That Looks Swollen       

Remember I mentioned that several readers have asked questions that would become blogs? For example, one reader’s question became last week’s blog concerning creatinine and PTH. Another reader’s question became this week’s blog about lymphedema. She was diagnosed with it and wondered if it had anything to do with her protein buildup.

She’s a long time reader and online friend, so she already knows I remind those that ask questions that I am not a doctor and, no matter what I discover, she must speak with her nephrologist before taking any action based on what I wrote. That is always true. I’m a CKD patient just like you. The only difference is that I know how to research (Teaching college level Research Writing taught me a lot.) and happen to have been a writer for decades before I was diagnosed. Just take a look at my Amazon Author Page at amazon.com/author/gailraegarwood . But enough about me.

Anyone know what lymphedema is? I didn’t when I first heard the word, although my Hunter College of C.U.N.Y education as an English teacher gave me some clues. Edema had something to do with swelling under the skin. Actually, we can get more specific with The Free Medical Dictionary at https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/-edema :

“suffix meaning swelling resulting from an excessive accumulation of serous fluid in the tissues of the body in (specified) locations”

I took a guess that lymph had to do with the lymph nodes. Using the same dictionary, but this time at https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/lymph, I found this:

“The almost colourless fluid that bathes body tissues and is found in the lymphatic vessels that drain the tissues of the fluid that filters across the blood vessel walls from blood. Lymph carries antibodies and lymphocytes (white blood cells that help fight infection) that have entered the lymph nodes from the blood.”

Time to attach the suffix (group of letters added at the end of a word that changes its meaning) to the root (most basic meaning of the word) to come up with a definition of lymphedema. No, not my definition, the same dictionary’s.

“Swelling, especially in subcutaneous tissues, as a result of obstruction of lymphatic vessels or lymph nodes, with accumulation of lymph in the affected region.”

I found this definition at https://www.thefreedictionary.com/lymphedema, but if you switch the search options at the top of the page from dictionary to medical dictionary, you’ll find quite a bit of information about lymphedema.

Okay, we know what lymphedema is now but what – if anything – does that have to do with protein buildup? This is the closest I could come to an answer that

  1. Wasn’t too medical for me to understand and
  2. Had anything to do with the kidneys.

“A thorough medical history and physical examination are done to rule out other causes of limb swelling, such as edema due to congestive heart failure, kidney failure, blood clots, or other conditions.”

It’s from MedicineNet at https://www.medicinenet.com/lymphedema/article.htm#how_is_lymphedema_diagnosed

My friend, while a Chronic Kidney Disease patient, is not in renal failure. Was there something I missed?

Johns Hopkins Medicine at https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/treatment-tests-and-therapies/treating-lymphedema gives us our first clue. It seems that lymphedema is a buildup of a specific fluid: protein-rich:

“Lymphedema is an abnormal buildup of protein-rich fluid in any part of the body as a result of malfunction in the lymphatic system.”

Malfunction in the lymphatic system? What could cause that? According to Lymphatic Education & Research at https://lymphaticnetwork.org/living-with-lymphedema/lymphatic-disease:

Secondary Lymphedema (acquired regional lymphatic insufficiency) is a disease that is common among adults and children in the United States. It can occur following any trauma, infection or surgery that disrupts the lymphatic channels or results in the loss of lymph nodes. Among the more than 3 million breast cancer survivors alone, acquired or secondary lymphedema is believed to be present in approximately 30% of these individuals, predisposing them to the same long-term problems as described above. Lymphedema also results from prostate, uterine, cervical, abdominal, orthopedic cosmetic (liposuction) and other surgeries, malignant melanoma, and treatments used for both Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Radiation, sports injuries, tattooing, and any physical insult to the lymphatic pathways can also cause lymphedema. Even though lymphatic insufficiency may not immediately present at the time any of the events occur, these individuals are at life-long risk for the onset of lymphedema.”

I know the reader who has asked the question has a complex medical history that may include one or more of the conditions listed above. As for the protein buildup, we already know that kidneys which are

not working well don’t filter the protein from your blood as well as they could. So, is there a connection between this reader’s protein buildup and her lymphedema? Sure looks like it.

While the following is from BreastCancer.org at https://www.breastcancer.org/treatment/lymphedema/how/start, it is a simple explanation that may apply to other causes of lymphedema, too:

“… lymph nodes and vessels can’t keep up with the tissues’ need to get rid of extra fluid, proteins (Gail here: my bolding), and waste.… the proteins and wastes do not get filtered out of the lymph as efficiently as they once did. Very gradually, waste and fluid build up…. “

Ready for a topic change? The World Health Organization offers this pictograph for our information. Notice diabetes, one of the main causes of Chronic Kidney Disease.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Inked

tattooThere’s a woman I know, younger than I by three and a half decades, who is inked… and I mean inked. She has sleeves on both arms and (almost) a body suit.  Don’t know what I’m talking about? Take a look at http://www.inkedmag.com/tattoo-lingo/. Unfortunately she’s lost a job or two when narrow minded employers saw her arms, but that’s not what I’m writing about today.

Oh, all right. Here are the definitions of the jargon above: inked = tattooed; sleeve= fully tattooed on the arm; body suit= tattoos on the majority of the body.

I was thinking about her the other day and that got me to thinking about tattoos and whether or not they’re safe for us since we have Chronic Kidney Disease. Let’s take a look at the tattooing process itself to see if there’s anything there to worry about.

I turned to The Mayo Clinic at http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/in-depth/tattoos-and-piercings/art-20045067 for this information.

“A tattoo is a permanent mark or design made on your skin with pigments inserted through pricks into the skin’s top layer. Typically, the tattoo tattoo machineartist uses a hand-held machine that acts much like a sewing machine, with one or more needles piercing the skin repeatedly. With every puncture, the needles insert tiny ink droplets.

The process — which is done without anesthetics — causes a small amount of bleeding and slight to potentially significant pain.”

Personally, I’m too much of a scaredy cat to give tattooing a try now that I know about the possibility of pain. There’s enough of that in my life already… like the endometrial biopsy a few months ago. Ugh! But maybe you’re not…

Well, why might you want a tattoo in the first place? Maybe it’s an artistic requirement for your soul.  Maybe it’s to remind yourself of some life lesson like my New York daughter, Nima’s. Or maybe it’s a medical tattoo to wear rather than a medical alert bracelet.

What is itHmmm, I’d think again. As CKD patients, our blood is already not that pure. Remember, as I explained in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease,

“The kidneys remove these toxins (e.g. from the blood) and change them into urine ….”

Our kidneys are not functioning at the top of their game. With my current GFR of 51, my kidneys are only functioning at a teeny bit more than half capacity while still trying to filter the blood as kidneys with a GFR of 100% would. Oh, right, GFR. In The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 that’s explained according to the NKDED:

“The National Kidney Disease Education Program at The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services provides the following information.DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAIL

  1. A blood test checks your GFR, which tells how well your kidneys are filtering. GFR stands for glomerular filtration rate. …”

Here’s what I found on Health Impact News at http://healthimpactnews.com/2015/think-before-you-ink-the-little-known-risks-of-tattoos/ that makes me so leery of tattoos.

“In 2011, a study in The British Journal of Dermatology revealed that nanoparticles are indeed found in tattoo inks, with black pigments containing the smallest particles (white pigments had the largest particles and colored pigments were in between).

Nanoparticles are ultramicroscopic in size, making them able to readily penetrate your skin and travel to underlying blood vessels and your bloodstream. Evidence suggests that some nanoparticles may induce toxic effects in your brain and cause nerve damage, and some may also be carcinogenic.”Healthy%20Kidney

Whenever I speak to someone who has a tattoo, they tell me the ink only goes as far as the dermis (the second layer of skin) and nowhere near the blood.  I often wondered about that since the dermis is rife with blood vessels. I guess I just learned that the tattoo owners were misinformed. And why we as CKD patients should not be allowing even the possibility of more toxins entering our blood streams for our already overworked kidneys to eliminate.

Are tattos pretty? I think so.  Are they spiritual? Sometimes they are. Are they worth the risk? It’s your decision, but I can’t agree that they are. I found even more evidence to the contrary on WebMd at http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/laser-tattoo-removal?page=2

“There are minimal side effects to laser tattoo removal. However, you should consider these factors in your decision:

tattoo removalThe tattoo removal site is at risk for infection. You may also risk lack of complete pigment removal, and there is a slight chance that the treatment can leave you with a permanent scar….”

I’d also read on various sites that simply being tattooed may leave you open for infection if the autoclave (instrument steaming machine) or needles are not clean enough. I don’t know of any sites to rate the cleanliness of tattoo parlors, but I do know infection opportunities are far more common for us as CKD patients…and they are more dangerous for us.

This paragraph from The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2 should clarify the why of avoiding infection possibilities.

Digital Cover Part 2 redone - Copy“Think about it: your liver and your kidneys are the two most important blood filters you have. We already know we need to maintain as steady a blood pressure in the kidneys as we can to do no more damage to them.  The liver does this by releasing angiotensin which constricts your blood vessels. Don’t forget the liver helps maintain your blood sugars.  If it can’t do that due to infection, kidney function can be further reduced. The liver also filters toxins and drugs from the blood.”

I wondered if I’d find enough information for a blog about CKD patients and tattoos. On the contrary, I find I could go on and on.

Tuesday is the beginning of National Kidney Month. While I won’t be leading my team in the kidney walk this year (Damn neuropathy!), I’ve got another surprise up my sleeve to celebrate. I may be able to announce that next week.2015-04-18 22.09.45

Don’t forget about the National Kidney Fund of Arizona’s annual conference on March 11th and 12th. I’ll be there on the 11th. You can register at www.SWNC.org.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

What If…

Have you ever become anxious about the unknown, specifically the future? You are not alone.  Since you have Chronic Kidney Disease, you are so the opposite of not being alone. You have a progressive disease, one which affects two of the most important organs your body possesses.

thCAQ0P7T3Most days, I wonder if I’ll stay at Stage 3A for the rest of my life or – despite my best efforts – I’ll end up on dialysis and need a transplant anyway.  It’s one of those things I try really hard not to dwell upon.

Whoops!  I did it again.  Let’s backtrack a bit so we all know what I’m writing about. I went back to the glossary of What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease for the following definition of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD).Book Cover

Chronic Kidney Disease:  Damage to the kidneys for more than three months, which cannot be reversed but may be slowed.

According to DaVita.com, Stage 3A means:

A person with stage 3 chronic kidney disease (CKD) has moderate kidney damage. This stage is broken up into two: a decrease in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) for Stage 3A is 45-59 mL/min and a decrease in GFR for Stage 3B is 30-44 mL/min.

There’s a wealth of Stage 3 information at http://www.davita.com/kidney-disease/overview/stages-of-kidney-disease/stage-3-of-chronic-kidney-disease/e/4749.

As usual, one definition leads to the need for another, in this case GFR.

Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is a test used to check how well the kidneys are working. Specifically, it estimates how much blood passes through Glomerulus-Nephron 300 dpi jpgthe glomeruli each minute. Glomeruli are the tiny filters in the kidneys that filter waste from the blood.

Many thanks to MedlinePlus at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/007305.htm for the definition.

Uh-oh, now we need to define both dialysis and transplant. According to the National Kidney Foundation at https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/dialysisinfo

Dialysis is a treatment that does some of the things done by healthy kidneys. It is needed when your own kidneys can no longer take care of your body’s needs.

There are several different kinds of dialysis. Basically, they each eliminate the wastes and extra fluid in your blood via different methods.

As for transplant, WebMD at http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/kidney-transplant-20666 tells us

kidney transplant is surgery to replace your own diseased kidneys with a healthy (donor) kidney.

I should mention that while there are transplants from both living and cadaver donors, both will require lifelong drugs to prevent rejection.faq_kidney_transplantation

All right, now that our background is in place, let’s deal with that anxiety.  Why worry (ouch!) if you have anxiety and you have CKD?

I went to The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 for help here.

Digital Cover Part 1In the August 16, 2012 post, I included this.

Poor mental health linked to reduced life expectancy

There  is  a  possibility  that  mental  health  problems  may  be  associated with  biological  changes  in  the  body  that  increase  the  risk  of  diseases such as heart disease.

In  this  study,  approximately  a  quarter  of  people  suffered  from  minor symptoms  of  anxiety  and  depression,  however,  these  patients  do  not usually come to the attention of mental health services. The authors say that  their  findings  could  have  implications  for  the  way  minor  mental health problems are treated.

The information was originally published on PyschCentral.com at http://psychcentral.com/news/2012/08/01/even-mild-mental-health-problems-linked-to-reduced-life-expectancy/42487.html

Not to be too morbid, but our life expectancy may already be reduced due to our Chronic Kidney Disease. Now we’re reducing it even further with our anxiety… even though we certainly may have cause to be anxious?

Time to deal with that anxiety.  But first, what exactly is anxiety?

The Free Dictionary’s Medical Dictionary at http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Anxiety is fairly explicit about what it is.

Anxiety is a multisystem response to a perceived threat or danger. It reflects a combination of biochemical changes in the body, the patient’s personal history and memory, and the social situation…. a large portion of human anxiety is produced by anticipation of future events.

Nothing I want any part of! So how to I reduce my anxiety about my CKD so that I don’t further reduce my life expectancy?

I was so taken with Barton Goldsmith, Ph.’s advice that I wanted to post it all, but that would make this week’s blog far too long.  You can read what I omitted at https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/emotional-fitness/201205/top-10-tips-reduce-anxiety

  1. If you are prone to anxiety you have two choices .Give in to it or learn to live with it.support
  2. When you wake up tomorrow start doing something right away, and keep busy all day. Taking action by doing something, almost anything, will help you work through your anxiety.
  3. Focus your attention on where the feeling of anxiousness is in your body and keep your attention there until the feeling moves or dissolves.
  4. Anxiety will grow if it’s not directed into some positive action.Find someone who needs you and lend him or her a helping hand.
  5. Talking to someone is one of the best ways to overcome your anxiety.
  6. Exercise is another good way to keep from letting your fears overwhelm you.
  7. Start a gratitude journal; write down three to five things that you are grateful for. Do this every night, it works and it’s very easy.
  8. The opposite of fear is faith.When you are anxious, a great way to get out of it is to find some faith. Believing that things will get better is sometimes all it takes to make it better.
  9. If watching the news fills you with anxiety – turn off the TV!
  10. Courage is not the absence of fear, but taking action in spite of fear.

Now it makes sense to me that Bear and I have a gratitude jar into which we drop a slip of paper containing one thing that made each of us happy each day. Now it makes sense to me that I look for ways to help others.  I think I’ve been warding off my own anxiety without knowing it.

Talking about not knowing, have you seen P2P’s Chronic Illness Awareness Buy and Sell page on Facebook?Part 2

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

How I Connect Coyotes and CKD

Sunday evening is the Sustainable Blues dance lesson at the Blooze Bar.  When Abby teaches, I go and then I do some marketing on the way home.blues

When Bear was helping me unload the groceries from my car last night, he pointed out a coyote casually walking down the street.  We’re only a quarter of a mile from an arroyo and often see wild life there, but other than bunnies and Gambrel Quail, not in front of the house.

This means Bella needs to stay in the house from before dusk until after dawn since those are prime hunting times for the coyote.  Her dog door was closed last night.  While she is a medium sized dog, I wouldn’t be surprised if a pack of coyotes could devour her… and that’s why IMAG0269 (1)they’re on our block.

These creatures are hungry and they want red meat.  They’re adaptable and will eat anything when they’re hungry enough – even garbage – but 90% of their diet consists of red meat when they can find it.  Notice I’m not citing any websites here.  This is common knowledge when you live in the desert, something I’ve done for the last dozen years.

The coyote sighting got me to thinking.  They eat red meat.  Humans do, too.  Yet, as Chronic Kidney Disease patients we’re urged away from this practice.  I accept it, but I’ve forgotten why and thought you might have, too.coyote

As usual, let’s start at the beginning.  Precisely what is ‘red meat’? According to the Bing Dictionary, red meat is “meat that is red when raw: meat that is relatively dark red in color when raw, e.g. beef or lamb.”

I don’t eat lamb and never have due to some childhood questioning as to why a child should eat another child. (Okay, so I was a deep thinker even then.) Red meat was the staple of the family’s diet when I grew up and no meal was considered complete without it. That’s not the case now.

red meatWebMD has a truly illuminating three page article debating the merits and demerits of red meat at http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/features/the-truth-about-red-meat. Most of it deals with the protein and fat content.  That is something that should concern us as CKD patients.    (It also explains why pork is considered a red meat rather than a white meat as a former colleague at Phoenix College tried to convince me.)

Okay, so fat – and hence, cholesterol – is something that could adversely affect your heart, not great for anyone including us.  But, as CKD sufferers, it’s more the protein content of red meat that concerns us right now.

In What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, protein is defined as “Amino acids arranged in chains joined by peptide bonds to form a compound, important because some proteins are hormones, enzymes, and antibodies.”  That’s on pages 134-5 for those of you with a print copy of the book.  Those of you with a digital copy, use the word search function.

That definition says a lot.  Let’s take it bit by bit.  Amino acids, simply put, are “any one of many acids that occur naturally in living things and that include some which form proteins.”  Thank you, Merriam Webster Dictionary.  Did you notice that they may form proteins?  Keep that in mind.Book Cover

So what are peptide bonds, then? This is a bit more complicated, so I went to Education Portal at http://education-portal.com/academy/lesson/peptide-bond-definition-formation-structure.html#lesson for the most easily understood definition: “Peptide bonds are the key linkages found in proteins. These bonds connect amino acids and provide one of the key foundations for protein structure.”  Again, proteins.  This is a bit circular, but the important point here is that both are involved in the production of protein.

The renal diet I follow restricts my daily protein intake to five ounces a day, but why? Back to What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, page77 this time:

So, why is protein limited? One reason is that it is the source of a great deal of phosphorus. Another is that a number of nephrons were already destroyed before you were even diagnosed. Logically, those that remain compensate for those that are no longer viable. The remaining nephrons are doing more work than they were meant to. Just like a car that is pushed too hard, there will be constant deterioration if you don’t stop pushing. The idea is to stop pushing your remaining nephrons to work even harder in an attempt to slow down the advancement of your CKD.  Restricting protein is a way to reduce the nephrons’ work.

Your kidneys have about a million nephrons, which are those tiny structures that produce urine as part of the body’s waste removal process. Each of them has a glomerulus or network of capillaries.  This is where the blood from the renal artery is filtered.  The glomerulus is connected to a

Glomerulus-Nephron 300 dpi jpgrenal tubule, something so small that it is microscopic. The renal tubule is attached to a collection area.  The blood is filtered. Then the waste goes through the tubules to have water and chemicals balanced according to the body’s present needs. Finally, the waste is voided via your urine to the tune of 50 gallons of fluid filtered by the kidneys DAILY.  The renal vein uses blood vessels to take most of the blood back into the body.

For those of you who may have forgotten, phosphorus isn’t troublesome in early or moderate stage CKD, but can be in Stages 4 and 5.  Phosphorus works in conjunction with calcium to keep our bones and teeth healthy, but it has other jobs, too.  Compromised kidneys cannot filter out enough of this, though.  That can lead to calcification in parts of the body.

Confession time: after six years of following the Northern Arizona Council of Renal Nutrition Diet, I am not attracted to red meat.  Bear’s family traditionally has standing rib roast for Christmas and ham for Easter.  I will gladly cook them for the family – or buy them already cooked – but I’m fine with the steamed vegetables and a taste, a little one at that, of each of the meats. We don’t buy red meat when we market (except when Bear has an urge) and rarely eat it in restaurants. It wasn’t that hard to get out of the habit of always having red meat.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Lest We Forget

Today is Memorial Day.  Until I became engaged to a retired army colonel, I never truly understood what that meant.  He’s told me.  Even with keeping the worst of it to himself, from Bear’s memories I understand… and the sacrifices of these men and women were horrific.  It is not  ‘happy’ Memorial Day; it is a somber day to remember what our countrymen and countrywomen have given for us.

A friend from my theater life, James David Porter( Arizona Curriculum Theater),  posted this on Facebook today:

“Memorial Day began as “Decoration Day” in the 1860s, to honor the 625,000 soldiers who died in the Civil War. The first Decoration Day event was organized by freed African-American slaves in 1865 in Charleston, S.C., where a parade of 10,000, led by 3,000 black schoolchildren, took place to honor the dead around a racetrack that had been used as a burial ground.”

Once you’re over being surprised that Memorial (instituted as Decoration) Day  was orginally organized by freed slaves, pay attention to the part that  mentions it was “to honor the dead.”  Organ donations are not the only way our dead offer us life. Oh, and thank  you to Larry Jacobson, a former colleague a million years ago, for locating the picture above.

I’ve  got an exercise video for you to demonstrate that exercise CAN be fun.  We went to Nathaniel Smalley’s (he and his wife, Elizabeth had two swing dance clubs here until recently)  Feather Focus’s photography exhibit Friday night where Bill Morse was dj for some East Coast Swing Dancing.  I wasn’t about to pass up the chance to do some exercise I actually liked!  My partner is MacGyver Mann who teaches at Gmann’s in Mesa (Arizona) on Thursday nights.  I never met him before so you can appreciate what a good lead he is. It’s night, it’s outdoors and it’s dark.   But it is fun and got my heart rate up!  Can you catch the smile on my face? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OHPReqcTMIU&feature=channel&list=UL. Thank you, Bear, for getting any video at all for us with your wonderful, magical phone.

Ready for some kidney news? First, do you remember my disappointment with the medical jewelry company that sent the alert bracelet with a note saying that it should not be immersed in water, as in bathing or swimming?  I don’t know about you, but I have this habit of showering every day and that includes immersing myself in water.  I also have arthritis which means taking jewelry off and then putting it back on is a nightmare – even with the arthritis helper made specifically for this purpose.  My mother loved that little device; I’m just not co-ordinated enough with my left hand to use it on a bracelet worn on my right hand since I’m right handed. We can now bypass the whole problem.  Read on:

Tattoos Replace Bracelets for Medical Alerts

By Chris  Kaiser, Cardiology Editor, MedPage Today

Published: May 25, 2012

 
 

PHILADELPHIA   —  As more people with diabetes replace their medical alert bracelets with tattooed warnings, there might be a need for a standard design and body location, a researcher here said.

“The tattoo has to be easily recognizable to first responders,” Saleh Aldasouqi, MD, from the Sparrow Diabetes Center of Michigan State University in East Lansing, said during a press conference.

“It may be that we need guidelines for medical alert tattoos for both patients and tattoo artists,” Aldasouqi said. “Should tattoos be prescriptive? I don’t know. We’re at the beginning of this dialogue and I think it’s an important one.”

Medical alert tattoos for diabetes are a relatively new phenomenon and Aldasouqi admitted he has no hard data on the number of people who choose ink over metal to alert first responders in case of an emergency.

He initially became aware of medical tattoos about 3 years ago when a patient showed up with one. His search of the literature, however, produced only two case reports. But a search on the Internet revealed ample evidence that the practice is alive and well.

“You can find groups of people discussing their medical tattoos,” he said.

Rick Lopez, who works at Hard Ink Tattoo in Philadelphia, told MedPage Today that he recently inked a diabetes alert on a young man.

“He brought the bracelet into the shop and I just copied it onto his wrist,” Lopez said.

He said he has tattooed a lot of “cancer ribbons” on customers, generally family members of those with cancer who want to show support, but also on cancer survivors as well. And he has inked the autism puzzle ribbon. But only one medical alert.

Aldasouqi and colleagues reported a case presentation here of a 32-year-old women with type 1 diabetes who decided to shed the alert jewelry for a permanent ink reminder on her wrist.

She said she was frustrated with the numerous broken necklaces and bracelets throughout her life, and the ensuing costs of them.

Last year in the American Family Physician journal, Aldasouqi published another case report of a man who tattooed his diabetic condition onto his wrist.

As the practice of medical tattoos grows, he wants to ensure it’s headed in the right direction. Paramedics have to be educated about these tattoos so they recognize them during an emergency. There perhaps should be some standardization in design and location, such as the wrist, so it’s easier to identify the tattoo as an alert, he said.

He cited a case where a man had the letters “DNR” inked on his chest. During an emergency, first responders thought the tattoo might be a directive for “do not resuscitate.” As it turned out, the man had lost a bet in his youth, which resulted in those letters emblazoned on his chest.

Aldasouqi has recently teamed up with a colleague from the University of Helsinki to produce peer-reviewed studies on the phenomenon and to begin a registry of patients with medical tattoos.

You can read the article in its orginal form at: http://www.medpagetoday.com/MeetingCoverage/AACE/32916.

One of my step-daughers, Kelly Garwood, is gloriously tatooed (or is called inked?).  Here’s hoping she never needs to add a medical tatoo to the collection of art on her body.

Before I sign off, a little reminder that while I’m donating books as fast as I can at urgicare centers, and PCPs’, nephrologists’ and urologists’ offices, there are still plenty left for you to order a personalized one for the discount price of $8.00.  I finally figured out the price had to be less than that of the digital copy of the book or where’s the discount?

Also, myckdexperience.com is no longer a viable address, so if you’d rather order digital or print (not discounted or personalized), go through Amazon or B & N.

The nephrologist I mentioned who wanted to sell our books together is becoming disillusioned since neither online selling site is willing to do this.  I wonder if we should offer the two book set via our blogs.  What’s your opinion here?

Until next week,

Keep living your life!