re·​ha·​bil·​i·​ta·​tion 

What! As if staying in the hospital for six to thirteen days weren’t enough, it turned out that I would be in a rehabilitation center for an additional six to eight weeks. Again, while this was for pancreatic cancer, many Chronic Kidney Disease patients who have had surgery may require a stay in such places, too. I look for new experiences, but not this kind.

human-438430Let’s go to my favorite dictionary, the Merriam-Webster Dictionary at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/rehabilitation for the definition of the word.

“: to bring (someone or something) back to a normal, healthy condition after an illness, injury, drug problem, etc.

b: to teach (a criminal in prison) to live a normal and productive life

c: to bring (someone or something) back to a good condition”

I hope it’s clear that it’s the first definition we’re dealing with today.

Forgive me for being dense, but I still didn’t get how that’s going to be done. So I searched for help and MedlinePlus, which is part of the U.S. National Library of Congress which, in turn, is part of the National Health Institutes, at https://medlineplus.gov/rehabilitation.html did just that.

What happens in a rehabilitation program?a.d.

When you get rehabilitation, you often have a team of different health care providers helping you. They will work with you to figure out your needs, goals, and treatment plan. The types of treatments that may be in a treatment plan include

  • Assistive devices, which are tools, equipment, and products that help people with disabilities move and function
  • Cognitive rehabilitation therapy to help you relearn or improve skills such as thinking, learning, memory, planning, and decision making
  • Mental health counseling
  • Music or art therapy to help you express your feelings, improve your thinking, and develop social connections
  • Nutritional counseling
  • Occupational therapy to help you with your daily activities
  • Physical therapy to help your strength, mobility, and fitness
  • Recreational therapy to improve your emotional well-being through arts and crafts, games, relaxation training, and animal-assisted therapy
  • Speech-language therapy to help with speaking, understanding, reading, writing and swallowing
  • Treatment for pain
  • Vocational rehabilitation to help you build skills for going to school or working at a job

Depending on your needs, you may have rehabilitation in the providers’ offices, a hospital, or an inpatient rehabilitation center. In some cases, a provider may come to your home. If you get care in your home, you will need to have family members or friends who can come and help with your rehabilitation.”

Personally, I won’t need some of these such as cognitive rehabilitation, speech-language therapy, and vocational rehabilitation. Brain and speaking aren’t involved in pancreatic surgery and I’m retired. You may be in the same situation if you have rehabilitation or you may not. It’s a list that’s made unique for each patient. I’ve got to remind you here that I’m not a doctor; this is a lay person giving her opinion.

IMG_1843(Edited)

Hmmm, it seemed pretty clear that each type of surgery requires its own sort of rehabilitation. Now that we know what’s involved, let’s see who would be involved if you required rehabilitation after a surgery. WebMD at https://www.webmd.com/healthy-aging/rehab-after-surgery#1 offered a succinct, easy to understand answer.

Who Works With You

Different experts help with different parts of your rehab. Some people who might be on your team:

Physiatrist. He’s a doctor who specializes in rehab. He tailors a plan to your needs and oversees the program to make sure it’s going well.

Physical therapist. He teaches you exercises to improve your strength and the range you have when you move your arm, leg, or whatever part of your body had the operation.

Occupational therapist. He helps you regain the skills you need for some basic activities in your everyday life. He might teach you how to cook meals, get dressed, shower or take a bath, and use the toilet. He’ll also show you how to use gadgets that can help you care for yourself more easily, such as a dressing stick or elastic shoelaces. Some occupational therapists will visit your home to make sure it’s safe and easy for you to get around.

Dietitian. He’ll help you plan healthy meals. If your doctor has told you to avoid salt, sugar, or certain foods after your surgery, the dietitian can help you find other choices.

Speech therapist. He helps with skills like talking, swallowing, and memory. Speech therapy can be helpful after surgery that affects your brain.

Nurses. They care for you if you’re staying for a few weeks or months in a rehab center. They may also come to your home to help track your recovery and help you with the transition to life back at home.

Psychologist or counselor. It’s natural to feel stressed out or depressed after your surgery. A mental health professional can help you manage your worries and treat any depression.

It can take many months to recover from an operation, but be patient. A lot depends on your overall health and the kind of procedure you had. Work closely with your rehab team and follow their instructions. Your hard work will pay off.”

Looking over the list, I won’t need a speech therapist and neither would you if you have some kind of kidney related surgery. I’m not so sure about a psychologist or counselor, either. I’m sort of thinking that going through chemotherapy and radiation treatments without one, I won’t need one after surgery. Then again, I’ve never had major surgery before and I’ve been told this is major major surgery. However, should I find myself in a position where my medical team and/or I feel I need counseling, I would not hesitate to ask for it… just as I’ve asked for help with the cancer.ot

Rehabilitation offers so much. I had no idea this was available until my surgeon told me about it. Nor did I know that Medicare will pay for it… sort of. This is from Medicare at https://www.medicare.gov/coverage/inpatient-rehabilitation-care.

 

“You pay this for each benefit period:

  • Days 1-60: $1,364 deductible.*
  • Days 61-90: $341 coinsurance each day.
  • Days 91 and beyond: $682 coinsurance per each “lifetime reserve day” after day 90 for each benefit period (up to 60 days over your lifetime).
  • Each day after the lifetime reserve days: all costs.

*You don’t have to pay a deductible for care you get in the inpatient rehabilitation facility if you were already charged a deductible for care you got in a prior hospitalization within the same benefit period. This is because your benefit period starts on day one of your prior hospital stay, and that stay counts towards your deductible.”

Excuse me while I go check my bank account.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

You’re Bringing What?

I have stayed overnight in the hospital three times in my life: once for a concussion, of which I don’t remember anything (No surprise there.), and twice for the birth of each of my daughters, of which I only remember the actual births. I’m facing a six to thirteen day stay towards the end of the month… and I just don’t know what to bring or why. While it’s not a kidney related stay, as Chronic Kidney Disease patients we all know CKD patients may need to stay in the hospital, too, for transplants,  kidney cancer, or other reasons.

I got a call from the surgeon’s office today. They were able to explain what to bring on the day of surgery: nothing. It seems there are no lockers to hold valuables while you’re in surgery. While I took a breath to contemplate life without my phone and/or iPad, it was explained that I would probably be sleeping until the next day, anyway. I didn’t know that. Hmmm, maybe I’ll just bring a book – a real book – for that first day… just in case I wake up. I can bring a paperback so I won’t care if it’s ‘mislaid.’ Or can I?

All right, enough guessing. Let’s do some researching here. This is from MedicineNet at https://www.medicinenet.com/hospital_10_tips_packing_for_a_hospital_stay/views.htm:

  1. Documents and paperwork. Ideally, you should bring all the necessary paperwork in one folder, preferably the kind with a tie or snap closure to guarantee that important documents will not be lost. Don’t forget insurance cards, a list of all the medications you are currently taking, and a list of telephone numbers of family and friends. If you have a written power of attorney or living will, always bring those along with you too.
  2. A small amount of money for newspapers, vending machines, and such. Bringing credit cards or large amounts of cash is not recommended, since theft can occur in hospitals. It is also a good idea to leave all jewelry at home, it is one less thing to worry about losing or being stolen.
  3. Clothing. You may want to bring comfortable pajamas or lounging clothes, if you’ll be able to wear your own clothing. Bring a supply of loose-fitting underwear and comfortable socks …. A cardigan-style sweater or bed jacket can help ward off the chills. Make sure you have slippers to walk around in the hospital and one pair of regular shoes (in case you’re allowed to walk outside, and you’ll need them for the trip home anyway).
  4. Eyeglasses, if you require them.
  5. Writing paper and pen, for making notes or recording questions you want to ask your doctor
  6. A prepaid phone card for calls from your room telephone.
  7. Toiletries. You can bring your toothbrushtoothpaste, lotion, deodorant, soap, shampoo, a comb or hair brush, and other toiletries from home, but avoid perfumes and any highly scented products. Lip balm is also a good addition to your toiletries kit.
  8. Something to occupy your time – Bring books or magazines to help pass the time….
  9. Photos or small personal items. Many people enjoy having a couple of small framed photos or mementos from home to personalize their hospital space.
  10. Finally, check the hospital’s policy about electronic items before you pack your laptop, portable DVD player, MP-3 or CD player, or cell phone. In particular, cell phone use is forbidden in many hospitals since it may interfere with electronic patient monitoring equipment. Don’t forget that high-end electronic items can also be targets for theft – if you are allowed to bring them, make sure that a relative or friend takes them home or that they can be safely stored when you’re sleeping or not in your room.

Now, wait a minute. I get it that MedicineNet may be referring to the day after surgery. But, in my case, that means I prepare a bag and give it to my daughter to bring the next day. The staff at the surgeon’s office did tell me the hospital will provide a toothbrush and toothpaste, but will they allow me to bring the BiPap that I use for sleep apnea or the mouth piece I sleep with to prevent my jaw from locking? Let’s look again.

U.S. News has some of the same items on their list at https://health.usnews.com/health-news/patient-advice/slideshows/11-items-to-pack-in-your-hospital-bag?onepage :

To recap, here are 11 items to pack in your hospital bag.

  • Loose, warm and comfortable clothing.
  • Your own pillow.
  • Your own toiletries.
  • Flip-flops.
  • Earplugs and earphones.
  • Comfort flicks.
  • Escapist books.
  • Laundry lists: of your medications, doctors and family and friends.
  • Pen and paper.
  • Scents.
  • Drugstore supplies.”

They also make a really good point about bringing you own medications and toiletries so you’re not being charged for them by the hospital. I would avoid the scents just because so many people are scent sensitive these days.

 

I was still a bit confused, so I went to my hospital’s website. I learned that not only are cell phones permitted, but Wi-Fi is offered for free. Great. What more can I find out about what to pack, I wondered. My biggest desire was for Shiloh, my comfort dog, to be with me but I knew that wasn’t going to happen.

I thought VeryWellHealth at https://www.verywellhealth.com/what-to-pack-for-the-hospital-3157006 was more realistic about what to pack and I especially appreciated the warnings about electronics:

“You won’t have a lot of space to store things, so try to fit everything you need into a standard roll-on bag. Be sure that is well labeled and is lockable as an extra layer of security.

Among the things you should include on your packing checklist:

  • Personal medications, preferably in their original container so that the nurse can find them for you if you are unable to reach them
  • A list of your current medications to add to your hospital chart, including names, dosages, and dosing schedule
  • Comfortable pajamas (loose-fitting is best)
  • A light robe for modesty, especially in a shared room
  • Slippers with rubber soles (to prevent slipping)
  • Plenty of socks and underwear
  • Toothbrush, toothpaste, and deodorant
  • Hairbrush or comb
  • Soap, skin care products, and hair care products if you prefer your own (ideally travel size)
  • Special needs products like tampons, sanitary pads, or denture cream
  • Glasses (which may be easier than contacts if you think you’ll be dozing a lot)
  • Outfit to wear home (something loose is best, also make sure it won’t rub on your incision)
  • A cell phone charger for your cell phone
  • Your laptop charger if you intend to bring one
  • Earplugs if you are ​a light sleeper
  • An eyemask if you are used to black-out curtains
  • Entertainment such as books, a portable DVD player, puzzles, or magazines
  • Earbuds or earphones for your P3 or DVD player
  • Non-perishable snacks, especially if you have dietary concerns (such as diabetes or chronic medications that need to be taken with high-fat foods)”

One quick call to the hospital to see if they have any additions to make to these lists and I’m ready to pack. How about you?

Until next week,

Keep living your life!