What’s New?

Here we are in the fourth week of National Kidney Month. I caught myself wondering if I were up to date on anything and everything new in the world of kidney disease. I receive emails every day about this or that happening in the kidney community, but how many of them refer to what’s new? I decided to find out. 

I started with a general search and found quite a bit. Let’s start with this paper which was published on January 5th of this year. Since I’ve just had an expensive new crown made, this one on ScienceDaily caught my eye: 

“Lead author Dr Praveen Sharma, from the Periodontal Research Group at the University of Birmingham’s School of Dentistry, said: ‘This is the first paper to quantify the causal effect of periodontitis on kidney function and vice-versa as well as the first to elucidate the pathways involved. 

It showed that even a modest reduction in gum inflammation can benefit renal function. Given the relative ease of achieving a 10% reduction in gum inflammation, through simple measures like correct brushing techniques and cleaning between the teeth, these results are very interesting.’ ” 

Reminder: periodontis is gum infection which can become so serious that you lose teeth and possibly even affects the bone under your teeth. The ‘dont’ part of the word means teeth, while ‘peri’ means around. By this time in reading the blog, we can figure out that ‘itis’ means inflammation. Keep up the brushing and flossing, folks. This may help you save your kidneys. 

Just a week later, on January 12th, EuerkAlert! announced: 

“While investigating the underlying causes of a rare skin disorder, a researcher at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) discovered a previously unknown mechanism in the kidneys that is important for regulating levels of magnesium and calcium in the blood. 

The discovery, described in the journal Cell Reports, highlights the role of a previously little-studied gene called KCTD1. The gene directs production of a protein that regulates the kidney’s ability to reabsorb magnesium and calcium from urine and return it to the bloodstream.” 

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service’s National Institutes of Health’s Office of Dietary Supplements,  

“Magnesium is a nutrient that the body needs to stay healthy. Magnesium is important for many processes in the body, including regulating muscle and nerve function, blood sugar levels, and blood pressure and making protein, bone, and DNA.” 

According to the same agency

“The body needs calcium to maintain strong bones and to carry out many important functions. Almost all calcium is stored in bones and teeth, where it supports their structure and hardness. 

The body also needs calcium for muscles to move and for nerves to carry messages between the brain and everybody part. In addition, calcium is used to help blood vessels move blood throughout the body and to help release hormones and enzymes that affect almost every function in the human body.” 

I remember being flabbergasted upon discovering that the kidneys produce glucose. Can you imagine how my mind is reeling to learn that it also regulates the levels of magnesium and calcium in the blood? Maybe instead of telling me to drink my milk for calcium, my mom should have been telling me to keep an eye on my kidney function… not that we even knew what the kidneys were back then. [By we, I mean my mom and me.] 

But wait, there’s more. [Why do I feel like a 2 a.m. television ad?] Many important discoveries started as experiments with fruit flies. Hopefully, this one announced on January 26th is another of those: 

“In a new paper published in the journal Molecules, alum Cassandra Millet-Boureima (MSc 19) and Chiara Gamberi, affiliate assistant professor of biology, write that melatonin was found to reduce cysts in the renal tubules of fruit flies. These tubules are also found in more complex mammals, including humans, where they are called nephrons. This study, which builds on previous studies by Millet-Boureima and Gamberi, was co-authored by Roman Rozencwaig and Felix Polyak of BH Bioscience in Montreal. 

The researchers hope that their findings can be applied to treating people suffering from autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. ADPKD is a genetic chronic and progressive disease characterized by the growth of dozens of cysts in the nephrons. It is incurable and affects approximately 12.5 million worldwide.” 

Thank you to Medical Dialogues for this information. You may need a reminder about ADPKD, so here it is from PDK Foundation

“Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is one of the most common, life-threatening genetic diseases. In ADPKD, fluid-filled cysts develop and enlarge in both kidneys, eventually leading to kidney failure.” 

May as well define melatonin, too, don’t you think? My favorite dictionary helped us out here: 

“a vertebrate hormone that is derived from serotonin, is secreted by the pineal gland especially in response to darkness, and has been linked to the regulation of circadian rhythms.” 

We are vertebrates, meaning we have a backbone. The pineal gland is sometimes called the third eye, which makes sense now since it responds to darkness, just as our eyes do. 

There are a few more just this year alone, but I think we have room for just one more in today’s blog. 

“Oxygen is essential for human life, but within the body, certain biological environmental conditions can transform oxygen into aggressively reactive molecules called reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can damage DNA, RNA, and proteins. Normally, the body relies on molecules called antioxidants to convert ROS into less dangerous chemical species through a process called reduction. But unhealthy lifestyles, various diseases, stress, and aging can all contribute to an imbalance between the production of ROS and the body’s ability to reduce and eliminate them. The resulting excessive levels of ROS cause ‘oxidative stress,’ which can disrupt normal cellular functions and increase the risk of diseases like cancer, neurodegeneration, kidney dysfunction, and others, which are all accompanied by severe inflammation. 

Since oxidative stress is associated with various serious diseases, its detection within living organs offers a route to early diagnosis and preventive treatment, and is, thus, a matter of considerable interest to scientists working in the field of biomedicine. Recent international collaboration between the Japanese National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology (QST), Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, and Sofia University St. Kliment Ohridski in Bulgaria led to a promising technology for this purpose: a novel quantum sensor. Their work is published in the scientific journal Analytical Chemistry2021.” 

This was from their January 29th press release. Here we have another valuable theory of inquiry. 

My head is swimming. There’s so much new research re keeping our kidneys healthy. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! 

It’s Not Just Scaly Patches

Did I ever mention that I have latent psoriasis? Or that it has something to do with Chronic Kidney Disease? Hmmm, well maybe it’s time… not that most people ever want to admit they have unsightly psoriasis. 

I realize not everyone knows what that is, so we’ll start with a definition from the Mayo Clinic

“Psoriasis is a skin disease that causes red, itchy scaly patches, most commonly on the knees, elbows, trunk and scalp. 

Psoriasis is a common, long-term (chronic) disease with no cure. It tends to go through cycles, flaring for a few weeks or months, then subsiding for a while or going into remission. Treatments are available to help you manage symptoms. And you can incorporate lifestyle habits and coping strategies to help you live better with psoriasis.” 

Now you can see why people might be lax to mention they have psoriasis. It almost appears as if you hadn’t been taking care of your personal hygiene, and no one enjoys looking at those sores. My father had it in large, constant patches, but I grew up seeing it on him and never questioned what it was or how he got it. Maybe that’s why I’m so open about having it myself. 

Oh, yes, latent. That just means it’s there, but it hasn’t made itself known yet. 

I went to WebMD for an explanation of the symptoms of psoriasis. 

“Plaques of red skin, often covered with silver-colored scales. These plaques may be itchy and painful, and they sometimes crack and bleed. In severe cases, the plaques will grow and merge, covering large areas. 

Disorders of the fingernails and toenails, including discoloration and pitting of the nails. The nails may also crumble or detach from the nail bed. 

Plaques of scales or crust on the scalp.” 

I remember a dermatologist telling me a long time ago that this skin disorder causes skin cells to produce 10 times faster than usual and asking me if I had psoriatic arthritis. I looked at him blankly. That resulted in a trip to the rheumatologist.  

Yes, that’s what I had. Arthritis.org was extremely clear about just what psoriatic arthritis [abbreviation: PsA] is: 

“Causes 

PsA (like psoriasis) is an autoimmune disease, which means the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks healthy tissue, causing inflammation and pain and resulting in damage. Researchers aren’t sure why some people develop PsA. They think it’s a combination of having certain genes, which makes them more likely to develop the disease, and being triggered by something in the environment, like an infection, stress, physical trauma or another factor.  

Symptoms: 

Skin: 

Itchy, painful red patches or a silvery white buildup of dead skin cells; most commonly on the knees, elbows and scalp, although a rash can occur anywhere on the body. It is not contagious. [Gail here: same symptoms as psoriasis] 

Joints/Spine: 

Mainly occurs in the fingers (in the joints closest to the nail), wrists, ankles and knees. Symptoms such as pain, tenderness, warmth and swelling, may affect different sides of the body (right hand and left knee). This may be referred to as peripheral arthritis. Sometimes one entire, individual finger or toe will swell up, making it painful and hard to bend. This is referred to as dactylitis. Pain and stiffness in the low back, buttock can also occur. Sometimes the neck and hips are affected and this may be referred to as spondylitis or axial arthritis.  

Nails: 

Cracking, pitting, white spots and lifting from the nail bed can occur. This may be referred to as nail disease. 

Enthesis (plural, entheses): 

Inflammation and swelling of one or more entheses, which are the places in the body where a tendon or ligament connects with a bone. Common spots include at the back of the heel and the bottom of the foot. This is called enthesitis.  
 
Many people with psoriatic arthritis get very tired (fatigue) and some may have a low-grade fever. Symptoms may come and go. A period of increased inflammation and worsening of other symptoms is called a flare. A flare can last for days or months.”   

And now for the biggie- What does any of this have to do with CKD? 

“’Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease of the skin that causes inflammation throughout the entire body,’ says Dr. Aamir Memon, nephrologist on staff at Advocate Sherman Hospital in Elgin, Ill. ‘When you have an autoimmune disease, you have antibodies in your blood, which can deposit anywhere in the body, such as your heart and kidneys. The increased inflammation increases the risk of atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) and organ damage.’ 

According to Dr. Memon, many patients with moderate to severe psoriasis take medications like Cyclosporine or Methotrexate as treatment. However, side effects from these medications include kidney problems. 

‘Since psoriasis has effects on the kidneys, it would intuitively make sense to control the inflammation to prevent further worsening of the kidneys,’ Dr Memon says. ‘Further studies are needed to evaluate if that is the case and as to what medications are best to decrease inflammation and prevent or halt kidney disease.’” 

Thank you to health enews at Advocate Aurora Health for the above information. This is a new site for me, so allow me to introduce you to them via their website: 

“health enews is the Midwest’s go-to source for timely, patient-centered and credible health news and information. Our goal is to provide readers with relevant and engaging articles and stories as part of our commitment to building healthy and informed communities across Illinois, Wisconsin and beyond. 

health enews is produced by a team of seasoned journalists and public affairs professionals from across Advocate Aurora Health.” 

From my 11 years of blogging about CKD, I’m beginning to accept that it is all connected. What happens to one part of the body does, indeed, affect the other parts of the body. Now you know how CKD and psoriasis are related, in case you’d ever wondered. 

You may have noticed there are no URLs in the blogs lately. Press control and click on the name of the organization instead. They are linked to the articles mentioned.

Until next week, 

Keep living your life!  

Mg or Magnesium to You and Me

We usually think of Mg (mg) as the abbreviation for milligrams. Lately, I’ve been hearing a lot about Mg as the symbol for magnesium. In fact, a friend all the way across the country in Florida sent me an article about it from her local town paper. That got me to thinking. I haven’t written about magnesium in over three years. Has anything new been uncovered about this particular electrolyte? But first we need to know what I wrote about it in SlowItDownCKD 2017.  

“The medical dictionary part of The Free Dictionary by Farlex at http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/magnesium tells us: 

‘An alkaline earth element (atomic number 12; atomic weight 24.3) which is an essential mineral required for bone and tooth formation, nerve conduction and muscle contraction; it is required by many enzymes involved in carbohydrate, protein and nucleic acid metabolism. Magnesium is present in almonds, apples, dairy products, corn, figs, fresh leafy greens, legumes, nuts, seafood, seeds, soybeans, wheat germ and whole grains. Magnesium may be useful in treating anxiety, asthma and cardiovascular disease; it is thought to prevent blood clots, raise HDL-cholesterol, lower LDL-cholesterol, reduce arrhythmias and blood pressure, and to help with depression, fatigue, hyperactivity and migraines.’ 

All this by an electrolyte that constitutes only 1% of extra cellular fluid? I’m beginning to suspect that magnesium is the under explained electrolyte. 

All right then, what happens if you have too little magnesium?

The U.S. Dept. of Health & Human Services of the National Institutes of Health at https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Magnesium-HealthProfessional/ lays it out for us: 

‘Early signs of magnesium deficiency include loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, and weakness. As magnesium deficiency worsens, numbness, tingling, muscle contractions and cramps, seizures, personality changes, abnormal heart rhythms, and coronary spasms can occur …. Severe magnesium deficiency can result in hypocalcemia or hypokalemia (low serum calcium or potassium levels, respectively) because mineral homeostasis is disrupted….’ 

Well, who’s at risk for magnesium deficiency? The same source tells us: 

‘Magnesium inadequacy can occur when intakes fall below the RDA [Gail here today: RDA is the Recommended Dietary Allowances] but are above the amount required to prevent overt deficiency. The following groups are more likely than others to be at risk of magnesium inadequacy because they typically consume insufficient amounts or they have medical conditions (or take medications) that reduce magnesium absorption from the gut or increase losses from the body. 

People with gastrointestinal diseases 
The chronic diarrhea and fat malabsorption resulting from Crohn’s disease, gluten-sensitive enteropathy (celiac disease), and regional enteritis can lead to magnesium depletion over time …. Resection or bypass of the small intestine, especially the ileum, typically leads to malabsorption and magnesium loss …. 

People with type 2 diabetes [Gail again today: That’s me.] 
Magnesium deficits and increased urinary magnesium excretion can occur in people with insulin resistance and/or type 2 diabetes…. The magnesium loss appears to be secondary to higher concentrations of glucose in the kidney that increase urine output …. 

People with alcohol dependence 
Magnesium deficiency is common in people with chronic alcoholism…. In these individuals, poor dietary intake and nutritional status; gastrointestinal problems, including vomiting, diarrhea, and steatorrhea (fatty stools) resulting from pancreatitis; renal dysfunction with excess excretion of magnesium into the urine; phosphate depletion; vitamin D deficiency; acute alcoholic ketoacidosis; and hyperaldosteronism secondary to liver disease can all contribute to decreased magnesium status …. 

Older adults 
Older adults have lower dietary intakes of magnesium than younger adults …. In addition, magnesium absorption from the gut decreases and renal magnesium excretion increases with age …. Older adults are also more likely to have chronic diseases or take medications that alter magnesium status, which can increase their risk of magnesium depletion ….’” 

Okay, that was then. Let’s see if there’s more news now.  Oh, look at that! I found lots of goodies at https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Magnesium-HealthProfessional/ which is one of the same sites I used in 2017. I suggest you check this site for even more information about magnesium and your health. 

Table 1: Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) for Magnesium  

Age Male Female Pregnancy Lactation 
Birth to 6 months 30 mg* 30 mg*   
7–12 months 75 mg* 75 mg*   
1–3 years 80 mg 80 mg   
4–8 years 130 mg 130 mg   
9–13 years 240 mg 240 mg   
14–18 years 410 mg 360 mg 400 mg 360 mg 
19–30 years 400 mg 310 mg 350 mg 310 mg 
31–50 years 420 mg 320 mg 360 mg 320 mg 
51+ years 420 mg 320 mg   

*Adequate Intake (AI) 
 

Table 2: Selected Food Sources of Magnesium  

Food Milligrams 
(mg) per 
serving 
Percent 
DV* 
Pumpkin seeds, roasted, 1 ounce 156 37 
Chia seeds, 1 ounce 111 26 
Almonds, dry roasted, 1 ounce 80 19 
Spinach, boiled, ½ cup 78 19 
Cashews, dry roasted, 1 ounce 74 18 
Peanuts, oil roasted, ¼ cup 63 15 
Cereal, shredded wheat, 2 large biscuits 61 15 
Soymilk, plain or vanilla, 1 cup 61 15 
Black beans, cooked, ½ cup 60 14 
Edamame, shelled, cooked, ½ cup 50 12 
Peanut butter, smooth, 2 tablespoons 49 12 
Potato, baked with skin, 3.5 ounces 43 10 
Rice, brown, cooked, ½ cup 42 10 
Yogurt, plain, low fat, 8 ounces 42 10 
Breakfast cereals, fortified with 10% of the DV for magnesium, 1 serving 42 10 
Oatmeal, instant, 1 packet 36 
Kidney beans, canned, ½ cup 35 
Banana, 1 medium 32 
Salmon, Atlantic, farmed, cooked, 3 ounces 26 
Milk, 1 cup 24–27 
Halibut, cooked, 3 ounces 24 
Raisins, ½ cup 23 
Bread, whole wheat, 1 slice 23 
Avocado, cubed, ½ cup 22 
Chicken breast, roasted, 3 ounces 22 
Beef, ground, 90% lean, pan broiled, 3 ounces 20 
Broccoli, chopped and cooked, ½ cup 12 
Rice, white, cooked, ½ cup 10 
Apple, 1 medium 
Carrot, raw, 1 medium 2” 

As mentioned in my earlier blog on magnesium: 

“Quick, go check your lab results. You’ll notice there’s no magnesium level. If you’d like your magnesium tested, you or your doctor need to order a specific test for that. Some labs will allow you to order your own magnesium test; others will require a doctor’s orders.” 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! 

How Rare is This?

I have been hearing about so many different kinds of kidney disease that I’d forgotten which I’d written about. UMOD nephropathy is one that has kept coming up this past week or so. That got me to thinking… yep, I did write about it once before. It seems I had trouble getting any information at that time. Let’s try again. 

To start, here is some of the information about the disease that I included in SlowItDownCKD 2019. 

This is what the U.S. National Library of Medicine at bit.ly/3sykq5O had to say: 

‘Many individuals with uromodulin-associated kidney disease develop high blood levels of a waste product called uric acid. Normally, the kidneys remove uric acid from the blood and transfer it to urine. In this condition, the kidneys are unable to remove uric acid from the blood effectively. A buildup of uric acid can cause gout, which is a form of arthritis resulting from uric acid crystals in the joints. The signs and symptoms of gout may appear as early as a person’s teens in uromodulin-associated kidney disease. 

Uromodulin-associated kidney disease causes slowly progressive kidney disease, with the signs and symptoms usually beginning during the teenage years. The kidneys become less able to filter fluids and waste products from the body as this condition progresses, resulting in kidney failure. Individuals with uromodulin-associated kidney disease typically require either dialysis to remove wastes from the blood or a kidney transplant between the ages of 30 and 70. Occasionally, affected individuals are found to have small kidneys or kidney cysts (medullary cysts).’” 

By the way, the U.S. National Library of Medicine is part of the National Institutes of Health. 

I suspected I could find more information since almost two years have passed and I did. The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD), which is part of the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences which, in turn, is part of the National Institutes of Health (just as the U.S. National Library of Medicine is) at Bit.ly/35KOalW offered the following:   

Autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease due to UMOD mutations (ADTKD–UMOD) is an inherited disorder that causes a gradual loss of kidney function that eventually leads to the need for kidney transplantation or dialysis between the ages of 30 and 70. Patients with ADTKD-UMOD have high blood levels of uric acid before kidney failure develops, and some affected individuals may develop gout. Gout is a form of arthritis (inflammation) that occurs often in the big toe, ankle, knee, or other joints…. ADTKD-UMOD is caused by a mistake (mutation) in the UMOD gene, which leads to the build-up of the altered uromodulin protein in the tubules [Gail here: These are small tubes in your kidneys.] the kidney, leading to slow loss of kidney function. ADTKD-UMOD is inherited in a dominant pattern in families. It is diagnosed based on the symptoms, laboratory testing, family history and genetic testing. Many of the symptoms of ADTKD-UMOD can be treated with medication. For patients whose kidney function worsens to end-stage kidney disease, kidney transplant and dialysis can be used. The long-term outlook for people with ADTKD-UMOD is good, though patients may require dialysis or kidney transplantation between the ages of 30 and 70….” 

I was having a bit of trouble with the different names of the disease, so I turned to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1356/ for clarification: 

“Autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease caused by UMOD pathogenic variants (ADTKD-UMOD) was previously known as familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy type 1 (FJHN1), medullary cystic kidney disease type 2 (MCKD2), and UMOD-associated kidney disease (or uromodulin-associated kidney disease)” 

The NCBI is ultimately also part of (surprise!) the National Institutes of Health. 

Well, that helped but you may also need this definition found in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease’s Glossary: 

Nephropathy: Kidney disease.” 

Hmmm, come to think of it, we could use a few more definitions. Thank you to Medline Plus for the definitions: 

Uremic acid: Uric acid is a chemical created when the body breaks down substances called purines. Purines are normally produced in the body and are also found in some foods and drinks. Foods with high content of purines include liver, anchovies, mackerel, dried beans and peas, and beer. 

UMOD gene: The UMOD gene provides instructions for making a protein called uromodulin. This protein is produced by the kidneys and then excreted from the body in urine. The function of uromodulin remains unclear, although it is known to be the most abundant protein in the urine of healthy individuals. Researchers have suggested that uromodulin may protect against urinary tract infections. It may also help control the amount of water in urine. 

This is quite a bit of information, but we still need the symptoms? According to Wake Forest Baptist Health at bit.ly/3oRN7s8

“There are three common features of this disease: 

Patients develop chronic kidney failure with loss of kidney function beginning in the teenage years and progressing to the need for dialysis or kidney transplantation at an age between 30 and 70 years. Patients have few or no symptoms of kidney disease when they are diagnosed. 

Usually, affected individuals are found to have some loss of kidney function when they undergo blood testing by their doctor as part of a general health screening. A blood test called the serum creatinine level is performed. If the blood creatinine level is above 1, this is usually abnormal and means the kidney is not removing the creatinine from the blood well enough. …. Frequently the doctor does not know why the serum creatinine level is high. Even if a kidney biopsy (the removal of a small piece of kidney tissue) is performed, a correct diagnosis is frequently not made. 

The patient has gout or some member of the family has a history of gout …. Affected individuals have high blood uric acid levels, and this leads to gout. Every affected individual in the family may not have gout, but there are usually at least one or two people in the family who have gout. Gout frequently involves the big toe, the foot, or the knee. The big toe will become extremely tender, and even placing a sheet on the toe will cause pain. In this condition, gout occurs in the late teenage years in both men and women. (In contrast, gout developing in the normal adult population tends to occur in overweight men in their 30’s to 50’s). Family members may develop bumps on their joints called tophi that are deposits of uric acid. 

The disease is likely to be inherited. If a person has the disease, their children have a 1 out of 2 (50%) chance of having the disease. The disease does not skip a generation, though a parent may be less severely affected than their child, and may not have gout or other signs of kidney disease for some time. Therefore, there is usually a strong family history of the condition.” 

Unfortunately, there is no cure for this rare disease – there are medications available to treat the symptoms. Only 400 people worldwide suffer from UMOD Nephropathy. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! 

You Think It’s All in Your Head?

As I was sitting in my allergist’s office last week, I started to wonder if Chronic Kidney Disease had anything to do with my runny nose. I’d thought it was the usual seasonal allergies, but over the last dozen years or so I’ve learned that almost every malady I experience has some kind of relation to my kidneys…  so why not the runny nose? 

The American Kidney Fund at https://bit.ly/3kvpjb9 explains for us: 

“Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), formerly known as Wegener’s granulomatosis, is a disease that causes swelling and irritation of blood vessels in the kidneys, nose, sinuses, throat and lungs. Swollen blood vessels make it harder for blood to get to the organs and tissues that need it, which can be harmful. The disease also causes lumps called granulomas to form and damage the area around them. In some people GPA only affects the lungs. GPA that affects the kidneys can lead to chronic kidney disease and kidney failure.” 

Whoa! Not good. Let’s see how it’s treated. The Cleveland Clinic at https://cle.clinic/3mjudss tells us, 

“People with GPA who have critical organ system involvement are generally treated with corticosteroids [Gail here: commonly just called steroids] combined with another immunosuppressive medication such as cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan ®) or rituximab (Rituxan®). In patients who have less severe GPA, corticosteroids and methotrexate can be used initially. The goal of treatment is to stop all injury that is occurring as a result of GPA. If disease activity can be completely ‘turned off,’ this is called ‘remission.’ Once it is apparent that the disease is improving, doctors slowly reduce the corticosteroid dose and eventually hope to discontinue it completely. When cyclophosphamide is used, it is only given until the time of remission (usually around 3 to 6 months), after which time it is switched to another immunosuppressive agent, such as methotrexate, azathioprine (Imuran®), or mycophenolate mofetil (Cellcept®) to maintain remission. The treatment duration of the maintenance immunosuppressive medication may vary between individuals. In most instances, it is given for a minimum of 2 years before consideration is given to slowly reduce the dose toward discontinuation.” 

If this sounds familiar, you’re right. It’s straight out of this year’s May 25th blog. Aha! Now we see the value of using the category drop down to the right of the blog. 

Anyway, while this is interesting (to me, at least), it’s not answering my question: Can CKD cause sinus problems. What was that? You want to know what a runny nose has to do with your sinuses? Let’s find out.  

I returned to the ever-reliable Cleveland Clinic, this time at https://cle.clinic/2FXOm7Q,  for some information: 

“Sinusitis is an inflammation, or swelling, of the tissue lining the sinuses. The sinuses are four paired cavities (spaces) in the head. They are connected by narrow channels. The sinuses make thin mucus that drains out of the channels of the nose. This drainage helps keep the nose clean and free of bacteria. Normally filled with air, the sinuses can get blocked and filled with fluid. When that happens, bacteria can grow and cause an infection (bacterial sinusitis). 

This is also called rhinosinusitis, with ‘rhino’ meaning ‘nose.’ The nasal tissue is almost always swollen if sinus tissue is inflamed.” 

It seems that you need a runny nose to avoid sinusitis. Is that right? I don’t think so, and neither does MedicineNet at https://www.medicinenet.com/sinusitis/article.htm.  

“Sinusitis signs and symptoms include 

sinus headache, 

facial tenderness, 

pressure or pain in the sinuses, in the ears and teeth, 

fever, 

cloudy discolored nasal or postnasal drainage, [I bolded this symptom.] 

feeling of nasal stuffiness, 

sore throat, 

cough, and 

occasionally facial swelling.” 

So, now it seems that a runny nose can be a symptom of sinusitis. 

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

And how does that fit in with having CKD? Before we answer that, I think we need to straighten out the differences between allergy and cold symptoms since both conditions may cause sinusitis. 

“The symptoms of allergies and sinusitis overlap a lot. Both can give you a stuffy nose. If it’s allergies, you may also have: 

Runny nose and sneezing 

Watery or itchy eyes 

Wheezing 

If it’s sinusitis, besides a stuffy nose, you may have: 

Thick, colored mucus 

Painful, swollen feeling around your forehead, eyes, and cheeks 

Headache or pain in your teeth 

Post-nasal drip (mucus that moves from the back of your nose into your throat) 

Bad breath 

Cough and sore throat 

Fatigue 

Light fever” 

Thank you to WebMD at https://www.webmd.com/allergies/sinusitis-or-allergies for the list above.  

 On to my original question. This is from Vick’s at https://vicks.com/en-us/treatments/how-to-treat-a-cold/how-to-stop-a-runny-nose. (Who better to go to than a trusted friend since childhood?)  

“A runny nose is a discharge of mucus from the nostrils. It’s the result of excess nasal mucus production. The excess nasal mucus leads to watery nasal secretions that flow out of your nostrils or drip down into your throat. A runny nose is a discharge of mucus from the nostrils. It’s the result of excess nasal mucus production. The excess nasal mucus leads to watery nasal secretions that flow out of your nostrils or drip down into your throat. Nasal congestion is due to the inflammation of the linings of the nasal cavity.” 

Did you notice the word “inflammation” in the last sentence? Ahem, an article by Oleh M Akchurin of Weill Cornell Medical College and Frederick J Kaskel of Albert Einstein College of Medicine published by ResearchGate at https://bit.ly/3jtVzKL states: 

“Chronic inflammation should be regarded as a common comorbid condition in CKD and especially in dialysis patients.”   

And there you have it. Your (and my) runny nose can be caused – in part – from having CKD. Inflammation is the name of the game if you have Chronic Kidney Disease. 

Although, in these times, I wonder if Covid-19 might somehow be involved in certain cases. Just remember, I’m not a doctor and never claimed to be one, so this just might be a question for your medical provider. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! (Safely: mask up, wash up, social distance)