It Isn’t  Ain’t; It’s AIN.  

I’ll explain that in a minute, but first – on this Labor Day weekend – I want to thank all the readers who have liked individual blogs. These likes let me know I’m writing about topics that interest you.

Let’s turn to AIN now.  You know it’s not just a word, but an acronym. That’s a word formed by the initials of a term, like ASAP for as soon as possible. By the way, ‘nym’ means name, while ‘acr’ means height, summit, tip, top.  ‘O’ connects the two roots. So, we have the tip of the words or the first letters forming an acronym which becomes a recognized word. Thank you to my college course in Greek and Latin roots. I knew that would come on handy someday and it has again and again.

Well, what does AIN mean? It is the acronym for Allergic Interstitial Nephritis, which is a mouthful itself. ‘Allergic’ we get. That’s a common enough word. ‘Interstitial’, though? I remember the prefix (group of related words before the root word that changes its meaning) ‘inter’ means between, but between what? Merriam-Webster Dictionary at https://bit.ly/3h3cF0H, here we come.

asituated within but not restricted to or characteristic of a particular organ or tissue —used especially of fibrous tissue

 baffecting the interstitial tissues of an organ or part

I wonder if we’ll need both definitions. I think we need to be reminded of what nephritis is before we can tell. Again, I remember from that college course so very long ago (Funny what sticks in your mind, isn’t it?) that ‘itis’ means inflammation. We know from all the writings about Chronic Kidney Disease that ‘neph’ means kidneys. Putting these together, we have inflammation of the kidneys. Let’s take a look at my favorite dictionary again, just to be certain.

Yep, there we have it at www.merriam-webster/dictionary/nephritis:

“acute or chronic inflammation of the kidney caused by infection, degenerative process, or vascular disease”

How do you define the whole term? According the excerpt from Nancy A. Finnigan and Khalid Bashir’s book Statpearls on NCBI’s bookshelf at https://bit.ly/31ZTeS2,

“Allergic interstitial nephritis (AIN) is the most common form of acute interstitial nephritis. It is most often caused by exposure to a drug. AIN is often associated with an acute decline in renal function and may be associated with permanent renal insufficiency.”

Acute? Oh, yes. That’s means sudden. It’s the opposite of chronic, which means long term. Looks like we only needed the second dictionary definition of interstitial after all.

So, this kind of nephritis is usually caused by drugs? Which drugs? I went to UpToDate at https://bit.ly/3i4exHS for the answer:

“The most common drug causes of AIN now include …:

  • Nonsteroidalanti-inflammatoryagents (NSAIDs), including selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors
  • Penicillinsand cephalosporins
  • Rifampin
  • Antimicrobial sulfonamides, including trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole
  • Ciprofloxacin and,perhaps toa lesser degree, other quinolones
  • Diuretics, including loop diuretics such as furosemide and bumetanide, and thiazide-type diuretics
  • Cimetidine (only rare cases have been described with other H-2 blockers such as ranitidine) [24,25]
  • Allopurinol
  • Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) such as omeprazole and lansoprazole [26-29]
  • Indinavir
  • 5-aminosalicylates (eg, mesalamine)”

There are some very common drugs on this list. As Chronic Kidney Disease patients, we are warned away from NSAIDS. I’ve been warned about Ciprofloxacin, too, and PPIs, but diuretics? Most of the other drugs we’d have to ask our doctors about when and if they’re prescribed. Then again, I ask my family doctor to check the effect of the drug on the kidneys when she prescribes a drug. She happily does so.

You should note that many of these drugs do not require a prescription. In that case, speak with your pharmacist about its possible effect on your kidneys before buying any over the counter drug. Another possibility is using Drugs.com or a similar website for possible effects on your kidneys before using any drugs.

What are the symptoms, if any, of AIN? Well, much like Chronic Kidney Disease, there are often no symptoms until it is quite advanced. Then you would notice the acute drop in kidney function. A blood test and urine test will help with the diagnosis, although the urine test will only show the presence of white blood cells. That indicates an infection. Sometimes a kidney biopsy is required to diagnose AIN.

And now the biggie: what do you do if you develop AIN? You stop the medication. It’s common sense. Your doctor will probably suggest that once it’s been determined you have allergic interstitial nephritis. Remember though, there are other causes of AIN such as infections and/or autoimmunity.

Topic switch: While I’ve been laboring over this blog, I’ve also been thinking about the fact that today is Labor Day in the United States. Coming from a union family, I thought I’d tell you a little bit about Labor Day that you may not know.

This, and more information about Labor Day, may be found at https://bit.ly/3jPeaRR

“In the late 1800s, the state of labor was grim as U.S. workers toiled under bleak conditions: 12 or more hour workdays; hazardous work environments; meager pay. Children, some as young as 5, were often fixtures at plants and factories.

The dismal livelihoods fueled the formation of the country’s first labor unions, which began to organize strikes and protests and pushed employers for better hours and pay. Many of the rallies turned violent.

On Sept. 5, 1882 — a Tuesday — 10,000 workers took unpaid time off to march in a parade from City Hall to Union Square in New York City as a tribute to American workers. Organized by New York’s Central Labor Union, It [sic]was the country’s first unofficial Labor Day parade. Three years later, some city ordinances marked the first government recognition, and legislation soon followed in a number of states.”

As many of you already know, my grandfather was an organizer for the Brass Workers Union. Many a time he’d disappear. He was jailed for his activities, but that didn’t stop him.

As you labor to avoid AIN and keep your kidneys functioning properly, enjoy the holiday weekend.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!