World Kidney Day, 2021

Will you look at that? The world keeps moving on, pandemic or not. And so, I recognize that Thursday of this week is World Kidney Day. In honor of this occasion, I’ve chosen to update whatever I’ve written about World Kidney Day before … now sit back and enjoy the read. 

…World Kidney Day? What’s that? I discovered this is a fairly new designation. It was only fifteen years ago that it was initiated. 

 According to http://worldkidneyday.org

“World Kidney Day is a global awareness campaign aimed at raising awareness of the importance of our kidneys.” 

Sound familiar? That’s where I’m heading with What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney DiseaseSlowItDownCKD 2011SlowItDownCKD 2012

SlowItDownCKD 2013SlowItDownCKD 2014SlowItDownCKD 2015;

 SlowItDownCKD 2016SlowItDownCKD 2017

SlowItDownCKD 2018SlowItDownCKD 2019the soon to be published SlowItDownCKD 2020; Facebook; Instagram; LinkedIn; Pinterest; Twitter; and this blog. We may be running along different tracks, but we’re headed in the same direction. 

According to their website,  

The International Society of Nephrology (ISN) is a global professional association dedicated to advancing kidney health worldwide since 1960 through education, grants, research, and advocacy.  

We do this for all our stakeholders by:  

BRIDGING THE GAPS of available care through advocacy and collaborations with our global partners  

BUILDING CAPACITY in healthcare professionals via granting programs, education and research  

CONNNECTING OUR COMMUNITY to develop a stronger understanding of the management of kidney disease.  

The ISN, through its members and in collaboration with national and regional societies, engages 30,000 health professionals from across the globe to reduce the burden of kidney diseases and provide optimal health care for patients.”  

If you go to Initiatives on the ISN’s website, you’ll find the following: 

“World Kidney Day (WKD) is a joint initiative between the International Society of Nephrology (ISN) and the International Federation of Kidney Foundations (IFKF). 

World Kidney Day is a global campaign that aims to raise awareness of the importance of our kidneys to overall health and to reduce the frequency and impact of kidney disease and its associated health problems. 

World Kidney Day is an annual event that takes place worldwide. Hundreds of organizations and individuals launch initiatives and events on WKD to help raise awareness of kidney disease.” 

Now we just need to know what the International Federation of Kidney Foundations (IFKF) has to say about themselves: 

“Vision 

Better kidney health for all. 

Optimal care for people affected with Kidney Disease or Kidney Failure. 

Mission 

Leading a worldwide movement to 

Promote better kidney health with primary, secondary and tertiary preventive measures. 

Promote optimal treatment and care so as to maximize the health, quality of life, and longevity for people with or at high risk for developing Kidney Disease or Kidney Failure.” 

As of July of last year, the name has been changed to the International Federation of Kidney Foundations – World Kidney Alliance (IFKF-WKA) 

Photo by Karolina Grabowska on Pexels.com

Back to World Kidney Day’s website now, if you please. 

“The World Kidney Day Steering Committee has declared 2021 the year of ‘Living Well with Kidney Disease’. This has been done in order to both increase education and awareness about effective symptom management and patient empowerment, with the ultimate goal of encouraging life participation. Whilst effective measures to prevent kidney disease and its progression are important, patients with kidney disease – including those who depend on dialysis and transplantation – and their care-partners should also feel supported, especially during pandemics and other challenging periods, by the concerted efforts of kidney care communities.” 

Their site offers materials and ideas for events as well as a map of global events. Prepare to be awed at how wide spread World Kidney Day events are. 

Before you leave their page, take a detour to Kidney FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) on the toolbar at the top of the page.  You can learn everything you need to know from what the kidneys do to what the symptoms (or lack thereof) of CKD are, from how to treat CKD to a toolbox full of helpful education about your kidneys to preventative measures. 

Just as this year’s, the previous World Kidney Day themes were all educational and much needed by the CKD community. 

“2020 Kidney Health for Everyone Everywhere – from Prevention to Detection and Equitable Access to Care 

2019 Kidney Health for Everyone, Everywhere 

2018 Kidneys & Women’s Health. Include, Value, Empower 

2017 Kidney Disease & Obesity – Healthy Lifestyle for Healthy Kidneys 

2016 Kidney Disease & Children – Act Early to Prevent It! 

2015 Kidney Health for All 

2014 Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) and aging 

2013 Kidneys for Life – Stop Kidney Attack! 

2012 Donate – Kidneys for Life – Receive 

2011 Protect your kidneys: Save your heart 

2010 Protect your kidneys: Control diabetes 

2009 Protect your kidneys: Keep your pressure down 

2008 Your amazing kidneys! 

2007 CKD: Common, harmful and treatable 

2006 Are your kidneys OK?” 

If only my nurse practitioner had been aware of National Kidney Month [That’s the topic of next week’s blog] or World Kidney Day, she could have warned me immediately that I needed to make lifestyle changes so the decline of my kidney function could have been slowed down earlier. How much more of my kidney function would I still have if I’d known earlier? That was thirteen years ago. This shouldn’t still be happening… but it is. 

Photo by Gabby K on Pexels.com

I received a phone call a few years ago that just about broke my heart.  Someone very dear to me sobbed, “He’s dying.” When I calmed her down, she explained a parent was sent to a nephrologist who told him he has end stage renal disease and needed dialysis or transplantation immediately. 

I pried a little trying to get her to admit he’d been diagnosed before end stage, but she simply didn’t know what I was talking about. There had been no diagnose of Chronic Kidney Disease up to this point. There was diabetes, apparently out of control diabetes, but no one impressed upon this man that diabetes is the foremost cause of CKD. 

What a waste of the precious time he could have had to do more than stop smoking, which he did [to his credit], the moment he was told it would help with the diabetes.  Would he be where he was then if his medical practitioners had been aware of National Kidney Month or World Kidney Day, especially since this man was high risk due to his age and diabetes?  I fervently believe so. 

I have a close friend who was involved in the local senior center where she lives.  She said she didn’t know anyone else but me who had this disease.  Since 1 out of every 7 people does nationally (That’s 15% of the adult population) and being over 65 places you in a high risk group, I wonder how many of her friends were included in the 90% of those in the early stage of CKD who don’t know they have CKD or don’t even know they need to be tested.  I’d have rather been mistaken here, but I’m afraid I wasn’t. National Kidney Month or World Kidney Day could have helped them become aware. Thank you to the CDC for these figures. Please note the figures are as of 2019. 

For those of you who have forgotten [Easily understood explanations of what results of the different items on your tests mean are in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease.], all it takes is a blood test and a urine test to detect CKD.  I have routine blood tests every three months to monitor a medication I’m taking.  It was in this test, a test I took anyway, that my family physician uncovered Chronic Kidney Disease as a problem. 

There is so much free education about CKD online. Maybe you can start with the blogroll on the right side of the blog or hit ‘Apps’ on the Topics Dropdown .Responsum is a good place to start. None of us needs to hear another sorrowful, “If only I had known!” 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life!