It’s Not Just Scaly Patches

Did I ever mention that I have latent psoriasis? Or that it has something to do with Chronic Kidney Disease? Hmmm, well maybe it’s time… not that most people ever want to admit they have unsightly psoriasis. 

I realize not everyone knows what that is, so we’ll start with a definition from the Mayo Clinic

“Psoriasis is a skin disease that causes red, itchy scaly patches, most commonly on the knees, elbows, trunk and scalp. 

Psoriasis is a common, long-term (chronic) disease with no cure. It tends to go through cycles, flaring for a few weeks or months, then subsiding for a while or going into remission. Treatments are available to help you manage symptoms. And you can incorporate lifestyle habits and coping strategies to help you live better with psoriasis.” 

Now you can see why people might be lax to mention they have psoriasis. It almost appears as if you hadn’t been taking care of your personal hygiene, and no one enjoys looking at those sores. My father had it in large, constant patches, but I grew up seeing it on him and never questioned what it was or how he got it. Maybe that’s why I’m so open about having it myself. 

Oh, yes, latent. That just means it’s there, but it hasn’t made itself known yet. 

I went to WebMD for an explanation of the symptoms of psoriasis. 

“Plaques of red skin, often covered with silver-colored scales. These plaques may be itchy and painful, and they sometimes crack and bleed. In severe cases, the plaques will grow and merge, covering large areas. 

Disorders of the fingernails and toenails, including discoloration and pitting of the nails. The nails may also crumble or detach from the nail bed. 

Plaques of scales or crust on the scalp.” 

I remember a dermatologist telling me a long time ago that this skin disorder causes skin cells to produce 10 times faster than usual and asking me if I had psoriatic arthritis. I looked at him blankly. That resulted in a trip to the rheumatologist.  

Yes, that’s what I had. Arthritis.org was extremely clear about just what psoriatic arthritis [abbreviation: PsA] is: 

“Causes 

PsA (like psoriasis) is an autoimmune disease, which means the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks healthy tissue, causing inflammation and pain and resulting in damage. Researchers aren’t sure why some people develop PsA. They think it’s a combination of having certain genes, which makes them more likely to develop the disease, and being triggered by something in the environment, like an infection, stress, physical trauma or another factor.  

Symptoms: 

Skin: 

Itchy, painful red patches or a silvery white buildup of dead skin cells; most commonly on the knees, elbows and scalp, although a rash can occur anywhere on the body. It is not contagious. [Gail here: same symptoms as psoriasis] 

Joints/Spine: 

Mainly occurs in the fingers (in the joints closest to the nail), wrists, ankles and knees. Symptoms such as pain, tenderness, warmth and swelling, may affect different sides of the body (right hand and left knee). This may be referred to as peripheral arthritis. Sometimes one entire, individual finger or toe will swell up, making it painful and hard to bend. This is referred to as dactylitis. Pain and stiffness in the low back, buttock can also occur. Sometimes the neck and hips are affected and this may be referred to as spondylitis or axial arthritis.  

Nails: 

Cracking, pitting, white spots and lifting from the nail bed can occur. This may be referred to as nail disease. 

Enthesis (plural, entheses): 

Inflammation and swelling of one or more entheses, which are the places in the body where a tendon or ligament connects with a bone. Common spots include at the back of the heel and the bottom of the foot. This is called enthesitis.  
 
Many people with psoriatic arthritis get very tired (fatigue) and some may have a low-grade fever. Symptoms may come and go. A period of increased inflammation and worsening of other symptoms is called a flare. A flare can last for days or months.”   

And now for the biggie- What does any of this have to do with CKD? 

“’Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease of the skin that causes inflammation throughout the entire body,’ says Dr. Aamir Memon, nephrologist on staff at Advocate Sherman Hospital in Elgin, Ill. ‘When you have an autoimmune disease, you have antibodies in your blood, which can deposit anywhere in the body, such as your heart and kidneys. The increased inflammation increases the risk of atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) and organ damage.’ 

According to Dr. Memon, many patients with moderate to severe psoriasis take medications like Cyclosporine or Methotrexate as treatment. However, side effects from these medications include kidney problems. 

‘Since psoriasis has effects on the kidneys, it would intuitively make sense to control the inflammation to prevent further worsening of the kidneys,’ Dr Memon says. ‘Further studies are needed to evaluate if that is the case and as to what medications are best to decrease inflammation and prevent or halt kidney disease.’” 

Thank you to health enews at Advocate Aurora Health for the above information. This is a new site for me, so allow me to introduce you to them via their website: 

“health enews is the Midwest’s go-to source for timely, patient-centered and credible health news and information. Our goal is to provide readers with relevant and engaging articles and stories as part of our commitment to building healthy and informed communities across Illinois, Wisconsin and beyond. 

health enews is produced by a team of seasoned journalists and public affairs professionals from across Advocate Aurora Health.” 

From my 11 years of blogging about CKD, I’m beginning to accept that it is all connected. What happens to one part of the body does, indeed, affect the other parts of the body. Now you know how CKD and psoriasis are related, in case you’d ever wondered. 

You may have noticed there are no URLs in the blogs lately. Press control and click on the name of the organization instead. They are linked to the articles mentioned.

Until next week, 

Keep living your life!  

A New Year, New Kidney Disease Information

Happy New Year! Or, at least, that’s what I’m hoping for. I fervently believe the more you know, the better you can handle whatever’s happening in your world. That’s why, today, I’m exploring yet another term pertaining to kidney disease that I hadn’t been aware of. Oh my, how many, many types of kidney disease am I (and possibly you) unaware of?  

This one is membranous glomerulonephritis. I sort of-maybe-suspected what it might be, but I wanted to know for sure so I turned to Healthline – who bestowed a couple of awards on this blog a few years ago – at https://www.healthline.com/health/membranous-nephropathy for something more in the way of a definition. 

“Your kidneys are made up of a number of different structures that aid in the removal of wastes from your blood and the formation of urine. Glomerulonephritis (GN) is a condition in which changes in the structures of your kidney can cause swelling and inflammation. 

Membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) is a specific type of GN. MGN develops when inflammation of your kidney structures causes problems with the functioning of your kidney. MGN is known by other names, including extramembranous glomerulonephritis, membranous nephropathy, and nephritis.” 

It’s hard to know where to start in exploring this disease. Let’s take the easy way and start with a definition of nephritis from… ta da, you guessed it – my all-time favorite dictionary, the Merriam Webster at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/nephritis.  

“acute or chronic inflammation of the kidney caused by infection, degenerative process, or vascular disease” 

I’m going back to the beginning of my blog journey to What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease for the following definitions. 

“Acute: Extremely painful, severe or serious, quick onset, of short duration; the opposite of chronic. 

 Chronic: Long term; the opposite of acute.” 

By the way, you can click on the title of the book if you’re interested in purchasing it from Amazon. 

So, basically, nephritis means a kidney problem. But membranous glomerulonephritis is something more specific in that it is a kind of GN or glomerulonephritis. Back to the dictionary for the definition of glomerulonephritis: 

“acute or chronic nephritis that involves inflammation of the capillaries of the renal glomeruli, has various causes (such as streptococcal infection, lupus, or vasculitis) or may be of unknown cause, and is marked especially by blood or protein in the urine and by edema, and if untreated may lead to kidney failure” 

Ah, so now we know what part of the kidneys are involved. Do you remember what the glomeruli are? Just in case you don’t, here’s how ‘s Lexicon at https://www.lexico.com/en/definition/glomerulus  defines this plural noun: 

“a cluster of nerve endings, spores, or small blood vessels, in particular a cluster of capillaries around the end of a kidney tubule, where waste products are filtered from the blood.” 

Now we’re getting somewhere. Let’s keep digging. Membranous glomerulonephritis is a specific GN. I went directly to MedlinePlus, which is part of the National Institutes of Health, which in turn is part of The U.S. National Library of Medicine at https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000472.htm

“Membranous nephropathy is caused by the thickening of a part of the glomerular basement membrane. The glomerular basement membrane is a part of the kidneys that helps filter waste and extra fluid from the blood. The exact reason for this thickening is not known. 

The thickened glomerular membrane does not work normally. As a result, large amounts of protein are lost in the urine. 

This condition is one of the most common causes of nephrotic syndrome. This is a group of symptoms that include protein in the urine, low blood protein level, high cholesterol levels, high triglyceride levels, and swelling. Membranous nephropathy may be a primary kidney disease, or it may be associated with other conditions. 

The following increase your risk for this condition: 

Cancers, especially lung and colon cancer 

Exposure to toxins, including gold and mercury 

Infections, including hepatitis B, malaria, syphilis, and endocarditis 

Medicines, including penicillamine, trimethadione, and skin-lightening creams 

Systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, Graves disease, and other autoimmune disorders 

The disorder occurs at any age, but is more common after age 40.” 

Being only a bit more than a year out from cancer, I was getting nervous so I went to the National Kidney Foundation at https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/membranous-nephropathy-mn for a list of symptoms. 

“Swelling in body parts like your legs, ankles and around your eyes (called edema) 

Weight gain 

Fatigue 

Foaming of the urine caused by high protein levels in the urine (called proteinuria) 

High fat levels in the blood (high cholesterol) 

Low levels of protein in the blood” 

These symptoms struck me as so common that I wanted to know just how usual membranous glomerulonephritis was. After checking numerous sites, the consensus I found was that this is not a common disease. Thank goodness! 

Even though it’s not common, we still might want to know what to do if we were diagnosed with membranous glomerulonephritis, especially since I discovered that this may be considered an autoimmune disease. This is how the Mayo Clinic suggested the disease be treated: 

“Treatment of membranous nephropathy [Gail here: That’s a synonym for membranous glomerulonephritis.] focuses on addressing the cause of your disease and relieving your symptoms. There is no certain cure. 

However, up to three out of 10 people with membranous nephropathy have their symptoms completely disappear (remission) after five years without any treatment. About 25 to 40 percent have a partial remission. 

In cases where membranous nephropathy is caused by a medication or another disease — such as cancer — stopping the medication or controlling the other disease usually improves the condition.” 

There is much more detailed treatment information on their website at mayoclinic.in/354QFPU.    

That is a bit more reassuring. Thank you to all the readers who use terms I hadn’t heard of before and/or ask questions about topics that are new to me. May this year be kinder to us than the last one. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! 

D&C Now has Another Meaning

We usually think of a D&C as a women’s issue:  

“Dilation and curettage (D&C) is a procedure to remove tissue from inside your uterus. Doctors perform dilation and curettage to diagnose and treat certain uterine conditions — such as heavy bleeding — or to clear the uterine lining after a miscarriage or abortion.” 

Thank you to MayoClinic at https://mayocl.in/3oOzkC2 for the above explanation. 

But that’s not what I’ll be writing about today. The ‘D’ in the title stands for Dialysis and the ‘C‘ for Covid-19. Yes, Covid-19 has struck close to home for us. Someone my grown children are very close to has tested positive. He also started dialysis so recently that he hasn’t yet accepted that this is what is keeping him alive. 

Let’s get some definitions out of the way first. Take it away, Merriam-Webster Dictionary

Dialysis:  1. the separation of substances in solution by means of their unequal diffusion through semipermeable membranes 

                 2. the process of removing blood from an artery (as of a patient affected with kidney failure), purifying it by dialysis, adding vital substances, and returning it to a vein 

Covid-19: a mild to severe respiratory illness that is caused by a coronavirus (Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 of the genus Betacoronavirus), is transmitted chiefly by contact with infectious material (such as respiratory droplets) or with objects or surfaces contaminated by the causative virus, and is characterized especially by fever, cough, and shortness of breath and may progress to pneumonia and respiratory failure 

NOTE: While fever, cough, and shortness of breath are common symptoms of COVID-19, other symptoms may include fatigue, chills, body aches, headache, loss of taste or smell, sore throat, runny nose, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. 

 Here are an additional couple of definitions you may need. They’re from the glossary of What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease. 

Arteries: Vessels that carry blood from the heart. 

Veins: Vessels that carry blood toward the heart. 

Now what? Let’s see if we can find out how Covid-19 affects dialysis patients. The Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN) at https://cjasn.asnjournals.org/content/15/8/1087 reports the following in an August study: 

“The patients with kidney disease who appear most at risk for COVID-19 are those with a kidney transplant, due to immunosuppression, and those who undergo in-center hemodialysis treatments thrice weekly, due to inability to self-isolate. Patients with kidney disease also have other comorbidities, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease, that are risk factors for poor outcomes in COVID-19.” 

On December 1 of this year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cautioned those of us with chronic kidney disease, including those on dialysis: 

“Having chronic kidney disease of any stage increases your risk for severe illness from COVID-19. 

Actions to take 

Continue your medicines and your diet as directed by your healthcare provider. 

Make sure that you have at least a 30-day supply of your medicines. 

Stay in contact with your healthcare team as often as possible, especially if you have any new signs or symptoms of illness. Also reach out to them if you can’t get the medicines or foods you need. 

If you don’t have a healthcare provider, contact your nearest community health or health department. 

Have shelf-stable food choices to help you follow your kidney diet. 

If you are on dialysis: 

Contact your dialysis clinic and your healthcare provider if you feel sick or have concerns. 

Do NOT miss your treatments. 

Plan to have enough food on hand to follow the KCER 3-Day Emergency Diet for dialysis patients in case you are unable to maintain your normal treatment schedule. 

Learn more about kidney disease. 

Learn how to take care of your kidneys.” 

The KCER 3-Day Emergency Diet is not that intricate, but it is a long explanation. Click on the link to go right to the diet itself. 

We know the best way to deal with Covid-19 is prevention. I’m sure you’re tired of hearing it, but here are the ways you can hopefully do just that. This information was posted on the World Health Organization’s (WHO) website at bit.ly/3nfeMCB on December 8th of this year. 

“Maintain at least a 1-metre [Gail here: that’s 3.28 ft, so I’d be more comfortable with 2-metres.] distance between yourself and others to reduce your risk of infection when they cough, sneeze or speak. Maintain an even greater distance between yourself and others when indoors. The further away, the better. 

Make wearing a mask a normal part of being around other people. The appropriate use, storage and cleaning or disposal are essential to make masks as effective as possible. 

Here are the basics of how to wear a mask: 

Clean your hands before you put your mask on, as well as before and after you take it off, and after you touch it at any time. 

Make sure it covers both your nose, mouth and chin. 

When you take off a mask, store it in a clean plastic bag, and every day either wash it if it’s a fabric mask, or dispose of a medical mask in a trash bin. 

Don’t use masks with valves….  

How to make your environment safer 

Avoid the 3Cs: spaces that are closed, crowded or involve close contact. 

Outbreaks have been reported in restaurants, choir practices, fitness classes, nightclubs, offices and places of worship where people have gathered, often in crowded indoor settings where they talk loudly, shout, breathe heavily or sing. 

The risks of getting COVID-19 are higher in crowded and inadequately ventilated spaces where infected people spend long periods of time together in close proximity. These environments are where the virus appears to spreads by respiratory droplets or aerosols more efficiently, so taking precautions is even more important. 

Meet people outside. Outdoor gatherings are safer than indoor ones, particularly if indoor spaces are small and without outdoor air coming in…. 

Avoid crowded or indoor settings but if you can’t, then take precautions: 

Open a window. Increase the amount of ‘natural ventilation’ when indoors…. 

Wear a mask (see above for more details).  

Don’t forget the basics of good hygiene 

Regularly and thoroughly clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water. This eliminates germs including viruses that may be on your hands. 

Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Hands touch many surfaces and can pick up viruses. Once contaminated, hands can transfer the virus to your eyes, nose or mouth. From there, the virus can enter your body and infect you. 

Cover your mouth and nose with your bent elbow or tissue when you cough or sneeze. Then dispose of the used tissue immediately into a closed bin and wash your hands. By following good ‘respiratory hygiene’, you protect the people around you from viruses, which cause colds, flu and COVID-19. 

Clean and disinfect surfaces frequently especially those which are regularly touched, such as door handles, faucets and phone screens.” 

This is a long, but necessary, blog. Just a bit more now. 

I’d wondered why dialysis patients are so much more at risk of Covid-19 and was surprised at how simple and common sense the reasons are. These are gathered from multiple sites that agree that shared rides, the inability to quarantine (since hemodialysis patients usually need to go to a dialysis center), and closer than six feet distancing at the centers (if that’s the case) all contribute to the susceptibility of dialysis patients to Covid-19. 

Please be safe. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! 

You Think It’s All in Your Head?

As I was sitting in my allergist’s office last week, I started to wonder if Chronic Kidney Disease had anything to do with my runny nose. I’d thought it was the usual seasonal allergies, but over the last dozen years or so I’ve learned that almost every malady I experience has some kind of relation to my kidneys…  so why not the runny nose? 

The American Kidney Fund at https://bit.ly/3kvpjb9 explains for us: 

“Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), formerly known as Wegener’s granulomatosis, is a disease that causes swelling and irritation of blood vessels in the kidneys, nose, sinuses, throat and lungs. Swollen blood vessels make it harder for blood to get to the organs and tissues that need it, which can be harmful. The disease also causes lumps called granulomas to form and damage the area around them. In some people GPA only affects the lungs. GPA that affects the kidneys can lead to chronic kidney disease and kidney failure.” 

Whoa! Not good. Let’s see how it’s treated. The Cleveland Clinic at https://cle.clinic/3mjudss tells us, 

“People with GPA who have critical organ system involvement are generally treated with corticosteroids [Gail here: commonly just called steroids] combined with another immunosuppressive medication such as cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan ®) or rituximab (Rituxan®). In patients who have less severe GPA, corticosteroids and methotrexate can be used initially. The goal of treatment is to stop all injury that is occurring as a result of GPA. If disease activity can be completely ‘turned off,’ this is called ‘remission.’ Once it is apparent that the disease is improving, doctors slowly reduce the corticosteroid dose and eventually hope to discontinue it completely. When cyclophosphamide is used, it is only given until the time of remission (usually around 3 to 6 months), after which time it is switched to another immunosuppressive agent, such as methotrexate, azathioprine (Imuran®), or mycophenolate mofetil (Cellcept®) to maintain remission. The treatment duration of the maintenance immunosuppressive medication may vary between individuals. In most instances, it is given for a minimum of 2 years before consideration is given to slowly reduce the dose toward discontinuation.” 

If this sounds familiar, you’re right. It’s straight out of this year’s May 25th blog. Aha! Now we see the value of using the category drop down to the right of the blog. 

Anyway, while this is interesting (to me, at least), it’s not answering my question: Can CKD cause sinus problems. What was that? You want to know what a runny nose has to do with your sinuses? Let’s find out.  

I returned to the ever-reliable Cleveland Clinic, this time at https://cle.clinic/2FXOm7Q,  for some information: 

“Sinusitis is an inflammation, or swelling, of the tissue lining the sinuses. The sinuses are four paired cavities (spaces) in the head. They are connected by narrow channels. The sinuses make thin mucus that drains out of the channels of the nose. This drainage helps keep the nose clean and free of bacteria. Normally filled with air, the sinuses can get blocked and filled with fluid. When that happens, bacteria can grow and cause an infection (bacterial sinusitis). 

This is also called rhinosinusitis, with ‘rhino’ meaning ‘nose.’ The nasal tissue is almost always swollen if sinus tissue is inflamed.” 

It seems that you need a runny nose to avoid sinusitis. Is that right? I don’t think so, and neither does MedicineNet at https://www.medicinenet.com/sinusitis/article.htm.  

“Sinusitis signs and symptoms include 

sinus headache, 

facial tenderness, 

pressure or pain in the sinuses, in the ears and teeth, 

fever, 

cloudy discolored nasal or postnasal drainage, [I bolded this symptom.] 

feeling of nasal stuffiness, 

sore throat, 

cough, and 

occasionally facial swelling.” 

So, now it seems that a runny nose can be a symptom of sinusitis. 

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

And how does that fit in with having CKD? Before we answer that, I think we need to straighten out the differences between allergy and cold symptoms since both conditions may cause sinusitis. 

“The symptoms of allergies and sinusitis overlap a lot. Both can give you a stuffy nose. If it’s allergies, you may also have: 

Runny nose and sneezing 

Watery or itchy eyes 

Wheezing 

If it’s sinusitis, besides a stuffy nose, you may have: 

Thick, colored mucus 

Painful, swollen feeling around your forehead, eyes, and cheeks 

Headache or pain in your teeth 

Post-nasal drip (mucus that moves from the back of your nose into your throat) 

Bad breath 

Cough and sore throat 

Fatigue 

Light fever” 

Thank you to WebMD at https://www.webmd.com/allergies/sinusitis-or-allergies for the list above.  

 On to my original question. This is from Vick’s at https://vicks.com/en-us/treatments/how-to-treat-a-cold/how-to-stop-a-runny-nose. (Who better to go to than a trusted friend since childhood?)  

“A runny nose is a discharge of mucus from the nostrils. It’s the result of excess nasal mucus production. The excess nasal mucus leads to watery nasal secretions that flow out of your nostrils or drip down into your throat. A runny nose is a discharge of mucus from the nostrils. It’s the result of excess nasal mucus production. The excess nasal mucus leads to watery nasal secretions that flow out of your nostrils or drip down into your throat. Nasal congestion is due to the inflammation of the linings of the nasal cavity.” 

Did you notice the word “inflammation” in the last sentence? Ahem, an article by Oleh M Akchurin of Weill Cornell Medical College and Frederick J Kaskel of Albert Einstein College of Medicine published by ResearchGate at https://bit.ly/3jtVzKL states: 

“Chronic inflammation should be regarded as a common comorbid condition in CKD and especially in dialysis patients.”   

And there you have it. Your (and my) runny nose can be caused – in part – from having CKD. Inflammation is the name of the game if you have Chronic Kidney Disease. 

Although, in these times, I wonder if Covid-19 might somehow be involved in certain cases. Just remember, I’m not a doctor and never claimed to be one, so this just might be a question for your medical provider. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! (Safely: mask up, wash up, social distance)