All of Me, uh, Us

When I was a little girl, I liked to listen to my father whistle ‘All of Me,’ written by Marks and Simon in 1931 when Charlie, my father, was just 16. Only a few years later, it became a sort of love language for my mother and him. Enter a former husband of my own and my children. When my folks visited from Florida and my then husband’s side of the family journeyed over to Staten Island from Brooklyn to visit them, they all sang the song with great emotion. (By then, Bell’s palsy had robbed my father of the ability to whistle.)

To this day, I start welling up when I hear that song. But then I started thinking about the lyrics:

“All of me
Why not take all of me?”

Suddenly, it popped. For us, those with chronic kidney disease, it should be:

“All of us

Why not take all of us?”

For research purposes. To “speed up health research breakthroughs.” For help in our lifetime. To spare future generations whatever it is we’re suffering… and not just for us, but for our children… and their children, too.

The National Institutes of Health has instituted a new research program for just that purpose, although it’s open to anyone in the U.S. over the age of 18 whether ill with any disease or perfectly healthy. While only English and Spanish are the languages they can accommodate at this time, they are adding other languages.

I’m going to devote most of the rest of this blog to them. By the way, I’m even more inclined to be in favor of this program because they launched on my first born’s birthdate: May 6. All of Us has its own inspiring welcome for you at https://launch.joinallofus.org/

This is how they explain who they are and what they intend to do:

“The goal is to advance precision medicine. Precision medicine is health care that is based on you as an individual. It takes into account factors like where you live, what you do, and your family health history. Precision medicine’s goal is to be able to tell people the best ways to stay healthy. If someone does get sick, precision medicine may help health care teams find the treatment that will work best.

To get there, we need one million or more people. Those who join will share information about their health over time. Researchers will study this data. What they learn could improve health for generations to come. Participants are our partners. We’ll share information back with them over time.”

You’ll be reading more about precision medicine, which I’ve written about before, in upcoming blogs. This is from All of Us’s website at https://www.joinallofus.org/en, as is most of the other information in today’s blog, and makes it easy to understand just what they are doing.

How It Works

Participants Share Data

Participants share health data online. This data includes health surveys and electronic health records. Participants also may be asked to share physical measurements and blood and urine samples.

Data Is Protected

Personal information, like your name, address, and other things that easily identify participants will be removed from all data. Samples—also without any names on them—are stored in a secure biobank.

Researchers Study Data

In the future, approved researchers will use this data to conduct studies. By finding patterns in the data, they may make the next big medical breakthroughs.

Participants Get Information

Participants will get information back about the data they provide, which may help them learn more about their health.

Researchers Share Discoveries

Research may help in many ways. It may help find the best ways for people to stay healthy. It may also help create better tests and find the treatments that will work best for different people.

I’m busy, too busy to take on even one more thing. Or so I thought. When I read the benefits of the program (above) and how easy it is to join (below), I realized I’m not too busy for this and it is another way to advocate for Chronic Kidney Disease awareness. So I joined and hope you will, too.

Benefits of Taking Part

Joining the All of Us Research Program has its benefits.

Our goal is for you to have a direct impact on cutting-edge research. By joining the program, you are helping researchers to learn more about different diseases and treatments.

Here are some of the benefits of participating in All of Us.

Better Information

We’re all human, but we’re not all the same. Often our differences—like age, ethnicity, lifestyle habits, or where we live—can reveal important insights about our health.

By participating in All of Us, you may learn more about your health than ever before. If you like, you can share this information with your health care provider.

Better Tools

The goal of the program is better health for all of us. We want to inspire researchers to create better tools to identify, prevent, and treat disease.

You may also learn how to use tools like mobile devices, cell phones and tablets, to encourage healthier habits.

Better Research

We expect the All of Us Research Program to be here for the long-term. As the program grows, the more features will be added. There’s no telling what we can discover. All thanks to participants like you.

Better Ideas

You’re our partner. And as such, you are invited to help guide All of Us. Share your ideas and let us know what works, and what doesn’t.

Oh, about joining:

Get Started – Sign Up

Here’s a quick overview of what you’ll need to do to join.

1

Create an Account

You will need to give an email address and password.

2

Fill in the Enrollment and Consent Forms

The process usually takes 18-30 minutes. If you leave the portal during the consent process, you will have to start again from the beginning.

3

Complete Surveys and More

Once you have given your consent, you will be asked to complete online health surveys. You may be asked to visit a partner center. There, you’ll be asked to provide blood and urine samples and have your physical measurements taken. We may also ask you to share data from wearables or other personal devices.

Before I leave you today, I have – what else? – a book give away. The reason? Just to share the joy that’s walked into my life lately. It’s easy to share the troubles; why not the joys? If you haven’t received one of my books in a giveaway before, all you have to do is be the first person to let me know you want this copy of SlowItDownCKD 2017.

 

I need to get back to that online health survey for All of Us now.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

 

Published in: on May 21, 2018 at 10:38 am  Leave a Comment  
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This Former Hippy Wannabe Likes HIPAA

Each day, I post a tidbit about, or relating to, Chronic Kidney Disease on SlowItDownCKD’s Facebook page. This is the quote from Renal and Urology News that I posted just a short while ago:

“Patients with stage 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease (CKD) who were managed by nephrology in addition to primary care experienced greater monitoring for progression and complications, according to a new study.”

My primary care physician is the one who caught my CKD in the first place and is very careful about monitoring its progress. My nephrologist is pleased with that and feels he only needs to see me once a year. The two of them work together well.

From the comments on that post, I realized this is not usual. One of my readers suggested it had to do with HIPPA, so I decided to look into that.

The California Department of Health Care Services (Weird, I know, but I liked their simple explanation.) at http://www.dhcs.ca.gov/formsandpubs/laws/hipaa/Pages/1.00WhatisHIPAA.aspx defined HIPPA and its purposes in the following way:

“HIPAA is the acronym for the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act that was passed by Congress in 1996. HIPAA does the following:

• Provides the ability to transfer and continue health insurance coverage for millions of American workers and their families when they change or lose their jobs;
• Reduces health care fraud and abuse;
• Mandates industry-wide standards for health care information on electronic billing and other processes; and
• Requires the protection and confidential handling of protected health information”

Got it. Let’s take a look at its last purpose. There is an infogram from HealthIT.gov at https://www.healthit.gov/sites/default/files/YourHealthInformationYourRights_Infographic-Web.pdf  which greatly clarifies the issue. On item on this infogram caught my eye:

“You hold the key to your health information and can send or have it sent to anyone you want. Only send your health information to someone you trust.”

I always send mine to one of my daughters and Bear… and my other doctors if they are not part of the hospital system most of my doctors belong to.

I stumbled across National Conference of State Legislatures at http://www.ncsl.org/research/health/hipaa-a-state-related-overview.aspx and learned more than I even knew existed about HIPAA. Take a look if you’d like more information. I finally tore myself away from the site to get back to writing the blog after following links for about an hour. It was fascinating, but not germane to today’s blog.

Okay, so sharing. In order to share the information from one doctor that my other doctors may not have, I simply fill out an Authorization to Release Medical Information form. A copy of this is kept in the originating doctor’s files. By the way, it is legal for the originating doctor to charge $.75/page for each page sent, but none of my doctors have ever done so.

I know, I know. What is this about doctors being part of the hospital system? What hospital system? When I first looked for a new physician since the one I had been using was so far away (Over the usual half-an-hour-to-get-anywhere-in-Arizona rule), I saw that my new PCP’s practice was affiliated with the local hospital and thought nothing of it.

Then Electronic Health Records came into widespread use at this hospital. Boom! Any doctor associated with that hospital – and that’s all but two of my myriad doctors – instantly had access to my health records. Wow, no more requesting hard copies of my health records from each doctor, making copies for all my other doctors, and then hand delivering or mailing them. No wonder I’m getting lazy; life is so much easier.

Back to HealthIt.gov for more about EHR. This time at https://www.healthit.gov/buzz-blog/electronic-health-and-medical-records/emr-vs-ehr-difference/:

“With fully functional EHRs, all members of the team have ready access to the latest information allowing for more coordinated, patient-centered care. With EHRs:

• The information gathered by the primary care provider tells the emergency department clinician about the patient’s life threatening allergy, so that care can be adjusted appropriately, even if the patient is unconscious.
• A patient can log on to his own record and see the trend of the lab results over the last year, which can help motivate him to take his medications and keep up with the lifestyle changes that have improved the numbers.
• The lab results run last week are already in the record to tell the specialist what she needs to know without running duplicate tests.
• The clinician’s notes from the patient’s hospital stay can help inform the discharge instructions and follow-up care and enable the patient to move from one care setting to another more smoothly.”

Did you notice the part about what a patient can do? With my patient portal, I can check my labs, ask questions, schedule an appointment, obtain information about medications, and spot trends in my labs. Lazy? Let’s make that even lazier. No more appointments for trivial questions, no more leaving phone messages, no more being on hold for too long. I find my care is quicker, more accessible to me, and – believe it or not – more easily understood since I am a visual, rather than an audial, person.

Kudos to American Association of Kidney Patients for postponing their National Patient Meeting in St. Petersburg from last weekend to this coming spring. The entire state of Florida was declared in a state of emergency by the governor due to the possible impact of Hurricane Irma. The very next day, AAKP acted to postpone placing the safety of its members over any monetary considerations. If I wasn’t proud to be a member before (and I was), I certainly am now.

Aha! That gives me five found days to separate The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 and The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2 each into two separate books with indexes. I never was happy with the formatting of those two. I plan to reward myself after this project. How, you ask. By writing a book of short stories. I surmise that will be out next year sometime. Meanwhile, there’s always Portal in Time, a time travel romance. Geesh! Sometimes I wonder at all my plans.

Until next week,
Keep living your life!

And I Shall Dance the Night Away

Once upon a time, there was a little girl who loved to dance. Her parents were ballroom dancers: smooth, gliding, and delightful to watch. She ballroomwanted to do that, too, but there were no ballroom lessons for little girls at that time. She took a tap lesson or two, but the dance school was too far away for her to walk or for her driving shy mother to drive.

Then there was nothing until her junior high school offered dance lessons during the physical education period, all kinds of dance: square, cha-cha, rhumba, mambo, salsa, waltz, foxtrot. That’s when she realized her parents were her best dance teachers… and that dancing was in her blood. When she hit college, she went dancing with her buddies every chance she got. At that time, it was clubs.

Eventually she married, had a family, and only danced at weddings. It wasn’t such a happy time for her. But her children grew older and she found she could bring them to swing dances with her. She was happy again. One of these children grew up to initiate and teach blues dance lessons every week.  She was ecstatic.

That group is Sustainable Blues, Phoenix, and that child is Abby Wegerski. The little dancer grown up? It’s me, as if you hadn’t guess by now. And here’s comes the reason for the dancing introduction to this week’s blog.

We have Chronic Kidney Disease; we need to exercise at least half an hour a day for five days a week, daily if possible. This little tidbit from What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease explains why:What is it

“I researched, researched and researched again.  Each explanation of what exercise does for the body was more complicated than the last one I read.  Keeping it simple, basically, there’s a compound released by voluntary muscle contraction.  It tells the body to repair itself and grow stronger.”

I went into this just a bit further in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1:

“With Chronic Kidney Disease, I need the daily exercise to keep my organs – all of them – strong, especially since CKD can eventually affect your IMG_2982other organs.  It’s our not-quite-filtered blood that feeds these organs, so we need to keep them healthy in as many ways as we can.”

Okay. Got it. Now the biggie: Is dancing the exercise we think it is?  I turned to WebMD at http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/features/dancing-your-way-to-better-health#2 for the following:

(Exercise physiologist Catherine Cram, MS, of Comprehensive Fitness Consulting in Middleton, Wis. is the one being quoted.)

“Once someone gets to the point where they’re getting their heart rate up, they’re actually getting a terrific workout….Dance is a weight-bearing activity, which builds bones. It’s also wonderful for your upper body and strength, says Cram.”

Weight-bearing? I wasn’t so sure I could accept that so I turned to the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases at http://www.niams.nih.gov/health_info/bone/Bone_Health/Exercise/default.asp for verification.

“The best exercise for your bones is the weight-bearing kind, which forces you to work against gravity. Some examples of weight-bearing exercises include weight training, walking, hiking, jogging, climbing stairs, tennis, and dancing.”

Look at that last word. Finally! My weight is working for me, instead of against me. Of course, I am in no way suggesting you gain weight so you can get more of the weight-bearing benefits of dancing. You know that, don’t you? Don’t you????

But that’s not the only benefit of dancing as a weight-bearing exercise. In The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, FullSizeRender (3)Part 2 I included part of a Los Angeles Times article about weight-bearing exercise. Potteiger is Jeffrey Potteiger, an exercise physiologist at Grand Valley State University in Grand Rapids, Mich., and a fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine.

“’Another big advantage … is improving glucose metabolism, which can reduce the risk of diabetes. Strength training boosts the number of proteins that take glucose out of the blood and transport it into the skeletal muscle, giving the muscles more energy and lowering overall blood-glucose levels.If you have uncontrolled glucose levels,’ Potteiger said, ‘that can lead to kidney damage, damage to the circulatory system and loss of eyesight.’”

I found the following list on the website of  Australia’s Victoria State Government Better Health Channel at https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/healthyliving/dance-health-benefits after a bit of digging and liked how succinctly it demonstrated just how much we benefit ourselves when we dance.

 Health benefits of dancing

Dancing can be a way to stay fit for people of all ages, shapes and sizes. It has a wide range of physical and mental benefits including:

  • improved condition of your heart and lungs
  • increased muscular strength, endurance and motor fitness
  • increased aerobic fitness
  • improved muscle tone and strength
  • weight managementdepression-cause-heart-attack-1
  • stronger bones and reduced risk of osteoporosis
  • better coordination, agility and flexibility
  • improved balance and spatial awareness
  • increased physical confidence
  • improved mental functioning
  • improved general and psychological wellbeing
  • greater self-confidence and self-esteem
  • better social skills.

Wow – just wow. Who knew that the little girl who loved dancing would grow up to be the woman who used what she loved to help keep her Chronic Kidney Disease under control?

After all this good news – actually joyful to me – I unfortunately have to end this week’s blog on a cautionary note. It’s been brought to my IMG_2980attention that students are still being tricked into wasting their money by renting my Chronic Kidney Disease books for more than it would cost to buy them or asking their libraries to order copies to be borrowed for free . So, here’s the same warning I published earlier this year in SlowItDownCKD 2015.

“Students: do NOT rent any of these (e.g. my CKD books) for a semester.  The cost for that is much higher than buying the book.  Having been a college instructor, I know you sometimes have to buy your textbooks before the class begins and the instructor has the chance to tell you this.”

College has changed. It’s no longer two or three terms a year. Many college classes have staggered start dates, some weekly, some graduationmonthly. Many of the duped students used their financial aid money to pay these book rental companies. Be careful, students.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

What a Weird Dream

Part 2I woke up today realizing I’d been dreaming about my bladder.  Sometimes that’s a somatic clue to wake up and empty it, but I’d done that already. Hmmm, was I being told to look into the different aspects of the bladder?  Oh, maybe the dream DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAILwas pointing toward the connection between Chronic Kidney Disease and the bladder. By now, you’ve probably realized everything in my world points to CKD.

To my way of thinking, if I were going to dream of anything CKD related, I should have been dreaming about the photos of you reading one of my books in a weird place that you’ve posted on SlowItDownCKD’s Facebook page to win a free copy of The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1. That would make sense, wouldn’t it?

What is it

But, no.  It was the bladder.  Okay, then, let’s take a look at the bladder. As usual, we’ll start at the beginning with a definition. Many thanks to the ever reliable MedicineNet at http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=2472 for the following:

A hollow organ in the lower abdomen that stores urine. The kidneys filter waste from the blood and produce urine, which enters the bladder through two tubes, called ureters. Urine leaves the bladder through another tube, the urethra. In women, the urethra is a short tube that opens just in front of the vagina. In men, it is longer, passing through the prostate gland and then the penis. Also known as urinary bladder and vesical.

Notice the mention of the kidneys. Notice also the urine flows from the kidneys to the bladder, not vice versa.  Doesn’t help much to explain the dream.  I wonder if a bladder infection might explain more.

Another standby, WebMD, at http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/understanding-bladder-infections-basic-information explains:

Bladder infections are known as cystitis or inflammation of the bladder. They are common in women, but very rare in men. More than half of all women get at least one bladder infection at some time in their lives. However, a man’s chance of getting cystitis increases as he ages, due to in part to an increase in prostate size….

Bladder infections are not serious if treated right away. But they tend to come back in some people. Rarely, this can lead to kidney infections, which are more serious and may result in permanent kidney damage. So it’s very important to treat the underlying causes of a bladder infection and to take preventive steps to keep them from coming back.kidney location

Oh, so repeated bladder infections can lead to kidney infections, although rarely.  Maybe we’d better take a look at the symptoms of bladder infections… just in case, you understand.

This was the point in my research that I once again appreciated how user friendly, yet detailed, the Mayo Clinic is. The following information may be found at http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/urinary-tract-infection/basics/symptoms/con-20037892

Part of urinary tract affected      Signs and symptoms

Kidneys (acute pyelonephritis)   Upper back and side (flank) painurinary-tract-infection-uti-picture

High fever

Shaking and chills

Nausea

Vomiting

Bladder (cystitis)                            Pelvic pressure

Lower abdomen discomfort

Frequent, painful urination

Blood in urine

Urethra (urethritis)                        Burning with urination

Let’s change direction here and take a look at pyelonephritis since that involves the kidneys.

at http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/kidney-disease/pyelonephritis-kidney-infection/Pages/index.aspx has this information.

Pyelonephritis is caused by a bacterium or virus infecting the kidneys. Though many bacteria and viruses can cause pyelonephritis, the bacterium Escherichia coli is often the cause. Bacteria and viruses can move to the kidneys from the bladder or can be carried through the bloodstream from other parts of the body. A UTI in the bladder that does not move to the kidneys is called cystitis.

However, the site carefully explains that a bladder infection or a structural abnormality that causes urine to flow back into the kidneys are the two most usual causes.  So we’re back to looking at bladder infections after this little detour.

Location of KidneysFor information about what might cause a bladder infection, I shot over to Healthline at http://www.healthline.com/health/bladder-infection#Overview1

Bladder infections are caused by germs or bacteria that enter through the urethra and travel into the bladder. Normally, the body is able to remove the bacteria by clearing it out during urination. Sometimes, however, the bacteria attach to the walls of the bladder and multiply quickly, overwhelming the body’s ability to destroy them, resulting in a bladder infection.

Simple, direct, and to the point. Here we are knowing what a bladder infection is, what the symptoms are, and how we might have developed one.  But, what do we do about it?

UTI OTC testFirst of all, verify that you have UTI or urinary tract infection since the kidneys, the urethra, and the bladder are part of this system. OTC or over the counter test strips for this purpose are available, although I seem to remember they are not effective if you’ve passed menopause.  That was seven years ago when I had my first and last bladder infection, so things may have changed.  You can also make an appointment with your doctor to verify. Usually, a high white blood cell count will indicate you’re fighting some sort of infection.

All right, let’s say you home test and see you’re fighting an infection. Now what? Well, you can try the usual home remedies of cranberry juice and uber hydration, but you have CKD.  You have to act fast before a UTI becomes a bladder infection which may lead to a kidney infection.

My advice?  Call your doctor.  He or she may prescribe an antibiotic which will hopefully clear up the infection in just a few days.  A bladder infection does not have to lead to a kidney infection or be serious… unless you ignore it.

I have spent every day of the last eight years working diligently to protect my kidneys, slow down the progress of Chronic Kidney Disease, and raise GFRmy GFR when I can.  I, for one, am not willing to jeopardize my kidney function because I didn’t jump on what I thought might be a UTI.  Won’t you join me in taking immediate action should you have the symptoms?  Remember the connections between the urethra, the bladder, and the kidneys.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Exercising My Options

According to a study published in Diabetes Care this past July, “Weight control through diet and exercise can prevent most cases of type 2 diabetes in American women over age 50…”  I am a woman.  I am an American. I am over the age of 50.  And I have chronic kidney disease which can be a cause of diabetes.  Therefore, I am also confused.  (One place to read about this study is http://www.drugs.com/news/weight-control-can-cut-women-s-diabetes-risk-study-shows-39516.html.)exercising

Why, you ask?  Easy, I’ve just finished reading Dr.Wes Fisher’s November 30th essay in Physician. In this essay, he makes a point in the form of a question: “What if, believe it or not, when it comes to people with Type II diabetes, diet and exercise don’t affect the incidence of heart attack, stroke, or hospital admission for angina or even the incidence of death?” Of course, the quote is taken out of context so you need to read the essay for yourself at: http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2012/11/reconsider-benefits-exercise-weight-loss.html?utm_medium=twitter&utm_source=twitterfeed.

Okay, so my wildest dream of not having to exercise to avoid illness has finally come true.  Or has it?  I looked over the articles I’d saved about my nemesis. It was a lot easier to force myself to exercise four years ago than it is now.  My knees troubled me a bit then, but that was it. Now it’s the knees, right hip, feet, and shoulders.  I honestly do exercise, but it’s not half as much fun as it used to be. Sure enough, in the articles I’d saved, I ran right into a bunch of reasons to keep up the exercise.

“Statin therapy and physical fitness amounted to a one-two punch for lowering mortality risk in a large cohort of middle-age and older patients with dyslipidemia followed for 10 years.” Damn!  I have dyslipidemia (high cholesterol) and periodically need to pay closer attention to it.  According to this study originally printed in The Lancet, I need to keep exercising – if not to prevent myself from developing the horrors of Type II Diabetes possible outcomes, then to keep the dyslipidemia under control… and I need to keep watching my diet.  You can read the article via Medpage at: http://www.medpagetoday.com/PrimaryCare/GeneralPrimaryCare/36134?utm_source=share&utm_medium=mobile&utm_campaign=medpage%2Biphone%20app.

sore kneeWell, what about my knees and my other hurting parts that make me NOT want to exercise?  The best quote I found came from Dr. Candice Johnstone at the Radiological Society of North America’s press briefing this year when she spoke about exercising in moderation,

“I was not surprised by these results. This is more like common sense,” added Johnstone,

who is from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. “This adds to information

people have to use to design their own exercise program.”

The url for this article is: http://www.medpagetoday.com/MeetingCoverage/RSNA/36117?utm_source=share&utm_medium=mobile&utm_campaign=medpage%2Biphone%20app

Dr. Johnstone’s reference to common sense seems like… well, common sense.  If it hurts, don’t do it.  If you can do it with modification so that no pain is incurred, do it.  You try not to poke at a tooth that hurts, don’t you?  So why poke at a joint that hurts?

All right now, just one more article.  This one just about convinced me I should be happy about exercising. “Most weight loss occurs because of decreased caloric intake. However, evidence shows the only way to maintain weight loss is to be engaged in regular physical activity.” I can accept that.  But what was the convincing part of the article is this:

“Physical activity also helps to–

  • Maintain weight.
  • Reduce high blood pressure.
  • Reduce risk for type 2 diabetes, heart attack,      stroke, and several forms of cancer.
  • Reduce arthritis pain and associated disability.
  • Reduce risk for osteoporosis and falls.
  • Reduce symptoms of depression and anxiety. “

And this from my old friend, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Read it for yourself at: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/physical_activity/index.html?s_cid=tw_ob254

Now I remember why I started exercising.  I love life.  I love avoiding extra medication for ailments I could have handled with life style changes (sorry, Dr. Fisher). I love moving and feeling alive.dogandcatmainpage

Of course today’s blog leaves me thinking that I must continue to exercise.  Am I happy about that?  No, I can’t honestly say I am, but I will do so.  Who knows, maybe it’ll keep me healthy enough that I’ll live long enough to see grand-children instead of just grand-animals.

Announcing the winners of last week’s contest to find the most creative use of the useless garden tub in my master bathroom:

Advocator Peruza – a copy of the book is on its way to her now and it’s personally inscribed to her

Mimi Smiley – all I need is her information to send her a personally inscribed poster for the book

Nima Beckie – who entered just for the fun of it.

Thank you all!  Unfortunately, no one could come up with an answer to the question, “Why is this called a garden tub if it’s in the house?” so I’ll research that myself.

Until next week,

Keep living your life.

Fat Day

I am being thrust into the 21st century whether I like it or not.  Thank goodness, Bear gave me an iPad for my 65th birthday because my laptop is not so functional these days and my big guy needs all kinds of things installed on it now that it’s fixed. This is a first for me, but I’m one paragraph in and so far, so good. Welcome to iPad blog (#1?).

I feel fat and frustrated today, sort of like this picture: Image  I could do the analyzing thing and decide that the frustration is displaced from not being able to do anything about my buddy’s decision to end her life or my cousin’s running out of options to save hers, but I know I have no control over these tragedies.

I feel fat and frustrated because I know what to do to lose weight, do it and still gain.  It got so that I started to wonder if exercise were worth it.  And counting calories?  That went out the window.  I never did get to the point of abandoning the renal diet, though.  That’s become sacrosanct, the way I wish losing weight was.

Following my usual method when I have a problem, I started researching.  I remembered blogging about brown fat cells, but these were only recently discovered and no one knows how to access them yet.  In case you forgot, brown fat cells gobble up other fat cells or something like that.  I’d have to revisit the blog about them to be more specific, but I fear if I leave this page it will disappear.  This is all so new to me.  You should be able to find it quickly since the computer savvy Ms. Nima Beckie categorized the blogs.  How nice for me to have family who can freelance on the payroll.

I found some information that won’t help me lose weight but makes the frustration lessen.  Lucky for me that I just bought a Groupon for dance lessons and that my youngest daughter, Abby Wegerski, runs Sustainable Blues at The Blooze Bar on 32 Street  ( Sunday nights free lesson at 5 with live band after).  There’s exercise I at least adore and it’s clear to me despite all my belly aching, exercise is very much in my future.

EurekAlert’s article about long term weight loss after menopause gave me pause (sorry, I couldn’t resist.  I think I’m feeling better already.) Obviously I’ve been through menopause, but not so obviously had no idea that because of that my resting metabolism has decreased, so has my losing weight and keeping it off ability despite having no sugary drinks, fried food or desserts.  Well, drastically cutting down on desserts. It helps that I know I’m lactose intolerant, but I certainly am having trouble working gluten sensitivity into my renal diet. You can find this article at: http://www.eurkalert.org/pub_releases/2012-08/ehs-ilw082212.php.

That wasn’t enough for me though.  I wanted to feel that I was like everyone else so I searched some more.  I should mention here that belly fat holds a great deal of my excess weight or, at least it looks that way to me. Why Medical News Today’s article “Belly Fat Increases Risk Of Death Even In People Of Normal Weight” should be comforting is beyond me, but it was and actually lessened my frustration a bit. The article cites a Mayo Clinic study in which it was suggested, “that people of average weight who have extra fat in their stomach have a higher risk of dying than obese people.” Am I interpreting this to mean it’s better to be obese?  I sure hope that is not the case.  The address for this article is: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/249506.php.

A few things became clear while writing this blog.  I am trying to combine the renal diet with those for high cholesterol, lactose intolerance, and gluten sensitivity. I am not succeeding.  My failure here is probably the cause of my weight gain so I’ll see my renal nutritionist for help, keep on exercising (see you there, Abby) and go right back to counting calories.  Problem solved.

Did you know the book is available in India?  I didn’t. I thought it was only available here and in Europe.  Great work on Amazon’s part.  It’s also available on B&N.com, should you have a Nook.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!Image