National Kidney Month

The world has acknowledged World Kidney Day. We have had walks in many countries. We have had educational seminars in many countries. We have posted in many countries. All to bring awareness to what our kidneys do for us and the worldwide challenge of kidney disease. Thursday, March 11th, was World Kidney Day. 

But today is Monday. And you know what? It’s still March, National Kidney Month, here in the United States. Each year, I write about National Kidney Month, just as I write about World Kidney Day. Interesting tidbit: the Philippines also has a National Kidney Month which they celebrate in June. I’ll only be writing about the U.S.’s National Kidney Day. 

 As usual, let’s start at the beginning. What is National Kidney Month? Personalized Cause has a succinct explanation for us. While I’m not endorsing them since I usually try to avoid endorsements, I do want to let you know they sell the green ribbons and wristbands for kidney disease awareness that you’ll probably be seeing hither and yon all month. 

“National Kidney Month, observed in March and sponsored by the National Kidney Foundation, is a time to increase awareness of kidney disease, promote the need for a cure, and spur advocacy on behalf of those suffering with the emotional, financial and physical burden of kidney disease. The National Kidney Foundation is the leading organization in the U.S. dedicated to the awareness, prevention and treatment of kidney disease for hundreds of thousands of healthcare professionals, millions of patients and their families, and tens of millions of Americans at risk. 

National Kidney Month is a time to increase awareness about the function of the kidneys and kidney disease. Kidneys filter 200 liters of blood a day, help regulate blood pressure and direct red blood cell production. But they are also prone to disease. One in three Americans is at risk for kidney disease due to diabetes, high blood pressure or a family history of kidney failure. There are more than 26 million Americans who already have kidney disease, and most do not know it because there are often no symptoms until the disease has progressed.” 

That, of course, prompted me to go directly to the National Kidney Foundation’s information about National Kidney Month. This is what I found: 

March 1, 2021, New York, NY — In honor of National Kidney Month which starts today, the National Kidney Foundation’s (NKF) national public awareness campaign, “Are You the 33%?” enters a new phase focusing on the connection between type 2 diabetes (T2D) and kidney disease, also known as chronic kidney disease (CKD). NKF urges everyone to find out if they’re the 1 in 3 at risk for developing kidney disease by taking a one-minute quiz at MinuteForYourKidneys.org

Diabetes is a leading risk factor for developing kidney disease. Over time, having high blood sugar from diabetes can cause damage inside your kidneys. But it doesn’t have to end up this way; because with careful control of glucose (sugar) levels, there is evidence that you can prevent kidney disease in people with diabetes. 

Award-winning actress, Debbie Allen joined the campaign as the T2D Campaign Celebrity Spokesperson in February, Black History Month, to help promote awareness of diabetes as a leading cause for developing chronic kidney disease. Allen has a family history of diabetes and was recently diagnosed with pre-diabetes.” 

Indeed, the National Kidney Foundation has a lot to offer with peer mentoring, community, an information helpline, and transplant, palliative care, dialysis, kidney donation, and research information. 

The American Kidney Fund [AFK] joins in National Kidney Month with their form to pledge to fight kidney disease. I signed up; you can, too, if you’d like to. I’m not comfortable with the word “fight,” but I’m not going to let that stop me from spreading awareness of the disease.  

If you’re inclined to donate to the cause, the American Kidney Fund is doubling your donation this month. They also offer an advocacy program, as well as free screenings, activity days, financial assistance, and kidney education in addition to transplant and kidney donation information, 

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases [NIDDK], part of the National Institutes of Health [NIH], celebrates National Kidney Month with the following post and offerings. 

“Follow these healthy lifestyle tips to take charge of your kidney health. 

  1. Meet regularly with your health care team. Staying connected with your doctor, whether in-person or using telehealth via phone or computer, can help you maintain your kidney health. 
  1. Manage blood pressure and monitor blood glucose levels. Work with your health care team to develop a plan to meet your blood pressure goals and check your blood glucose level regularly if you have diabetes. 
  1. Take medicine as prescribed and avoid NSAIDs like ibuprofen and naproxen. Your pharmacist and doctor need to know about all the medicines you take. 
  1. Aim for a healthy weight. Create a healthy meal plan and consider working with your doctor to develop a weight-loss plan that works for you. 
  1. Reduce stress and make physical activity part of your routine. Consider healthy stress-reducing activities and get at least 30 minutes or more of physical activity each day. 
  1. Make time for sleep. Aim for 7 to 8 hours of sleep per night. 
  1. Quit smoking. If you smoke, take steps to quit. 

It may seem difficult, but small changes can go a long way to keeping your kidneys and you healthier for longer. 

Learn more about managing kidney disease 

As for me, I’ll continue to blog my brains out [just as I declared in last week’s blog] until more and more people are aware of the kidneys and kidney disease. Same goes for the Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and LinkedIn accounts, and the SlowItDownCKD book series. It’s all about kidney disease. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! 

Your Kidneys and Covid – or – Covid and Your Kidneys

Thanks to an unidentified woman at The Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center who passed a telephone number on to me, Bear and I have appointments for both our first and second Covid vaccinations. That got me to thinking. In this time of Covid with its breathing problems, is Chronic Kidney Disease involved in some way? We know that Covid can cause Acute Kidney Injury, but this is different. It’s trying to find out if CKD can contribute to Covid. 

Respiratory Acidosis sprang to mind, probably because of the word ‘respiratory.’ We already know acidosis can be a problem for CKD patients, but does it contribute to Covid? I didn’t know, so I started my search for an answer at The National Center for Biotechnology Information.    

“Acid-base disorders are common in patients with chronic kidney disease, with chronic metabolic acidosis receiving the most attention clinically in terms of diagnosis and treatment. A number of observational studies have reported on the prevalence of acid-base disorders in this patient population and their relationship with outcomes, mostly focusing on chronic metabolic acidosis…. “ 

Okay, so we’ve established chronic metabolic acidosis is common in CKD patients, but what is that? The National Kidney Foundation explains: 

“The buildup of acid in the body due to kidney disease or kidney failure is called metabolic acidosis. When your body fluids contain too much acid, it means that your body is either not getting rid of enough acid, is making too much acid, or cannot balance the acid in your body.” 

And, of course, we know that chronic means long term as opposed to acute, which means sudden onset. 

But respiratory acidosis? Is that part of acidosis? MedlinePlus came to the rescue with an easily understood definition for us: 

“Respiratory acidosis is a condition that occurs when the lungs cannot remove all of the carbon dioxide the body produces. This causes body fluids, especially the blood, to become too acidic.” 

Let me think a minute to figure out how this is all connected. Got it!  Let’s go back to what the kidneys do for us. 

“Your kidneys remove wastes and extra fluid from your body. Your kidneys also remove acid that is produced by the cells of your body and maintain a healthy balance of water, salts, and minerals—such as sodium, calcium, phosphorus, and potassium—in your blood. 

Without this balance, nerves, muscles, and other tissues in your body may not work normally. 

Your kidneys also make hormones that help 

  • control your blood pressure 
  • make red blood cells  
  • keep your bones strong and healthy” 

Thank you to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases for the above information. 

Aha! Carbon dioxide is a waste product even though the body produces it. The kidneys are tasked with removing wastes. CKD is a progressive decline in your kidney function for over three months. Decline as in don’t work as well. Oh, my. CKD can contribute to breathing problems with Covid. 

The January, 2021, issue of NDT [ Gail here: that stands for Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation] tells us: 

“Although not listed in initial reports as a risk factor for severe COVID-19, CKD has emerged not only as the most prevalent comorbidity conveying an increased risk for severe COVID-19, but also as the comorbidity that conveys the highest risk for severe COVID-19. The increased risk is evident below the threshold of eGFR that defines CKD and the risk increases as the eGFR decreases, with the highest risk in patients on kidney replacement therapy. Although CKD patients are known to be at increased risk of death due to infectious diseases, the factors contributing to their greater vulnerability for severe COVID-19 should be explored, as these may provide valuable insights into therapeutic approaches to the disease in this patient group. It is presently unknown if earlier categories of CKD (G1/G2, i.e. patients with preserved kidney function but with increased albuminuria) are also at an increased risk of severe COVID-19, and this must be explored. Moreover, the recognition that CKD significantly contributes to the severity of COVID-19 should now result in focused efforts to improve outcomes for the 850 million global CKD patients.”  

Uh-oh, do we panic now? No, no, no.  We protect ourselves. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC] has been extremely vocal about this: 

“It is especially important for people at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19, and those who live with them, to protect themselves from getting COVID-19. 

The best way to protect yourself and to help reduce the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19 is to: 

Limit your interactions with other people as much as possible. 

Take precautions to prevent getting COVID-19 when you do interact with others. 

If you start feeling sick and think you may have COVID-19, get in touch with your healthcare provider within 24 hours.  If you don’t have a healthcare provider, contact your nearest community health center or health department.” 

The CDC further explains: 

“Three Important Ways to Slow the Spread 

Wear a mask to protect yourself and others and stop the spread of COVID-19. 

Stay at least 6 feet (about 2 arm lengths) from others who don’t live with you. 

Avoid crowds. The more people you are in contact with, the more likely you are to be exposed to COVID-19.” 

By the way, the CDC acknowledges that CKD raises your risk of getting Covid… as does diabetes… and possibly hypertension. These are also the two primary causes of CKD.  

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

One Thing is Not Like the Other

I’d always thought that albuminuria and proteinuria were one and the same since the words are often use interchangeably. Guess who was wrong. While ‘uria,’ means:  

“a combining form with the meanings ‘presence in the urine’ of that specified by the initial element (albuminuria; pyuria), ‘condition of the urinary tract,’ ‘tendency to urinate as specified (polyuria).’’ 

according to Dictionary.com at https://www.dictionary.com/browse/-uria, albumin and protein are two different substances. 

I know they are closely related, but yet… still not the same. Let’s take a look at albumin: 

“Your liver makes albumin. Albumin carries substances such as hormones, medicines, and enzymes throughout your body.” 

Thank you to University of Rochester’s Medical Center’s Health Encyclopedia at bit.ly/3agVUO8 for this information. 

Wait a minute, the liver? I thought we were dealing with the kidneys. Let me think a minute. I know: we’ll go to the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease. This is what I found at bit.ly/3pDfmer

“Albuminuria is a sign of kidney disease and means that you have too much albumin in your urine. Albumin is a protein found in the blood. A healthy kidney doesn’t let albumin pass from the blood into the urine. A damaged kidney lets some albumin pass into the urine. The less albumin in your urine, the better.” 

Oh, so the albumin itself doesn’t harm the kidneys, but is a sign of kidney disease. Got it. But it’s a protein. Let’s take a look at the protein part of proteinuria and see if we can figure this out. 

In What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Kidney Disease, I defined protein as: 

“Amino acids arranged in chains joined by peptide bonds to form a compound, important because some proteins are hormones, enzymes and antibodies.”   

Look at that: hormones and enzymes are mentioned in both definitions. It would make sense to define these two words now. According to my first book on Chronic Kidney Disease, 

“Hormones: Gland produced chemicals that trigger tissues to do whatever their particular job is.” 

I need some examples. Hormone.org has an extensive list.  Some hormones you might recognize are: 

  • Adrenaline 
  • Cortisol 
  • Erythropoietin 
  • Estrogen 
  • Glucagon 
  • Insulin 
  • Melatonin 
  • Oxytocin 
  • Serotonin 
  • Testosterone 
  • Vitamin D 

What about enzymes? The Merriam Webster Dictionary can help us out here. 

“any of numerous complex proteins that are produced by living cells and catalyze specific biochemical reactions at body temperatures” 

I don’t know about you, but I’m better with examples. I took a short list from MedicalNewsToday: 

  • Lipases 
  • Amylase 
  • Lactase 

These terms may look familiar from your quarterly blood tests. 

I still don’t get it. If albumin is a protein, why isn’t it considered proteinuria? MDEdge, a new site for me, but one that seems credible, explains: 

“Proteinuria and albuminuria are not the same thing. Proteinuria indicates an elevated presence of protein in the urine (normal excretion should be < 150 mg/d), while albuminuria is defined as an ‘abnormal loss of albumin in the urine.’…. Albumin is a type of plasma protein normally found in the urine in very small quantities. Albuminuria is a very common (though not universal) finding in CKD patients; is the earliest indicator of glomerular diseases, such as diabetic glomerulosclerosis; and is typically present even before a decrease in the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) or a rise in the serum creatinine…. 

Albuminuria, without or with a reduction in estimated GFR (eGFR), lasting > 3 months is considered a marker of kidney damage. There are 3 categories of persistent albuminuria…. Staging of CKD depends on both the eGFR and the albuminuria category; the results affect treatment considerations.” 

The important part to remember is that both are indicators of Chronic Kidney Disease. 

Switch of topics here. Remember KidneyX? That’s, 

“The Kidney Innovation Accelerator (KidneyX), a public-private partnership between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the American Society of Nephrology (ASN), is accelerating innovation in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of kidney diseases.”   

Well, they have an announcement for you: 

“The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) announced the eight winners of the KidneyX COVID-19 Kidney Care Challenge Round 1. The $300,000 challenge has identified solutions that could reduce the transmission of coronavirus among people with kidney disease and/or reduce the risk of kidney damage among people who contract the virus. 

‘We congratulate the Round 1 winners who have highlighted approaches to patient monitoring, patient education, and vaccine distribution,’ said HHS Acting Assistant Secretary for Health Rear Admiral Felicia Collins, MD, MPH. ‘We look forward to the subsequent round of rapid-response innovation that supports COVID-19 risk reduction in kidney patients and health professionals during the pandemic.’ 

Each winner will receive $20,000 in recognition of their solution…. The KidneyX Round 2 winners will be announced in February, 2021. 

COVID-19 Kidney Care Challenge Round 1 Winners 

The following submissions were selected as winners of the COVID-19 Kidney Care Challenge Round 1: 

  • 9 Remote Monitoring Platform to Reduce COVID-19 Risk for Hemodialysis Patients 
  • Free E-Learning Platform with CKD and COVID-19 Patient Education 
  • Immediate Rooming for Patients 
  • Canopy: the Next Generation, Reusable Respirator 
  • Characterizing and Targeting Vaccine Hesitancy Among End-Stage Kidney Disease (ESKD) Patients 
  • COVID-19 in Translation: Making Patient Education Accessible to Minorities 
  • The ‘Good Humoral’ Immunity Truck and Freezer Project 
  • Development of Telemedicine-Enhanced Peritoneal Dialysis Training Protocols During COVID-1″ 

Did you know that patients were involved in these projects? 

We’ve passed a sort of milestone with SlowItDownCKD: this is the 601st blog. If there were no Covid-19, I would invite you all to my house for a Renal Diet Bar-B-Q. We know that’s not going to happen any time soon, so – please – have a special meal at your home with those you love. Wear your masks, keep six feet apart, wash your hands often, keep it to a very small gathering of those who are in your pod (Our pod is very small, just Bear and me.), but have a good time anyway. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life!