take to confirm that you do, indeed, have VTE. You know what comes next. How do we treat VTE once it’s confirmed?

These are some, but not all, of the treatments that may be recommended. I discovered them on WebMD’s site at https://www.webmd.com/dvt/what-is-venous-thromboembolism.

“Blood thinners. These drugs don’t break up the clot, but they can stop it from getting bigger so your body has time to break it down on its own. They include heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, apixaban (Eliquis), edoxaban (Savaysa), rivaroxaban (Xarelto), and warfarin (Coumadin).

Clot-busting drugs. These medicines are injections that can break up your clot. They include drugs like tPA (tissue plasminogen activator).

Surgery. In some cases, your doctor may need to put a special filter into a vein, which can stop any future clots from getting to your lungs. Sometimes, people need surgery to remove a clot.

Even after you recover from a VTE and you’re out of the hospital, you’ll probably still need treatment with blood thinners for at least 3 months. That’s because your chances of having another VTE will be higher for a while.”

I’m still wondering how to avoid VTE. This is what The National Blood Clot Alliance at https://www.stoptheclot.org/learn_more/prevention_of_thrombosis/ suggested:

“Ask your doctor about need for ‘blood thinners’ or compression stockings to prevent clots, whenever you go to the hospital

Lose weight, if you are overweight

Stay active

Exercise regularly; walking is fine

Avoid long periods of staying still

Get up and move around at least every hour whenever you travel on a plane, train, or bus, particularly if the trip is longer than 4 hours

Do heel toe exercises or circle your feet if you cannot move around

Stop at least every two hours when you drive, and get out and move around

Drink a lot of water and wear loose fitted clothing when you travel

Talk to your doctor about your risk of clotting whenever you take hormones, whether for birth control or replacement therapy, or during and right after any pregnancy

Follow any self-care measures to keep heart failure, diabetes, or any other health issues as stable as possible”

And we have yet another reason to be extra cautious if you have CKD.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

 

Saving Lives

Last week, I promised to write about COVID-19 and Chronic Kidney Disease for today’s blog. This topic has touched me personally since one of my daughters was sent to the hospital when it was suspected she’d contacted the virus. Without the COVID-19 test, we still don’t know if she has the virus. We do know she still has the cough. Luckily, an x-ray proved her lungs were clear, so she was sent home with a Z-pack and orders to take Tylenol. No, she doesn’t have CKD, but her treatment at the hospital left me with a lot of questions for those of us who do.

Once again, I’m rushing headlong into the topic. Let’s slow down and start at the beginning. Why is it called COVID-19 anyway? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/faq.html,

“On February 11, 2020 the World Health Organization announced an official name for the disease that is causing the 2019 novel coronavirus outbreak, first identified in Wuhan China. The new name of this disease is coronavirus disease 2019, abbreviated as COVID-19. In COVID-19, ‘CO’ stands for ‘corona,’ ‘VI’ for ‘virus,’ and ‘D’ for disease. Formerly, this disease was referred to as ‘2019 novel coronavirus’ or ‘2019-nCoV.’”

There are many types of human coronaviruses including some that commonly cause mild upper-respiratory tract illnesses. COVID-19 is a new disease, caused be [sic] a novel (or new) coronavirus that has not previously been seen in humans. The name of this disease was selected following the World Health Organization (WHO) best practice for naming of new human infectious diseases.”

I don’t know about you, but I want to know about corona viruses. How did they get that name? So I went to Dictionary.com at https://www.dictionary.com/browse/coronavirus where I hoped to find that information. This is what was there.

“any of various RNA-containing spherical viruses of the family Coronaviridae, including several that cause acute respiratory illnesses.”

To be honest, all I understood was that it “causes acute respiratory illnesses.” Like my daughter’s coughing. But why would she be given a Z-pack for that? Healthcare-Online at www.healthcare-online.org/What-Is-A-Z-Pack.html confirmed my belief that antibiotics are for bacterial infections, not viral ones. Curiouser and curiouser.

Drugs.com at https://www.drugs.com/medical-answers/antibiotics-kill-coronavirus-3534867/ had the answer.

“The World Health Organization (WHO) is very clear that antibiotics do not work against viruses, only bacteria, and yet health care providers are using antibiotics in some patients with COVID-19. This is because:

  • Patients with viral pneumonia can develop a secondary bacterial infection that may need to be treated with an antibiotic, although, this complication is reported to be uncommon early on in the course of COVID-19 pneumonia.
  • Also known as Azithromycin, a Z-pack is a medication used for treating serious and severe infections caused by bacteria. It contains macrolide antibiotic, which helps in stopping all forms of growth caused bantibiotic, although, this complication is reported to be uncommon early on in the course of COVID-19 pneumonia.If treatment is required for a secondary bacterial infection then a range of antibiotics can be used such as penicillins (ampicillin plus sulbactam [Unasyn], piperacillin plus tazobactam [Zosyn]), macrolides (azithromycin), cephalosporins (ceftriaxone [Rocephin]), aminoglycosides (tobramycin) and glycopeptides (vancomycin [Vancocin HCL]) for example. Often a combination of two different antibiotics is used.
  • Azithromycin is also thought to have antiviral and anti-inflammatory activity and may work synergistically with other antiviral treatments. In in vitro laboratory studies azithromycin has demonstrated antiviral activity against Zika virus and against rhinoviruses, which cause the common cold.”

Time to deal with CKD when you have COVID-19. I wanted to understand how CKD could make you more vulnerable to this disease. I turned to Prevention at https://www.prevention.com/health/a31245792/coronavirus-high-risk-groups/ for more information.

“People with underlying health conditions are at a higher-than-normal risk of developing severe forms of COVID-19…. When your body is already dealing with a separate health condition, it has less energy to put toward fighting an acute infection…. The CDC says these conditions include:

  • Blood disorders, such as sickle cell disease or taking blood thinners
  • Chronic kidney disease, as defined by your doctor
  • Chronic liver disease, as defined by your doctor
  • Compromised immune system, including undergoing cancer treatment such as chemotherapy or radiation, having received an organ or bone marrow transplant, or taking     high doses of corticosteroids or other immunosuppressant medications, and HIV or AIDS
  • Current or recent pregnancy in the last two weeks
  • Endocrine disorders, such as diabetes
  • Metabolic disorders
  • Heart disease
  • Lung disease, including asthma
  • Neurological and neurologic and neurodevelopment conditions”

This is definitely not a case of misery loves company. Not only do I have CKD, but I am undergoing chemotherapy. Oh, and I have diabetes. To all others in the high risk group, I’m so sorry we all belong to this particular community right now.

Hmmm, do we need to do something more than everyone else needs to do to avoid COVID-19? After spending more time than usual surfing the web, I admit I was surprised that there were no extra precautions other than those for everyone else. What are those you ask? Back to the CDC for their infograph at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/downloads/COVID19-What-You-Can-Do-High-Risk.pdf which makes it easy for us to understand. It also defines who is higher risk. Unfortunately, it could not be reproduced, so you’ll have to go to the website directly.

I always seem to feel better when I understand what might be a threat to me or anyone in one of my communities. The purpose of today’s blog was to help you understand so that you may also feel better. Make no mistake: This is serious. I only go out to Chemotherapy every other week. Even young, not high risk people from my dancing community are being safe. They are not going out either (unless they are essential workers). Do yourself a favor and save your life by staying in.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Kevin Got His Preemptive Kidney Transplant

Several years ago,  I was invited to a kidney disease meeting. That’s where I first met Kevin Fowler, Principal of The Voice of the Patient, Inc. I liked listening to his ideas. Later, we walked into each other at an AAKP conference. This time I thoroughly enjoyed his company, but had quite a few questions about pre-emptive transplants. Kevin was good enough to explain his story, which answers my questions, in this guest blog during National Kidney Month. Take it away, Kevin! 

Kidney disease has always been a part of my life.  When I was growing up, my mom told me stories about her father who had suffered from Autosomal Polycystic Kidney Disease ( ADPKD), a disease which prompts the growth of cysts on the kidneys. My mom was the oldest of three sisters, and had great love and affection for my grandfather, Hubert Duvall.  I never had a chance to meet him because he died before I was born. It was the late 1950s when he was admitted to the hospital because he was not feeling well. Unknown to him, he was experiencing uremia, the inability of the kidneys to rid themselves of waste products such as urea, as he went into kidney failure. Shortly after his hospital admission he died.  As he neared death, he learned that ADPKD was the cause of his kidney failure. 

My grandfather’s patient journey had a profound impact upon his three daughters: Mary Ann, Ruth, and Laverne in that his genetic disease was passed on to each of them.  My mom, Mary Ann, was diagnosed after the birth of her third child. Imagine the joy of giving birth to a child while being diagnosed with a disease with limited scientific knowledge and a very uncertain future.  My mom and dad faced the unknown with a positive attitude, but with very little professional guidance.

As a young boy, I was very close to my mom.  I felt her unconditional love for me, and her whole life was dedicated to her three children.  As her ADPKD advanced, I saw her suffer with the disease. I saw her experience constant back pain, routine exhaustion and nausea.  All of this physical suffering was difficult to understand as a young child. Moreover, what was really difficult was the look on her face as she faced a nebulous future.

Eventually, my mom’s kidneys failed.  Unlike my grandfather, hemodialysis was available as a treatment option to sustain her life.  She started hemodialysis at the age of 48. While she approached dialysis with optimism, her future was never clear to her or our family.  I saw my mom struggle to survive on dialysis. I saw her return home from dialysis feeling exhausted and tired. I saw that when she had a rough hemodialysis session, it would take her longer to recover from the treatment.  She never bemoaned her fate, and provided us the legacy of her example.

After four and a half years on hemodialysis, my mom died at the age of 52.  Her dialysis experience left an indelible impression upon me. From that point on, I lived in fear that I would face the same fate.  I choose to never determine if I had the same disease. In many ways, it was a rational decision. Interventions were not able to slow down the progression of ADPKD.  If I were diagnosed with ADPKD, I would be penalized. I would face difficulty obtaining health and life insurance. The fear of facing the same patient journey as my mom was always hanging over my head, and I didn’t have the courage to determine if I too had ADPKD.  

I was married to my wife, Kathy, in 1995, and in less than five years we had two children.  During this time, I was being seen by a primary care physician who was aware of my ADPKD family history.  My kidney function was tested on my annual appointments, and he told me that my kidney function was fine. He stated that if I had ADPKD, there was not much that could be done to slow down the progression.  Later that same year near the Christmas season, I experienced deep flank (the side of your body between the bottom rib and the hip) pain. Initially, I attributed it to moving some furniture. The pain persisted, and because of my additional responsibilities as a husband and father, I called my primary care physician requesting an ultrasound test.  The ultrasound test would determine once and for all whether I too had ADPKD.

On a cold and sunny day in January 2001, my physician administered the ultrasound test. Watching his reaction told me all I needed to know.  At the age of 39, I was informed that I would be in kidney failure within the next three to five years. He offered to make a nephrology referral, but I declined.  Since he had not demonstrated competence managing my condition, I intuitively sensed that I could not trust his referral would serve my best interests. 

At that time, I was working in the pharmaceutical industry, so I called a physician friend at Barnes Hospital in St. Louis seeking a nephrology recommendation.  On my mother’s birthday, I met with my nephrologist – who had a profound impact on my life. He informed me that it was not necessary to be on dialysis, and that I could have a preemptive kidney transplant.  Because of my fear, I had never taken the time to learn about the different End Stage Kidney Disease treatment options. I was incredibly fortunate to receive the best treatment option.

On this recently past World Kidney Day, the theme was prevention due to detection.  In the United States approximately 90% of those with Stage 3 Chronic Kidney Disease are unaware of their condition.  This is no longer acceptable. The American Kidney Health Executive Order has initiated a public campaign to detect kidney disease earlier.  In fact, the National Kidney Foundation and CVS Kidney Care launched their public awareness campaign this month, National Kidney Month.  Unlike when I was diagnosed, there are now approved treatments to slow down the progression of kidney diseases.  There are potentially additional treatments in the pipeline for ADPKD, Diabetic Kidney Disease, FSGS, IGAN, etc. For many people there is no longer a need to live in fear.  There is a very real possibility that their patient journey may change for the better.

Thank you, Kevin, for sharing your personal kidney journey with us. Kevin may be reached via email at kevinjohnfowler@gmail.com or on Twitter as @gratefull080504.

 

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Now What? 

Wow! It’s the last month of 2019 already. You may have noticed there was no blog post last week. That’s because I was unexpectedly hospitalized with just my iPhone on me and poor internet at the hospital not once, but twice. But I’m back in the office now.

Today is Dana’s turn to have his request filled. Although, I do wish the reader who graciously agreed to wait until after I’d recovered from major surgery to have her questions answered would contact me again. With so many people at my computer while I was hospitalized, her questions have been, er, mislaid.

Okay, Dana, back to you. Uh-oh, your messages have seemed to disappear, too. Well, I guess that’s the last time I allow anyone to use my computer. I do apologize. Please resend your questions.

Mind you all, I am not a doctor. I’m just a writer who’s taught research writing and been a Chronic Kidney Disease, stage 3 patient for 11 years. Anything I suggest – or that anyone else suggests, for that matter – should be checked with your nephrologist before you act on it

Hmmm, we have to hold off on both questions. Now what? I know. Let’s look at a rare kidney disease. Are you game? Well, will you look at that? I’ve already blogged about some of them on this list by the American Kidney Fund at https://www.kidneyfund.org/kidney-disease/other-kidney-conditions/rare-diseases/  Use the topic drop down on the right side of the blog if you’re seeking info on one of them or let me know if you’d like information about one I haven’t yet written about. Use comment on the blog so it doesn’t get lost.

Minimal change disease?  Whatever could that be? And why is it labeled in plain, laymen English rather than medical terms that we’d have to look up? Let’s find out.

According to the National Kidney Fund at https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/minimal-change-disease,

“Many diseases can affect your kidney function by attacking and damaging the glomeruli, the tiny filtering units inside your kidney where blood is cleaned. The conditions that affect your glomeruli are called glomerular diseases. One of these conditions is minimal change disease (MCD). Minimal change disease is a disorder where there is damage to your glomeruli. The disease gets its name because the damage cannot be seen under a regular microscope. It can only be seen under a very powerful microscope called an electron microscope. Minimal change disease is the most common cause of nephrotic syndrome in children. It is also seen in adults with nephrotic syndrome, but is less common. Those with MCD experience the signs and symptoms of nephrotic syndrome much quicker than they would with other glomerular diseases.”

This is so logical it makes me wonder why the rest of medicine isn’t. I was referring to the part about the electron microscope. Let’s slow down a bit and take a look at “nephrotic syndrome” to ensure we fully understand what this disease is about.

The Mayo Clinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/nephrotic-syndrome/symptoms-causes/syc-20375608 tells us,

“Nephrotic syndrome is a kidney disorder that causes your body to excrete too much protein in your urine.

Nephrotic syndrome is usually caused by damage to the clusters of small blood vessels in your kidneys that filter waste and excess water from your blood. Nephrotic syndrome causes swelling (edema), particularly in your feet and ankles, and increases the risk of other health problems.”

Got it? Okay, then back to minimal change disease. How, in heaven’s name, do you get it? Hmmm, after surfing the internet for a while, it’s become clear the medical community doesn’t yet know the cause of minimal change disease, although the following may be involved:

“The cause is unknown, but the disease may occur after or be related to:

  • Allergic reactions
  • Use of NSAIDs
  • Tumors
  • Vaccinations (flu and pneumococcal, though rare)
  • Viral infections”

Thank you MedlinePlus (part of the U.S. National Library of Medicine, which is part of the National Institutes of Health) at https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000496.htm.

All right then, maybe we could move on to the symptoms. This is clearly one of those times I wish I could understand medicalese. The best I could figure out is that, while kidney function remains normal, minimal change disease leads you right into nephrotic syndrome. That is a conglomeration of symptoms, as explained by Merck Manual Consumer Version at https://www.merckmanuals.com/home/kidney-and-urinary-tract-disorders/kidney-filtering-disorders/nephrotic-syndrome?query=Minimal%20Change%20Disease#v761896:

“Early symptoms include

  • Loss of appetite
  • A general feeling of illness (malaise)
  • Puffy eyelids and tissue swelling (edema) due to excess sodium and water retention
  • Abdominal pain
  • Frothy urine

The abdomen may be swollen because of a large accumulation of fluid in the abdominal cavity (ascites). Shortness of breath may develop because fluid accumulates in the space surrounding the lungs (pleural effusion). Other symptoms may include swelling of the labia in women and, in men, the scrotum. Most often, the fluid that causes tissue swelling is affected by gravity and therefore moves around. During the night, fluid accumulates in the upper parts of the body, such as the eyelids. During the day, when the person is sitting or standing, fluid accumulates in the lower parts of the body, such as the ankles. Swelling may hide the muscle wasting that is progressing at the same time.

In children, blood pressure is generally low, and blood pressure may fall when the child stands up (orthostatic or postural hypotension). Shock occasionally develops. Adults may have low, normal, or high blood pressure.

Urine production may decrease, and kidney failure (loss of most kidney function) may develop if the leakage of fluid from blood vessels into tissues depletes the liquid component of blood and the blood supply to the kidneys is diminished. Occasionally, kidney failure with low urine output occurs suddenly.

Nutritional deficiencies may result because nutrients are excreted in the urine. In children, growth may be stunted. Calcium may be lost from bones, and people may have a vitamin D deficiency, leading to osteoporosis. The hair and nails may become brittle, and some hair may fall out. Horizontal white lines may develop in fingernail beds for unknown reasons.

The membrane that lines the abdominal cavity and abdominal organs (peritoneum) may become inflamed and infected. Opportunistic infections—infections caused by normally harmless bacteria—are common. The higher likelihood of infection is thought to occur because the antibodies that normally combat infections are excreted in the urine or not produced in normal amounts. The tendency for blood clotting (thrombosis) increases, particularly inside the main veins draining blood from the kidneys. Less commonly, the blood may not clot when clotting is needed, generally leading to excessive bleeding. High blood pressure accompanied by complications affecting the heart and brain is most likely to occur in people who have diabetes or systemic lupus erythematosus.”

So, while the name of the disease is written in plain language, it’s clear this is a more complicated rare kidney disease than that would suggest.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

re·​ha·​bil·​i·​ta·​tion 

What! As if staying in the hospital for six to thirteen days weren’t enough, it turned out that I would be in a rehabilitation center for an additional six to eight weeks. Again, while this was for pancreatic cancer, many Chronic Kidney Disease patients who have had surgery may require a stay in such places, too. I look for new experiences, but not this kind.

human-438430Let’s go to my favorite dictionary, the Merriam-Webster Dictionary at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/rehabilitation for the definition of the word.

“: to bring (someone or something) back to a normal, healthy condition after an illness, injury, drug problem, etc.

b: to teach (a criminal in prison) to live a normal and productive life

c: to bring (someone or something) back to a good condition”

I hope it’s clear that it’s the first definition we’re dealing with today.

Forgive me for being dense, but I still didn’t get how that’s going to be done. So I searched for help and MedlinePlus, which is part of the U.S. National Library of Congress which, in turn, is part of the National Health Institutes, at https://medlineplus.gov/rehabilitation.html did just that.

What happens in a rehabilitation program?a.d.

When you get rehabilitation, you often have a team of different health care providers helping you. They will work with you to figure out your needs, goals, and treatment plan. The types of treatments that may be in a treatment plan include

  • Assistive devices, which are tools, equipment, and products that help people with disabilities move and function
  • Cognitive rehabilitation therapy to help you relearn or improve skills such as thinking, learning, memory, planning, and decision making
  • Mental health counseling
  • Music or art therapy to help you express your feelings, improve your thinking, and develop social connections
  • Nutritional counseling
  • Occupational therapy to help you with your daily activities
  • Physical therapy to help your strength, mobility, and fitness
  • Recreational therapy to improve your emotional well-being through arts and crafts, games, relaxation training, and animal-assisted therapy
  • Speech-language therapy to help with speaking, understanding, reading, writing and swallowing
  • Treatment for pain
  • Vocational rehabilitation to help you build skills for going to school or working at a job

Depending on your needs, you may have rehabilitation in the providers’ offices, a hospital, or an inpatient rehabilitation center. In some cases, a provider may come to your home. If you get care in your home, you will need to have family members or friends who can come and help with your rehabilitation.”

Personally, I won’t need some of these such as cognitive rehabilitation, speech-language therapy, and vocational rehabilitation. Brain and speaking aren’t involved in pancreatic surgery and I’m retired. You may be in the same situation if you have rehabilitation or you may not. It’s a list that’s made unique for each patient. I’ve got to remind you here that I’m not a doctor; this is a lay person giving her opinion.

IMG_1843(Edited)

Hmmm, it seemed pretty clear that each type of surgery requires its own sort of rehabilitation. Now that we know what’s involved, let’s see who would be involved if you required rehabilitation after a surgery. WebMD at https://www.webmd.com/healthy-aging/rehab-after-surgery#1 offered a succinct, easy to understand answer.

Who Works With You

Different experts help with different parts of your rehab. Some people who might be on your team:

Physiatrist. He’s a doctor who specializes in rehab. He tailors a plan to your needs and oversees the program to make sure it’s going well.

Physical therapist. He teaches you exercises to improve your strength and the range you have when you move your arm, leg, or whatever part of your body had the operation.

Occupational therapist. He helps you regain the skills you need for some basic activities in your everyday life. He might teach you how to cook meals, get dressed, shower or take a bath, and use the toilet. He’ll also show you how to use gadgets that can help you care for yourself more easily, such as a dressing stick or elastic shoelaces. Some occupational therapists will visit your home to make sure it’s safe and easy for you to get around.

Dietitian. He’ll help you plan healthy meals. If your doctor has told you to avoid salt, sugar, or certain foods after your surgery, the dietitian can help you find other choices.

Speech therapist. He helps with skills like talking, swallowing, and memory. Speech therapy can be helpful after surgery that affects your brain.

Nurses. They care for you if you’re staying for a few weeks or months in a rehab center. They may also come to your home to help track your recovery and help you with the transition to life back at home.

Psychologist or counselor. It’s natural to feel stressed out or depressed after your surgery. A mental health professional can help you manage your worries and treat any depression.

It can take many months to recover from an operation, but be patient. A lot depends on your overall health and the kind of procedure you had. Work closely with your rehab team and follow their instructions. Your hard work will pay off.”

Looking over the list, I won’t need a speech therapist and neither would you if you have some kind of kidney related surgery. I’m not so sure about a psychologist or counselor, either. I’m sort of thinking that going through chemotherapy and radiation treatments without one, I won’t need one after surgery. Then again, I’ve never had major surgery before and I’ve been told this is major major surgery. However, should I find myself in a position where my medical team and/or I feel I need counseling, I would not hesitate to ask for it… just as I’ve asked for help with the cancer.ot

Rehabilitation offers so much. I had no idea this was available until my surgeon told me about it. Nor did I know that Medicare will pay for it… sort of. This is from Medicare at https://www.medicare.gov/coverage/inpatient-rehabilitation-care.

 

“You pay this for each benefit period:

  • Days 1-60: $1,364 deductible.*
  • Days 61-90: $341 coinsurance each day.
  • Days 91 and beyond: $682 coinsurance per each “lifetime reserve day” after day 90 for each benefit period (up to 60 days over your lifetime).
  • Each day after the lifetime reserve days: all costs.

*You don’t have to pay a deductible for care you get in the inpatient rehabilitation facility if you were already charged a deductible for care you got in a prior hospitalization within the same benefit period. This is because your benefit period starts on day one of your prior hospital stay, and that stay counts towards your deductible.”

Excuse me while I go check my bank account.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

You’re Bringing What?

I have stayed overnight in the hospital three times in my life: once for a concussion, of which I don’t remember anything (No surprise there.), and twice for the birth of each of my daughters, of which I only remember the actual births. I’m facing a six to thirteen day stay towards the end of the month… and I just don’t know what to bring or why. While it’s not a kidney related stay, as Chronic Kidney Disease patients we all know CKD patients may need to stay in the hospital, too, for transplants,  kidney cancer, or other reasons.

I got a call from the surgeon’s office today. They were able to explain what to bring on the day of surgery: nothing. It seems there are no lockers to hold valuables while you’re in surgery. While I took a breath to contemplate life without my phone and/or iPad, it was explained that I would probably be sleeping until the next day, anyway. I didn’t know that. Hmmm, maybe I’ll just bring a book – a real book – for that first day… just in case I wake up. I can bring a paperback so I won’t care if it’s ‘mislaid.’ Or can I?

All right, enough guessing. Let’s do some researching here. This is from MedicineNet at https://www.medicinenet.com/hospital_10_tips_packing_for_a_hospital_stay/views.htm:

  1. Documents and paperwork. Ideally, you should bring all the necessary paperwork in one folder, preferably the kind with a tie or snap closure to guarantee that important documents will not be lost. Don’t forget insurance cards, a list of all the medications you are currently taking, and a list of telephone numbers of family and friends. If you have a written power of attorney or living will, always bring those along with you too.
  2. A small amount of money for newspapers, vending machines, and such. Bringing credit cards or large amounts of cash is not recommended, since theft can occur in hospitals. It is also a good idea to leave all jewelry at home, it is one less thing to worry about losing or being stolen.
  3. Clothing. You may want to bring comfortable pajamas or lounging clothes, if you’ll be able to wear your own clothing. Bring a supply of loose-fitting underwear and comfortable socks …. A cardigan-style sweater or bed jacket can help ward off the chills. Make sure you have slippers to walk around in the hospital and one pair of regular shoes (in case you’re allowed to walk outside, and you’ll need them for the trip home anyway).
  4. Eyeglasses, if you require them.
  5. Writing paper and pen, for making notes or recording questions you want to ask your doctor
  6. A prepaid phone card for calls from your room telephone.
  7. Toiletries. You can bring your toothbrushtoothpaste, lotion, deodorant, soap, shampoo, a comb or hair brush, and other toiletries from home, but avoid perfumes and any highly scented products. Lip balm is also a good addition to your toiletries kit.
  8. Something to occupy your time – Bring books or magazines to help pass the time….
  9. Photos or small personal items. Many people enjoy having a couple of small framed photos or mementos from home to personalize their hospital space.
  10. Finally, check the hospital’s policy about electronic items before you pack your laptop, portable DVD player, MP-3 or CD player, or cell phone. In particular, cell phone use is forbidden in many hospitals since it may interfere with electronic patient monitoring equipment. Don’t forget that high-end electronic items can also be targets for theft – if you are allowed to bring them, make sure that a relative or friend takes them home or that they can be safely stored when you’re sleeping or not in your room.

Now, wait a minute. I get it that MedicineNet may be referring to the day after surgery. But, in my case, that means I prepare a bag and give it to my daughter to bring the next day. The staff at the surgeon’s office did tell me the hospital will provide a toothbrush and toothpaste, but will they allow me to bring the BiPap that I use for sleep apnea or the mouth piece I sleep with to prevent my jaw from locking? Let’s look again.

U.S. News has some of the same items on their list at https://health.usnews.com/health-news/patient-advice/slideshows/11-items-to-pack-in-your-hospital-bag?onepage :

To recap, here are 11 items to pack in your hospital bag.

  • Loose, warm and comfortable clothing.
  • Your own pillow.
  • Your own toiletries.
  • Flip-flops.
  • Earplugs and earphones.
  • Comfort flicks.
  • Escapist books.
  • Laundry lists: of your medications, doctors and family and friends.
  • Pen and paper.
  • Scents.
  • Drugstore supplies.”

They also make a really good point about bringing you own medications and toiletries so you’re not being charged for them by the hospital. I would avoid the scents just because so many people are scent sensitive these days.

 

I was still a bit confused, so I went to my hospital’s website. I learned that not only are cell phones permitted, but Wi-Fi is offered for free. Great. What more can I find out about what to pack, I wondered. My biggest desire was for Shiloh, my comfort dog, to be with me but I knew that wasn’t going to happen.

I thought VeryWellHealth at https://www.verywellhealth.com/what-to-pack-for-the-hospital-3157006 was more realistic about what to pack and I especially appreciated the warnings about electronics:

“You won’t have a lot of space to store things, so try to fit everything you need into a standard roll-on bag. Be sure that is well labeled and is lockable as an extra layer of security.

Among the things you should include on your packing checklist:

  • Personal medications, preferably in their original container so that the nurse can find them for you if you are unable to reach them
  • A list of your current medications to add to your hospital chart, including names, dosages, and dosing schedule
  • Comfortable pajamas (loose-fitting is best)
  • A light robe for modesty, especially in a shared room
  • Slippers with rubber soles (to prevent slipping)
  • Plenty of socks and underwear
  • Toothbrush, toothpaste, and deodorant
  • Hairbrush or comb
  • Soap, skin care products, and hair care products if you prefer your own (ideally travel size)
  • Special needs products like tampons, sanitary pads, or denture cream
  • Glasses (which may be easier than contacts if you think you’ll be dozing a lot)
  • Outfit to wear home (something loose is best, also make sure it won’t rub on your incision)
  • A cell phone charger for your cell phone
  • Your laptop charger if you intend to bring one
  • Earplugs if you are ​a light sleeper
  • An eyemask if you are used to black-out curtains
  • Entertainment such as books, a portable DVD player, puzzles, or magazines
  • Earbuds or earphones for your P3 or DVD player
  • Non-perishable snacks, especially if you have dietary concerns (such as diabetes or chronic medications that need to be taken with high-fat foods)”

One quick call to the hospital to see if they have any additions to make to these lists and I’m ready to pack. How about you?

Until next week,

Keep living your life!