Feed Me

Over the years, I’ve seen advertisements for food preparation services. You know the ones that cook your meals and deliver them weekly. I would approach the people offering the service to see what they could do with the renal diet. That was a deal killer right there.

All right, I figured. Maybe what I should be doing is finding a chef who is willing to work with kidney patients rather than ask existing food preparation services to accommodate just me. I even had one chef who agreed that this is a valuable service and something she wanted to do. I was excited. Then she simply stopped emailing and answering calls. That was a couple of years ago.

I sort of gave up… until I ran into an advertisement for Clarence’s food service. I figured it was worth it to try again and called him. It was.

I explained to Clarence that I don’t permit advertising on my blog, but I would like other Chronic Kidney Disease patients to see how they can make use of food preparation services such as his. He was kind enough to write this guest blog for us. I’m hoping that this inspires you to approach a chef in your area to ask him/her if he/she is willing to provide such a service. Of course, not all of us want to have someone else prepare our meals or want to spend the money to do so, so this is a blog for that portion of readers who do.

Meal Planning for Those with Kidney Disease.
Clarence Ferguson, RTSM, CMTA, NT

Understanding your kidney disease, or renal disease, is the first step in taking control of your health. While I am not a doctor, I have aligned myself with those whose specialize in CKD so that I can adjust meals accordingly. When you have kidney disease, your kidneys are no longer able to remove waste effectively from your body or to balance your fluids. The buildup of wastes can change the chemistry of your body causing some symptoms that you can feel, and others that you don’t.

With kidney diseases, the first symptoms you may have are ones that you won’t feel but that will show up in tests that your doctor orders. Common problems are high blood pressure, anemia and weakening bones. It is important to find a kidney doctor (also called a nephrologist). And once you have your doctor’s recommendation that’s where we come in and prepare your meal according to his or her recommendations.

Okay Clarence, we know that but how do we navigate healthy eating?

Here are some suggestions for you and what I prepare for clients who struggle with CKD.

Make sure these snacks are readily available:
1. Fruit: apples, grapes, tangerines or strawberries; dried cranberries or blueberries; or packaged fruit cups with diced     peaches, pears, pineapple, mandarin oranges or mixed fruit. Make sure they are organic.
2. Low- or no-sodium microwave popcorn.
3. Low-sodium crackers, pita chips or unsalted pretzels.
4. Pouches of tuna or chicken and a side of Vegainse (a dairy free option for mayonnaise).
5. Kidney-friendly nutrition bars or liquid supplements, such as the ones from ID life, since they meet these guidelines.

What we do at Fit Body Foods
1. Compare brands. Sodium and potassium levels can vary significantly from one brand to another.
2. Look for low-sodium labels on packaging. Stock up on the lowest sodium broths, stocks and condiments.
3. Choose fresh vegetables, or frozen or canned veggies with no added salt or sodium.
4. Use only 1/4 as much of the tomato sauce and canned tomatoes that a recipe calls for to limit potassium and sodium.
5. Don’t use canned fish or chicken with added salt. All fish is fresh, so we can control the sodium levels by rinsing to reduce the sodium. Try to limit use of canned goods in general.
6. Avoid baking and pancake mixes that have salt and baking powder added. Instead, make a kidney-friendly recipe from scratch.
7. Use sweet pickles instead of dill pickles and check for added salt.
8. Check cold and instant hot cereals for sodium amounts. Although oatmeal contains more phosphorus than some cereals, it may be okay one to two times a week if phosphorus is well-controlled.
9. Check the ingredients in vinegar. Some vinegars, such as seasoned rice vinegar, contain added salt and sugar.
10. Avoid store-bought sauces and gravies that have mystery ingredients in them. Make our own instead from real-food ingredients.
11. Use homemade soup recipes, such as Rotisserie Chicken Noodle Soup, instead of pre-made or canned soups. Some soups contain more than 800 mg sodium per serving.
12. Low – and reduced – sodium broth is great for use in cooking. We save the homemade broth from stewed or boiled chicken or beef.
13. Don’t trade sodium for potassium. Some products replace salt with potassium chloride.
14. Limit nuts, seeds and chocolate as they are high in potassium and phosphorus.

We prepare food weekly and deliver to our clients on Sundays. We take the worry out of meal prep, our meals start at $7.99 a meal, and we can accommodate most palates. We can be reached for orders at: info@coachclarence.com.

Below is a sample recipe:
Cucumber-Carrot Salad
Diet types: CKD non-dialysis, Dialysis, Diabetes
Portions: 4
Serving size: 1/2 cup
Ingredients:
1/4 cup unseasoned rice vinegar
1 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon olive oil
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 cucumber
1 cup carrots
2 tablespoons green onion
2 tablespoons red bell pepper
1/2 teaspoon Mrs. Dash® Italian Medley seasoning blend

Notice there is nothing new here. We all know this information. What is appealing is having someone else, someone who understands our diet limitations, buy the food and prepare it for our meals. I explained to Clarence that our food needs as far as electrolytes change with each blood test and he agreed that it’s important to eat according to your numbers. That’s something he’s very willing to pay attention to. Should this interest you, why not approach a professional in your area to see if they can also provide such a service?Big news! SlowItDownCKD 2011 is now available on Amazon.com in both print and digital (and needs reviews: hint). SlowItDownCKD 2012 will not be far behind. These are the first and second parts of the reformatted, larger print, more comprehensively indexed The Book of Blogs: Moderate Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1, (available only until SlowItDownCKD 2012 is published).

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

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Updated

 

 

 

You may have seen the pictures of the updates we’ve been making to our home on Facebook or Instagram. Now, it seemed to me that if I could update my home, I could update SlowItDownCKD’s social media. So I did. The website at www.gail-raegarwood.com is totally SlowItDownCKD now, as are the Instagram, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Pinterest accounts. Of course, the blog was next. I liked my updates, but realized some of the new organizations on the blogroll (the list to the right of the blog) may be unknown to you.

No problem. I’ll just introduce them to you. Allow me to make the introductions…

We’ll go alphabetically down the roll here. The American Association of Kidney Patients, The American Kidney Fund, and The American Society of Nephrology are not new. Just in case you need a reminder of what each is, I’ve linked their titles to the organization. Just click on one of them to go to their websites, as you usually do for any title on the blogroll.

This brings us to The International Federation of Kidney Foundations. This is directly from the young (established 1999) organization’s website:
The International Federation of Kidney Foundations leads the way in the prevention and treatment of kidney disease, through its Membership on all continents around the world. The Federation was formed to foster international collaboration and the exchange of ideas that will improve the health, well-being and quality of life of individuals with kidney disease. We hope to achieve this by advocating for improved health care delivery as well as adopting and disseminating standards of best practice of treatment and care. We facilitate education programs for member organisations, promote research, communicate with other organisations and exchange ideas, particularly those concerning fund raising….
The IFKF helps facilitate the establishment of more kidney foundations and to help existing foundations become more dynamic and effective. Worldwide, most individuals with chronic kidney disease or hypertension are not diagnosed until long after the illness has developed. Moreover, when they are diagnosed they are too often treated sub-optimally or not at all. In many parts of the world, once end stage kidney failure occurs, patients do not have access to dialysis or kidney transplantation.
IFKF members join together with ISN members and kidney patient associations, to celebrate World Kidney Day annually in March, to influence general physicians, primary healthcare providers, health officials and policymakers and to educate high risk patients and individuals.

I’ve been interested in the global effects of Chronic Kidney Disease since I started preparing for Landmark’s 2017 Conference for Global Transformation at which I presented this past May. Writing two articles for their journal opened my eyes- yet again – to the fact that this is not just a local problem, but a worldwide problem. That’s why I included Kidney Diseases Death Rate By Country, On a World Map in the blogroll. I mapped out the statistics I found here on a trifold map to exhibit at the conference. Seeing the numbers spread all over the world was startling, to say the least.

Here is their 2015 global CKD information:
In 2015, the Asian nations of India and China fared the worst when it came to the number of deaths due to this degenerative health condition per thousand people. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) data (I’m interrupting. Would you like a link to WHO on the blogroll?), India had the highest number of kidney diseases deaths. The data put the figure at an astounding 257.9 per 1,000 people. China had the second highest number of deaths due to kidney diseases. Here, the number stood at 187.4 per 1,000 people. Though not as bad as the two Asian nations, the United States was also grappling with the problem of kidney diseases deaths in 2015. The nation had 59.8 deaths (per 1,000 people) due to kidney diseases, while Indonesia, which occupied the fourth place, had an estimated 43 deaths (per 1,000 people) due to kidney diseases. Nations such as Egypt, Germany, Mexico, Philippines, Brazil, Thailand and Japan reported deaths between 20 and 40 (per 1,000 people) due to kidney-related diseases. But, on the positive side, there were many nations in the world where a negligible number of people died due to kidney diseases. It is a noteworthy fact that countries such as Maldives, Vanuatu, Iceland, Grenada, Comoros, Belize, and many others, reported a zero figure in 2015.

But then I wanted to cover more localized information about CKD, so I included The National Chronic Kidney Disease, Fact Sheet, 2017. This is basically facts with pictograms that make the information about the United States’ CKD information more visual and easier to grasp. The information is more distressing each year the site is updated.

Fast Stats

• 30 million people or 15% of US adults are estimated to have CKD.*

• 48% of those with severely reduced kidney function but not on dialysis are not aware of having CKD.

• Most (96%) people with kidney damage or mildly reduced kidney function are not aware of having CKD.

After several sites that are not new, the last new site, other than direct links to SlowItDownCKD’s kidney books, is The Kidney & Urology Foundation of America. Why did I include that? Take a look at their website. You’ll find this there:
The Kidney & Urology Foundation focuses on care and support of the patient, the concerns of those at risk, education for the community and medical professionals, methods of prevention, and improved treatment options.
What Sets Us Apart?
The Kidney & Urology Foundation of America is comprised of a dedicated Executive Board, medical advisors, educated staff and volunteers who provide individualized support to patients and their families. Adult nephrologists and transplant physicians comprise our Medical Advisory Board, Board – certified urologists serve on the Urology Board, and pediatric nephrologists and urologists represent the Council on Pediatric Nephrology and Urology.
We are a phone call or e-mail click away from getting you the help you need to cope with a new diagnosis, a resource for valuable information on kidney or urologic diseases, a window into current research treatment options or a link to a physician should you need one.

Are there any organizations I’ve left out that you feel should be included? Just add a comment and I’ll be glad to take a look at them. I am convinced that the only way we’re going to get any kind of handle on Chronic Kidney Disease as patients is by keeping each other updated.

Until next week,
Keep living your life!

Gluten Free

“…I started GF mid-April & my June lab work showed significant improvement. My next lab work is not until August, but I feel & look so much better, and because my BP dropped so much, my nephrologist took me off hydrochlorothorozide and reduced irbesartan from 300 to 75.” This is a small part of the message I received from a reader… and it intrigued me.

I take hydrochlorothiazide.  I know I looked it up at the time it was prescribed, something about fluid. Hmmm, it wouldn’t hurt to look it up again to refresh my (and your) memory. According to Medicinenet.com at http://www.medicinenet.com/hydrochlorothiazide/page2.htm, hydrochlorothiazide is prescribed for the following reasons:

“Hydrochlorothiazide is used to treat excessive fluid accumulation and swelling (edema) of the body caused by heart failure, cirrhosis, chronic kidney failure, corticosteroid medications, and nephrotic syndrome. It also is used alone or in conjunction with other blood pressure lowering medications to treat high blood pressure…. Hydrochlorothiazide can be used to treat calcium-containing kidney stones because it decreases the amount of calcium excreted by the kidneys in the urine and thus decreases the amount of calcium in urine to form stones….”

I didn’t recognize irbesartan specifically, although the sartan part was  familiar. According to the same source, but this time at http://www.medicinenet.com/irbesartan/article.htm, “Irbesartan is used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension) and to help protect the kidneys from damage due to diabetes. Lowering high blood pressure helps prevent strokes, heart attacks, and kidney problems. Irbesartan belongs to a class of drugs called angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). It works by relaxing blood vessels so that blood can flow more easily.”

Oh, of course! I’m taking losartan for the same reason. I’d had hypertension for over 20 years before I was diagnosed with Chronic Kidney Disease. Even if I hadn’t, once I was diagnosed with CKD, a drug like this would have been prescribed.  As a matter of fact, when I complained to my primary care doctor that I was taking too many pills (mostly supplements), she came up with one that combined hydrochlorothiazide and losartan.

 

 

 

 

But I digress. So, it’s a good thing that this reader no longer needs her hydrochlorothiazide since she has no swelling and that her irbesartan has been reduced since her blood vessels are becoming more relaxed. Wait a minute. Why wouldn’t every CKD patient want these results? Ah, but I’ve left something out of the equation.

She’s gone GF or Gluten Free. Ready? Here is the definition of gluten from the Oxford Dictionary at https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/GLUTEN “A mixture of two proteins present in cereal grains, especially wheat, which is responsible for the elastic texture of dough.” Oh, come on. There must be more to it than that. Let’s try gluten free instead of gluten. Oh, my! NephCure at https://nephcure.org/livingwithkidneydisease/diet-and-nutrition/gluten-free-diet/

has an entire page devoted to going gluten free. But I am getting ahead of myself here.

Let’s go back to gluten, this time sources. The American Diabetes Association at http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/planning-meals/gluten-free-diets/what-foods-have-gluten.html  offers these lists:

What Foods Have Gluten?

Gluten is found in wheat, rye, barley and any foods made with these grains. Avoiding wheat can be especially hard because this means you should avoid all wheat-based flours and ingredients. These include but are not limited to:
White Flour
Whole Wheat Flour
Durum Wheat
Graham Flour
Triticale
Kamut
Semolina
Spelt
Wheat Germ
Wheat Bran

Common foods that are usually made with wheat include:
Pasta
Couscous
Bread
Flour Tortillas
Cookies
Cakes
Muffins
Pastries
Cereal
Crackers
Beer
Oats (see the section on oats below)
Gravy
Dressings
Sauces
This may seem like a long list, but there are still plenty of gluten-free foods out there! Choose from many fresh, healthy foods like fruits, vegetables, beans, dairy, nuts and gluten-free grains like quinoa or rice. There are also gluten-free versions of many of the foods above available in most grocery stores. You just have to look for them!

Gluten Surprises
You may not expect it, but the following foods can also contain gluten:
broth in soups and bouillon cubes
breadcrumbs and croutons
some candies
fried foods
imitation fish
some lunch meats and hot dogs
malt
matzo
modified food starch
seasoned chips and other seasoned snack foods
salad dressings
self-basting turkey
soy sauce
seasoned rice and pasta mixes
There are also many additives  and ingredients in packaged foods that may contain gluten. Always check labels and ingredient lists for these. For a more comprehensive list of gluten-containing additives, contact your local celiac support group.

Other Tips to Remember
Don’t forget that ingredients in food products change frequently, so always check the label before buying packaged foods. Remember that “wheat-free” does not automatically mean “gluten-free.” While a product may not contain wheat, it can still contain rye or barley in some form. If you have any question about whether a food contains gluten, contact the manufacturer directly.

The Fuss About Oats
Pure oats are a gluten-free food, but most commercially processed oats have been contaminated during the growing, harvesting or processing stages. In the past, many experts recommended completely avoiding oats  those on a gluten-free diet in addition to wheat, barley, and rye. Now, some oats are grown and processed separately, and can be labeled “gluten-free.”

I see an awful lot of the same foods to avoid on this list as I do on the renal diet. I wonder if that would make it easier to go gluten free if you decide to?

Phosphorous! Aha. We, as CKD patients, need to limit our phosphorous intake. Have you noticed that many of these foods are high phosphorous? Is it possible that the gluten free diet will help us with our renal diets? I’m not suggesting that you go gluten free and I’m not suggesting that you don’t. I am saying the idea is, well, intriguing.

Before I forget: SlowItDownCKD has been chosen as one of Healthline’s top kidney disease blogs for 2017. Second year in a row!!!!! AND I’ve lowered the price of all five of my digital kidney books to $2.99 to spread the awareness of CKD out there more effectively. Oh, yes, you can still get them for free on Kindle Unlimited.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

 

 

So That’s How It’s Decided

SlowItDownCKD’s being honored as one of the best kidney disease blogs for 2016 has had some interesting results.  The first was the health and food writer’s guest blog about hydration for Chronic Kidney Disease on March 6th. Then it was the guest blog by the Social Security Administration’s Outreach Director. This week, it’s a telephone interview with Dr. Michael J. Germain, a nephrologist from Massachusetts, about some of the suggested guidelines in the upcoming KDIGO for 2016.

Got it:  backtrack. Let’s start with KDIGO. This stands for KIDNEY DISEASE | IMPROVING GLOBAL OUTCOMES. Their homepage at KDIGO.org states, “KDIGO MISSION – Improving the care and outcomes of kidney disease patients worldwide through the development and implementation of global clinical practice guidelines.” Anyone up for visiting their offices? What an excuse to go to Belgium!

Okay, now we know what the organization is and what it does, but why Dr. Germain? I asked the same question. Although he is not on the KDIGO panel of doctors who decide what the next year’s development and implementation will be, he is well versed with the topic having published or having been part of the writing for an overwhelming number of articles in such esteemed journals as the American Journal of Kidney Disease, Kidney International, and The Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, as well as contributing to textbooks, … and he could simplify the medicalese in the guidelines to simple English for this lay person.

If you think I remind you quite often that I’m not a doctor, you should read my emails to our liaison. State I’m not a doctor, repeat, state I’m not a doctor, repeat. She had the good graces to laugh at my insecurities.

The latest guideline updates have not been released yet, so both the good doctor (over 40 years as a nephrologist) and I (CKD patient and awareness advocate for a decade) were working off the draft that was released last August.

Dr. Germain also made it a point to ensure that I understand the guidelines are based upon expert opinion, not evidence. That made sense to me since he is not only a patient seeing nephrologist, but also a research nephrologist – to which his numerous publications will attest. With me being a lay person, he “had a lot of ‘splaining to do.” I had to admire his passion when discussing the vitamin D guidelines.

In the draft guidelines, it was suggested that hypercalcemia be avoided. I know; it’s a new word. We already know that hyper is a prefix meaning over or too much; think excessive in this case. Calcemia looks sort of like calcium. Good thinking because, according to Healthline at http://www.healthline.com/health/hypercalcemia:“Hypercalcemia is a condition in which you have too high a concentration of calcium in your blood. Calcium performs important functions, such as helping keep your bones healthy. However, too much of it can cause problems….”

This excerpt from What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease explains how calcium works with vitamin D and phosphorous.

“The kidneys produce calcitrol which is the active form of vitamin D. The kidneys are the organs that transfer this vitamin from your food and skin [sunshine provides it to your skin] into something your body can use. Both vitamin D and calcium are needed for strong bones. It is yet another job of your kidneys to keep your bones strong and healthy. Should you have a deficit of Vitamin D, you’ll need to be treated for this, in addition for any abnormal level of calcium or phosphates. The three work together. Vitamin D enables the calcium from the food you eat to be absorbed in the body. CKD may leech the calcium from your bones and body.”

The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2 offers us more information.

“The parathyroid glands are located in the neck, near or attached to the back side of the thyroid gland. Parathyroid hormone controls calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D levels in the blood and bone. Release of PTH is controlled by the level of calcium in the blood. Low blood calcium levels cause increased PTH to be released, while high blood calcium levels block PTH release. …  Thanks to MedLine Plus at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003690.htm .”

As Dr. Germain explained, CKD patients break down vitamin D quickly since they have more of a catabolic enzyme, the enzyme that converts the vitamin D to an inactive form. Oh, right, catabolic means “any destructive process by which complex substances are converted by living cells into more simple compounds, with release of energy” according to Dorland’s Medical Dictionary for Health Consumers.

Here’s the problem: vitamin D can cause hypercalcemia. Dr. Germain phrased it, “In fact, the draft guideline recommends active vitamin D hormone therapy not to be routinely used in patients with CKD stage 3 or 4 due to increased risk of hypercalcemia and the lack of efficacy shown in studies.” Therefore, he urges nephrologists to wait until stage 4 or 5 to recommend vitamin D since hyperparathryoidism may lead to bone damage. But just as in any disease, it is harder to treat bone damage once it’s already there. His recommendation: Ask about your parathyroid level every three to six months and discuss the results of your tests with your nephrologist. By the way, his feeling – and obviously mine – is that preserving the kidney function is the most important job of the nephrologist and the patient.

I am eager to see the guidelines published so I can write more about them. The conclusion about vitamin D is based upon what nephrologists have seen in their practices since the last set of KDIGO guidelines were published in 2009. It will affect the way our nephrologists speak with us about our treatment, just as the other guidelines for 2016 will.

That will affect the way we self-manage. For example, I restrict my sun time to 15 minutes a day based on these findings. Take a look at how you self-manage. It should bring up a list of questions for you to ask your nephrologist at your next appointment.

You should also know the KDIGO deals with all stages of CKD including End Stage CKD and pediatric CKD.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Yet Another Possibility

Today we have yet another fitness plan? Weight loss plan? Health plan? Beauty plan? I don’t know what to call it since they offer so many different types of products. What’s that, you ask. It’s called Wakaya Perfection. It seems a great number of my friends and acquaintances have been involved in their health in this way recently. They, however, do not have Chronic Kidney Disease.

Let’s get this part out of the way: I want to go there. Yes, there. Wakaya is not only a company, but an island in the South Pacific and it.is.beautiful. Take a look at their website (wakayaperfection.com) so you can see for yourself… but, of course, that’s not what this blog is about.

The company has several different lines, so I decided to look at one product from each to evaluate them for CKD patients. Remember, should they not be viable options for CKD patients does not mean they’re not viable for those without CKD.

Let’s start with the weight loss products since that’s what’s on my mind lately. That would be the Bula SlimCap. This is what their website has to say about these caps:

“At Wakaya Perfection, when we say all natural, that is exactly what we mean. Our tropical flavors are:

  • Sugar Free
  • Fat Free
  • Gluten Free

And Contain:

  • NO Artificial Flavors, Ingredients or Colors
  • NO Monosodium Glutamate (MSG)
  • NO Insect or Animal Matter
  • NO Growth Hormones
  • NO Antibiotics
  • NO Herbicides or Pesticide

That sounds great and appeals to me. Wait a minute, natural is good, but what is it that’s natural? I couldn’t find an ingredient list other than this:

  • All Natural Flavors
  • Active Ingredients
  • Pink Fijian Ginger
  • Stevia Reb-A 98%
  • Quick Dissolve Blend

What makes it a quick dissolve blend? What are the all natural flavors? What are the active ingredients? Ginger is permissible for CKD patients, but how much ginger is in each cap? And as for Stevia Reb-A 98%, this is a warning I found on New Health Guide at http://www.newhealthguide.org/Stevia-Side-Effects.html: “The FDA has noted that stevia may have a negative impact on the kidneys, reproductive, cardiovascular systems or blood sugar control.” Uh-oh, they mentioned our kidneys.

Oh well, that’s only one product and maybe there’s some other source of ingredients somewhere. Hmmm, I’d want to know what’s in a product and how much of each ingredient is in it before I took it, especially with CKD on my plate.

Let’s switch to a fitness product. I stayed away from the protein shake meal replacements for the reasons I explained about such products in SlowItDownCKD 2016. This is the poignant part of that blog:

“Ladies and gentlemen, our protein intake is restricted because we have CKD. Why would we take a chance on increasing the protein in our bodies? Here’s a reminder from What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease about why we need to limit our protein.

‘So, why is protein limited? One reason is that it is the source of a great deal of phosphorus. Another is that a number of nephrons were already destroyed before you were even diagnosed. Logically, those that remain compensate for those that are no longer viable. The remaining nephrons are doing more work than they were meant to. Just like a car that is pushed too hard, there will be constant deterioration if you don’t stop pushing. The idea is to stop pushing your remaining nephrons to work even harder in an attempt to slow down the advancement of your CKD.  Restricting protein is a way to reduce the nephrons’ work.’”

Why don’t we take a look at the BulaFit Burn Capsules? Wakaya Perfection describes them as,

“A potent combination of herbs and extracts that help you manage appetite/cravings while providing sustained energy and heightened focus throughout your day. BulaFIT BURN™ is designed to help boost fat burning and provide a sense of wellbeing that reduces cravings for food and snacking.

When combined with a healthy diet and exercise, BURN capsules promote a sense of well being and energy that reduces cravings for food and snacking. BURN can also play an important role in increasing the results of ketosis and even avoiding the ‘keto flu’ that some people may experience with other ketogenic programs.”

Huh? What’s keto flu? I figured a site with the name Keto Size Me (http://ketosizeme.com/keto-flu-101-everything-need-know/) could help us out here… and they did. “The ‘keto flu’ is what we commonly call carbohydrate withdrawal symptoms. These symptoms usually occur in people who start a low carb diet that alters their hormones and causes and electrolyte imbalances.”

Wait! Electrolyte imbalances? But we work so hard with the renal diet trying to keep these within the proper range for CKD. I went back to What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease for a little reminder about electrolytes.

“In order to fully understand the renal diet, you need to know a little something about electrolytes. There are the sodium, potassium, and phosphate you’ve been told about and also calcium, magnesium, chloride, and bicarbonate. They maintain balance in your body….Too much or too little of a certain electrolyte presents different problems.”

Nope, not me. I’m keeping my electrolytes right where they belong. This is not looking good for the Chronic Kidney Disease patient. I vote no; you, of course, have to make up your own mind.

News of a local opportunity: This year’s first Path of Wellness Screening will be Saturday, June 17th at the Indo American Cultural Center’s community hall, 2809 W. Maryland Ave., Phoenix, AZ 85017. The free screening events can process up to 200 people.  Their use of point-of-care testing devices provides blood and urine test results in a matter of minutes, which are reviewed onsite by volunteer physicians.  All screening participants are offered free enrollment in chronic disease self-management workshops.  Help is also given to connect participants with primary care resources.  The goals of PTW are to improve early identification of at-risk people, facilitate their connection to health care resources, and slow the progression of chronic diseases in order to reduce heart failure, kidney failure and the need for dialysis.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Just Blend In

Well, if that doesn’t beat all! Here I thought I was juicing until a reader asked me if my nephrologist knew the difference between juicing and blending. There’s something called blending? Let’s get my doctor out of the equation right away. He may or may not know the difference between the two, but I certainly didn’t.

I heard juicing and just assumed (and we all know what happens when we assume) it meant tossing 80% vegetables – since this was prescribed for fast weight loss – and 20% fruits in the blender. Hmmm, the name of the machine I used should have tipped me off that there was a difference, but it went right over my head.

Let me tell you what I learned. Juice, according to Dictionary.com at http://www.dictionary.com/browse/juicing, is: “the natural fluid, fluid content or liquid part that can be extracted from a plant or one of its parts…” while juicing is “to extract juice from.” Uh-uh, I wasn’t doing that. There was no pulp left after the vegetables and fruits were processed in the blender. It all sort of mushed – oh, all right – blended together.

The same dictionary tells me blending is: “to mix smoothly and inseparably together.” Yep, that’s what I’ve been doing. By the way, for those of you who asked to be kept posted about any weight loss, I’ve lost five pounds in ten days. To be perfectly candid, there was one day of I’m-going-to-eat-anything-I –want! mixed in there.

Another CKD Awareness Advocate wondered just what I was doing to my electrolyte limits while on this blending (I do know that’s what it is now.) diet. I arbitrarily chose a recipe from a juicing book I got online before I realized I wasn’t juicing. The recipe called for:

2 beets (what a mess to peel and chop)

2 carrots (I used the equivalent in baby ones since my hands were already starting to hurt from dealing with the beets)

8 strawberries

7 leaves of kale – which I learned is also called Tuscan cabbage

I added a cup of water since I wasn’t taking any pulp out, so the mixture was really thick.

All the ingredients were on my renal diet. So far, so good. But the question was about my daily electrolyte limits. My limits are as follows (Yours may be different since the limits usually are based upon your most current labs.):

Calories – 2100

Potassium – 3000 mg.

Phosphorous – 800 mg.

Protein – 5 ounces (141,748 mg.)

Sodium – 2000 mg.

Nutritional Data at http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2348/2 tells me I drank this much of each of those electrolytes in the total of two drinks I had of this concoction… I mean blend. The measurement is milligrams and each drink replaces a meal.

 

 

Protein Phosphorus
Beets  1300   33
Carrots  2700   42
Kale  2200   38
Strawberries  1000   37
Totals  7200 150

 

 

 

Potassium

 

 

Sodium

Beets   267  1300
Carrots   359   2700
Kale   299  2200
Strawberries   233   1000
Totals  1158  7200

 

 Calories
Beets    33
Carrots    42
Kale    38
Strawberries    37
Totals   150

I had to backtrack a little to figure out that 8 baby carrots is the equivalent to 2/3 of a cup or a little over five oz. Thanks to http://www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org/how-much-do-i-need for the help there. They were also the source I used to verify that 8 large strawberries equal 1 cup or 8 oz.

The calculations were the hardest part of this blog for me. I rounded up whenever possible. Also, keep in mind that different sites or books may give you different approximations for the electrolytes in the different amounts of each different food you blend. I discovered that when I was researching and decided to stick with the simplest site for me to understand.

So, did I exceed my limits? I am permitted three different vegetables per day with a serving of half a cup per vegetable. There are only three vegetables in this recipe. I did go over ½ cup with the all of them, yet am under my limitations for each of the electrolytes. This is complicated. As for the fruit, I am also allowed three different ones with ½ cup limit on each. Or can I count the one cup of strawberries as two servings of today’s vegetables? Welcome to my daily conundrum.

Over all, I still have plenty of electrolytes available to me for my third meal today, which is to be a light meal of regular foods (provided they’re on my renal diet). I also have two cups of coffee a day which has its own numbers:

Protein  Phosphorus Potassium  Sodium   Calories

6000              14                232               9               4

Add those in and I still have plenty of food available to me with the electrolytes within the balance limits. The funny part is that I’m not hungry for hours after one of the blended drinks and, bam! all of a sudden I’m ravenous. I usually have the light meal mid-day so I’m not still digesting at bedtime. This is really important: on that I’m-going-to-eat-anything-I –want! day, I was hungier and hungier the more I ate and didn’t recognize when I was full.

The nice part about blending is that the fiber is still in the mixture. Fiber is necessary for a multitude of reasons when you’re a CKD patient. DaVita at https://www.davita.com/kidney-disease/diet-and-nutrition/diet-basics/fiber-in-the-kidney-diet/e/5320 lists those reasons for us:

Benefits of fiber

Adequate fiber in the kidney diet can be beneficial to people with chronic kidney disease (CKD) because it:

  • Keeps GI (gastrointestinal) function healthy
  • Adds bulk to stool to prevent constipation
  • Prevents diverticulosis (pockets inside the colon)
  • Helps increase water in stool for easier bowel movements
  • Promotes regularity
  • Prevents hemorrhoids
  • Helps control blood sugar and cholesterol

Our fourth anniversary is Thursday. We have had numerous health problems to deal with since that date, BUT we’ve also had numerous opportunities for fun…and we’ve taken each one. Did I ever tell you we had the ceremony at 4 p.m. in our backyard and the reception at 6 p.m. in order to help us remember the date? 4/6 = April 6th. Get it?

Anyway, any help offered to make the blending and a light meal work on Saturday when we’ll be celebrating by attending the Phoenix Film Festival (http://www.phoenixfilmfestival.com/) all day and night will be gratefully accepted. Bring your copy of one of my books. I’ll gladly sign it for you.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

The Three Musketeers

I was in Cuba last week with very sketchy internet, so it was not possible to post a blog. But for now, I was thinking about a friend – you know, one of those Facebook friends you pic_backbone_sidenever met but you feel an instant kinship with – who told me that her surgeon warned her that her recovery from the spinal fusion surgery she’d recently had would be slow because she has Chronic Kidney Disease.

CKD…bone healing. Let’s start slowly and work this one out.  First of all, what do the kidneys have to do with your bones?

I turned to What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease for some answers.

FullSizeRender (2)“Both vitamin D and calcium are needed for strong bones. It is yet another job of your kidneys to keep your bones strong and healthy….Vitamin D enables the calcium from the food you eat to be absorbed in the body. CKD may leech the calcium from your bones and body….Be aware that kidney disease can cause excessive phosphorus. And what does that mean for Early Stage CKD patients? Not much if the phosphorous levels are kept low. Later, at Stages 4 and 5, bone problems including pain and breakage may be endured since excess phosphorous means the body tries to maintain balance by using the calcium that should be going to the bones.”

Whoa! Each one of those thoughts needs at least a bit more explanation. Let’s start with the jobs of the kidneys. The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 has a paragraph that mentions some of them. I turned it into a list to make it more visual.

“Our kidneys are very busy organs, indeed.  They produce urine, remove potentially harmful waste products from the blood, aid in the maintenance of the local environment around the cells of the body, kidneys5

help to stimulate the production of red blood cells, regulate blood pressure, help regulate various substances in the blood {For example, potassium, sodium, calcium and more}, help to regulate the acidity of the blood, and regulate the amount of water in the body. Mind you, these are just their main jobs.”IMG_2982

Another of those various substances in the blood they help to regulate is phosphorous. That’s where one of the connections between CKD and your bones lies. If your phosphorous is not being correctly regulated by your kidneys (since your kidneys are impaired), yes you do experience pain and broken bones, but did you notice that your body also diverts your necessary-for-bone-health calcium to regulate the other substances in your blood?

I wanted to know more about phosphorous so I turned to The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2. I got a chuckle from seeing that I’d quoted from my first book in explaining how phosphorous works. I’d forgotten about that.

sparkling teeth“This is the second most plentiful mineral in the body and works closely with the first, calcium. Together, they produce strong bones and teeth. 85% of the phosphorous and calcium in our bodies is stored in the bones and teeth.  The rest circulates in the blood except for about 5% that is in cells and tissues…. Phosphorous balances and metabolizes other vitamins and minerals including vitamin D which is so important to CKD patients. As usual, it performs other functions, such as getting oxygen to tissues and changing protein, fat and carbohydrate into energy.”

FullSizeRender (3)

Talk about multi-tasking. Let’s focus in on the calcium/phosphorous connection. Kidney Health Australia at http://kidney.org.au/cms_uploads/docs/calcium-and-phosphate-balance-fact-sheet.pdf explained this succinctly:

“When your kidney function declines, you are unable to get rid of excess phosphate. (Me here: that’s what we call phosphorous except when dealing with inorganic chemistry.)  The phosphate builds up in your body and binds to calcium, which, in turn, lowers your calcium levels. When your calcium levels get too low, glands in bloodyour neck (called the parathyroid glands) pull the extra calcium your body needs out of your bones. This can make your bones easy to break. The bound phosphate and calcium get deposited in your blood vessels. It can increase your risk of heart disease and stroke. It can also cause skin ulcers and lumps in your joints.”

So where does vitamin D come in? As was mentioned in SlowItDownCKD 2015,

“’Vitamin D: Regulates calcium and phosphorous blood levels as well as promoting bone formation, among other tasks – affects the immune system.’ We know vitamin D can be a real problem for us.  How many of you are taking vitamin D supplements? Notice my hand is raised, too.  How many of you read the blogs about vitamin D?  Good!” IMG_2980

It sounds like vitamin D is in charge here. Let me get some more information about that for us. Bingo: DaVita at https://www.davita.com/kidney-disease/diet-and-nutrition/diet-basics/vitamin-d-and-chronic-kidney-disease/e/5326 was able to help us out here.

“Vitamin D is responsible for:

  • Building and maintaining strong bones
  • Keeping the right level of calcium and phosphorus in the blood
  • Preventing bones from becoming weak or malformed
  • Preventing rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults

vitamin d pillsToo much vitamin D can be toxic….”

Hmmm, the three work together with vitamin D as their captain.

I wondered what foods would be helpful for my friend in her healing process.

“Calcium

Milk, yogurt, cheese, sardines, spinach, collard greens, kale, soybeans, black-eyed peas, white beans and foods often fortified with calcium: breakfast cereals, orange juice, soy milk, rice milk

Vitamin D

Salmon, mackerel, sardines, tuna, flounder, sole, cod

Phosphorusfish

Ricotta cheese, barley, soybeans, sunflower seeds, cottage cheese, lentils”

Thank you to Weill Cornell Medical College’s Women’s Health Advisor at http://www.cornellwomenshealth.com/static_local/pdf/WHA0210_BoneHealth.pdf for the above information.

But, you know, it’s never just that easy. As CKD patients, we have limits of how much protein, potassium, sodium, and – wait for it – phosphorous we can eat each day. There is no socking in all the good stuff for kidney disease patients.

I can see why my friend’s surgeon told her the recovery might be slow. Something else that keeps the bones strong is weight bearing exercise, but how can she do that right now?

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

 

It’s Unfolding Now

Remember when I was lucky enough to catch the flu just after Christmas? (She wrote sarcastically.) When I went to the Immediate Care facility my doctor is associated with, the doctor there had my records and knew I’d had pleurisy at one time. But now, he ordered a chest x-ray to check for pneumonia. What he found instead was news to me… so, of course, I’m telling you about it.

IMG_2982To quote from the final result report of the X-ray: “There is unfolding of the thoracic aorta.” Huh? In The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 there’s an explanation of thorax.

“What?  The what? Oh, the thorax. That’s ‘the part of the human body between the neck and the diaphragm, partially encased by the ribs and containing the heart and lungs; the chest’ according to The Free Dictionary at http://www.thefreedictionary.com/thorax.”

Thoracic is the adjective form of thorax; it describes the aorta in this case.

Do you remember what the aorta is? I sort of, kind of did, but figured I’d better make certain before I started writing about it. MedicineNet at http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=2295 was helpful here.

“The aorta gives off branches that go to the head and neck, the arms, the major organs in the chest and abdomen, and the legs. It serves to supply them all with oxygenated blood. The aorta is the central conduit from the heart to the body.”

Now I get the connection between Chronic Kidney Disease and the aorta. Did you catch “oxygenated blood” in that definition? And what organs oxygenate the blood? IMG_2980Right. Your kidneys. This excerpt from SlowItDownCKD 2015 may help.

““The National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse …explains.

‘Healthy kidneys produce a hormone called erythropoietin, or EPO, which stimulates the bone marrow to produce the proper number of red blood cells needed to carry oxygen to vital organs.  Diseased kidneys, however, often don’t make enough EPO. As a result, the bone marrow makes fewer red blood cells.’”

With me so far? Now, what the heck is an unfolded aorta? I turned to the British site for radiologists, Radiopaedia.org, at https://radiopaedia.org/articles/unfolded-aorta for the definition. “The term unfolded aorta refers to the widened and ‘opened up’ appearance of the aortic arch on a frontal chest radiograph. It is one of the more common causes for apparent mediastinal widening and is seen with increasing age.

It occurs due to the discrepancy in the growth of the ascending aorta with age, where the length of the ascending aorta increases out of proportion with diameter, causing the plane of the arch to swivel.”

thoracic-aortaI purposely left the click through definitions in so you read them for yourself. You know the drill: click on the link while holding down your control key. For those of you who are reading the print version of the blog, just add the definition of aorta to the common terms we know: arch and ascending.

Mediastinal, according to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/mediastinum is the adjective (describing) form of mediastinum or “the space in the chest between the pleural sacs of the lungs that contains all the tissues and organs of the chest except the lungs and pleurae; also:  this space with its contents.”

Hang on there, folks, just one more definition. I searched for a new site that wouldn’t offer a terribly technical definition of pleura (or pleurae) and found verywell at https://www.verywell.com/pleura-lungs-definition-conditions-2249162.

“The pleura refers to the 2 membranes that cover the lungs and line the chest cavity. The purpose of the pleura is to cushion the lungs during respiration.

The pleural cavity is the space between these 2 membranes and contains pleural fluid.”graduation

Side note: I definitely feel like I’m back teaching a college class again.

Okay, so now we have a bunch of definitions, we’ve put them together as best we can and where does it bring us? Are you ready for this? Nowhere. An unfolding of the thoracic aorta is nothing more than a function of age.

FullSizeRender (2)However, with CKD, it’s somewhere. As was explained in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, “Hemoglobin is the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body.”  We’re already not getting enough oxygen due to our poor, declining in function kidneys.

Am I concerned about the unfolding thoracic aorta? No, not at all. It happens with age; I don’t think I can do anything about that. But, the CKD that also lowers our oxygen production? Oh yes, I can – do – and will do something about that by protecting my kidneys as best I can and keeping the remaining kidney function I have.

Kidneys.com, quoted in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1, did a nice job of laying out a plan for me to do just that.

“Along with taking your prescribed blood pressure medications, lifestyle changes such as losing weight, exercising, meditating, eating less sodium,  drinking  less  IMG_2982alcohol  and  quitting  smoking  can  help  lower  blood pressure. Better blood pressure control helps preserve kidney function.”

I added using my sleep apnea machine and aiming for eight hours of sleep a night. I also stick to my renal diet – which limits protein, phosphorous, potassium, and sodium (as mentioned by kidney.com) – for the most part and keeping my kidneys hydrated by drinking at least 64 ounces of fluid a day.

Is it hard? I don’t know any more. It’s been nine years. They’re simply habits I’ve developed to live as long as I can and, sometimes, even raise the bottled waterfunction of my kidneys.

When my New York daughter was with us over the holidays, I realized how differently we eat than other people do. My husband has chosen to pretty much eat the way I do. So she actually had to go down to the market to pick up the foods that people ordinarily eat.  It would have been funny if I hadn’t been sick. I would have gone with her and laughed each time I answered, “No,” when she asked, “Do you eat this?”laughing

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

What Are You Doing for Others?

Today is Martin Luther King’s birthday. Today, more than ever, we need to heed his message. Whether you apply it to today’s bizarre political scene, your local community, your family, your co-workers doesn’t matter. What matters is the operant word: doing.

mlk-do-for-others

That picture and those words got me to thinking.  What AM I doing for others? And what still needs to be done?

My commitment is to spread awareness of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). As a patient myself, I know how important this is. As you know, CKD is a costly, lethal disease if not caught early and treated… and it’s not just older folks – like me – who are at risk. One out of ten people worldwide has CKD, yet an overwhelming number of them are unaware they have it.

stages of CKDWe also know the disease can be treated, just not the way you’d usually expect a disease to be treated. A diet with restrictions on protein, potassium, phosphorous and sodium is one aspect of that treatment. Exercise, adequate sleep, and avoiding stress are some of the other aspects. Some patients – like me – may have to take medication for their high blood pressure since that also affects kidney function. Imagine preventing a death with lifestyle changes. Now image saving the lives of all those who don’t know they have CKD by making them aware this disease exists. Powerful, isn’t it?

We’re all aware by now that the basic method of diagnosing CKD is via routine blood and urine tests. Yet, many people do not undergo these tests during doctor or clinic visits, so don’t know they have Chronic Kidney Disease, much less start treating it. That’s where I come in; I tell people what can be done. I tell people how they can be diagnosed and treated, if necessary.IMG_2979

I was a private person before this CKD diagnosis so many years ago. Now, in addition to a Facebook page, LinkedIn, and twitter accounts as SlowItDownCKD, I make use of an Instagram account where I post an eye catching picture daily with the hashtag #SlowItDownCKD. This brings people to my weekly blog about CKD (the one you’re reading now) and the four books I wrote about it: What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease (which explains CKD) and the others – The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1; The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2; and SlowItDownCKD 2015 – which are the blogs in print for those who don’t have a computer or are not computer savvy.

Healthline is a well-respected, informative site for medical information. This past year this blog, SlowItDownCKD, was a winner in their list of The Six Best Kidney Disease Blogs. That brought the hits on my page up by the hundreds. That means hundreds more people are now aware of Chronic Kidney Disease, how it is diagnosed, how it is treated, and how to live with it.badge_kidney-disease-1

But not everything is working as I’d hoped it would. Unfortunately, I am still not having success in having Public Service Announcements placed on television or radio. Nor have I been able to interest most general magazines or newspapers in bringing the disease to the public’s awareness.

It hasn’t totally been a wipeout there, though. Michael Garcia did interview me on The Edge Podcast and both Nutrition Action Healthletter, Center for Science in the Public Interest (the nation’s largest-circulation nutrition newsletter) and New York State United Teachers (membership 600,000) ‘It’s What We Do’ profiled my work spreading CKD Awareness. Profiling my work, interviewing me, mentioning the blog all bring awareness of Chronic Kidney Disease to the public. Awareness leads to testing. Testing leads to diagnosing. Diagnosing leads to treatment. Treatment leads to saving lives. This is why I do what I can to spread awareness of Chronic Kidney Disease.

friendsWhat about you? Can you speak about CKD with your family? Your friends? Your co-workers? Your brothers and sisters in whichever religion you follow? What about your neighbors? I was surprised and delighted at the number of non CKD friends and neighbors who follow the blog. When I asked why they did, they responded, “I have a friend….” We may all have a friend who may have CKD, whether that friend has told us yet or not.

There are more formal methods of spreading this awareness if that interests you. The National Kidney Foundation has an Advocacy Network.

“A NKF Advocate is someone who has been affected by kidney disease, donation or transplant and who wants to empower and educate others. These include people NKF-logo_Hori_OBwith kidney disease, dialysis patients, transplant recipients, living donors, donor family members, caregivers, friends and family members.

Advocacy plays an integral role in our mission. You can make a significant difference in the lives of kidney patients by representing the National Kidney Foundation. We give you the tools you need to make your voice heard.”

You can read more about this program at https://www.kidney.org/node/17759 or you can call 1.800.622.9010 for more information.

The American Kidney Fund also has an advocacy program, but it’s a bit different.

“There is strength in numbers. More than 5,100 passionate patients, friends, loved ones and kidney care professionals in our Advocacy Network are making a huge AKF logodifference on Capitol Hill and in their own communities. Together, we are fighting for policies that improve care for patients, protect patients’ access to health insurance and increase funding for kidney research. As advocates, we play a key role in educating elected officials and our communities about the impact of kidney disease.”

You can register for this network online at http://www.kidneyfund.org/advocacy/advocate-for-kidney-patients/advocacy-network/

Obviously, I’m serious about doing that which will spread awareness of CKD. You can take a gander at my website, www.gail-raegarwood.com, to see if that sparks any ideas for you as to how you can start doing something about spreading awareness of CKD, too. I urge you to do whatever you can, wherever you can, and whenever you can.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

 

It’s a Miracle!

It’s that time of year again… the time to believe in miracles. There’s the miracle of Mary’s virgin birth at Christmas. And there’s the miracle of the Christmas TreeChanukah oil burning for eight nights instead of the one it was meant to. That got me to thinking about miracles and so, we have a different kind of several part blog beginning today. Consider it my gift to you this holiday season.

Miracles happen every day, too. We just need to take action to make them happen… and that’s what I’d like to see us do with Chronic Kidney Disease by sharing the available information.  This particular miracle is helping to alleviate the fear of needing dialysis and/or transplantation. This particular miracle is helping patients help themselves and each other. This particular miracle is helping doctors appreciate involved patients.

Yet, causing this miracle by sharing information is overlooked again and again. Chronic Kidney Disease, or CKD, is easily diagnosed by simple blood tests and urine tests (as we know), but who’s going to take them if they have no idea the disease exists, is widespread, and may be lethal? By Menorahsharing information, those at high risk will be tested. Those already in the throes of CKD can be monitored and treated when necessary. While CKD is not curable, we know it is possible to slow down the progression of the decline in your kidney function.

According to the National Institutes of Health at http://www.ncbi.nlm.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4112688,

“2014: Worldwide, an estimated 200 million people have chronic kidney disease (CKD).”

Before I was diagnosed, I had never heard of this disease… and apparently I’d had it for quite some time.  Why weren’t people sharing information about this?  Couldn’t that have prevented my developing it? At the time of my diagnose nine years ago, I meant doctors.  I don’t anymore. Nor do I leave causing a miracle by sharing to others.

This is my life. I have had Chronic Kidney Disease for nine years. As a college instructor who taught Research Writing at the time of my diagnose, I researched, researched, and researched again, but the only person I was sharing my research with was the nephrologist who treated me and FullSizeRender (2)monitored my condition. I may have expected a miracle there, but I didn’t get one. Why?

I got to thinking about that and realized he already knew what I told him. That’s when it struck me that if I expected a miracle with CKD, I would have to start sharing this information with the people who need it: the ones who didn’t know, the ones who had just been diagnosed and were terrified, and the families of those with CKD who didn’t know they also might be at risk. I went so far as to bring CKD education to the Native American Communities in Arizona since Native Americans are at high risk. I had the information and had experts willing to come to the communities to share that information.

We all know this is a costly, lethal disease if not caught early and treated… and that it’s not just the elderly who are at risk. One out of ten people worldwide has CKD, yet an overwhelming number of them are unaware they have it. We know CKD can be treated, just not the way those who don’t have it might expect. A diet with restrictions on protein, potassium, phosphorous and sodium may be one aspect of that treatment. Exercise, adequate sleep, and avoiding stress are some of the other aspects. Some patients – like me – may have to take medication for their high blood pressure since that also affects kidney function. Imagine preventing a death with lifestyle changes. Now imagine EXPECTING the miracle of preventing that death by sharing this information. Powerful, isn’t it?

We know the basic method of diagnosing CKD is via routine blood and urine tests. Yet, many people do not undergo these tests during doctor or clinic visits, so don’t know they have Chronic Kidney Disease, much less start treating it.urine container

This is where the miracle I expected in my life began for me. I started speaking with every doctor of any kind that I knew or that my doctors knew and asked them to share the information. They were already experiencing time constraints, but suggested I write a fact sheet and leave it in their waiting rooms since they agreed there’s no reason to wait until a person is in kidney failure and needs dialysis or a transplant to continue living before diagnosing and dealing with the illness.

My passion about producing this miracle multiplied threefold from that point on. So much so that I went one better and wrote a book with the facts. I was convinced we would be able to cause a miracle by sharing information about this disease. My goal was clear: have everyone routinely tested.

Dr. Robert  Provenzano, a leading nephrologist in the United States,  succinctly summed up the problem worldwide.

“Chronic Kidney Disease is an epidemic in the world…. As other countries become Westernized, we find the incidence of Chronic Kidney Disease and end-stage renal failure increases. We see this in India, and in China. We see this everywhere. …”

We repeatedly see diabetes and hypertension cited as the two major causes of CKD. Does your neighbor know this? How about the fellow at the gas bp cuffstation? Ask them what Chronic Kidney Disease is. More often than not, you’ll receive a blank look – one we can’t afford if you keep the statistic at the beginning of this paper in mind. We can cause a miracle to change this.

Sharing can be the cause of that miracle… but that’s not something we can leave to the other guy. We each ARE the other guy. More on this next week.

For now, Merry Christmas, Happy Chanukah, Happy Kwanzaa (somehow implicit in this holiday is the miracle of bringing people together), and every other holiday I’ve inadvertently missed or don’t know about.

portal_in_time_cover_for_kindleI just got word that Portal in Time – my first novel – is available on Amazon.com. Consider that as a holiday gift for those friends not interested in CKD. Of course, I just happen to have four CKD books on Amazon.com for those who might be interested in CKD. Be part of a miracle.IMG_2979

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Clean…or Dirty?

My daughter brought a friend to a party we were both attending a few weeks ago. We all enjoyed each other so we talked about the possibility of going out to dinner together at some future date. Being well aware of my renal restrictions and how that sometimes limits our choice of restaurants, IMG_2980I asked my daughter’s friend how he likes to eat. He said, “Clean.”

I’ve heard this before, as you probably have, too. Yet, I wasn’t sure exactly what it meant. And that’s why I’m researching it today and seeing just how it does – or doesn’t – fit into our usual renal diet. Will someone get the dictionary, please?  Thanks.

According to my personal favorite, The Merriam-Webster at http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/clean, clean means

: free from dirt, marks, etc.

: not dirty

: tending to keep clean

: free from pollution or other dangerous substancesdictionary

Maybe it’s that last definition that applies to eating?  Hmmm, I need to take a closer look at this.

In her nutrition blog on another of my favorites – The MayoClinic – this past summer,  Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L.D., suggested these as the main tenets of clean eating:

  • Eat more real foods. Sound familiar? One of the tenets of the Mayo Clinic Diet is eating more real foods and fewer processed or refined foods. Convenience food is OK, sometimes even necessary, just make sure that what’s in that can or package is the real thing with few other ingredients.
  • Eat for nourishment. Eat regular, balanced meals and healthy snacks that are nourishing and not too rushed. Eat at home more often and prepare food in healthy ways. Pack food to eat away from home when on the road, at work or activities. When you do eat out, choose wisely.
  • Eat safe food. This is my addition to the idea of clean eating. Based on the name itself, clean food should be safe. Practice food safety by IMG_2982washing produce before consumption (you may consider buying organic as well), keeping raw meats separate from produce from the grocery store to home, cooking food to proper temperatures and chilling food quickly after service.

You can read more of her thoughts about clean eating at http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-blog/clean-eating/bgp-20200665. By the way, R.D. means Registered Dietician and L.D. is Licensed Dietitian. Most states require at least one of these in order for the person to provide nutrition or diet advice.

This sounds too simple. Let’s look a bit more. I found loads of articles on sites I didn’t recognize by people I hadn’t heard of, so I decided to take a look at a site specifically for clean eaters. This is from Clean Eating Magazine at http://www.cleaneatingmag.com/food-health/food-and-health-news/what-is-clean-eating/.

water melon“The soul of eating clean is consuming food the way nature delivered it, or as close to it as possible. It is not a diet; it’s a lifestyle approach to food and its preparation, leading to an improved life – one meal at a time.

Eat five to six times a day – Three meals and two to three small snacks. Include a lean protein, plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables, and a complex carbohydrate with each meal. The steady intake of clean food keeps your body energized and burning calories efficiently all day long.

Choose organic clean foods whenever possible.

Drink at least two liters of water a day.

veggiesLimit your alcohol intake to one glass of antioxidant-rich red wine a day

Get label savvy – Clean foods contain just one or two ingredients. Any product with a long ingredient list is human-made and not considered part of a clean diet.

Avoid processed and refined foods – This includes white flour, sugar, bread and pasta. Enjoy complex carbs such as whole grains instead.

Steer clear of anything high in trans fats, anything fried or anything high in sugar. Avoid preservatives, color additives and toxic binders, stabilizers, emulsifiers and fat replacers.

Consume healthy fats.

FullSizeRender (3)Aim to have essential fatty acids, or EFAs, incorporated into your clean diet every day.

Learn about portion sizes – Work towards eating within them. When eating clean, diet is as much about quantity as it is quality.”

Wow! And there’s much more on their site.

There are just a few things that concern me here, specifically about the contents of those three meals and two to three small snacks. How can I stretch my five ounces of protein over all these meals and snacks? And my three servings each of only certain fruits and vegetables?   I suppose I could skip the protein on one of them and have only one ounce at each of the others.

Do you know what one ounce of protein looks like? One egg, ¼ tablespoon of peanut butter, or 2 bites of meat (although I don’t eat red meat), poultry or seafood. That last one is subjective; I used my food scale to test it out. I imagine it could be different if your mouth is smaller or larger than mine. I also didn’t take into account the foods not on the renal diet, such as beans and nuts.

Thanksgiving

I’m attempting to avoid carbohydrates as much as I can in order to lose some weight, but my renal diet allows for 7 or 8 choices of these a day and 3 of fruits – which I do eat in moderation.  There may be a problem with the whole grains recommended for clean eating since whole grains are high in phosphorous, something Chronic Kidney Disease patients need to watch.  Chapter 8 of What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease explains the renal diet I follow in detail.FullSizeRender (2)

Other than those objections, I like the sound of clean eating. However, I do remember going to a clean eating restaurant when they first started opening and finding I was severely limited as to what I could order. Yep, whole grains, fruits and vegetables not on my diet, and too much protein. I checked out the vegetarian dishes, but found them huge.  Funny to think of that as a negative, isn’t it?

As usual, it looks like this is something you have to decide for yourself according to your renal diet since each of us is different.  Would I try a clean eating restaurant again, sure. Would I try clean eating at home?  Maybe, although the whole grains thing bothers me.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!  

Bridging the Gap…

Which gap? The anion. What’s that, you say.

“The anion gap deals with the body’s acidity. A high reading for the anion gap could indicate renal failure.”

Book CoverThat’s what I wrote in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease. But you know what? It’s just not enough information any more. Why? I’m glad you asked.  Oh, by the way, if you want to check your own reading look in the Comprehensive Metabolic Panel part of your blood tests, but only if your doctor requested it be tested.

I mentioned a few blogs back that I returned to a rheumatologist I hadn’t seen in years and she chose to treat me as a new patient. Considering how much had happened medically since I’d last seen her, that made sense to me and I agreed to blood tests, an MRI, and a bone density test.

The only reading that surprised me was an abnormally high one for anion gap. The acceptable range is 4 – 18. My reading was 19.  While I have Chronic Kidney Disease, my kidneys have not failed (Thank goodness and my hard work.) In addition, I’ve become quite aware of just how important acidity and alkaline states are and have been dealing with this, although apparently not effectively.

MedFriendly at http://www.medfriendly.com/anion-gap.html – a new site for me written by Dr. Dominic Carone for the express purpose of simplifying complex medical terms for the lay person – explains it this way:diabetes equipment

“…. Too high of an anion gap level can mean that there is acidosis (too much acid in the blood) due to diabetes mellitus. The high anion gap level can also be due to lactic acidosis, in which the high level of acid is due a buildup of a substance called lactic acid. … A high anion gap can also be due to drug poisoning or kidney failure. …When the anion gap is high, further tests are usually needed to diagnose the cause of the problem.”

Ah, I remember writing a bit about acidosis in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1. It had to do with DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAILfruits and vegetables.

“’After three years, consuming fruits and vegetables or taking the oral medication reduced a marker of metabolic acidosis and preserved kidney function to similar extents. Our findings suggest that an apple a day keeps the nephrologist away,’ study author Dr. Nimrit Goraya, of Texas A&M College of Medicine, said in a university news release.

Apparently, some CKD suffers have metabolic systems that are severely acidic. Fruits and vegetables are highly alkaline.  This may counteract the acidity in the patients mentioned above AND those that have less metabolic acidosis (acid in the body).

You can find the complete article at http://kidneygroup.blogspot.com/2012/11/eating-fruits-and-vegetables-may-help.html

Okay, I like fruit and I like vegetables. Ummm, will my limitation of three servings of each within the kidney friendly fruit and vegetable lists do the trick, I wonder. Looks like I’ll be questioning both the rheumatologist and the renal dietician about that.

Recently I’ve written about alkaline being the preferred state of a CKD patient’s body. That is the antithesis of an acid body state. Years ago, Dr. Richard Synder was a guest blogger here and also interviewed me on his radio show. He is the author of What You Must Know about Kidney Disease and a huge proponent of alkaline water.  Here’s what he had to say about that (also from Part 1):

“I have taken alkaline water myself and I notice a difference in how I feel. Our bodies are sixty percent water. Why would I not want to put the best517GaXFXNPL._SL160_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-dp,TopRight,12,-18_SH30_OU01_AA160_ type of water into it? Mineralized water helps with bone health.  In alkalinized water, the hydroxyl ions produced from the reaction of the bicarbonate and the gastric acid with a low pH produce more hydroxyl ions which help buffer the acidity we produce on a daily basis. (Me interrupting here: During our visit last Monday, I noticed that my extremely health conscious, non-CKD, Florida friend drinks this.)

Where are these buffers? In the bones and in the cells, as well as some extracellular  buffers. You  are  helping lower  the  total  body  acidity  and decreasing the inflammation brought on by it. You do this early on so that you don’t have a problem with advanced acidosis later. Why wait until you are acidotic before doing something?”

Notice his comment about lowering body acidity and decreasing inflammation.  We already know CKD is an inflammatory disease.  There was Digital Cover Part 2 redone - Copysomething to this. I went back to The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2 to tease it out.

“‘Belly fat is also much more inflammatory than fat located elsewhere in the body and can create its own inflammatory chemicals (as a tumor would).’

You can read the entire article at http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/21/body-fat-facts_n_2902867.html

Inflammatory?  Isn’t CKD an inflammatory disease? I went to The National Center for Biotechnology Information, which took me to the National Library of Medicine and finally to a National Institute of Health study at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3332073/   for the answer.

‘The persistent inflammatory state is common in diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD).

This is a lot to take in at once.  What it amounts to is that another way to possibility prevent the onset of CKD is to lower your phosphorous intake so that you don’t accumulate belly fat.’”

Phosphorous? Once we have CKD, we do have phosphorous restrictions. But I have never had high phosphorous readings.  Maybe I should be exploring an abundance of lactic acid as a cause of the high anion gap reading instead.

According to Heathline.com,

adam_liver_8850_jpg“Lactic acidosis occurs when there’s too much lactic acid in your body. Many things can cause a buildup of lactic acid. These include chronic alcohol use, heart failure, cancer, seizures, liver failure, prolonged lack of oxygen, and low blood sugar. Even prolonged exercise can lead to lactic acid buildup.”

I’m definitely barking up the wrong tree here.

Wait a minute. I recently started using a BiPAP since I have sleep apnea and wasn’t exhaling enough CO2. That could cause acidosis, but it would be respiratory acidosis. Say, a basic metabolic panel would expose that. Nope, that’s not it either since my CO2 levels were normal.

It looks like this is going to be one of those blogs that asks more questions than it answers. I do have an appointment with the rheumatologist on the 20th and will ask for answers then.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!SlowItDownCKD 2015 Book Cover (76x113)

Apple Cider Vinegar?

I woke up thinking, ‘apple cider vinegar.” Granted, that’s an odd thought for the first thing in the morning… or is it? Last week, I blogged about the Apple-Cider-Vinegarbenefits of drinking lemon juice in a glass of water first thing in the morning. Okay, you’ve read the blog; you know that.

What you may not know is that the blog is posted on a multitude of Facebook chronic illness sites. A reader on one of these sites commented on the blog. I don’t remember exactly what she said, but it had something to do with her taking apple cider vinegar every day to help keep her body in alkaline balance.

Ah, now that first thought of the day today is starting to make sense. Monday is blog day for me. It looks like my mind was providing me with a topic for today’s blog.SlowItDownCKD 2015 Book Cover (76x113)

I’ll bet the first question you have is why she would want to help keep her body in alkaline balance. Let’s do a little back tracking to answer that question. As per last week’s blog, Dr. Jonny Bowden, a nutritionist and health author, tells us, “Having a healthy alkaline balance helps fight germs.” No contest, I’m sure we all want to do that.

I know, I know, now you’d like to know why alkaline balance – as opposed to acidic body chemistry – does that.  I do, too.  An article on MedIndia, a respected medical site, at http://www.medindia.net/patients/lifestyleandwellness/alkaline-diet.htm explains this:

“A pH of less than 7 is acidic and a pH of more than 7 is alkaline, water being neutral with pH=7. Since one of the most important measurements of health is the pH of the body fluids, it is very important to have an acid-base balance. Any imbalance, especially those leaning towards acidic, could be associated with health disorders including obesity, tiredness, premature aging, heart disease, diabetes and cancer.”

Reminder: “The pH of a solution is a measure of the molar concentration of hydrogen ions in the solution and as such is a measure of the acidity or basicity of the solution.” Thank you, Hyperphysics at http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/chemical/ph.html for the definition.

Did you catch diabetes in the MedIndia quote? That is the number one cause of Chronic Kidney Disease. This is what I wrote about that in my first What is itCKD book What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease,

“In fact, the U.S. has the highest rate of CKD with 210 people per million having it, and two thirds of those cases caused by diabetes or HBP.”

And that was back in 2011. Two thirds of 210 people per million. .. and we don’t know how many of them developed CKD from HBP – or diabetes. Taking no chances, I’ll opt for alkaline balance in my body, even though I already have Chronic Kidney Disease.

Next question: how does apple cider vinegar help keep a body in alkaline balance? Let’s go back to last week’s blog again.

“Body Ecology at http://bodyecology.com/articles/acidic-foods-and-acid-forming-foods-do-you-know-the-difference had exactly what I needed:

‘To clear up some of the confusion:

  • Acidic and alkaline describe the nature of food before it is eaten.
  • Acidifying foods and acid-forming foods are the same, making the body more acidic.
  • Alkalizing foods and alkaline-forming foods are the same, making the body more alkaline. ‘”

All right then, we get it that something acidic – like vinegar – could actually be alkaline once it’s ingested. And we understand that an alkaline balance can keep us healthier. But we have CKD. Is apple cider vinegar something we can take?

Kidney Hospital China at http://www.kidneyhospitalchina.org/ckd-healthy-living/961.html was helpful here, although I am still leery of websites that offer online doctor advice. They maintain that it can lower your blood pressure – a good thing since high blood pressure is not only a cause of CKD, but also can make it worse. They also consider it an anti-inflammatory, although I’m beginning to wonder if all alkaline foods are. Then they mention it helps prevent colds and removes toxins in the blood. Both will help relieve some of the kidney’s burden.

This warning was the first I’d seen in all the blogs and natural eating sites I perused for information about today’s topic… and it comes from Kidney Hospital China:

“Apple cider vinegar is high in potassium and phosphorus, so kidney disease patients who have high potassium and high phosphorus levels in blood need to avoid the intake of the drinks.”

In The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1, I referred to an article entitled Vegetarian diet helps kidney disease patients stay healthy in order to point out why we need to keep our phosphorous levels low:

“Individuals with kidney disease cannot adequately rid the body of phosphorus, which is found in dietary proteins and is a common food additive. Kidney disease patients must limit their phosphorous intake, as high levels of the mineral can lead to heart disease and death.”

IMG_1398

 

In The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2, I succinctly reminded us why we want to watch our potassium intake:

“But isn’t potassium good for you?  After all, it does help the heart, muscles, and our beloved kidneys function normally as well as dumping wastes from our cells. Here’s the kicker, an excess of potassium can cause irregular heartbeat and even heart attack.”

All in all, I think this might be a go. Do talk it over with your nephrologist or renal dietician before you start on a regiment of apple cider vinegar. I only research; they’ve been to medical school. By the way, many of these sites talked about the pleasing taste of this drink. I may have to try it just to see if any drink containing vinegar tastes good.

I have not forgotten that I promised to give you the link to the most recent podcast. I had thought the topic was going to be my Chronic Kidney Disease Awareness Advocacy, but the skillful interviewer – Mike G. – managed to cover every aspect of my life.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Aha! It is Possible.

What is itI’ve written periodically about the difficulties I was having combining the renal diet and the prediabetes diet. My usual renal dietician was unavailable for this year’s second (Thank you, Medicare.) appointment, so I saw someone else… and am I glad I did!

My first renal dietician introduced me to weights, measures, and what to eat in the first place.  Needless to say, this was all new to me and I wasn’t so happy with all these numbers, but she calmly, patiently kept explaining until I understood.  By the way, she’s quoted in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease.

This is the renal diet she devised for me as a brand new Chronic Kidney Disease patient. It’s based on The Northern Arizona Council on Renal Nutrition’s diet.

Scan0003

(Seems I see things off kilter. Scan0002

Just tilt your head a bit, if you will.)

As you can see, it was very exacting… just what I needed when I was so confused with all this new information and having to completely change the way I ate.

But then it became clear I also suffered from pre-diabetes, so my PCP sent me for diabetic counseling. Yes, I did know quite a bit already, but I did not know everything about diabetes…specifically, how to combine the two diets.  This is something my first renal dietician, good as she was, couldn’t answer. Well, maybe the diabetes counselor could.

Remember, this time we were not dealing with keeping sodium, potassium, and phosphorous under control to spare the kidneys. This time we were concerned with blood sugar.

I got some useful suggestions about herbs and spices I could use instead of salt.  This was not helpful for me since I’d already done some successful experiences with herbs and spices and discontinued the use of salt eight years ago when I was first diagnosed with CKD.

I was warned against hypertension and urged to keep it under 140/80, something I’d already been doing since my CKD diagnose. I was urged to avoid stress and work on weight management.  Again, been doing that for years.  Then I was educated about the value of sleep… again, nothing new here. But what about combining the two diets?

Scan0001Well, we did get to a meal plan. But it was unacceptable with the CKD. I was on a 1200 calorie diet to lose weight. Here I was urged to eat 1500 calories to lose weight and 1843 to maintain. But what really dissuaded me from adopting this meal plan was that it called for over four servings of fruit and four of vegetables when the renal diet limited me to three of each. I wasn’t willing to ingest that much phosphorous/potassium. In addition, it called for six fats a day, whereas the renal diet calls for five.

*sigh* So that wasn’t the way to combine the renal and pre-diabetes diets.

But then I went to the second renal nutritionist just last week and started to understand how to combine the two diets. Finally! She dealt solely with carbohydrates without specifying whether they be fruit, vegetable or grain. She explained that 15 gms. is a carbohydrate portion or choice. She explained that they should be paired with protein or fact to control my blood sugar. Now that was news to me.

While the diabetes counselor offered the same information about eating three meals with two snacks in between, it didn’t work for me because of the amount of food – most with potassium and phosphorous counts that were too high for the CKD – but here I was eating what I could with specific carbohydrate distributions for each meal or snack.

black breadIt was the same portions as the CKD diet, only with the gram count added.  For example, a slice of bread, 1/3 cup cooked pasta, 1/2 cup cooked cereal, or 3 cups of popcorn (no salt) are each one portion of my grain allotment daily just as they are on the prediabetes diet. The three allotments of fruit and vegetable, too. While I don’t care for dairy, I could still have the same amount of milk – if I drank milk, that is.  I had three carb choices at breakfast and lunch, but two at dinner.  There was also a carb unit for each snack.

There were no carb units assigned to meats or fats because they don’t affect blood sugar, but I still needed to pay attention to them for the CKD.  Well, that could be done just as I’d done it since my diagnosis: little or no red meat and keep it to five or six ounces. As for the fats, same cautions as with the CKD diet: avoid saturated fats and eliminate trans fat.

The hardest part about combining the two diets for me is consistency.  For the pre-diabetes, eating at the same time each day is preferable. I was used to eating whenVictorian clock I got hungry… before I saw the diabetes counselor. Then after taking her advice, right after I woke up and no longer than six hours – at the most – between meals or meals and snacks.

While that’s certainly feasible, I’m a writer.  I don’t like to leave the computer when I’m popping.  But now I do.  If I want to keep on being a writer, if I want to keep on being alive (okay, so that’s a bit dramatic), I have to take care of myself. So now I eat more often, try to be consistent about when I eat and sometimes even set an alarm on my phone to remind me to get up and go eat something. I’ll live. Well, that is the point: to live.

By the way, I’m having such fun devising the index for both The Books of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 and The Books of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2 that I wonder if maybe, just maybe, I’m taking a little more time than I need to.  It’s okay to think that’s weird, you know. I’ve heard it before.

IMG_1398

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

 

Me and My Llama, Going to the Dentist Today

No, I’m not crazy and I’m not talking about one of the llamas living only a few miles from my home. Nor am I ignoring the rules of structure.

Today’s title is from the lyrics of a song sung on the children’s television show Sesame Street just about the time my first born (the ever interesting Ms. Nima Beckie)llama had her first dental appointment.  Believe me, it helped reduce her anxiety – and mine – about that appointment.

You guessed it.  I’ve been getting questions about Chronic Kidney Disease and dental health. I know some readers are saying, “Huh?” I did, too, until I did some research. (Maybe my brand should be, “I research so you don’t have to,” instead of “SlowItDownCKD”?)

By the way, in fulfilling an assignment for Landmark Worldwide’s Wisdom Unlimited course I discovered I first started researching in fifth grade.  My topic? Ladies in Waiting. My research results? Dismal.  I sure am glad those days of encyclopedias and library books only for research are over. Oh wait, I was writing about dental health.

You’ve already read my previous blogs about the safety of nitrous oxide (laughing gas) and Novocain, so today’s blog is going to be about the laughingconnection between CKD and dental problems.  If you remember that diabetes is the leading cause of CKD, you’ve already figured out that the diabetes itself could be causing the dental problems with people suffering from both CKD and diabetes.

But what about those of us who don’t have diabetes.  Why could we be prone to dental problems? I started my research with DaVita at http://www.davita.com/kidney-disease/overview/symptoms-and-diagnosis/dental-health-for-people-with-kidney-disease/e/4731

A study in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology reported that people with kidney disease and those on dialysis are more likely to have periodontal disease and other oral health problems than the general population. Buildup of bacteria in the mouth can cause infection. Because people with kidney disease have weakened immune systems, they are more susceptible to infections.

Journal of CLinical Perioldontolgy coverBone loss in the jaw can occur in those with kidney disease. Calcium imbalance contributes to loss of calcium from the bones resulting in weak bones. Weak bones can cause teeth to become loose and potentially fall out. The best way to help prevent bone loss is to make sure calcium and phosphorus levels stay within the goal range.

Oh, there is so much to go with there! I immediately started digging into What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease for whatever it was that was tickling my memory and found it in the glossary on page 136.

What is itVitamin D: Regulates calcium and phosphorous blood levels as well as promoting bone formation, among other tasks – affects the immune system.

We know vitamin D can be a real problem for us.  How many of you are taking vitamin D supplements? Notice my hand is raised, too.  How many of you read my blogs about vitamin D?  Good!  The rest of you, it might be a good idea to use the topic search to find and read them. You know, “I research so you don’t have to,” etc.

I’ve read again and again in the online support groups that there are major questions about controlling your phosphorous intake, specifically keeping it low. Keep that in mind when you think of CKD and dental health.

plaqueThe biggest part CKD plays in dental health and periodontic issues is that of lowering your immune system. Remember my writing about proteinuria, something you can develop with CKD? Quick reminder: this is just what it sounds like; protein leaks into the urine. The problem is that antibodies are made up of protein. Antibodies is defined by Dictionary.com at http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/antibodies as

A protein substance produced in the blood or tissues in response to a specific antigen, such as a bacterium or a toxin, that destroys or weakens bacteria and neutralizes organic poisons, thus forming the basis of immunity.

Lose lots of protein into your urine and you’re losing some of your immunity. In other words, you’re open to infection.

How do you get an infection in your mouth in the first place, you ask. Think about plaque. This is what the National Center for Biotechnology Information, part of the National Institutes of Health, offered at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK8259/

Dental decay is due to the irreversible solubilization of tooth mineral by acid produced by certain bacteria that adhere to the tooth surface in bacterial communities known as dental plaque.interior of tooth

In other words, you eat and the acid in your food combines with bacteria to form plaque which then starts to demineralize your tooth enamel.  Usually, you have the antibodies in your immune system to prevent cavities… although we probably all know someone without CKD who doesn’t.  You, as a CKD sufferer, do not have the necessary antibodies.  The CKD has already compromised your immune system.

This is what the University of Maryland Medical Center at http://umm.edu/health/medical/reports/articles/periodontal-disease has to say about gingivitis and periodontitis.gingivitis

Gingivitis is an inflammation of the gingiva, or gums. It is characterized by tender, red, swollen gums that bleed easily and may cause bad breath (halitosis). Gingivitis can be treated by good dental hygiene, proper diet, and stopping smoking. Untreated gingivitis can lead to periodontitis.

Periodontitis occurs when the gum tissues separate from the tooth and sulcus (Me, here. That means  the space between the tooth and the gum.) forming periodontal pockets. Periodontitis is characterized by:

Gum inflammation, with redness and bleeding

Deep pockets (greater than 3 mm in depth) that form between the gum and the tooth

Loose teeth, caused by loss of connective tissue structures and bone

Plenty of space for bacteria to sneak in and attack your already compromised immune system.

I realize this is light weight research for those who are already suffering from these ailments, but hoped only to enlighten those of us who’d never even considered these possibilities and maybe, just maybe, help you understand just a bit better.

Say, if you live in Arizona, don’t forget about this:

free Path to Wellness health screening in Mesa at Adelante Healthcare 1705 W. Main St. on the 20th from 8 to 1:30 this Saturday.

Until next week,Digital Cover Part 2 redone - CopyDIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAIL

Keep living your life!

Water, Water Everywhere

11194487_10206480685479477_4614482644786730988_oYesterday was Mother’s Day here in the U.S.  Here’s what I posted on that day:

When I grew up, mothers were all married women. Not anymore! Happy Mother’s Day to the moms who are moms in a lesbian relationship, the dads who are moms in a gay relationship, the single dads who are both mother and father, the moms in straight relationships, the older siblings bringing up their brothers and sisters, the single moms and those who have lost their child. You’re all still mothers and I relish enjoying this day with you.

I hope yours was a very happy one, even if your children are far away like my Nima who is in New York. Nima

This mother (two biological daughters, two step-daughters, two significant others) has been writing about sea sickness remedies, both medical and natural, for the past two weeks.  That got me to thinking about another kind of water and why we need it.

I’ve mentioned that I see a nutritional counselor to help me prevent my pre-diabetes from becoming diabetes. We all know I need 64 oz. of fluid intake a day as a Chronic Kidney Disease patient, but it’s not all water.  There’s my beloved 16 ounces – or two cups – of coffee a day plus any solid that turns to a liquid when melted (think ices) and the liquid in fruits such as watermelon.  By the way, did you know that our bodies are 50-75% water depending upon our health and age?diabetes equipment

Debbie, my nutritional counselor, kept hitting the need to hydrate.  Until she realized I already take this into account daily, she asked me to keep count of the number of eight ounce glass of water I drank each day.  That’s how important she felt it was.  We know that; we’re CKD patients.

But, have you ever wondered why it’s so important that we keep hydrated?  That’s one of those questions that was answered when I was first diagnosed, but – being who I am – I don’t remember the answer.  And that got me to wondering if you did.

The most obvious answer is that we need water so that our metabolism can function at its best. This is important so we have energy and build new cell materials. Let’s explore this a bit more.

The Oxford Dictionary defines catabolism (love that name) as

the breakdown of complex molecules in living organisms to form simpler ones, together with the release of energy; destructive metabolism.

In this case, ‘destructive’ is a positive.  No destruction of complex molecules = no release of energy.  Heaven knows we already have enough problems with energy as CKDers.

I used the Medical-Dictionary at http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/anabolism for an explanation of anabolism.

The phase of metabolism in which simple substances are synthesized into the complex materials of living tissue.

So catabolism is the function of metabolism which breaks down complex molecules for energy and anabolism is the function that builds up cell material.metabolism

Oh, almost forgot – metabolism simply means change. How can I remember a college etymology lesson from fifty years ago, but not remember what my nephrologist told me seven years ago????

All right, but why the need to hydrate? While a commercial site, Nestle Waters at http://www.nestle-waters.com/healthy-hydration/water-fonctions-in-human-body (I did wonder about that ‘o’ in fonctions.) lists the five reasons we need water.  Notice number five and remember that toxins need to be eliminated, too.  That’s the job of the kidneys… and they need water to do it.water to cells

  1. Cell life
  2. Chemical and metabolic reactions
  3. Transport of nutrients
  4. Body temperature regulation
  5. Elimination of waste

As I researched, I hit medical sites, sports sites, pregnancy sites, elder care sites, and even pediatric sites.  All included hydration in their how-to-stay-healthy advice.

As CKDers, we know that an excess of sodium, phosphorous, potassium, and protein is not good for us.  Guess what flushes out the excess.  That’s right.  Your kidneys filter it from your blood, it’s converted to urine, and leaves your system.  Of course, you don’t want to overtax your already compromised nephrons by going over your daily limits of each of the above.

We’ll pause for a moment here while you go get a drink of water.

409px-Glass-of-waterRefreshed?  Okay.

Did you know there are different types of water? Many thanks to Consumer Reports for the following chart.

Artesian

Water obtained from a well that taps a confined aquifer, an underground layer of rock or sand that contains water. Example: Fiji Natural Artesian Water.

Distilled

Water that has been boiled and then recondensed from the steam that the boiling produces. Distillation kills microbes and removes minerals, giving water a flat taste. Example: Glacéau Smartwater.

Mineral

Groundwater that naturally contains at least 250 parts per million of dissolved solids. All minerals and other trace elements must be present in the water when it emerges at the source. Example: Calistoga.

P.W.S.

Public water source, also known as municipal water supply, or tap water. Fun fact: Aquafina, one of the top 10 selling domestic brands, used to say “P.W.S.” on its label—but changed that in 2007 under pressure from Corporate Accountability International to make clear that the water came from a public supply and not some pristine mountain spring called P.W.S.

Purified

Water from any source that has been treated to remove chemicals and pathogens according to standards set by the U.S. Pharmacopoeia. Must contain no more than 10 parts per million of dissolved solids. Distillation, deionization, and reverse osmosis are all purification methods. Examples: Aquafina, Dasani. (Note from me: recently, Dasani has started added minerals to their water.)

Sparklingbottled water

Water that contains carbon dioxide at an amount equal to what it contained when it emerged from its source. Carbon dioxide lost during the treatment process may be added back. (Carbonated waters such as soda water and seltzer are considered soft drinks, not bottled waters.) Example: Perrier.

Spring

Water derived from an underground formation from which water flows naturally to the Earth’s surface. Spring water must be collected at the spring or through a borehole tapping the underground formation (aquifer) feeding the spring. Examples: Arrowhead Mountain Spring Water (Nestlé), Evian. (Hmmm, Nestle also has minerals added now.)

I stick to either spring water or osmosis filtered water.  Be wary of any water with minerals added. You don’t really need more of those.

Digital Cover Part 1

 

Book Cover

It’s contest time.  Post a picture of you reading any of my three books in the most unusual place you can think of and win a copy of Part 2The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1.  You can post your pictures at https://www.facebook.com/WhatHowearlyCKD which is SlowItDownCKD’s Facebook page.  Make sure the title and your face are clearly visible. Keep it clean and keep them coming!  The contest ends on May 31.  Thank you to inspired reader, Geo De Angelo, for sparking the idea in my mind. I’m eager to see how creative you can get.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Let Them Eat Cake!

The_Book_of_Blogs-_M_Cover_for_KindleWe have still not finished celebrating my birthday.  Say, now that you’ve downloaded your free copy of The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 as my gift to you on my birthday, why not share it for free for 14 days on the Kindle Book Lending program?

Another low cost way of getting the book is asking someone who bought the print copy from Amazon to buy the digital one for you via the Kindle MatchBook program for $2.99.  Of course, you can always ask your library to order a copy.  There are lots of low cost and free ways to get the book.

We were up in Flagstaff for two days as part of my birthday celebration.  Bear remembered that I had repeatedly expressed a desire to see Meteor Crater. Yep, I wanted to visit a hole in the ground for my birthday.

While we were there, we also visited Sunset Crater and learned the difference between eruption and meteor craters.  Going whole hog, we drove IMG_1030along to Wakupti and Wukoki to see the ruins of the pueblos there. This is an amazing state we live in.

We had to stay somewhere, so we stayed somewhere special.  The England House Bed & Breakfast was built about 1902, which made me feel right at home since I raised my daughters in an 1899 Victorian house on New York’s Staten Island.  Now, here’s where the renal part of our overnight get-away comes into play and why there’s a blog about it.  I know, I know… you thought I just wanted to share my birthday fun with you.

Well, that too, but the owner of the B & B – Laurel Dunn – asked if we had any eating restrictions.  Good question for renal patients; bad question for those cooking for them.  I told her. In detail. With examples.  And she came through.

While my husband enjoyed fruit soup, I had fresh cut melon, strawberries, and blueberries.  I had never heard of fruit soup before, so Laurel explained that it was fruit liquefied with yoghurt. Uh-oh, the dreaded yoghurt. That’s not recommended on my renal diet due to the phosphorous in it.

As a Chronic Kidney Disease Patient, my kidneys do not filter my blood as well as they were meant to.  Too much phosphorous can cause problems. I went to What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease {page 81} to remind myself what phosphorous does for us and why too much of it is not a good thing when you’re a CKD patient.

Book CoverI have to admit I didn’t know anything about phosphorous. This is the second most plentiful mineral in the body and works closely with the first, calcium. Together, they produce strong bones and teeth. 85% of the phosphorous and calcium in our bodies is stored in the bones and teeth.  The rest circulates in the blood except for about 5% that is in cells and tissues. Again, phosphorous is important for the kidneys since it filters out waste via them. Phosphorous balances and metabolizes other vitamins and minerals including vitamin D which is so important to CKD patients. As usual, it performs other functions, such as getting oxygen to tissues and changing protein, fat and carbohydrate into energy.

Be aware that kidney disease can cause excessive phosphorus. And what does that mean for Early Stage CKD patients? Not much if the phosphorous levels are kept low. Later, at Stages 4 and 5, bone problems including pain and breakage may be endured since excess phosphorous means the body tries to maintain balance by using the calcium that should be going to the bones. There are other consequences, but this is the one most easily understood.

But, of course, there was more to breakfast.  Bear enjoyed a lovely soufflé and muffins.  Bing, bing, bing. A soufflé has a custard base, in other words, a creamy base.  I think I’ve mentioned before that I’m also lactose intolerant.  I’ll say this, it certainly looked tasty.  So what did I have instead?  A simple vegan cheese omelet with four spears of asparagus cunningly arranged over it.

The night before, Laurel had opened her refrigerator to me so I could read the labels on different products.  One was the vegan cheese. It looked all right as far as my sodium, phosphorous, potassium, and protein restrictions, but I had never tasted it before. Let’s just say it’s probably an acquired taste.  My fault, not Laurel’s.

And the excruciatingly aromatic muffins that Richard, Laurel’s partner, baked?  Why did I pass them up? You guessed it.  It was the phosphorous again.  But I did not go away hungry.  Laurel and Richard provided cranberry/blueberry bread from The Wild Flower Baking Company. Apparently this is a specialty item since I could not find it on their website to pull up the ingredients.

Let’s put it this way: this bread was so good that I had it instead of the ugly blue cake I got for the family because I felt bad for it.  I let them {the IMG_1039family} eat cake, while I feasted on the bread.  At least that was the plan.  Once they tasted my bread, they clamored for it.  Ever see five grown children and a husband politely clamor?

But wait, there’s more.  Each juice Laurel had contained added sugar of some kind… except Ceres mango. It was not nectar, but juice sweetened with another juice – pear juice.  And it was delicious.  That became what I was going to have instead of ice cream at my birthday dinner.  Well, until everyone else tasted it.  You know the story.

You don’t think I let a breakfast go by without 1/2 of of my 16 ounces of coffee a day, do you?  It was superb, absolutely superb.

Add chicken cacciatore with brown rice that I made and was totally renal friendly and that, my friends, is how to enjoy your birthday get-away and your birthday dinner without breaking the renal diet.

IMG_1028As for exercise, ummm, well, it was too cold! No, really.  See, I’m even wearing a coat. I console myself with the fact that I got right on the exercise band wagon the very next day.  That’s okay, right?  It is, isn’t it?

Until next week,

Keep living your life.

Urine or You’re Out

How odd that urine is so important to us.  Make no mistake; if you have Chronic Kidney Disease, you’re always keeping an eye on it.  I’m pretty sure you all know about the color chart to see if you’re hydrating enough.  If you don’t hydrate enough, your kidneys can’t do their jobs as well… and they’re already struggling to do them. This is the least complicated urine hydration chart I’ve seen.urine hydration

Of course, I’ll go back to remind you of just what the jobs of your kidneys are.  My source?  My first book about our disease, What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, page 7.

They filter as many as 200 quarts of blood per day to rid us of roughly two quarts of waste and extra water.

These two organs, the master chemists of our bodies, have several functions: regulating the fluid balance in the body, providing vital hormones, producing erythropoietin, and producing the renin that regulates blood pressure. This is why CKD patients need to be careful about sodium, Book Coverpotassium, chloride, calcium, magnesium, and phosphates. Your nutritionist may not even mention magnesium to you since this constitutes only 1% of extra cellular fluid. Additional important jobs of the kidneys are removing liquid waste from your body and balancing the minerals in the body. The two liquid waste products are urea which has been broken down from protein by the digestive system and creatinine which is a byproduct of muscle activity.

Wait a minute; I think we need to go even further back.  A picture of the urinary tract would probably be helpful here, too.urinary

Okay, now I can start writing about your urine. I’m pretty sure I mentioned in an earlier blog how disturbed I was to be one point over the normal range for microalbumin. Here’s a definition of just what that is.

Micro, or very small amounts, of albumin in the urine. Ur stands for urine. {As in the test for proteinuria.} Albumin is a form of protein that is water soluble. Urine is a liquid, a form of water, so the albumin should have been dissolved. Protein in the urine may be an indication of kidney disease.

Read that last sentence again. There seems to be a Catch 22 here. As a Chronic Kidney Disease patient for the last seven years, this has never shown up in a urine test for me before. I am including both the 24 hour variety and the random {Dipstick} variety in that never.

So now we know about microalbumin.  What about proteinuria?  Notice the ur in the word.  We just learned that means urine.  This is another indication of kidney disease.  I have never been out of acceptable range for this.  According to WebMd at http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/proteinuria-protein-in-urine

Healthy kidneys do not allow a significant amount of protein to pass through their filters. But filters damaged by kidney disease may let proteins such as albumin leak from the blood into the urine.

Glomerulus-Nephron 300 dpi jpgFilters?  This diagram of the glomerulus may help.

If albumin is a protein, are proteinuria and microalbumin the same? Well, no.  Health Communities at http://www.healthcommunities.com/proteinuria-and-microalbuminuria/overview-of-proteinuria.shtml tells us

Albumin is particularly useful in absorbing bodily fluid into the blood. Because the albumin molecule is relatively small, it is often among the first proteins to enter the urine after glomeruli are damaged. Therefore, even minor kidney dysfunction is detectable with proper diagnosis of microalbuminuria.

All right, got it?  Albumin is a protein.  It will show up as microalbumin in your urine test.  It may also show up as proteinuria since albumin is a protein. Once upon a time, you always needed to conduct a 24 hour urine test for this information, but…

In recent years, researchers have found that a single urine sample can provide the needed information. In the newer technique, the amount of albumin in the urine sample is compared with the amount of creatinine, a waste product of normal muscle breakdown. The measurement is called a urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR). A urine sample containing more than 30 milligrams of albumin for each gram of creatinine (30 mg/g) is a warning that there may be a problem. If the laboratory test exceeds 30 mg/g, another UACR test should be done 1 to 2 weeks later. If the second test also shows high levels of protein, the person has persistent proteinuria, a sign of declining kidney function, and should have additional tests to evaluate kidney function.

Thank you to the National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse {A service of the NIH} at http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseases/pubs/proteinuria/#tests for that information.banner-nihlogo

And that is where creatinine comes in and why you need to be aware of your creatinine levels in your urinalysis. By the way, blood tests will also report the amount of albumin and creatinine in your blood. This could promote another discussion, one about Blood Urea Nitrogen tests, but it would be out of place here since that’s not part of the urine.

As you can see this is a complex topic.  You need to be aware of what the color of your urine can tell you about your hydration – whether or not you have Chronic Kidney Disease – and monitor both your microalbumin and proteinuria, as well as your creatinine.

41DsvandphL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-stThe Book of BlogsAnother complex topic is editing the new print books.  The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 and The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2 aren’t quite ready.  I’m working with a new publisher and we’re just getting to know each other’s styles.  The good part about that is you get two books for the price of one on Amazon.com digital until the print books are ready.  Look for The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease.  Once the print copies are ready, I promise a day of the digital copy for free… if that perk is still available to me at that time.

I don’t know about you, but I get just as tired from overdoing it for good things as well as bad.  This weekend was a test of how well I could adhere to my renal diet with date day, a memorial dinner, and a celebratory champagne brunch.  Being human, I blew it on ice cream.  My pounding heart and lightheadedness have convinced me: no more sugar treats!  Although, some of my non-CKD friends report the same symptoms upon a sugar overdose…

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

It’s Different

Sometime ago, I mentioned that Dr. Andrew Weill was my health guru.  I felt that way after my now deceased best buddy introduced me to the wonders of healthy eating. I miss her… and him.Dr. Andrew WEil

Why him?  As you know a healthy diet is not a renal healthy diet.  I still subscribe to his Nutrition Newsletter.  Today, vegetables and fruits were discussed including some excellent advice, but not for us as Chronic Kidney Disease patients.

Colorizing Your Diet

Phytonutrients – the chemical compounds in plants that appear to protect health, but are not established as essential nutrients – are generally concentrated in the skins of many vegetables and fruits, and are responsible for their vibrant hues, scents and flavors. Some phytonutrients are powerful anti-inflammatory agents; others modulate and enhance immune function, maintaining the body’s healing system while keeping abnormal inflammation in check; and still others boost antioxidant defenses to protect DNA and other cellular components from toxic insults that can cause direct harm, or can promote abnormal inflammation leading to tissue damage.

veggiesIn order to get the full range of protective phytonutrients, you should “colorize” your diet: include fresh produce from all parts of the color spectrum and aim for one serving per day (one-half cup cooked or one cup raw) of a fruit or vegetable from all the various color groups (red, red-purple, orange, orange-yellow, yellow-green, green and white-green).

Okay, we’re pretty sure CKD is an inflammatory disease so this would make sense.  We already have compromised systems, so we can use that immune function enhancement.  And we certainly won’t say no to something that can protect our cells and DNA from toxic insults.  So what’s the problem?

Let me answer it this way.  In Chapter 8: The Renal Diet of What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease on page 73

In order to fully understand the renal diet, you need to know a little something about electrolytes. There are the sodium, potassium, and phosphate you’ve been told about and also calcium, magnesium, chloride and bicarbonate. They maintain balance in your body.  This is not the kind of balance that helps you stand upright, but the kind that keeps your body healthy.  Too much or too little of a certain electrolyte presents different problems.  Eating a larger portion than suggested in the renal diet of a low sodium, phosphate, protein or potassium food is the equivalent of eating a high sodium, phosphate, protein or potassium food.

So it’s not just eating the fruits and vegetables from each color group.  We need to analyze the electrolytes in each serving, especially the phosphate and potassium.  I also can only eat three servings of fruits and three of vegetables rather than the seven Dr. Weil recommends.Book Cover

Why the restrictions of the electrolytes?

Let’s take a look at potassium. Potassium is not a bad thing if you don’t have CKD.  It dumps wastes from your cells and helps the kidneys, heart and muscles to function normally.  However, too much can cause irregular heartbeat and even heart attacks. Your kidneys are not doing an effective job of filtering the potassium in your blood.  You have CKD.  This should explain the connection between CKD and cardiovascular events.

And phosphorous? I’ll quote from What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease again here since I like the simple direct way I explained it on page 76.

This is the second most plentiful mineral in the body and works closely with the first, calcium. Together, they produce strong bones and teeth. 85% of the phosphorous and calcium in our bodies is stored in the bones and teeth.  The rest circulates in the blood except for about 5% that is in cells and tissues. Again, phosphorous is important for the kidneys since it filters out waste via them. Phosphorous balances and metabolizes other vitamins and minerals including vitamin D which is so important to CKD patients. As usual, it performs other functions, such as getting oxygen to tissues and changing protein, fat and carbohydrate into energy.

Be aware that kidney disease can cause excessive phosphorus. And what does that mean for Early Stage CKD patients? Not much if the phosphorous levels are kept low. Later, at Stages 4 and 5, bone problems including pain and breakage may be endured since excess phosphorous means the body tries to maintain balance by using the calcium that should be going to the bones. There are other consequences, but this is the one most easily understood.

water melonTo complicate matters even more, CKD patients are limited to different servings sizes of different fruits and vegetables, not the straight across the board ½ cup cooked or 1 cup raw of each Dr. Weil suggests.  For example: I can eat ½ cup of broccoli, but only 1/3 cup of raisins.  It depends upon the electrolytes in the particular fruit and vegetable and how much of that specific electrolyte you’ve eaten that day.

*sigh* I miss the days of having Dr. Weil as my health guru.

I found even more reviews and all five stars!  I am so enjoying this. Thank you all for the reviews.firworks

I was just diagnosed with Chronic Kidney disease Stage 4 a few weeks ago and I want to THANK YOU very much for this book. I put it on my Kindle. It is written in a way that one newly diagnosed and not in the medical field can understand.

Gail Rae has provided a good insight to the bombshell that befalls millions of unsuspecting humans worldwide. A CKD victim myself with years of experience under my belt, found the book extremely informative and a great reference when providing peer support to newly diagnosed sufferers of this silent killer.

So much good information for Chronic Kidney Disease Patients, from beginning to end. Thank you Gail Rae.

Ms. Rae knows, in my opinion, what she is talking about. She is direct-to the point-and the book is easily understood. She has just a hint of humor in her writing which keeps the reader engaged. Will keep this in my reference library.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Smokin’!

When I was in college a million years ago, this was a compliment.  I’d wear the new dress my mother bought me, go to a dance or a party, dance my brains out, and find some guys whispering this under their breath as I passed them.early headshots

Not anymore.  True, Mom’s long gone, I’m married, and if anyone whispered this to me now, I’d think they were asking me if I smoked…and that’s a big no-no these days, especially with Chronic Kidney Disease.

We’ve taken for granted for years now that people just don’t smoke anymore. That’s not true, you know.  Other countries still find smoking acceptable, although not all.  There are also people who are so addicted that they just can’t stop.  Today we’ll take a look at what might help.

But first, we need to go back to the basics – as usual. On my very first visit to a nephrologist, I was told to stop smoking, even social smoking.

But why?  DaVita at http://www.davita.com/kidney-disease/overview/living-with-ckd/smoking-and-chronic-kidney-disease/e/4897 offered a succinct answer to my question:

Blood Oxygen Cycle Picture 400dpi jpgHow smoking can harm kidneys

Here are some of the possible ways smoking is thought to harm kidneys:

  • Increases blood pressure and heart rate
  • Reduces blood flow in the kidneys
  • Increases production of angiotensin II (a hormone produced in kidney)
  • Narrows the blood vessels in the kidneys
  • Damages arterioles (branches of arteries)
  • Forms arteriosclerosis (thickening and hardening) of the renal arteries
  • Accelerates loss of kidney function

In addition to tobacco, smoking allows other toxins into the body. And according to the American Association of Kidney Patients (AAKP), studies have shown that smoking is harmful for the kidneys, and can cause kidney disease to progress and increases the risk for proteinuria (excessive amount of protein in the urine).

To make this a little more comprehensive, here are some definitions from What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease:The Table

Arteries: Vessels that carry blood from the heart.

Hormones: …chemicals that trigger tissues to do whatever their particular job is.

Protein: Amino acids arranged in chains joined by peptide bonds to form a compound, important    because some proteins are hormones, enzymes, and antibodies.

Renal: Of or about the kidneys

Sounds drastic, doesn’t it?  So, what can be done to help those people who are so addicted they can’t stop smoking on their own?

An Israeli PhD student at Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Anat Arzi, has a novel idea.  She believes that exposing smokers to the smell of smoke and other unpleasant odors while they sleep can make them less eager to smoke.  In her own words, “”This research stems from recent findings suggesting that novel associations can be learned during human sleep and retrieved upon awakening.”sleepWhile this was only a small study with 76 people, I can’t remember reading about any other cease smoking study that deals with aversive conditioning during REM sleep.  Aversive conditioning is {surprise!} just what it sounds like: using unpleasant stimuli – like the rotten fish Arzi used – to cause some kind of change in behavior.  Quick reminder, REM means Rapid Eye Movement and occurs during the second stage of falling asleep.

You can read about the study yourself at http://www.m.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/news/20141120/sleep-addiction-cigarettes?page=2

Then, there’s the FDA approved, safe, natural product Smoke Remedy offered on the internet.  You need to remember that FDA approved, safe, and natural does not necessarily mean safe for CKD. I applaud the fact that they list their ingredients, but this is not safe for us.

The homeopathic medicines in Smoke Remedy™ come from several different plant and mineral sources that include:

  • Avena sativa – to help with the addiction to nicotine and tobacco;
  • Caladium seguinum, Daphne Indica, Eugenia jambosa, Ignatia, Calcarea phosphorica, and Plantago major – these help to stop the craving and desire to smoke;
  • Kali phosphoricum, Nux vomica, and Staphysagria – to help prevent the withdrawal symptoms you may experience when quitting;
  • The product also contains purified water, citric acid and potassium sorbate.

For example, that last ingredient, potassium sorbate caught my eye because we know that we, as people with CKD, need to limit our potassium.  It turns out to be a preservative and nothing I’d want in my body whether the FDA approves it or not. The Calcarea Phosphorica made me pause, too.  As CKD patients, we do not need more phosphorous, as you already know.

I’m not saying don’t use homeopathic remedies, but I am saying you need to research each and every ingredient AND bring the list of side effects to your nephrologist before you do. Your doctor may not be familiar with homeopathic medicines, which is why you are doing the research to bring to him or her.Nicotine gum and crossed tobacco.

Of course, there’s always the patch or special gums, but they have their own problems.  Most feed slow doses of nicotine into your body. That’s the element of tobacco that injures your kidneys. This is to address the withdrawal symptoms.

I went to http://www.stopsmoking.net/free-nicotine-patch.html to see if there are side effects. Don’t you just love products with full disclosure? Here’s what I found:

“It’s worth noting that many of the top nicotine patches often produce undesirable side effects. Common side effects include headaches, dizziness, upset stomach, nausea, chest pain, breathing problems, anxiety, and irregular heartbeat. Furthermore, some people have nicotine patch allergies. The skin becomes red, and their body becomes severely irritated by the patch. If this ever happens, you need to contact a doctor right away. Nicotine patch allergies can produce damaging results.”

Now here’s an eye opener I found at http://thechart.blogs.cnn.com/2012/01/09/study-nicotine-gums-patches-only-help-with-withdrawal/:

“The perception of the public using the product is that these are good forever – that these will result in you not smoking in three, five, 10 years,” says Greg Connolly, Director of the Center for Global Tobacco Control at the Harvard School of Public Health. “Well, they were never designed to do that. They were designed to treat withdrawal, which is a symptom that occurs from stopping to probably six months, and then it usually ends.”

I never realized how really hard it is for addicted smokers to stop.  Now I fully appreciate my father who decided there wasn’t enough money 923117_10151599924904491_1034557671_ncoming in for him to waste it on cigarettes when he had three children.  He simply stopped. Or so I thought.  (This was way before 1996 when the patch and gum first made their appearance.) Thank you, Dad; this must have been really hard.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Up and Down…and Up…and Down

I usually base the blog upon what’s happening in my medical life or those of my family members and friends.  I thought I wouldn’t have anything to write about today. But then I got my latest lab results.  Ugh!

eGFR MDRD Non Af Amer >59 mL/min/1.73 47

There’s been some variation in my eGFR for the last few months and it hasn’t all been good.  What’s the eGFR, you ask.  Let’s start with the GFR and use the glossary in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease {page 132} for the definition:

Glomerulus-Nephron 300 dpi jpg“Glomerular filtration rate [if there is a lower case “e” before the term, it means estimated glomerular filtration rate] which determines both the stage of kidney disease and how well the kidneys are functioning.”

Wonderful, except we need to know what glomerulus means since the suffix ‘ar’ tells us that glomerular is an adjective or word that describes a noun – a person, place, thing, or idea.  In this case, the noun is glomerulus.   Thank you dictionary.reference.com for the following:

“Also called Malpighian tuft, a tuft of convoluted capillaries in the nephron of a kidney, functioning to remove certain substances from the blood before it flows into the convoluted tubule.”glomerulus

Yes, yes, I know more definitions are needed.  Back to the glossary in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease {page 134 this time):

“Nephrons: The part of the kidney that actually purifies and filters the blood.”

A tubule, as you’ve probably guessed, is a very small tube.  This is when having been an English teacher for decades pays off in my kidney work!

Maybe we should define capillary too, in case you’ve forgotten what it is. This time I used Merriam-Webster.com at MedlinePlus.

“a minute thin-walled vessel of the body; especially: any of the smallest blood vessels connecting arteriole with venules and forming networks throughout the body.”

In other words, they’re the smallest blood vessels in the body.

Alright, we’ve got our vocabulary in place; now why is the eGFR so important? As stated in the definition above, it is used for staging your Chronic Kidney Disease.  Different stages require different treatment or no treatment at all.  There are five stages with the mid-level stage divided into two parts.  The higher the stage, the worse your kidney function.stages chart

Think of the stages as a test with 100 being the highest score.  These are the stages and their treatments:

STAGE 1: (normal or high) – above 90 – usually requires watching, not treatment, although many people decide to make life style changes now: following a renal diet, exercising, lowering blood pressure, ceasing to smoke, etc.

STAGE 2: (mild) – 60-89 – Same as for stage one

STAGE 3A: (moderate) – 45-59 – This is when you are usually referred to a nephrologist {kidney specialist}. You’ll need a renal {kidney} dietitian, too, since you need to be rigorous in avoiding more than certain amounts of protein, potassium, phosphorous, and sodium in your diet to slow down the deterioration of your kidneys. Each patient has different needs so there is no one diet.  The diet is based on your lab results.  Medications such as those for high blood pressure may be prescribed to help preserve your kidney function.

STAGE 3B: (moderate) – 30-44 – same as above, except the patient may experience symptoms.

STAGE 4:  (severe 15-29) – Here’s when dialysis may start. A kidney transplant may be necessary instead of dialysis {artificial cleansing of your blood}. Your nephrologist will probably want to see you every three months and request labs before each visit.

STAGE 5: (End stage) – below 15 – Dialysis or transplant is necessary to continue living.

Many thanks to DaVita.com for refreshing my memory about each stage.

Back to my original concern about the GFR results in my labs.  Why did it fluctuate from 53 in August of last year, to 47 in February of this year, to 52 in May, to 56 in August, and to 47 last week? All the values are within stage 3A and I know it’s only a total fluctuation of six points, but it’s my GFRfluctuation so I want to know.  And that’s what started this whole blog about GFR.

I discovered that different labs may use slightly different calculations to estimate your GFR, but I always go to the same lab, the one in my doctor’s office.  Nope, that’s not my answer.

According to the American Kidney Fund, “…this test may not be accurate if you are younger than 18, pregnant, very overweight or very muscular.”  No, these situations don’t apply to me either.

Maybe I’m going about this all wrong and should look at the formula for arriving at GFR. The National Kidney Disease Education program lists the formula which includes your serum creatinine.  Aha! Maybe that’s the cause of the variation.  First a reminder: creatinine is the chemical waste product of muscle use. {This is a highly simplified definition.}

You’ll find this on your Comprehensive Metabolic Panel Blood Results, should you have your results. The normal values are between 0.57 and 1.00 mg/dL.  Mine were above normal for each test, a sign that I have CKD.  As if I didn’t already know that. These results were also lower each time my GFR was higher.

iPadI researched and research.  My final understanding is that not only can CKD elevate your creatinine, but so can dehydration, diabetes or high blood pressure.  If your creatinine is elevated, the results of the GFR formula will be lowered.  That’s enough information to allow me to rest easy until I see my doctor next week.

Some of this was pretty technical and I couldn’t give you many exact web addresses since my computer is having its own issues today.  You may want to try an online GFR calculator just to see how it works.  You will need your serum creatinine value {serum means blood, so this is not to be confused with the urine creatinine test} to do so.  I like the one at DaVita.com.

Until next week,Book Cover

Keep living your life!

Pro on Probiotics?

probioticsMy husband takes probiotics and they work for him. This is why he takes them, as explained by http://www.theralac.com/why-take-probiotics.aspx:

“For healthy people, probiotics can help boost the immune system and increase the absorption of important minerals and nutrients. For people with digestive problems, probiotics can be taken in higher doses to help regain digestive balance.”

I thought they might be worth a try, but my nephrologist disagreed.  We had our discussion about this right after I’d been a guest on a radio show during which the pros and cons of using probiotics for chronic kidney disease were discussed. This was just about the same time the information I’d requested from Kibow arrived.  This is from their website at www.Kibow.com:

“Certain probiotic microorganisms can utilize urea, uric acid and creatinine and other toxins as its nutrients for growth. Overloaded and impaired kidneys have a buildup of these poisonous wastes in the bloodstream. Probiotic microorganisms multiply, thereby creating a greater diffusion of these uremic toxins from the circulating blood across the lining of the intestinal walls into the bowel. This increased microbial growth is excreted along with the feces (which is normally 50% microbes by weight).

Enteric toxin reduction technology uses probiotic organisms to transform the colon into a blood cleansing agent, which, with the aid of microbes, indirectly removes toxic wastes and helps eliminate them as fecal matter. Consequently, a natural treatment for kidney failure is possible to maintain a healthy kidney function with the oral use of Renadyl™. The patented, proprietary probiotics in Renadyl™ have been clinically tested and shown to be safe, free of serious side effects, and effective in helping the body rid itself of harmful toxins when taken for as long as 6 months.”

Let’s slow down a bit.  We’ll need some definitions, so I turned to my favorite user friendly online medical dictionary, www.merriam-webster.com for the following:

CREATININE: (I know you know this one; this is just a reminder) a white crystalline strongly basic compound C4H7N3O formed from creatine and found especially in muscle, blood, and urine

ENTERIC: of, relating to or affecting the intestines; broadly:  alimentary

PROBIOTIC: a preparation (as a dietary supplement) containing a live bacterium (as lactobacilli) that is taken orally to restore beneficial bacteria to the body; also:  a bacterium of such a preparation

UREA: a substance that contains nitrogen, is found in the urine of mammals and some fish, and is used in some kinds of fertilizerdictionary

URIC ACID: a white odorless and tasteless nearly insoluble acid C5H4N4O3 that is the chief nitrogenous waste present in the urine especially of lower vertebrates (as birds and reptiles), is present in small quantity in human urine, and occurs pathologically in renal calculi {a little help here, this means a concretion usually of mineral salts around organic material found especially in hollow organs or ducts} and the tophi of gout

What I found on Kibow is a mouthful… and an advertisement.  I am not endorsing Renadyl.  However, there is an animation at http://www.renadyl.com/How-Renadyl-works which visually clarifies the information above. While I understood the process better after watching the animation, I’m still leery of that six month warning, especially after I found this at the bottom of one of their pages:

“* These statements have not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease. Results may vary.”

In addition, this product contains psyllium seed husk, something I was cautioned to avoid. It seems my nephrologist is not the only one who feels this way. http://www.metamuciladvisor.com/avoid-psyllium-and-metamucil-in-kidney-disease/ is the webpage of Metamucil, a product whose main ingredient is psyllium.  However, this conscientious company also posts this information on their website:

Psyllium Products and Their Minerals

There are certain psyllium products that contain a large amount of minerals that individuals with kidney disease cannot process. Some psyllium products contain high volumes of psyllium seed huskspotassium, sodium and magnesium, which if a person with kidney disease consumes can cause a lot of problems. If an individual’s physician gives permission on taking psyllium then they need to make sure the psyllium product follows their restricted diet.

Fluids Required With Psyllium

When consuming psyllium six to eight glasses of water must be consumed to keep from having any uncomfortable side effects. This can be a problem for an individual with kidney disease since the kidneys cannot effectively filter the fluid. Since the proper amount of fluid cannot be consumed this can cause side effects and make the natural fiber less effective.

Things to Consider

One of the number one complaints in individuals with kidney disease is constipation due to the fact fluid restrictions, vegetables and more. Since there are many restrictions an individual has with kidney disease with their diet there are other safe options to choose from. Discuss these other safe options with your physician to relieve constipation.

Maybe it’s just me, but I don’t understand why someone with kidney disease would want to take a product that will harm them.  As a matter of fact, I don’t understand why Kibow, the makers of Renadyl, don’t post such a warning on their site. Hmmm, I wonder if the  “…safe, free of serious side effects, and effective in helping the body rid itself of harmful toxins when taken for as long as 6 months” statement included in their material IS their warning.  And just how many people catch that one sentence anyway?

At http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00760162, I did find the record of a study filed by Kibow in 2009, but not the results of the six month trial.  The record was processed on November 9, 2014 which is very recent.  Either I don’t know how to find the outcomes of the trial or they are simply not there. I suspect the latter.

I have no intention of vilifying Kibow, but do find this to be another case of be careful what you choose to take, very careful.  Watch the small print, talk to your nephrologist before making any decisions, and make sure you guard whatever you have left of your kidney function.

Book CoverThank you for your continued interest in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease. Keep in mind what a terrific holiday gift this is… and that next year, you’ll be able to gift the same person with What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease’s little sister: The Book of Blogs.

Until next week,

Keep living your life.

Sunshine and Superwoman

sad womanToday is just one of those days: Bear’s car is in the shop so I got up early to take him to work, I turned on the dishwasher and nothing happened, I posted what I thought was a non-political message and got a political rant in return, answered a text only to find that my childhood friend thought I was ignoring her.  I’ve got a pretty happy life, so this was a disconcerting start of the day to say the least.

And then I opened the lab results for yet another blood test.  The one I wrote about two weeks ago was from August; this one is from last week. Should have saved it for tomorrow.

While the out of range results weren’t that much out of range, they were out of range.  Since this is one of those days, all of a sudden this became of great concern to me.

The Vitamin D, 25-Hydroxy, Total was 28.6 instead of within the 30.1 -100 normal range.  It would probably help you understand my mystification if I let you know that I’ve been taking 2000 mg. of vitamin D daily for several years.

I went running right back to What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease to find out why this is important.  Thank goodness, I have my office copy!  How could anyone memorize everything they need to know about their health, I wonder.Book Cover

This is what I wrote about vitamin D (page 48):

  • The kidneys produce calcitrol which is the active form of vitamin D. The kidneys are the organs that transfer this vitamin from your food and skin [sunshine provides it to your skin] into something your body can use.
  • Both vitamin D and calcium are needed for strong bones. It is yet another job of your kidneys to keep your bones strong and healthy.
  • Should you have a deficit of Vitamin D, you’ll need to be treated for this, in addition for any abnormal level of calcium or phosphates. The three work together.
  • Vitamin D enables the calcium from the food you eat to be absorbed in the body. CKD may leech the calcium from your bones and body.
  • Phosphate levels can rise since this is stored in the blood and the bones as is calcium.  With CKD, it’s hard to keep the phosphate levels normal, so you may develop itchiness since the concentration of urea builds up and begins to crystallize through the skin. This is called pruritus.

I have been itchy lately, but since my phosphate levels have never been out of range, I concluded it was just dry skin due to our low to nil humidity here in Arizona.  Maybe it’s not.  We’d been keeping my calcium levels low – but in range – since a bout with kidney stones several years ago. I also definitely stay out of the sun, another source of vitamin D, since a

sun-graphic1pre-cancerous face lesion. I’d had a bone density test recently and that was just fine, but had I been doing all the wrong things for my kidney health in protecting myself from kidney stones and melanoma?

Something was nagging at me about vitamin D, so I turned to the glossary of my book (page 136) and that’s where I found it:

“Vitamin D: Regulates calcium and phosphorous blood levels as well as promoting bone formation, among other tasks – affects the immune system.”

Affects the immune system.  But how?  Science Daily at http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100307215534.htm provided the answer I sought:

“Scientists have found that vitamin D is crucial to activating our immune defenses and that without sufficient intake of the vitamin – the killer cells of the immune system — T cells — will not be able to react to and fight off serious infections in the body. The research team found that T cells first search for vitamin D in order to activate and if they cannot find enough of it will not complete the activation process.”

How did I miss that?  And how many others knew that vitamin D didn’t just build strong bones as we’d been taught in primary school?

nsaidsI imagine my nephrologist will up my vitamin d dosage when I see him next week, but I still can’t handle the sun or take calcium supplements.  Maybe there’s some food that can provide vast quantities of this vitamin.

But no, according to the National Institutes of Health at http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminD-HealthProfessional/:

“Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that is naturally present in very few foods, added to others, and available as a dietary supplement.”

Well, I wanted to know what those foods were even if they could only provide 20% of the needed vitamin d at most.  I clearly remembered salmon, tuna, and egg yolks, but what else?  Mushrooms, of course.  And???

I had to turn to the internet for more suggestions. Fit Day at http://www.fitday.com/fitness-articles/nutrition/vitamins-minerals/5-foods-rich-in-vitamin-d.html informs us that milk, cereal, and even orange juice are vitamin d fortified. For me, that’s a joke.  I’m lactose intolerant, don’t like cereal, and o.j. has too much calcium in it.

I like fish, but two to three times a week?  I’m not sure I want to spend my five ounces of protein that way so often during a week.  I don’t care for eggs much, but am willing to eat them once a week just to eat something healthy. Mushrooms are really tasty, but my ¼ cup doesn’t go very far.

You know, just from moving myself to write, it doesn’t seem like such a bad day after all.IMG_0058

Which leads me to a thought I want to share: action is the road out of unhappiness.  I’m sure someone has thought of that before, but I own it now.  To that end, I’m working on The Book of Blogs and two other long time writing projects as well as having committed myself to Landmark Worldwide’s Wisdom Course.

Of course I still take the time to exercise (ugh!), sleep, and rest, but these projects are fun… and they make me happy.  We are capable of so much more than we think we are.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Number Three on The List

“Other studies have suggested that once diagnosed with kidney disease, weight loss may slow kidney disease progression, but this is the first research study to support losing belly fat and limiting phosphorus consumption as a possible way to prevent kidney disease from developing.”Vassalotti Photo June2010  Dr. Joseph Vassalotti, chief medical officer at the National Kidney Foundation  11/3/13

Why has this little gem not caused more positive uproar?  We already accept that high blood pressure and diabetes are the two leading causes of Chronic Kidney Disease and that preventing each may lessen your chances of developing the disease.  Are we now looking at a third deterrent to developing CKD?

When I first wrote What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, I was so eager to spread the word that I called Dr. Vassalotti and asked him to read the book.  He was encouraging, and oh-so-willing to discuss anything CKD.  I immediately trusted and believed what he had to say… and believe him now, especially with the research studies behind him.

So what is phosphorous, anyway?  I defined it in my book as

“One of the electrolytes, works with calcium for bone formation, but too much can cause calcification where you don’t want it: joints, eyes, skin and heart.”Book Cover

Hmmm, I don’t see any relation to preventing CKD there.  I researched my usual sites and found that they also discussed the effects of phosphorus on the bones in CKD, but nothing about how limiting it might prevent the disease from developing. 

You can find an abstract of the original study (but it’s rough going unless you have a medical background) at: http://www.ajkd.org/article/S0272-6386(13)00825-1/abstract. By the way, this is a well-respected journal, should you be interested in taking a gander. 

It was too technical for me, so I keep referring to the Medical News Today article.  In research work, this is called a secondary source.

AJKD Okay, let’s take another look at The American Journal of Kidney Disease’s information about this study as it was covered by Medical News Today at: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/268144.php.

But first, here’s what I found about phosphorous at MedlinePlus, a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine at The National Institutes of Health   (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002424.htm),

“It plays an important role in how the body uses carbohydrates and fats. It is also needed for the body to make protein for the growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues.”

This is new information to me and makes sense according to the article in Medical News Today.  So we’re not just dealing with phosphorus’s importance in bone health, but in the body’s use of carbs and fats.

If phosphorous is not doing its job as an electrolyte, there’s a good chance you are gaining weight. Think about all those carbs and fats not properly being eliminated from your body.  More caloric intake equals fat development.  (I do realize we’re not taking exercise into account here.)

This sentence from The Huffington Post’s Healthy Living section last March caught my attention in a big way: “Belly fat is also much more inflammatory than fat located elsewhere in the body and can create its own inflammatory chemicals (as a tumor would). “ You can read the entire article at: belly fathttp://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/21/body-fat-facts_n_2902867.html

Inflammatory?  Isn’t CKD an inflammatory disease? I went to The National Center for Biotechnology Information, which took me to the National Library of Medicine and finally to a National Institute of Health study at http://http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3332073/ for the answer.

“The persistent inflammatory state is common in diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD).”

This is a lot to take in at once.  What it amounts to is that another way to possibility prevent the onset of CKD is to lower your phosphorous intake so that you don’t accumulate belly fat.  All we need to know now is how this possible inflammatory state can cause CKD.

Thank you to Medical News Today for making it clear in this article:

“The researchers from Johns Hopkins claim that reducing your waist circumference and cutting down on dietary phosphorus have been linked to lower levels of protein in the urine (albuminuria). The presence of this protein in urine is one of the first indicators of kidney disease.”

chocolateI exercise.  I follow the kidney diet.  What was I eating before I developed CKD that might have contributed to its onset?

Although I considered myself a health nut, I loved chocolate…milk chocolate. Yep, high in phosphorous.

As I researched different sites, I realized being a health nut was exactly the opposite of what I should have been.  All of the following are on the majority of high phosphorous food lists: quinoa, oats, bran, milk, cheese, whole wheat, whole grain, dried beans or peas, brown rice or wild rice.

If you’re identifying with me, do not – I repeat: do not – beat yourself up.  Remember the connection between high phosphorous levels, belly fat, and CKD is new information.

Here’s a hint: avoid processed foods since they have phosphorous added to extend their shelf life.  I learned that somewhere along the way in my CKD journey, probably from my renal nutritionist. You can also add a recent product, flavored water, to the list of high phosphorous foods to avoid.

Unfortunately, phosphorous is not usually listed on labels.  Although, I did see PHOS listed once or twice.  Hopefully, it will become common usage to list phosphorous in the near future.

When I was a young woman, I wondered why I should keep up with the latest scientific research.  After all, new discoveries were making what I already learned obsolete on a daily basis.  Now I know why.

I have two daughters, two step-daughters, three almost sons-in-law, and a husband who loves me.  I want to be around to be part of their futures.  If it takes constant monitoring of the new CKD information, I’ll do it.

We leave for New York on Wednesday and I’m finally getting excited.  One or two medical emergencies in New York both kept me from being excited and wanting to hurry up to be there at the same time.  They are being resolved as I write.

AND I get to see Nima, my one child still living in New York. Oh, and friends of very, very long standing and my niece and her family.  Hah! I’m so excited now I can barely sit still to type. Nothing like dancing at the computer.NYC

Until next week when I’ll publish from The Big Apple,

Keep living your life!

Their Father’s Food  

GmM8B2ylPUP0lIuKR9OqrzOqFEOtJtRaf2Rpt6ncsBkHere’s hoping you all enjoyed your Father’s Day yesterday.  Although we were missing Nima who lives in New York and Kelly and Sean who both had to work, it was a very good day for us.  Lara’s love played the guitar for a sing-a-long and Darin showed us the newspaper article which quoted him.  Abby had to leave early for the Blues dance lesson she teaches, but we’d had a good, long afternoon together by that time.  Long enough that Lara finally got to really just talk with her dad.

It was all good, except the food.  Bear doesn’t have Chronic Kidney Disease and usually follows the renal diet with me anyway.  Yesterday was the exception.  Since we finally figured out that I’m not Bear’s mother and he’s not my father, this was the last Mother’s Day (He always makes me a bar b q with food I can eat.) or Father’s Day we would host. I gave him a pad and pen and said, “Write down your menu.”

Bear was raised in the Midwest and eats a lot of food that’s still strange to this ex New York Jew.  Let’s start with the honey baked ham.  Okay, he spent his childhood summers on his grandparents’ farm; I get that. I grew up not eating ham because it’s not kosher and we were practicing Jews.  But why isn’t it on the renal diet?ham

Thank you Wedliny Domowe at http://www.meatsandsausages.com/hams-other-meats/hams for this information. Ham is a processed meat.  It can be cured in a number of ways, but most include the use of salt, and nitrites, which themselves are either sodium or potassium. The dry method of curing uses salt, while the wet method uses brine. And what is brine but a solution of sodium in water? And then there’s smoking. {Ack! Smoke contains formaldehyde and alcohol.}

We know as CKDers that we need to limit our sodium intake. As I wrote in What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, pages 73-4,

“Basically, sodium balances fluid levels outside your cells.  You need it because it is responsible for watering your cells.  This watering is the prompt for potassium to Book Coverdump waste [cell process by-products] from your cells….If you have damaged kidneys and cannot excrete most of the sodium you ingest, you’re up against higher blood pressure which may worsen your CKD which may further cut down on your elimination of sodium and so on and so forth in an ever spiraling cycle. In addition, for CKD patients, too much sodium causes fluid retention, thereby causing swelling, further resulting in weight gain, leading to shortness of breath.”

And let’s not forget that high blood pressure is the second leading cause of Chronic Kidney Disease.

Well, what about the potassium in the nitrite used in preserving the ham.  Why do CKDers have to limit the amount of potassium they ingest? By the way, too much sodium can increase your need for potassium.

But isn’t potassium good for you?  After all, it does help the heart, muscles, and our beloved kidneys function normally as well as dumping wastes from our cells. Here’s the kicker, an excess of potassium can cause irregular heartbeat and even heart attack.

We are not your everyday people whose kidneys can filter any excess potassium from our bodies.  We have compromised kidney function which could mean a buildup in potassium.  No wonder CKD may lead to cardiovascular problems!potassium

I’m almost afraid to look at the rest of Bear’s Father’s Day menu.  He also requested cold cuts of roast beef.  Uh-oh, that’s another cured meat.  Cold cuts also tend to be fattier cuts and have nitrates, which are different than the nitrites discussed above.

According to Dictionary.com at http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/nitrate, a nitrate is “a salt or ester [That’s an organic compound.] of nitric acid.”  Wait a minute!  Nitric acid is a corrosive liquid, as most of us learned way back in high school.

And, as Dr. Veeraish Chauhan (one of the nephrologists in Florida that received a donation of the book this past March when I was there) wrote in his April 6, 2013 {our wedding day!} blog, “… red meat could be a big source of uric acid, which has been shown to be associated with worsening of CKD.”

Red meat contains cholesterol.  Fattier cuts contain more cholesterol. This substance can clog the arteries, leading to heart problems.  We already have a higher risk of heart problems simply because we have CKD.  Why raise the risk???

And then we have the sweet potato casserole.  Sweet potatoes?  I don’t remember the last time I had one of those. Talk about potassium overload!  We already discussed the CKDers’ problems with that.sweet potato casserole

Well, what about the green bean casserole?  I didn’t have to eat the crispy, fried onions on top of it. But it’s in creamed mushroom soup.  Oh, right.  Creamed soup is high in phosphorous. The National Kidney Foundation at http://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/phosphorus.cfm tells us, although phosphorus is necessary to work with calcium for healthy bones:

“High phosphorus levels can cause damage to your body. Extra phosphorus causes body changes that pull calcium out of your bones, making them weak. High phosphorus and calcium levels also lead to dangerous calcium deposits in blood vessels, lungs, eyes, and heart. Phosphorus and calcium control is very important for your overall health.”

The orange mimosas seemed to delight everyone but Abby.  I didn’t even try one.  I.just.don’t.drink.  Too much alcoholism in my family history.  Anyway, while the orange juice in this drink didn’t seem to be a problem, the champagne was actually good for us, according to the National Institutes of Health.

Their MedlinePlus at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_145838.html posted new findings about the benefits of wine.  Champagne is a wine.  Surprise!  If you have CKD, wine in moderation may help protect you from that health disease you’ve at risk of.carrot cake

I am not even going to analyze the carrot cake from Cheesecake Factory.  That is so bad for you on so many levels!  I am so glad I researched these foods AFTER the celebratory meal so I wasn’t tempted to spout this information to those enjoying the food.

I was thinking of combining the SlowItDown and book FB pages, twitter accounts, and website.  Any thoughts of your own about this?

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Kidney Book Cover

Another Holiday

Holidays abound! Or maybe it just feels that way. No sooner did my Russian Jewish almost son-in-law and I co-host our Seder then it was time to get ourselves together for Easter. Sometimes it’s a lot of work to have such an integrated family.

passover This time, no one stepped up to bat and I soon found out why. Another almost son-in-law had minor surgery, but was still in pain and not ready for people. A third adult child had weekend guests and had to work Sunday evening. But one couple wanted an Easter celebration.

So I quickly figured out that I could go to the weekly Sustainable Blues dance lesson that my youngest, Abby Wegerski, taught every week AND make dinner for these adult children if I planned carefully. That’s when I realized I wasn’t weighing and measuring or looking at my renal diet Bible before cooking. All the ingredients I needed were renal friendly and readily available in our house.blues

What a relief! It took almost seven years for this information and this way of being to become part of me. The point here is that the renal diet has become a way of life, one I don’t often think about too much anymore. I can easily remember a time I needed to pull out the diet list to see what I could eat, then another list to see if the protein, potassium, phosphorous, or sodium (3 Ps and and S, as I call them in What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease) levels were too high and finally the KidneyDiet app to make sure I hadn’t gone over my limits for each of these and a calorie count.

This wonderful revelation doesn’t mean that I don’t hit my own ‘refresh’ button periodically to make sure I really am correctly eye judging the amounts of each food I use in cooking and eating or that I don’t need to occasionally check to see if I’m right about the amount of whatever is in it.

I still carry all three of these – Northern Arizona Council on Renal Nutrition Diet, AAKP Nutrition Counter, and KidneyDiet app – as my talismen. There’s a certain security in knowing I have them if I need them. I also find that sometimes I just don’t remember exactly what I read in each, so it’s a comfort to have them at hand.Book Cover In Chapter 8: The Renal Diet of What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, I offer an example of the intricate and annoyingly painstaking little notebook I devised to keep track of my CKD nutrition. Ladies and Gentlemen: I am pleased (for CKD sufferers) to announce this is now obsolete!!!

One of the very first apps I purchased was KidneyDiet. It is not the same as my little notebook, but works equally well. The only thing it doesn’t do is tell you if you’ve reached your daily limit in each category of food (milk, meat or meat substitutes, grains, fruits, vegetables, and fats).

android_welcomeYou’re an intelligent person. You can figure out just by looking at a display of your entries if you’ve had your one four ounce serving of milk, five ounces of meat or meat substitutes, however many servings of grain (depends upon your sex, weight, and whether or not you want to lose weight), your three servings each of fruits and vegetables and your fill of fat intake. You’re the one entering your limits (as prescribed by your dietician), and they show up red if you’ve gone over them. Calories and cholesterol are also included, as is fluid intake. The nicest part is that if there’s a food you like which isn’t on the pre-existing list that comes with the app, you can add it. Do that once and you have the information for that food every time you enter it.

No, I do not own stock in the KidneyDiet app, although that might not be such a bad idea. I am thrilled that life keeps getting easier for us as CKD patients. I know I’ve written about the app before, but each time I use it, I’m grateful for how it’s made my life easier.

Wait a minute! I just realized the next holiday on the calendar is Mother’s Day. This should be interesting because I’m not cooking for that. If Bear does, no problem. He knows my dietary restrictions almost as well as I do. But if it’s one of the kids, especially one of the newer additions to the family…. Maybe it’s time to be more stringent when they ask me what I can eat, or better yet, tell them in advance.

When we went to Florida and stayed with my brother, Paul, and sister-in-law, Judy Peck (she of the magnificent cooking), Judy asked me what I could eat. So I sent her the renal diet I follow. It was overwhelming to her, just as it is to new CKD patients. As usual, she successfully simplified the matter. By asking me what I could eat instead of adhering to the list, she saved herself from having to pick and choose from a double sided page of dietary restrictions and I (of course) only told her the foods Bear and I liked. The moral of the story: everyone was happy once this was briefly discussed. photo (2)

The theme of today’s blog is that life is becoming easier for CKD patients but we’ve got to keep talking, keep exchanging ideas, keep each other updated about new information. CKD is part of me now, but it sure isn’t all of me.

About keeping each other informed: The Free Health Screening by Path to Wellness is on Saturday, 4/26 from 8:30 to 1:30 at The Golden Gate Community Center 1625 N. 30th Ave. in Phoenix, Az. While it is free you need to call for an appointment – the number if you speak English is 602 840 1644. For Spanish speakers, the number is 602 845 7905. You must be over 18 and have a family member with diabetes, heart or kidney disease, or have diabetes or high blood pressure yourself.

Have you looked at Dr. Mario Trucillo’s American Recall Center (www. recallcenter.com)? That was the site discussed in last week’s blog. I’d be interested to hear what you think of it.

I challenged myself to create a business card for SlowItDown doing all the formatting and graphics myself.  This is the final product:SlowItDown business card

Feedback?

 

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

March and National Kidney Month are Hare, I Mean Here.

My wake up alarm is the song ‘Good Morning,’ and that’s exactly what this is.  The sun is out, it’s warm but not hot, I’m listening to some good music, and I’m alone in the house for the first time since Bear’s October surgery.  I am thankful that he is driving himself to his doctors’ appointments. That is progress!   desktop

Talking about progress, it’s National Kidney Month and you know what that means… a recap of many of the organizations listed in What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease that may help with your Chronic Kidney Disease.  Ready?  Let’s start.

{I’m only including online addresses since this is on online blog.}

 

American Association of Kidney Patients (AAKP) 

https://www.aakp.org

MARCH IS NATIONAL KIDNEY MONTH (from AAKP’s website)

This is an advocacy group originally started by several dialysis patients in Brooklyn in 1969.  While they are highly involved with legislation, I see their education as the most important aspect of the group for my readers.

“Take some time and browse through our educational resources including our Resource Library that contains past and present published information from the American Association of Kidney Patients. Educate yourself on specific conditions, medicine, lifestyle improvement and get the latest news and information from the renal community.”

kidney-month-2014-v1  The American Kidney Fund

     http://www.kidneyfund.org/

While they work more with end stage Chronic Kidney Disease patients, they also have an education and a get tested program.

“The mission of the American Kidney Fund is to fight kidney disease through direct financial support to patients in need; health education; and prevention efforts.”

National Kidney Disease Education Program

www.nkdep.nih.gov

This is an example of the many videos available on this site.  They are also available in Spanish.

What is chronic kidney disease? Approach 1 A doctor explains what chronic kidney disease (CKD) is and who is most at risk. Learn more about diabetes, high blood pressure, and other kidney disease risk factors. Length 00:53  Category CKD & Risk

One of my favorites for their easily understood explanations and suggestions.  Their mission? “Improving the understanding, detection, and management of kidney disease.”  They succeed.

National Kidney Foundation

www.kidney.org

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s2U2iZQxkqI#t=1 (This is the link to their National Kidney Month Rap with Sidney the Kidney)

I have guest blogged for them several times and been glad to work with them whenever they need me.  The website is thoroughly helpful and easy to navigate. This is what you find if you click on ‘Kidney Disease’ at the top of their home page. What I really like about this site is that it’s totally not intimidating.  Come to think of it, none of them are, but this one feels the best to me.  (I can just hear my friends now, “Oh, there she goes with that spiritual stuff again.”  One word to them: absolutely!) Notice the Ask the Doctor function.

National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC)

www.kidney.niddk.nih.gov  National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Logo.

“Just the facts, ma’am,” said Sergeant Friday on an old television show and that’s what you get here.

This is their mission statement:

The National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC) is a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). The NIDDK is part of the National Institutes of Health of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Established in 1987, the Clearinghouse provides information about diseases of the kidneys and urologic system to people with kidney and urologic disorders and to their families, health care professionals, and the public. The NKUDIC answers inquiries, develops and distributes publications, and works closely with professional and patient organizations and Government agencies to coordinate resources about kidney and urologic diseases.

And let’s not forget

 Renal Support Network

www.rsnhope.org

This was initiated by a Chronic Kidney Disease survivor.  The part I like the best is the Hopeline.  While I have not called myself, I have referred people who were newly diagnosed and, well, freaking out.  I couldn’t tell them what the experience of dialysis is like, but these people can.

Renal Support Network (RSN) is a nonprofit, patient-focused, patient-run organization that provides non-medical services to those affected by chronic kidney disease (CKD)….  Call our Hopeline (800) 579-1970 (toll-free) Monday through Friday from 10am to 6pm (PT) to talk to a Person who has lived kidney disease.

Baxter Healthcare Corporation.

http://www.renalinfo.com/us

“… web site designed and developed to provide information and support to those affected by kidney failure. Renalinfo.com is supported through and educational grant from Baxter Healthcare Ltd, a company that supplies dialysis equipment and services to kidney patients worldwide.

They have all the information a newly diagnosed CKD patient could want and, while funded by a private company, do not allow paid advertisements.  Their site map is proof of just how comprehensive they are.

While many of the other sites offer their information in Spanish as well as English, if you click through the change language function here, you’ll notice there are many languages available.

Rest assured that these are not the only organizations that offer support and education.  Who knows?  We may even decide to continue this next week, although that’s so close to March 13th’s World Kidney Day that we’ll probably blog about that for next week.

I interrupt myself here to give you what I consider an important commercial message.  Remember that game I play about using the money from the book to pay off what I paid to produce the book so I can put more money into donations of the book?  There was a point when sales covered the cost of publishing.  Now they’ve covered the cost of digitalizing the book so it could be sold as an e-book.  Another milestone!  (Now there’s just about $15,000 worth of donations to pay off.)54603_4833997811387_1521243709_o

While I’m at it, I find I cannot recommend Medical Surgical Nursing: Critical Thinking for Collaborative Care, 4th Ed. but only because it was published in 2002.  The world of nephrology has changed quite a bit since then and continues to change daily. While I enjoyed the information, I’m simply not convinced it’s still applicable.

For those of you who are newly diagnosed, I sincerely wish these websites give you a starting point so you don’t feel so alone. (I’m sorry the book isn’t interactive.)

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

The Dizzying Array of D Vitamins

I’ve been taking vitamin D supplements for seven years and apparently I’ve become complacent about them.  When Bear’s PCP prescribed vitamin D supplements for him, I piped up telling her we have mine at home and – if the dosage was what he needed -could probably just share the bottle.

Bear checked it when we got home and asked, “These are D3.  Can I take them?”  Bing!  Today’s blog. I didn’t know if he could take them, but did know it was time to research the D vitamins again.

Let’s start at the beginning.  What does vitamin D do for us? According to What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease,  it “Regulates calcium and phosphorous blood levels as well as promoting bone formation, among other tasks – affects the immune system.”  Short, sweet, and to the point.Book Cover

But I think we need more here. Why are there are different kinds of vitamin D? I went to Buzzle (my new favorite for easily understood renal information) at http://www.buzzle.com/articles/different-types-of-vitamin-d.html and hit pay dirt on my first foray.

There are five different types of vitamin D.  It seems to me that the source designates which number it is.  For example, vitamin D2 comes from plants, small invertebrates, and fungus (Pay attention, vegans.) while the D3 that I take is manufactured synthetically. The designation D1 is no longer used, D4 is such a recent discovery that not much is known about it, and D5 is not technically a vitamin.images

By the way, if your vitamin bottle doesn’t have a number after the D, that means it’s D2 or D3. You should know that the kidneys are responsible for transforming calcitriol into active vitamin D.

So, the sunshine vitamin is produced by our own bodies, but sometimes not at the rate we need it.  Hence, we are prescribed vitamin supplements.  As Chronic Kidney Disease patients, we need the extra vitamin D – whether from nature (D2) or synthetically produced (D3).

Why you ask? DaVita at http://www.davita.com/kidney-disease/diet-and-nutrition/diet-basics/the-abcs-of-vitamins-for-kidney-patients/e/5311 offers us this handy information:

Vitamin D Helps the body absorb calcium and phosphorus; deposits   these minerals in bones and teeth; regulates parathyroid hormone (PTH) In CKD the kidney loses the ability to make vitamin D   active.  Supplementation with special active vitamin D is determined by   calcium, phosphorus and PTH levels….

The site also suggests that vitamin D be by prescription only and closely monitored.  Since it was my PCP who prescribed it for me (seven years ago as a CKD patient) and for Bear (last week and not a CKD patient), I’m wondering if that caveat is for end stage Chronic Kidney Disease patients.

Notice we have a new term in the description above – parathyroid hormone. That’s not as odd as it sounds.  There is currently a controversy as to whether vitamin D is a vitamin or a hormone, since it is the only vitamin produced by the body.  Parathyroid hormone (PTH) explained:

The parathyroid glands are located in the neck, near or attached to the back side of the thyroid gland. Parathyroid hormone controls calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D levels in the blood and bone.

Release of PTH is controlled by the level of calcium in the blood. Low blood calcium levels cause increased PTH to be released, while high blood calcium levels block PTH release.

fishAnd here you thought the kidneys worked alone to control these levels in the blood.  Thanks to MedLine Plus at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003690.htm for correcting us. This National Institutes of Health site is a constant fount of pretty much any kind of health information you may need.

Okay, so let’s say you don’t take the vitamin D supplements you need.  What happens to you then? I jumped right on to the Mayo Clinic site at http://www.mayoclinic.org/vitamin-d-deficiency/expert-answers/FAQ-20058397, but found their answer too general for my needs: “Vitamin D deficiency — when the level of vitamin D in your body is too low — can cause your bones to become thin, brittle or misshapen.”

The irony of this is that we live in the sunshine state.  Only 20 minutes of sun a day could give us the vitamin D we need… and melanoma.  Having had a brush with a precancerous growth already, I’m not willing to take the chance; hence, the supplements.

Let’s not forget that vitamin D also helps absorb calcium and phosphorous, so it’s not just your bones that are at stake, important as they are. I went back to the National Institutes of Health at http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminD-QuickFacts/ for more information. This is what they have to say:

Vitamin D is important to the body in many other ways as well. Muscles need it to move, for example, nerves need it to carry messages between the brain and every body part, and the immune system needs vitamin D to fight off invading bacteria and viruses.

Aha!  Keep in mind that as CKD patients our immune systems are already compromised and you’ll realize just how important this vitamin is to us.sun-graphic1

Let’s try it the other way.  Let’s say you are so gung ho on the benefits of vitamin D supplementation, that you take more than your doctor prescribed.  Is that a problem?  According to WebMD at http://www.webmd.com/osteoporosis/features/the-truth-about-vitamin-d-can-you-get-too-much-vitamin-d  it is:

Too much vitamin D can cause an abnormally high blood calcium level, which could result in nausea, constipation, confusion, abnormal heart rhythm, and even kidney stones.

To sum up, you may be vitamin D deficient.  Your blood tests will let you know.  If it is recommended you take vitamin D supplements, stick to the prescribed dosage – no more, no less.  While some foods like fatty fishes can offer you vitamin D, it’s not really enough to make a difference.

I get so caught up in my research that I often forget to mention what’s happening with the book or SlowItDown.  Back were discussed on this podcast http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/mathea-ford-2/renal-diet-headquarters?refid=stpr.  Renal Diet Headquarters interviewed me and I had a ball!  I must learn to be quiet just a little and let the interviewer get to ask the questions before I start answering them!

kidney-book-coverSlowItDown also has a new website at www.gail-rae.com. I would appreciate your feedback on this.

I hope you had a wonderful Valentine’s Day by yourself, with your love, your family, your friends, your animals, whoever you spent it with.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Book It!

With the holidays over and more time to think about what I’d like to write, I decided this would be a good time to update you about whatever other books are available that also concern Chronic Kidney Disease.

You know there are many out there, too many to mention here, so I eliminated any book that couldn’t be understood by a lay person (those without specific training in a certain field – in this case, medical) and renal diet books.  You can easily find those for yourself by going to Amazon.com and B&N.com. I also excluded those I found to be dubious… the spelling errors were a dead give-away that these were not professional.

I’m not going to tell you about What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease since you already know about it from this blog.  Let’s change that, I will tell you one or two things.  First, the books included in ‘Additional Resources’ (Chapter 13) won’t appear here, as good as they are.Book Cover

And – pay attention – students, be aware that both Campus Book Rentals and Chegg are attempting to rent the book to you for more than it costs to buy it.  The digital edition – when I was teaching college, my students always seemed to prefer the digital edition – is even less expensive.

Don’t forget about The KindleMatchBook program which allows you to buy the digital version at 70% discount if you’ve ever bought the print copy. Gather your classmates: pool your money so you can save. One of you buy the print edition, then the others can get the digital edition at deep discount (I have no idea why, but I love that phrase).

Disclaimer:  I am not a doctor, have never have claimed to be one , AND am not endorsing the following books, simply letting you know they exist. For the most part, the descriptions were written by the author. The ‘Look Inside!’ function only works if you follow the link to Amazon.com – sorry! I have been dreaming about this list, so let’s get it out of my dreams and on the blog:

510smylYevL._SL160_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-dp,TopRight,12,-18_SH30_OU01_AA160_Ford, Mathea A., RD (Registered Dietician) Kidney Disease: Common Labs and Medical Terminology: The Patient’s Perspective (Renal Diet HQ IQ Pre-Dialysis Living) (Volume 4)

New to kidney failure? Have no idea what your physician just said about your kidneys? Kidney disease labs and terminology can quite often be a challenge to understand and digest. Did your doctor use the “stages of kidney disease”? Did you physician refer to “eGFR”? What does all this mean for your health and future with kidney disease, lifestyle and nutrition choices. This book is the basic platform for understanding all the common labs and terminology that your doctors and nurses will use. This book with give you and your caregivers the confidence to manage your condition knowing that you have an understanding of all the ins and outs of the nephrology jargon. (Mrs. Mathea seems to have an entire series of books about CKD.)

Hunt, Walter A. Kidney Disease: A Guide for Living. 

When Hunt learned he had kidney disease, he was overwhelmed by the prospect of facing kidney failure. He had so many questions: Why are my kidneys failing? Is there anything I can do to save them? How will I know when my kidneys have failed? What will it feel like? 41nNk5SdqIL._AA160_What treatments are available for me? Is there a cure for kidney failure? The good news, as Hunt found out, is that kidney failure is highly treatable. People with the disease can lead full and productive lives, and Hunt’s readable and empathetic book will help them do just that. It discusses the latest scientific and medical findings about kidney disease, including what kidneys do; the underlying diseases that cause failure; diagnosis, treatment, and prevention; dietary factors; clinical trials; and the future direction of research on kidney failure. Kidney disease is difficult, but as Hunt’s narrative reveals, people living with it can take control of their health and their future. By understanding kidney failure — what causes it, how it may affect their lives, and what treatment options they have — people with the disease can improve their quality of life and achieve the best possible outcome.

51nUIkG8kSL._AA160_Lewis, Dr. Robert. Understanding Chronic Kidney Disease: A guide for the Non-Specialist.

This is meant for primary care physicians, but can be easily understood by the layman. I looked under the covers of this one and was delighted to see that the information we, as patients with CKD, need to know is also what our primary care physicians need to know. (I wrote this description.)

National Kidney Foundation of Southern California. Living Well With Kidney Disease.

The first edition of “Living Well With Kidney Disease” was developed and published by the National Kidney Foundation of Southern California. Based on the handbook “When Your Kidneys Fail” (originally published in 1982), this new and 41jxZoYLGzL._AA160_updated edition provides detailed information specifically intended for people coping with Kidney Disease and other renal failure, as well as their friends and families. The question and answer format provides a clear and manageable guide for those seeking support and answers. Among the topics covered are the principles of kidney function, methods of treatment, transplantation, and financial resources available to patients. With all of the ramifications of kidney failure and the rise of Chronic Kidney Disease and Type 2 Diabetes, there is a growing population of people afflicted with kidney failure. Although it was written with the patient in mind, family members, friends and health care professionals will also find this handbook a valuable resource.

517GaXFXNPL._SL160_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-dp,TopRight,12,-18_SH30_OU01_AA160_Synder, Rich DO (Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine) What You Must Know About Kidney Disease: A Practical Guide to Using Conventional and Complementary Treatments

The book is divided into three parts. Part One provides an overview of the kidneys’ structure and function, as well as common kidney disorders. It also guides you in asking your doctor questions that will help you better understand both status and prognosis. Part Two examines kidney problems and their conventional treatments. Part Three provides an in depth look at the most effective complementary treatments, from lifestyle changes to alternative healing methods. The diagnosis of kidney disease is the first step of an unexpected journey.

*Yes, this is the same Dr. Rich Snyder who interviewed me on his radio show twice since What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease was published.

It’s always hard to find good books about CKD that non-medical personnel can understand.  I hope this four (and mine!) help you feel more comfortable and knowledgeable about your diagnosis.

Here’s a little hint about your own health.  I’m back to no sweets or desserts and, I hate to admit it, but I’m feeling better.  Don’t you just hate when that happens?sugar

Until next week (when I’ll in in Culver City for a weekend of Landmark),

Keep living your life!

Back to D

Those of you who know me personally know that this blog is a vacation for me right now.  Between Bear’s back issues, Nima’s upcoming gallbladder removal {that’s one way to rid yourself of a stone, aching backHmmm, that’s not funny, is it?} and my macula degeneration {which I persist in mispronouncing as macula conception for some reason}, it’s good to get back to D.  Vitamin D, that is.  Even more information piled up on my desk about it this week and that’s after not having enough room in last week’s blog to incorporate all the information I had at that point.

The following definition is from MedlinePlus @http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002405.htm.  This is a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine  From the National Institutes of HealthNational Institutes of Health which I trust and often cite in the blog:

“Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium. Calcium and phosphate are two minerals that are essential for normal bone formation. Throughout childhood, your body uses these minerals to produce bones. If you do not get enough calcium, or if your body does not absorb enough calcium from your diet, bone production and bone tissues may suffer.Vitamin D deficiency can lead to osteoporosis in adults or rickets in children.”

So, as adults, we basically need vitamin D to keep our bones healthy, although it does perform other functions such as “regulates calcium and phosphorous blood levels … affects the immune system.” This last definition is from the glossary of What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease. By the way, thank you for keeping the sales going.  Every time I sell a book, it means another one I can donate. {Amazon.com or B&N.com. for digital or print.  Email me at: myckdexperience.com if you’d like a signed copy.}

I did manage to find out why my former nephrologist recommended supplemental vitamin D for me.  If he’d been as quick to answer the more important questions I had when I was his patient, he vit dmight not have become my former nephrologist.  But I do have to admit that as a newly diagnosed patient, I did not leave the poor man alone nor was I gentle in my demands for answers.  By the way, he was impressively gracious when I apologized for that behavior.

Apparently, vitamin D is routinely recommended for those over 60 since – statistically speaking – more than half the people in this age group have a vitamin D deficiency. Once you are tested, the level of the vitamin D in your blood determines whether you will be advised to take a low or high dose supplement. While the normal acceptable range is 30 to 100 {depending upon which lab you use}, mine was 29 back in 2009 when I started taking the supplements.  It did go up to 31 six months later. I still take the supplements to make certain it stays within range. 31 is so low in the acceptable range. I didn’t see it on any of this year’s lab results and intend to rectify that on my next lab date in two weeks.

As you know, I rarely write about children.  However, I noticed a MedPage Today article last week that suggested “There was an association between lower vitamin D levels and worse clinical outcome” in the need for pediatric heart-lung bypass.  It was far too technical for me, but you may want to take a look for yourself – especially since the article mentions pediatric studies “linking vitamin D deficiency with a number of condition such as asthma, acute respiratory infection, and cardiomyopathy {e.g. disease of the heart muscle}, as well as organ dysfunction and length of stay in the pediatric intensive care unit.” The address is: http://www.medpagetoday.com/Cardiology/HeartTransplanation/40384.

The day before the above article ran, MedPage Today ran another article discussing why low vitamin D levels in whites can lead to a heart risk, but the same low vitamin D levels don’t lead to heart risks in Blacks or Hispanics. I especially like Dr. Keith Norris’s comment on this “…reinforces what we’re seeing in medicine, [which] is a push toward personalized medicine where we’re really looking beyond what happens to a whole group of people, but how do we understand what’s happening at more [of] an individual level.” In other words, a person is a person is a person – even when it comes to their health.  You’ll find this one at: http://www.medpagetoday.com/Endocrinology/GeneralEndocrinology/40368races

MedPage Today seems to be carrying the blog today.  While there was no risk of heart disease due to low levels of vitamin D in Blacks, supplements could possibly lower blood pressure just a bit in Blacks.  So, if you don’t take them for one reason, you take them for another, I guess.  The researchers themselves are not certain, however, whether this study was long enough to prove anything. Still, I found it interesting and you might, too:  http://www.medpagetoday.com/Cardiology/Hypertension?38398.

Before you get down in the mouth about this information, let’s talk about vitamin D in kidney patients and gum disease {Get it? Down in the mouth? Gum disease? Oh well.} This time, the information is specifically for those with chronic kidney disease (hello!). According to Dr. Jessica Bastos back in April of this year, “This association seems to be mediated through an impairment in clearing bacterial infection due to a decrease in cathelicidin {e.g. antimicrobial polypeptides} production.” There is a purported correlation between low levels of vitamin D and low levels of cathelicidin production.  I don’t know about you, but I intend to print the blog and check that I took my vitamin D today.  My dentist is a nice guy, but this is my mouth we’re talking about. Take a gander: http://www.medpagetoday.com/MeetingCoverage/NKF/38254.

I have many more articles in front of me, so I’m going to simply list the areas in which low vitamin D is involved:Book signing

  • cardiovascular
  • chronic kidney disease {the purpose of this blog, lest we forget}
  • health hip fracture risk
  • hepatitis B {Have you decided to take the inoculation against this?}
  • hypertension
  • stroke

Got how dangerous low levels of vitamin D can be?  Good.  Be ready to be confounded.  Another study links low levels of vitamin D with long life.  The  studies suggest, ” that low serum levels of vitamin D are a consequence rather than a cause of disease,” according to its authors.  This is a must read: http://www.medpagetoday.com/Genetics/GeneralGenetics/35767.

Wow, this could have been a four part blog.  Let’s hope you’re confused enough about the benefits {or lack thereof} of vitamin D supplementation to do a little research of your own.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Weight A Minute

4weddingWe’ve been married for one week and one day (and no, I don’t feel any different.  Being married to Bear is just as delicious as co-habitating with him).  We just got our pictures back from our future son-in-law and videographer, Sean Rasbury.  They’re beautiful.  We’re beautiful.   Our family is beautiful. Our friends are beautiful. The wedding was beautiful.

But, you know it’s important to keep your weight down when you have Chronic Kidney Disease and the pictures were a rude awakening for me.  I thought I was doing just that.  Hah! I was not the beautiful blushing bride, but the beautiful bountiful bride.

Keeping your weight down is one of the ways to help retard the progression of the disease.  How? By not allowing yourself to become obese. Obiously, if you keep gaining weight, you can become obese.  Obesity is one of the contributing factors for developing diabetes.  Diabetes may lead to, and complicates the treatment of, ckd.

Look at my wedding picture again. Based on my BMI (Body Mass Index) I am obese. This is from What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease:

“The BMI formula was something about your weight divided by the sum of your height in inches squared times 703.  I think. I have researched and researched this,

but still do not understand it.  I did discover later on that there are free BMI Calculators online, such as the one on the United States Department of Health and

Human Services’ website [http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi/bminojs.htm], so you really only need to know our height and weight. If I’d known that at the time,

I just might not have felt so overwhelmed.”

You can order the book in either print or digital at: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=What+Is+It+And+How+Did+I+Get+It%3F+Early+Stage+Chronic+Kidney+Disease (which is Amazon) or http://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/What-Is-It-And-How-Did-I-Get-It–Early-Stage-Chronic-Kidney-Disease?keyword=What+Is+It+And+How+Did+I+Get+It%3F+Early+Stage+Chronic+Kidney+Disease&store=allproducts (which is Barnes and Noble).  If you’d like an endorsed print copy, just email me at myckdexperience@gmail.com or call (623) 266-2609.

You can see from the family wedding picture that some of us are naturally thin. They don’t seem to watch their diets or exercise, either. I notice that they need to start doing just that once they approach 30.  I sort of remember that being the case for me, too.  Then again, I danced all the time, studied Judo, ice skated, skied, and basically was moving all the time.  My diet was another story.  I didn’t have ckd at the time and, like any other 20 something, thought that I was immortal.  family

Here’s a chart from Health Travel Guides that offers the other benefits of losing body fat.  You can see it’s an overall positive action to take for your body’s health.

whenyoulosefat

Medical News Today published this information in an article:

“A University of Bristol team, with funding from the British Heart Foundation (BHF), has now identified that a target found to be critical in the brain’s regulation of body weight,

is also crucially involved in the development of obesity-associated conditions. Researchers describe the mechanism behind a key molecule, known as melanocortin-4-receptor (MC4R),

whose mutation or loss in both human and animal models has shown to cause severe obesity with type 2 diabetes.”

The title of the article is Scientists Identify Culprit In Obesity-Associated High Blood Pressure. Hmmm, high blood pressure (hypertension), another contributor to ckd. This is preliminary research so we can’t just pop a pill that will magically control our weight.  We need to do that ourselves. You can read the article for yourself at: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/255768.php.

If you read another article at: http://news.health.com/2013/02/06/vitamin-d-loss-attributed-to-obesity/, you’ll find that obesity also may lead to a drop in vitamin D, something we can’t afford as ckd patients.  This is the vitamin that regulates calcium and phosphorous blood levels as well as promoting bone formation, among other tasks.  It also affects the immune system. If you’re like me at stage 3A, you’re already taking vitamin D supplements since we need to control phosphorous levels, which means we cannot afford to lose any more of it.

Yet another caution about obesity from Medical News Today is not only for ckd patients but any woman of child bearing age.  The headline says it all: Obese Women Taking Certain Contraceptive May Be At Increased Risk For Type 2 Diabetes.  Keep in mind that diabetes, as mentioned before, may contribute to the development of ckd.  Want to read the entire article?  Here’s the link: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/256099.php

thAccording to DaVita at http://www.davita.com/kidney-diet-tips/?p=1872

  1.                                        “… people with a BMI 35 or greater had higher death rates than normal weight, overweight and mildly obese patients, so becoming more obese is a concern.
  •                                         Obese people are more likely to have chronic diseases like diabeteshigh blood pressure and heart disease, which could mean they receive more medical care
  •                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       and monitoring compared to normal weight people.
  •                                         Excess weight may be a source of energy during illness or injury—a benefit the lean person does not have.
  •                                        A person can have different degrees of  health and fitness regardless of their BMI or weight. Factors such as nutrition status, diseases, health history, where
  •                                                                                                                                                                         fat is stored (abdominal  vs. lower body), eating habits influence your level of fitness.

The message here is that while excess weight may not affect your general health and may even be of some benefit during times of ill health, we have a chronic disease and cannot afford the luxury of the benefits in being overweight.

We offered no goodies except the wedding cake at our shindig.  Our dinner was all pasta based with plenty of salad and an additional side of string beans.  We had enough champagne for a toast.  That’s it.  We were able to provide the usual wedding dinner with options for those with ckd (ME!). The only thing we each had to control is how much of each we ate.taste the cake

We spent time enjoying instead of gorging.  All our daughters took part in the ceremony:  Abby Wegerski sang Marry Me and Nima Rosensfit sang I Would Love To Be Your Last, Lara Garwood was in charge of the candles for the family blending part of the ceremony, and Kelly Garwood read ‘Corinthians.’  Bear and I wrote our own vows and tailored the officiant’s vows to our beliefs.

Our audience consisted of only Janet Le, my long time buddy from Staten Island; Karla Lodge, my Arizona buddy; and Alex Gilman, Lara’s beau, because I wanted to become Bear’s bride under the palo verde tree in our backyard with only our dearest and nearest in attendance – that, of course, includes Sean Rasbury, who is Kelly’s fiancé, and Michael Payne who was Bear’s best man.  Even Bella, our dog, showed up for the ceremony wearing her new red collar with the red hibiscus the Kurrs and Doris Widmayer had brought back from Hawaii for me.

More pictures next blog and further descriptions for what we did for fun, instead of gorging, at the reception.

Until next week,

Keep living your life.

Back To Basics

My daughter Abby and I just spent the weekend at Landmark Education’s Access to Communication Course.  If I weren’t already a Landmark graduate, I’d say I couldn’t believe what I learned.  Since I am a Landmark graduate, I’ll share with you my delight at learning just how simple and loving communication can be. people talking

Of course, I’d urge you graduates reading this blog to register for this course and those of you who aren’t yet graduates to explore the Landmark Forum.  You might get an idea of how forceful this work is when I tell you that my upcoming marriage is a result of it.

As a matter of fact, there’s an introduction this Wednesday night at the Scottsdale center from 7 – 11.  The address is 16100 North Greenway-Hayden Loop, Suite 108, and the phone number is 602-222-1110. You can always contact me and we can go together.

I chose communication about CKD as the topic for this week’s blog because I have been doing just that… and being startled over and over again at the number of people I’ve spoken with that know nothing about Chronic Kidney Disease.  So, this week, we go back to basics.

Anyone know what the kidneys are and what they do?  Will the gentleman with his hand raised in the back of the room answer the question, please?  Oh, it’s my future son-in-law, Sean, and he’s quoting me!

kidney locationOn page 1 of What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Gail Rae wrote, “Later, I learned that the kidneys were two reddish brown organs which lay on the muscles of the back on either side of your spine above hipbone level and below the diaphragm… Some have compared their size to that of a clenched fist or a large computer mouse, and the right one lies lower than the left since the liver is on that side.” [You can order digital copies of the book at Amazon.com and B&N.com.  Print copies are available at Amazon.com and myckdexperience@gmail.com.]

I couldn’t have said it better myself.  [ Ha Ha. Get it?  I DID say it.] Now about their function… Ah, lady on the left side of the room. Estelle, my dear East Coast buddy, I didn’t know you were here.

According to The National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC), A service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health (NIH) at http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseases/pubs/yourkidneys/#kidneys, “Every day, a person’s kidneys process about 200 quarts of blood to sift out about 2 quarts of waste products and extra water. The wastes and extra water become urine, which flows to the bladder through tubes called ureters. The bladder stores urine until releasing it through urination.” Nice job!

What else do they do?  Nima?  Yes, you may answer questions even though you’re my daughter.  Well then:

  • Control your body’s chemical balance
  • Help control your blood pressure
  • Help keep your bones healthyBook signing
  • Help you make red blood cells

You’ve learned well.  What was your source?  The American Kidney Fund at http://www.kidneyfund.org/kidney-health/kidney-basics/your-kidneys.html.

That’s a good one, as are all the others mentioned here.  They each contain far more information than we’ve included in today’s blog and can make you a sort of neophyte kidney expert.  Well, maybe someone who knows about his/her early stage chronic kidney disease or that of someone you know and/or love might be a more realistic title.

More?  Okay.  How many people have chronic kidney disease?  Look there.  Lara, my step-daughter, who is in very good health (thank the powers that be) is here.  Ummm, I did tell you that number but it’s changed a bit since then.  It’s 26 million in the USA alone and raising.  Those are the diagnosed people.  There are millions of other who have not yet realized they have CKD according to The National Kidney Foundation at     http://www.kidney.org/kidneydisease/aboutckd.cfm#facts

How do you know if you have it?  Excellent question, Kelly. As another healthy person, my step-daughter has asked an important question. Since there are rarely symptoms, it’s all about blood and urine tests.  A simply stated E-how article at http://www.ehow.com/how_2051919_test-kidney-disease.html explains without overwhelming.  Basically, your doctor is looking for protein in your urine and at the following values in your blood test: GFR (glomerular filtration rate) and bun (blood urea nitrogen).  I don’t advocate eHow for medical information, but this one is not that bad.

I will, Bear, right now.  The wonderful man I’ll be marrying in April asked me to make certain I write about the renal diet.  He follows it with me so we don’t have to cook two different meals when we do cook and he lost 60 pounds in the first several months of doing so.  I could hate him for that, except that I already love him.

The renal diet is only one part of the treatment. [There’s also exercise, adequate sleep and lack of stress.] I thought the one at Buzzle (http://www.buzzle.com/articles/diet-for-chronic-kidney-disease-ckd.html) was a good example until I realized there was no potassium restriction on this diet.  I follow that of the Northern Arizona Council of Renal Dietitians. What this tells us is that you need to pay attention to the specific renal diet the nephrologist (kidney and high blood pressure expert) has given you or your loved one, friend, and/or co-worker.water melon

Basically, sodium, phosphorous, protein, potassium and fluids are restricted. Sometimes, I feel like my fluids are exaggerated rather than restricted – like when I’m writing – and have to remind myself to drink so I can meet my 64 ounces/per day ‘limit.’

My neighbor and friend, Amy, just asked me to backtrack a bit and discuss the causes of CKD.  That would be helpful, wouldn’t it?

eMedicine at http://www.emedicinehealth.com/chronic_kidney_disease/page3_em.htmers this.  Two thirds of ckd is caused by high blood pressure or diabetes, but they neglected to mention that sometimes ckd is simply a result of growing older – as in my case.

You know the people I mentioned are not in my office as I write this blog, so here’s a public thank you to each of them for the loan of their names.  I kind of think they would have offered those answers or asked these questions if they were here with me right now.

Check out those websites.  They offer quite a bit of information.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Back To The Salt Minds

Here we are right smack in the middle of Chanukah with Christmas and Kwaanza coming up. We’ve read all the health articles about how to plan our party eating

including the Menorahmenorah lighting and latkes one at our house later this week – and we all know to avoid sodium since it causes so much havoc with blood pressure which causes further problems, right?  Maybe not.

Be prepared to have your minds blown (ahem, I am a child of the 60s):

Scant Evidence That Salt Raises BP, Review Finds

Published: December 04, 2012

The evidence for health benefits associated with salt reduction is controversial and the “concealment of scientific uncertainty” is a mistake, researchers suggested.

salt

Because this is such a treatment shattering controversy, I decided to let the experts speak for themselves. Do go to the following link and listen to them yourselves. (Notice the doctors insist that sodium restriction needs to depend upon the individual patient, not that it should be universally discarded.)

You can read the rest of the article and hear the doctors at: http://www.medpagetoday.com/Cardiology/Hypertension/36248?utm_content=&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=DailyHeadlines&utm_source=WC&xid=NL_DHE_2012-12-05&eun=g596983d0r&userid=596983&email=myckdexperience@gmail.com&mu_id=5721543

So, what does this mean for us as Chronic Kidney Disease patients?  Well… let’s go back to CKD basics for a moment.  We are restricted as far as the three ps (protein, potassium, phosphorous) and sodium, not to mention fluid intake and – for some of us – caloric intake.  {That’s odd, these restrictions don’t seem that complicated anymore, but when I type them, they look a bit daunting.}

Okay, so sodium.  Too much sodium can lead to hypertension (or can it?), which may lead to CKD. You already have CKD.  You are still at risk for edema, which is swelling caused by fluid retention in the tissues of the body.  Since this is already a potential problem for CKD patients, why exacerbate it?

This is what I wrote about sodium in What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease:

“What makes it worse is that there is no internal mechanism that tells us if we need more or less salt.  CKD sufferers are in a spot because the kidneys are the only route by which to eliminate excess salt.

Basically, sodium balances fluid levels outside your cells.  You need it because it is responsible for watering your cells.  This watering is the prompt for potassium to dump waste [cell process by-products] from your cells. Sodium does deal with other functions of the body, but this is a pretty important one.

If you have damaged kidneys and cannot excrete most of the sodium you ingest, you’re up again higher blood pressure {is that still true?} which may worsen your CKD which may further cut down on your elimination of sodium and so on and so forth in an ever spiraling cycle.  In addition, for CKD patients, too much sodium causes fluid retention, thereby causing swelling, further resulting in weight gain, leading to shortness of breath. That’s why your nephrologist asks if you’ve experiences shortness of breath.”

It gets worse.  Too much sodium can increase your need for potassium. While potassium is a necessity since it “dumps waste from your cells, but also helps the kidneys, heart and muscles to function normally.  Too much potassium can cause irregular heart beat and even heart attack.  This can be the most immediate danger of not limiting your potassium.” (also from my book)                                                                bbq-chips-beer-230

That is a simple, direct and universally accepted explanation of the horrors of sodium for CKD patients.  But is it still true for you?  With these newly uncovered controversies, who knows?  Speak with your nephrologist, but use common sense, too. I would not recommend running for the salt shaker under any circumstances, but is it safe to eat the fresh made potato chips you ordered at the local brewery (not that I drank any beer. Oh – I mean, not that you drank any beer.) when you tasted a bit of salt on them?

We are not an overly social couple, yet we have our Chanukah party, a friend’s huge pot luck, Bear’s work holiday social (Let’s hear it for Rockler’s!  They know how to do it right.), Christmas eve at Sean and Kelly’s (wow, another family tradition torch passed to the next generation) and now I’m playing around with the idea of a quiet champagne and caviar – neither of which I can eat – new year’s eve if that’s something the Arizona grown children and the assorted fiancés and boyfriends or best friends would be interested in.  That’s a lot of food intake planning.

I thought about taking it party by party and that has worked well for me.  Prior to that, I had a forbidden list I carried around in my head.  That was a total bust.  I would become frustrated at all the foods I couldn’t eat even though they were beautifully and enticingly displayed in front of me and just go whole hog.  Then I had to deal with the guilt, to say nothing of the bodily discomfort, that I felt after.

Yes, party by party is better for me. But that’s not all.  I am analytic, so I peruse the offerings and then – slowly – mentally check off what I can ingest, all the while socializing. That works for me. So does the old dieter’s motto: do-not-stay-seated-at-the-table-with-that-wonderfully-aromatic-food-in-front-of-you.  Feeling well armed to go to your holdiay parties with sodium intake well in hand?  Go party!

Until next week,

keep living your life!                       1129852_Christmas_Buffet_Smoked_salmon_Ham_Mini_quiches___Sausage_rolls_Pizza_Mincemeat_Lattice__nibbles_etc

What Did You Say Phosphorous Is?

I’ve discussed phosphorus before but another point of view, or another way of explaining it, is always helpful. As usual, you benefit from my research.  I especially like the substitutions for high phosphorous content foods in The National Kidney Foundation’s Phosphorous Fact Sheet.  I’ve reproduced most of the Fact Sheet here, but you can find the complete Fact Sheet at:  http://www.kidney.org/news/newsroom/fs_new/phosphorusCKD.cfm

PHOSPHORUS AND YOUR CKD DIET

 

What is phosphorus?

Phosphorus is a mineral found in your bones. Along with calcium, phosphorus is needed for building healthy strong bones, as well as keeping other parts of your body healthy.

Why is phosphorus important to you?

Normal working kidneys can remove extra phosphorus in your blood. When you have Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) your kidneys cannot remove phosphorus very well. High phosphorus levels can cause damage to your body. Extra phosphorus causes body changes that pull calcium out of your bones, making them weak. High phosphorus and calcium levels also lead to dangerous calcium deposits in blood vessels, lungs, eyes, and heart. Phosphorus and calcium control is very important for your overall health.

What is a safe blood level of phosphorus?

A normal phosphorus level is 3.5 to 5.5 mg/dL.

 

How can I control my phosphorus level?

You can keep you phosphorus level normal by understanding your diet and medications for phosphorus control. Your dietitian and doctor will help you with this. Below is a list of foods high in phosphorus.

HIGH PHOSPHORUS FOOD TO LIMIT OR AVOID

Beverages
ale
beer
  chocolate drinks cocoa
  drinks made with milk
canned iced teas
dark colas
     
Dairy Products cheese cottage cheese
  custard ice cream
  milk pudding
  cream soups yogurt
     
Protein carp crayfish
  beef liver chicken liver
  fish roe organ meats
  oysters sardines
     
Vegetables dried beans and peas:  
  baked beans black beans
  chick peas garbanzo beans
  kidney beans lentils
  limas northern beans
  pork ’ n beans split peas
  soy beans  
     
Other foods bran cereals brewer’s yeast
  caramels nuts
  seeds wheat germ
  whole grain products  

What are medications for phosphorus control?

Your doctor may order a medicine called a phosphate binder for you to take with meals and snacks. This medicine will help control the amount of phosphorus your body absorbs from the foods you eat. There are
many different kinds of phosphate binders. Pills, chewable tablets, and   powders are available. Some types also contain calcium, while others do  not. You should only take the phosphate binder that is ordered by your doctor or dietitian.

What do I do if my phosphorus level is too high?

When your phosphorus level is too high, think about your diet and substitute lower phosphorus foods for a while. Talk to your dietitian and doctor about making changes in your diet and ask about your phosphate binder prescription.

HIGH PHOSPHORUS FOODS
INSTEAD OF
LOW PHOSPHORUS FOODS
TRY
  Phosphorus (mg)     Phosphorus (mg)
8 ounce milk 230   8 ounce nondairy
creamer or4 ounce milk
100115
8 ounce cream soup made with milk
275
  8 ounce cream soup made with water 90
1 ounce hard cheese 145   1 ounce cream cheese 30
½ cup ice cream 80   ½ cup sherbet or 1 popsicle 0
12-ounce can cola 55   12 ounce can of Ginger Ale or lemon soda 3
½ cup lima or pinto beans 100   ½ cup mixed vegetables or green beans 35
½ cup custard or pudding made with milk 150   ½ cup pudding or custard made with nondairy creamer 50
2 ounce peanuts 200   1 ½ cup light salt/low fat popcorn 35
1 ½ ounce chocolate bar 125   1 ½ ounce hard candy, fruit flavors or jelly beans 3
2/3 cup oatmeal 130   2/3 cup cream of wheat or grits 40
½ cup bran cereal 140-260   ½ cup nonbran cereal, shredded wheat, rice cereals, or corn flakes 50-100

I find this refresher, well, ummm, refreshing.  Think about it and maybe try making just one change this week.

Until Friday,

Keep living

One last word from The National Kidney Foundation:

The National Kidney Foundation would like to thank theCouncil on Renal Nutrition for the development of this fact sheet.

Published in: on May 31, 2011 at 10:19 am  Leave a Comment  

Let’s Hear It For The Vegetarians!

In my book, What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, I discuss phospherous a bit:

This is the second most plentiful mineral in the body and works closely with the first, calcium. Together, they produce strong bones and teeth. 85% of the phosphorous and calcium in our bodies is stored in the bones and teeth.  The rest circulates in the blood except for about 5% that is in cells and tissues. Again, phosphorous is important for the kidneys since it filters out waste via them. Phosphorous balances and
metabolizes other vitamins and minerals including vitamin D which is so important to CKD patients. As usual, it performs other functions, such as getting oxygen to tissues and changing protein, fat and carbohydrate into energy.

Be aware that kidney disease can cause excessive phosphorus. And what does that mean for Early Stage CKD patients? Not much if the phosphorous levels are kept low. Later, at Stages 4 and 5, bone problems including pain and breakage may be endured since excess phosphorous means the body tries to maintain balance by using the calcium that should be going to the bones. There are other consequences, but this is the one most easily understood.

Milk and diary products contain phosphorous, which is why I’m limited to 4 ounces daily.  Other foods that I, for one, need to limit or avoid due to their high phosphorous level are colas, peanut butter (which I,
unfortunately, had just discovered much to my delight before being diagnosed), nuts, and cheeses.  To give you an idea why, my phosphorous limit per day is 800 mg. Two pancakes contain 476 mg. or well over half my daily allotment. Although both IHOP and Village Inn now make their pancakes from scratch, it’s very rarely that I spend so much of my phosphorous allotment on them.

Today, I found the following article (a little late since it was published last December) on Bioscholar.com which is fast becoming one of my favorite sites for chronic kidney disease updates. I bolded what I considered new information – well, that is, new to me.

Vegetarian diet helps kidney disease patients stay healthy

Friday, December 24th, 2010

// // //

Phosphorous levels plummet in kidney disease patients who stick to a vegetarian diet, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society Nephrology (CJASN). The results suggest that eating vegetables rather than meat can help kidney disease patients avoid accumulating toxic levels of this mineral in their bodies.

Individuals with kidney disease cannot adequately rid the body of phosphorus, which is found in dietary proteins and is a common food additive. Kidney disease patients must limit their phosphorous intake, as high levels of the mineral can lead to heart disease and death. While medical guidelines recommend low phosphorus diets for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), phosphorus content is not listed on food labels.

Sharon Moe, and her colleagues studied the effects of vegetarian and meat-based diets on phosphorous levels in nine patients with CKD. Patients followed a vegetarian or meat-based diet for one week, followed by the opposite diet two-to four- weeks later. Blood and urine tests were performed at the end of each week on both diets.

Despite equivalent protein and phosphorus concentrations in the two diets, patients had lower blood phosphorus levels and decreased phosphorus excretion in the urine when they were on the vegetarian diet compared with the meat-based diet. While the investigators did not determine the reason for this difference, a grain-based diet has a lower phosphate-to-protein ratio and much of the phosphate is in the form of phytate, which is not absorbed in humans.

The authors concluded that their study demonstrates that the source of protein in the diet has a significant effect on phosphorus levels in patients with CKD. Therefore, dietary counseling of patients with CKD must include information on not only the amount of phosphorous but also the source of protein from which it derives. “These results, if confirmed in longer studies, provide rationale for recommending a predominance of grain-based vegetarian sources of protein to patients with CKD. This diet would allow increased protein intake without adversely affecting phosphorus levels,” the researchers wrote.

Reference:
Sharon M. Moe, Miriam P. Zidehsarai, Mary A. Chambers, Lisa A. Jackman, J. Scott Radcliffe, Laurie L. Trevino, Susan E. Donahue, and John R. Asplin; Vegetarian Compared with Meat Dietary Protein Source and Phosphorus Homeostasis in Chronic Kidney Disease CJASN CJN.05040610; published ahead of print December 23, 2010, doi:10.2215/CJN.05040610

Disclaimer: Bioscholar is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. The articles are based on peer reviewed research, and discoveries/products mentioned in the articles may not be approved by the regulatory bodies.
 
The only problem here is that I am limited to three food units of vegetables per day.  If I add the six food units of starch, three of fruit and one of dairy (soy for me, if it’s to be vegetarian), I don’t think I’ll be satisfied.  I think I remember the vegetarians members of the family wondering the same thing as they were making their decision.  However, it would definitely help with my calorie count.
 
Keep thinking about that until Friday’s blog and, of course,
keep living your life.
Published in: on May 24, 2011 at 10:31 am  Leave a Comment  

Part Two of Me Pretending To Be A Dictionary

Before the weekend, I promised more definitions of the terms you may or may not find in discussions of Chronic Kidney Disease, or to be more specific – your Chronic Kidney Disease.  Without further ado (as they say in certain circles), here they are:

Hormones:  Gland produced chemicals that trigger tissues to do whatever their particular job is.

Hypertension: A possible cause of CKD, 140/90 mm Hg is currently considered hypertension, a risk factor for heart disease and stroke, too.

Hypertensive nephrosclerosis:  Kidney damage caused by HBP.

Hypertriglyceridemia: High triglyceride [major form of fat stored in the body] levels.

ICD:  International Statistical Classification of Disease and Related Health Problems, provides the medical codes for illnesses.

Ingested:  Taken by mouth.

Integumentary: The skin and its associates like the nails.

Interaction: Food or other medications which will affect how the one being prescribed works.

Kidney Stone: Stone caused in the urinary tract and kidney when crystals adhere to each other, most of those in the kidneys are made of calcium.

Lab: Short hand for medical laboratory, the place where your biological specimens are drawn and analyzed to ascertain the state of your health [think blood and urine, usually].

Lymphadenopathy: Disease of the lymph nodes.

M.A.: Short hand for medical assistant, the one who helps your health practitioner with clinical and administrative matters in the office.

Medicaid: U.S. government health insurance for those with limited income.

 Medicare: U.S. government health insurance for those over 65, those having certain special needs, or those who have end stage renal disease.

Meds:  Short hand for medication, chemical substances in the form of a script to treat, prevent, cure, or prevent disease.

Melena: Black, tarry, bloody stool.

MRI: Magnetic Resonance Imaging – a non-invasive method of imagining [seeing] the inside of your body.

Nausea: The feeling in the upper stomach that you need to vomit or are queasy.

Nephrolithiasis:  Kidney stones.

Nephrologist: Renal or kidney and hypertension specialist.

Nephrology: The subspecialty of internal medicine which deals with the kidneys and hypertension.

Nephrons: The part of the kidney that actually purifies and filters the blood.

Nephropathy: Kidney disease.

Nondistended: Not swollen.

NSAID: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen, aspirin, Aleve or naproxen usually used for arthritis or pain management, can worsen kidney disease, sometimes irreversibly.

Oral thrush: A mouth disease that can occur in people with compromised immune systems.

Orthostatis:  Fall in blood pressure which produces dizziness upon standing.

Oxalate: A simple molecule found in foods which sometimes combines with calcium to form kidney stones.

P.A.: Short hand for physician’s assistant, someone who is licensed to practice medicine under a licensed doctor’s supervision.

Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea: Sudden, recurring night bouts of shortness of breath.

Phosphorus:  One of the electrolytes, works with calcium for bone formation, but too much can cause calcification where you don’t want it: joints, eyes, skin and heart. 

Po: From the Latin per os meaning by mouth, usually found in the directions for a script.

Potassium: One of the electrolytes, important because it counteracts sodium’s effect on blood pressure.

 Protein:  Amino acids arranged in chains joined by peptide bonds to form a compound, important because some proteins are hormones, enzymes and antibodies.

Proteinuria: Protein in the urine, not a normal state of being.

Purine: Compound found mainly in beef, poultry, pork and fish that is metabolized into uric acid.

Pruritus: Itching, one whose cause might be kidney disease.

Rales: Crackling, clicking or rattling sounds in the lungs.

Renal: Of or about the kidneys.

Renin: Hormone that regulates blood pressure.

Rhonchi: Dry, leathery sounds in the lungs.

Script: Short hand for lab work order or prescription [orders from a medical practitioner for a pharmacy to provide medication or a medical device] depending upon how the term is used.

Sphygmomanometer: The cuff, the measuring device and the wires that connect the two in a machine used to measure your blood pressure, commonly called a blood pressure meter.

T3: Part of the CBC which measures your triiodothyronine, which is a thyroid hormone that plays an important role in controlling your metabolism.  If the T3 reading is abnormal, then the T4 test is ordered to find out what the problem might be.

Tid:  From the Latin ter in die meaning three times a day, usually found in the directions for a script.

Ultrasound: A certain kind of X ray that requires no radiation.

Ureter:  Carries urine from the kidneys to the bladder.

Veins: Vessels that carry blood toward the heart.

Vitamin D: Regulates calcium and phosphorous blood levels as well as promoting bone formation, among other tasks – affects the immune system.

The blog was a bit long today, but (hopefully) helpful.

Excuse me, I’ve got to go live my life now.  So, until Friday,

Keep living your life.

Not Again!

In one of those little flukes during which I didn’t receive my nephrologist’s report until a few weeks after the doctor visit and didn’t catch everything he said during the visit (yes, even after almost three years), I noticed a colonoscopy was recommended.  But I had one only eight years ago! When I called the nephrologist’s office to speak to his M.A. in an effort to find out why I needed this test, it was explained to me that the fatigue I’d been experiencing just might be from polyps.

That didn’t sound right to me so I dutifully made an appointment with the gastroenterologist, and while there, had a long, involved discussion with him.  He wisely allowed me to do most of the talking to see if he could get a handle on the nephrologist’s reason for wanting this test performed, but couldn’t.

Was it my failure to understand the M.A.?  Could be, but just to be certain AND to find out which drugs I would be allowed since I now have CKD  and was going to be “put out” – oh, Lord, I hope that’s nothing akin to being “put down” – for the experience , this specialist agreed to call the other specialist.

Here it is almost two weeks later and I’ve heard nothing from either of them.  Apparently, my nephrologist is on vacation and we’re waiting for his return. So, of course, I started researching on my own.  I still can’t quite figure out why I’m having the test since I couldn’t find anything about polyps contributing to fatigue in CKD patients (which doesn’t mean the information isn’t there – it may have been too technical for me to understand), but I did discover the following warning on the National Kidney Foundation’s site:

Oral Sodium Phosphate Safety Alerts

Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who use bowel cleansing products should be aware of a recent warning issued by the FDA for a type of sudden loss of kidney function or acute kidney injury, as well as, blood mineral disturbances. Phosphate crystal deposition in the kidneys causes the loss of kidney function, which can lead to kidney failure. The medical term for this condition is acute phosphate nephropathy.

The warning relates to the use of bowel cleansing agents, called sodium phosphate (OSP) products as laxatives or in preparation for colonoscopy. OSPs are available both with and without a prescription and are taken by mouth. These products can cause phosphate nephropathy.

Oral sodium phosphates clear the bowel by making bowel movements frequent, loose and runny. These agents work by causing fluid loss so it is recommended to patients that they drink large quantities of clear liquids as part of the bowel preparation.
Symptoms of acute phosphate nephropathy are:

  • Lethargy
  • Drowsiness
  • Decreased urination
  • Swelling of ankles, feet and legs

Early on, people may not have any symptoms at all. Anyone at high risk for this condition should have their kidney function monitored by their doctor.

Visicol® and OsmoPrep® are available by prescription only. Other similar OSP products are non-prescription, and can be used as a laxative at low doses.

Children under 18 years should not use these products alone or in combination with other laxatives containing sodium phosphate. Others groups who are at risk for acute phosphate nephropathy are:

  • People over 55
  • CKD patients
  • People who are dehydrated
  • People who have bowel obstruction, delayed bowel emptying or active colitis
  • People taking medications such as diuretics, angiotensin converting enzyme [ACE] inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers [ARBs], and inflammation and pain relief medications such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs])

The FDA requested that the manufacturer of Visicol® and OsmoPrep®, Salix Pharmaceuticals;

  • Add a black boxed warning to the pharmacy package insert for these products
  • Develop and distribute a medication guide for patients that is easier for most patients to understand than package inserts
  • Arrange a post-marketing trial to assess the risks to patients taking OSP products

Non-prescription OSP products have a long history of safety when used as laxatives and will still be available over the counter. However, because of the recent warning by the FDA, those OSP products should only be used as laxatives and not for bowel cleansing. The FDA suggests consumers should get a prescription from a health care professional when thinking about having a bowel cleansing.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) strongly recommends that clinicians screen men and women 50 years of age or older for colorectal cancer with one of several tests, including colonoscopy. If your doctor recommends colonoscopy, concerns about bowel cleansing should not prevent you from undergoing colon cancer screening. Colon cancer is treatable when the disease is caught early and the best treatment is to identify and remove precancerous polyps before they progress to cancer.

A high-quality and safe colon cleansing preparation is important for colon cancer screening using colonoscopy. There are other FDA-approved alternatives to OSP for bowel preparation prior to colonoscopy that may be safer for some patients, but may not always clean the bowel adequately. Patients should discuss the risks of the preparation and procedure, versus the benefits of the screening to determine the best bowel cleaning agent for their age, and risk conditions noted above.
More than 26 million American adults and thousands of American children have Chronic Kidney Disease. Most do not know they have this condition.

Date Reviewed: July 2009″

July, 2009, was 18 months ago yet I’ve found no updates anywhere on the internet.  Whether or not I’m satisfied with what my nephrologist tells the gastroenterologist or what the gastroenterologist tells me, I intend to bring this information with me to the gastroenterologist BEFORE the procedure and certainly bring it to the attention of the nephrologist.  After all, I am responsible for managing my own health issues.

Until Tuesday,

Keep living your life.

Published in: on February 18, 2011 at 9:59 am  Comments (6)  

Back to the Notebook Entries

Finally! The publisher tells me the book this blog is based upon is going to be out by late March.  It’s later than I’d wanted, but I’ll wait to make sure it’s done right.  Just had to share that with you.  I’m really excited, so I think I wanted you to be, too.  Good news before the holidays can be a real stress releaser to my way of thinking – even if it’s someone else’s good news.

Here’s the notebook entry again so you don’t have to flip back to Friday’s blog while I explain it. I hate to admit it, but I have to: while I lined up the columns perfectly last week, I just can’t seem to do it this week. Maybe that’s not such a bad thing because now the entries look a little bit more realistic.

Sample (Unrealistically Neat) Page from An Earlier Notebook Entry

Monday                                              Tuesday

2 coffee      458    1500NA        2 coffee       30

3 fruit           757     3050K          6 starch      383

2 veg.           150        612 P          5 protein   20

5 protein  987      750 PRO       dairy        134

1 starch                                            2 veg.         134

dairy                                               1 fruit           34

3

121

8

19

 154

1040

The second column is a calorie count.  You can see that on Monday, I was neither rushed nor tired so I could mentally add quite a few of the individual calorie counts of the food I ate and you only see a few numbers with the grand total on the bottom [458, 757, 150 = 987].  Tuesday, a teaching day, was far busier for me so I needed to write down even the three calories of a bite of something or other.  It was easier to write it down as soon as I could and total it later. Naturally, as you can see from the length of the calorie count column, the number next to the food does not necessarily correspond to that food.

I needed to take into account my limitations on protein, potassium, phosphorous, and sodium – three peas with salt.  On Monday, you see 1500NA.  That’s sodium.  My limit for this was 200o mg. per day, so I did all right on Monday.  K is potassium which is limited to 3000 mg. daily for me.  Uh-oh, I didn’t do so well with potassium that day.  P equals phosphorous of which I could have 800 mg. per day, so those 612 mg. were not a problem.  Although protein is one of the food groups, there are also grams of protein in other foods, so you need to keep account of how many mg. you have a day in addition to how many units of the protein food group you eat each day.  Since my limit for protein is five ounces a day which equals 35 grams [one ounce of meat is about seven grams], my 60 gram limit on protein is fairly generous.  By the way, all these different limits are based on your individual weight and nutritional needs.

You can see that I didn’t fill in the elements for Tuesday.  I kept a running list of the foods I ate on the back of my notebook intending to figure out the amounts of each element in those foods when I got home.  That was not a good idea since I forgot to do it.  That was also the last time I tried that, and I do not suggest you try it.

Not only is my sample notebook page unrealistically neat, but it took much more room to type it out neatly than it actually takes when handwritten. That’s why you can fit an entire week’s worth of this sort of accounting on the front and back of one index card of your notebook.

I kept refining the way I kept the notebook and playing around with different options, but this straight forward method was the one that worked the best for me.  Depending upon your mathematical ability, you may just choose to run all the totals in your head. Or, conversely, you may choose not to keep a single tally mentally.  The choice is yours.

If you come up with a different way of keeping your counts, why not share it with us via the blog comments?

Until Friday,

Keep loving your life!

Published in: on December 21, 2010 at 5:09 pm  Leave a Comment  

More Liquids and an Idea

Ready for the quandry?  Here it is:

My sweetheart made us a treat today: strawberry smoothies which consisted of the ½ cup of strawberries that can comprise one of my three fruit units today and four ounces of vanilla ice cream or my one and only dairy unit for the day.  I count this as a fruit and a dairy, but should it also be considered part of my remaining 48 ounces of liquid?  This is the type of quandary I run into in one form or another on a daily basis. As already mentioned, dairy is, indeed, taken into account as part of your fluids.

As a non-drinker and someone who doesn’t care for soda, I had no problem eliminating those from my diet, but my beloved hot chocolate is something I now have maybe once a year. Vitamin and flavored water were just becoming popular when I was diagnosed and, I was surprised to note they are high in sodium, potassium and/or phosphorous.

The list of what to avoid included so many surprises (to me) and the list of beverages that was permitted was so unappealing to me that I’m perfectly content sticking to filtered, non-iced water and coffee.  When I go out to dinner unexpectedly, if I’ve already had my two cups of coffee, I just order hot water and lemon. In over two years, maybe one waiter has asked me to repeat that order.

I was having a dismal time adding up how much sodium, potassium, protein and phosphorous I eat each day although I’d pretty much memorized my allotted food units and the calorie counts of each of my usual foods. I don’t know if this is a subconscious revolt against all the bookkeeping or if I truly was incapable of keeping this all straight. My son-in-law told me that eventually food packages will have bar codes containing how much of each of these is in it and our phones will be able to read these labels for us.  I sure hope he wasn’t kidding.

I devised a little notebook as the CKD patient’s food helper.  My nephrologist gave me a printed copy of the AAKP Nutrition Counter.  This can also be downloaded from their website, but this one was already printed and collated.  It measured four inches high by five and a half inches wide. At about the same time, I found a notebook of three by five inch ruled index cards.  That was a close enough match for me to realize I could tape the nutrition counter in the back of the notebook and make life easier for myself.  I managed to get a week’s worth of counting calories, food units, and elements on the front and back of one index card.

I listed each food unit I ate that day and circled the unit [e.g. dairy, protein, etc.] when I reached my limit for the day.  Each time I ate something, I used the nutrition counter in which food is listed alphabetically and contains portion size for the elements and calories.  I just now am beginning to be able to quickly tabulate the amount of each element and calories in the food and keep a running total until I’d reached my limit for the day.  It is cumbersome, but I hope to get it down to a science. Then it will become second nature, just as counting food units and calories has become. If I don’t routinely pull this little helper out at the start of a meal, my daughter automatically asks me where it is.  It’s actually becoming part of who I am. I have high hopes for this helper.

Sample (Unrealistically Neat) Page from An Earlier Notebook Entry

Monday                                              Tuesday                           Wednesday

2 coffee      458    1500NA        2 coffee       30

3 fruit         757     3050K          6 starch      383

2 veg.         150     612 P            5 protein     20

5 protein    987    750 PRO      dairy          134

1 starch                                      2 veg.         134

dairy                                         1 fruit           34

3

121

8

19

 154

1040

The first column for the day (shaded) is the food group column in which I recorded the number of units of the food I’d eaten from each group.  I’ve shaded these lists so you can easily locate them. In order to make this neat enough to read, I’ve used bold lettering [rather than the circles I actually used in my notebook] to indicate when I’d reached my daily limit for that food group. The groups are listed in the order I ate the first food in that group that particular day.  On each day, coffee – not a food group but limited, so included – was the first thing I had.  Then I ate fruit next on Monday, but starch next on Tuesday.  By looking at the food unit column, I could also see where I was falling down.  For example, I ate only two portions of vegetables each day.  I knew I needed to increase that number to three on the following days.

There’s more to explain about this, but it contains NUMBERS and it’s Friday night – the start of the weekend – so I’ll explain the rest on Tuesday.

Until then,

Keep loving your life.

Published in: on December 17, 2010 at 8:58 pm  Leave a Comment  

Food and Drink Items You Might Not Have Thought About

Did you ever consider herbal supplements?  They can be a problem when you have CKD since only a few have been studied with CKD patients.  Keeping in mind that my kidneys were not functioning up to snuff, I decided to abandon them completely.  This was quite a departure from the way I usually dealt with illness, but I was frightened enough to just stop using them. I also didn’t know if any of them contained “the three peas with salt” or phosphorous, protein, potassium or sodium. I wasn’t willing to accidentally further damage my precious kidneys.

While none of this is established, the following might be toxic to the kidneys -wormwood, periwinkle, sassafras (I remember drinking sassafras tea as a child.  Did that have any effect on my kidneys?) and horse chestnut just to name a few. Then there are other  herbal supplements that might be harmful to CKD patients: alfalfa, aloe, bayberry, capsicum, dandelion, ginger, ginseng, licorice, rhubarb and senna.  There are even more, but they seemed too esoteric to include. I found I was continuing to learn information that had nothing to do with CKD, but was surprising none the less.  For instance, I’d always used a broken open aloe stalk to treat burns never once realizing it was ingestible.

While I urge you to speak with your nephrologists before eating any of these, there are several websites that may be helpful. They are http://www.herbalgram.org and http://www.nccam.nih.gov. And, as my nutritionist kept mentioning, star fruit is toxic for CKD patients.  Gulp!  I ate that, too, when I was in Nigeria.  Again, I feel like the medical student who was convinced she suffered from every illness she studied, except in my case, I think everything I ate that’s not good for CKD patients was the cause of my disease.

Most of the renal diets limit liquid intake daily, despite the fact that humans lose one liter of water through our skin daily via evaporation. We also lose fluid through breathing, sweating and feces. Men are 60% fluid, which includes not only water but blood and salvia while females are 55% fluid.  The kidneys are the organs responsible for regulating the fluids in our bodies.

As CKD patients, we do not internally control the amount of liquid in our bodies, so we have to do it externally.  If we drink too little or sweat too much, we become dehydrated.  Severe dehydration can cause sweating, diarrhea, vomiting and usually the low blood pressure that makes you feel weak and dizzy when you stand up.  On the other hand, if we drink too much, we suffer fluid overload.

It’s thirst that makes us drink in order to dilute the concentration of dissolved solids in our bodies so we can bring them back to the proper level. Unfortunately, the brain concurrently releases vasopressin, which is an anti-diuretic hormone that causes the kidneys to conserve water.  What this means is that those of us with CKD drink when we’ve thirsty as does everyone else, but we don’t produce much concentrated urine.

If you fall below the proper concentration of dissolved fluids, normally you lose interest in drinking while your urine becomes diluted and you void a great deal of it.  However, if you suffer from CKD, there’s little increase in urine flow and the urine doesn’t become diluted.   In other words, a person with CKD – like you or me – has a low concentration of dissoluble solids.

I’ve already mentioned that my fluid intake restriction is 64 ounces and that I drink two eight ounces cups of coffee daily (I think they help to keep me from feeling deprived), so I’m left with only 48 ounces of liquid. In researching for this book, I discovered that the organic soy milk I sometimes have with cold cereal in the morning and the ice cream I sometimes have are considered fluids as well as being considered dairy.

I don’t have both on the same day since my allotment is only four ounces of dairy.  That’s only half a cup.  Have you ever tried to enjoy a quarter cup of ice cream?  That’s what I’d have to do as well as limit myself to two ounces of that soy milk to enjoy (hah!) them both on the same day.

Going back to the fluid intake, between the coffee and the dairy, I only have 44 ounces of fluid left per day.  I live in Arizona where the summer temperatures go up to 115 degrees.  I’ve learned to plan when I’m going to have water and how little to have each time.  You’ll have to do the same depending upon the climate. This is one time when that old dieting adage which recommends drinking water instead of eating whenever you think you’re hungry is not apt, and it’s certainly not necessary to drink when others do just to be social.

You might need to be reminded that popsicles, sherbet and gelatin are also fluids, though in solid form.  You might need to be reminded, but I needed to learn that.  To me, a solid was a solid and a liquid was a liquid. But that’s not true for CKD patients.  Think about it. Popsicles and sherbet are frozen water with flavoring (I know I’m being too simplistic here.) and gelatin is boiled water with a powder added.  This certainly made me curious about what else I didn’t know about what I always thought I knew.

I’ve got a little quandry ready for you to solve on Friday.

Until then,

Keep loving your life!

Published in: on December 14, 2010 at 10:00 am  Leave a Comment  

News Before Dietary Restricitons

I am flabbergasted!  This month, I am the featured writer on the front (home) page of both www.KidneyTimes.com and www.RSNHope.org. Not only that, but the book this blog is based upon, “What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Kidney Disease” is now ready for print.  Hmmm, I wouldn’t mind a little help here if you know people in the right places to help expedite the process.  Anyone out there a publisher?  Agent?  Have a friend who is one?  Point me to them!

I’m laughing out loud as I re-read what I just wrote.  A little full of myself today, aren’t I?  Okay, enough of that – let’s get back to the business at hand, the renal diet.

Another potential problem concerns both salt and water.  If these are retained, you develop edema of the soft tissues of the body.  Due to gravity, this occurs in the ankles and feet during the day and the back at night.  Edema is dangerous if it occurs in the lungs.  Restricting salt [sodium] and making use of a diuretic to cause the kidneys to increase their output of both sodium and water can cure the problem, but as a CKD patient, consult your nephrologist before you take action.

Too much sodium can also increase your need for potassium. Potassium is something you need to limit when you have CKD despite the fact that potassium not only dumps waste from your cells but also helps the kidneys, heart and muscles to function normally. Too much potassium can cause irregular heartbeat and even heart attack. This can be the most immediate danger of not limiting your potassium.  Some of the highly limited foods are my favorites such as chocolate, caffeine, and chips.

Keep in mind that as you age (you already know I’m in my 60s), your kidneys don’t do such a great job of eliminating potassium. So, just by aging, you may have an abundance of potassium. Check your blood tests. 3.5-5 is considered a safe level of potassium. You may have a problem if your blood level of potassium is 5.1-6, and you definitely need to attend to it if it’s above 6.  Speak to your nephrologist (although he or she will probably bring it up before you do).

The National Kidney Foundation is one of the many places that offer a list of the amounts of potassium in certain foods.  Here’s a little piece of information you might enjoy: neither gin nor whiskey is high in potassium, but wine is. Not being a drinker, I don’t see this as important, but then again, alcohol is something CKD patients are supposed to avoid, not totally eliminate.

I found myself in exactly the opposite position: too little potassium with no reasoning behind it.  Maybe I’d been a bit too conscientious about draining the liquid from the canned fruits and vegetables I ate which is one way of avoiding potassium. I’d also been really careful about not having lots of low potassium foods at one time since that increases the amount of potassium you’re ingesting even though they are low potassium foods.

The nephrologist handed me a list of low, medium and high potassium foods and simply told me to eat more foods on the medium list.  I did, drank some of the liquid from the canned fruits I ate and served myself larger portions of low potassium foods. That seemed to solve the problem.  Had I been doing too good a job of limiting potassium rich foods?  Before this, I’d been missing bananas, the one food I craved during both my pregnancies.  When I needed to raise my potassium, I ate one and was surprised to discover it was the aroma, not the taste, which I had missed.

I have to admit I didn’t know anything about phosphorous. This is the second most plentiful mineral in the body and works closely with the first, calcium. Together, they produce strong bones and teeth. 85% of the phosphorous and calcium in our bodies is stored in the bones and teeth.  The rest circulates in the blood except for about 5% that is in cells and tissues. Again, phosphorous is important for the kidneys since it filters out waste via them. Phosphorous balances and metabolizes other vitamins and minerals including vitamin D which is so important to CKD patients. As usual, it performs other functions, such as getting oxygen to tissues and changing protein, fat and carbohydrate into energy.

Be aware that kidney disease can cause excessive phosphorus. And what does that mean for Early Stage CKD patients? Not much if the phosphorous levels are kept low. Later, at Stages 4 and 5, bone problems including pain and breakage may be endured since excess phosphorous means the body tries to maintain balance by using the calcium that should be going to the bones. There are other consequences, but this is the one most easily understood.

Milk and diary products contain phosphorous, which is why I’m limited to 4 ounces daily.  Other foods that I, for one, need to limit or avoid due to their high phosphorous level are colas, peanut butter (which I, unfortunately, had just discovered much to my delight before being diagnosed), nuts, and cheeses.  To give you an idea why, my phosphorous limit per day is 800 mg. Two pancakes contain 476 mg. or well over half my daily allotment.  Although both IHOP and Village Inn now make their pancakes from scratch, it’s very rarely that I spend so much of my phosphorous allotment on them.

On Tuesday, we’ll take a look at our protein restrictions.  Enjoy your weekend and  keep loving your life!

Published in: on December 3, 2010 at 12:13 pm  Leave a Comment  

The Renal Diet, as Promised

In my research, I found information that amazed me.  Apparently, the majority of the U.S. population over 50 suffers from hypertension which may lead to CKD.  How are all these people paying for their nutritionist if they do develop CKD, I wondered.  Most people think of a nutritionist as a luxury even if they do have a chronic disease.  When I pulled out my checkbook to pay my renal dietitian [RD], I was told the government will pay for her services.  That made sense.  Especially in the current economic atmosphere and for older people, the government needs to help pay our medical bills.

Crystal Barraza, the RD in my nephrologist’s Arizona Kidney Disease & Hypertension Center practice, clarified the reasoning behind the diet with the following:

“One of the most obvious messages [I’ve heard] is that when people are sick, the last thing they want to hear is what they can and cannot eat.  It makes sense.  I feel that this is also true for many who have many chronic illnesses.  I have heard, time and time again from patients like you, ‘I am not going to be able to eat anything!’ My goal for any session is to help destress people about the diet and help with better food choices.  The main goal is to help protect your kidney(s). My favorite word is moderation.  I don’t feel that eliminating favorite food from anyone’s diet is going to help anyone.  It has to be realistic for all.  So, I have learned that the best approach is to meet you where you are.”

In order to fully understand the renal diet, you need to know a little something about electrolytes. There are the sodium, potassium, and phosphate you’ve been told about and also calcium, magnesium, chloride and bicarbonate. They maintain balance in your body.  This is not the kind of balance that helps you stand upright, but the kind that keeps your body healthy.  Too much or too little of a certain electrolyte presents different problems.  Eating a larger portion than suggested in the renal diet of a low sodium, phosphate, protein or potassium food is the equivalent of eating a high sodium, phosphate, protein or potassium food.  This simply did not occur to me until I read it in one of my sources.

Sodium is pretty well known since news articles about its effects have produced an influx of low sodium foods in supermarkets.  Too little sodium can be a problem. Since most adults easily consume the estimated required minimum daily 500 mg. without adding salt to food, it’s not a common problem.  However, excessive sodium intake is.  It can lead to hypertension which can be a cause of CKD.  It also may lead to edema, or swelling, another possible problem with CKD.

What makes it worse is that there is no internal mechanism that tells us if we need more or less salt.  CKD sufferers are in a spot because the kidneys are the only route by which to eliminate excess salt.

Basically, sodium balances fluid levels outside your cells.  You need it because it is responsible for watering your cells. This watering is the prompt for potassium to dump waste [cell process by-products] from your cells.  Sodium does deal with other functions of the body, but this is a pretty important one.

If you have damaged kidneys and cannot excrete most of the sodium you ingest, you’re up against higher blood pressure which may worsen your CKD which may further cut down on your elimination of sodium and so on and so forth in an ever spiraling cycle. In addition, for CKD patients, too much sodium causes fluid retention, thereby causing swelling, further resulting in weight gain, leading to shortness of breath.  That’s why your nephrologist asks if you’ve experienced shortness of breath.

That’s also why the following are not on the renal diet or, if they are, it is suggested they be eaten  in severely limited quantities once in a great while: pizza, frankfurters, canned soup, frozen dinners, luncheon meats, cheese and smoked or cured food. There are low sodium cheeses but you have to search for them.  The most common are Swiss and provolone. I had mistakenly thought nitrates were the problem with frankfurters.  Although there are now no nitrate brands, they are still too high in sodium.

It’s also become possible to buy reduced or no sodium mayonnaise, baking powder, butter, margarine, seasonings and snacks such as crackers, cookies, pretzels and chips. Don’t go too far and use salt substitutes.  Rather than help, they’ll hurt. They contain potassium chloride which could raise your potassium levels.

This information about food seems to interest people with or without CKD the most.  It makes sense.  We are a nation of people who love to eat and can.  We have supermarkets laden with food that is readily available.  There is so much more to learn about how to make appropriate choices as CKD patients.  Especially since our healthy choices are not the same as those without CKD.  There will be at least one more post on this topic.

Until Friday,

Keep loving your life!

Published in: on November 30, 2010 at 4:56 pm  Leave a Comment  

Where It All Started

My new primary care physician – a term I use interchangeably with family doctor or simply physician in this blog – was looking at the results of current blood and urine tests when she started asking me those questions I couldn’t answer. I’d always accepted that copies of my quarterly blood tests were in my file at the doctor’s office and I’d be informed if there was a liver problem since I was taking these tests to monitor how my medication was affecting my liver function in the first place.

Pretend you are looking at my test results. On top, above the results section, was all the information needed to identify these as my tests and the information that this was a fasting test, no eating or drinking after midnight the day before the blood and urine were collected.  Following are explanations of the different parts of these tests, including what is measured in each part.

The CBC, with Diff,/with Plt:

In plain English, this test measures the concentration of white blood cells (WBC), red blood cells (RBC), and platelets (PLAT) in the blood.  All are important since the white blood cells make up your immune system, the red ones carry oxygen to the other cells in your body – so the higher the number here the better – and wastes such as carbon dioxide from them, and the platelets deal with the blood’s clotting ability by repairing leaks in your blood vessels.

Something I found interesting: white blood cells are the largest, red ones smaller and platelets the smallest and that there are five billion red blood cells – the mid sized cells – in a single drop of your blood .  Your blood is 60% plasma, which is a fluid, and 40% blood cells.  Remember the kidneys should control the amount of fluid in your body, but with CKD doesn’t do this effectively.

Furthermore, red blood cells usually live 120 days, but not with CKD so they need to be replaced more often.  You may not yet have heard of EPO (erythropoietin). This is the substance that travels via the blood from the kidneys to the bone marrow to trigger the manufacture of red blood cells.  With CKD, less EPO is produced so the bone marrow makes fewer red blood cells.  That translates into anemia. 

“DIFF.” indicates that your doctor wants the lab to describe each type of white blood cell and list how many of each type of cell is present since each performs a different function. Lymphocytes, monocytes, basophils, eosinophils and neutrophils (segmented means mature) are different types of white blood cells. Absolute means that a formula has been used to count each type of white blood cell.

Hemoglobin is the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body.  I didn’t know it then, but hemoglobin is important for CKD patients. Hematocrit reflects the percentage of blood volume that is made up of red blood cells (erythrocytes), something else that is important to CKD patients.

MCV, or Mean Corpuscular Volume, measures the average volume or size of individual red blood cells. MCH, or Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin, measures the hemoglobin content of red blood cells. MCHC, or Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin Concentration, measures the concentration of hemoglobin in the average red blood cell. MPV, or Mean Platelet Volume, describes the size of the platelets. RDW is the red cell distribution width, also important for CKD patients since it deals with different kinds of anemia.

My explanation of the tests is a bit simplistic, but for me on this blood test, none of the results (column 2) were out of range (column 3) according to the reference ranges (column 4). This was good news for me.

 Most labs set up their reports using this four column system.  Column 1 was the name of the test.  I’ve learned to watch hemoglobin and hematocrit. It’ll be a little vague now, (all right, so it’s a little boring, too) but both have to do with anemia which can be common in people with our disease.

Amylase, Lipase

I glossed over the next section, since all was all right in my amylase – lipase world. Naturally, I had no idea what they were and didn’t care since they weren’t causing a problem for me.  But then curiosity got the better of me, so I looked them up: amylase is an enzyme that breaks starch down into sugar. Were we looking for diabetes, another cause of Chronic Kidney Disease, here?

 Lipase is an enzyme necessary for the absorption and digestion of nutrients in the intestines. I wasn’t sure why that was being tested until I researched a bit more and discovered that, even though an elevated level of this indicates a pancreatic problem, a mild increase of lipase in the blood could be an indication of kidney disease. Both tests were within range.  More good news for me.

Lipid Panel

Then I hit the Lipid Panel. Uh-oh, all these years of taking medication to successfully control my cholesterol level and the triglyceride number was out of range. These quarterly blood tests were to monitor the cholesterol lowering medication’s affect on my liver. I’d never had such a result before.  The triglycerides are one of the “bad” cholesterols like LDL cholesterol and could affect the heart and blood vessels. I was a little confused as to what this had to do with CDK.

Cholesterol, as you probably already know, is a natural substance in the body which is actually helpful – unless you have too much.  Then it threatens your heart health. Triglycerides, another natural substance in the body, can also threaten your heart health, this time via your coronary arteries. To be blunt, triglycerides are fat.

 I recognized HDL cholesterol as the “good” cholesterol and LDL as the “bad,” but what was VLDL Cholesterol? I discovered it’s “very low density lipoprotein,” a transporter of cholesterol within the body just like HDL and LDL cholesterol. I didn’t bother with ratios and percentages thinking (hoping?) they were self explanatory.

 

Comprehensive Metabolic Panel

It got worse: while my glucose (sugar in the blood), urea nitrogen (BUN) – which could indicate some kind of kidney disorder – and creatinine (a higher result could mean the kidneys were not adequately filtering this from the blood) were within range, the estimated GFR or Glomerular Filtration Rate was certainly not above 60 as it should be. The GFR is considered the best method measuring kidney function and staging of kidney disease. 

It is also important since the dosage of any medication you may be taking may have to be adjusted for this level of kidney function. Many drugs exit via the kidneys.  That means if your kidney function is reduced, these drugs are going further than they need to and you may need to take less of them.

 The percentage of kidney function is measured by comparing the amount of waste produced in your urine to the amount of waste found in your blood stream. To be perfectly clear, this test showed that my kidneys were functioning at a Stage 2 Kidney Disease Level.  Panic time for me!

Sodium, potassium, chloride, phosphate, calcium, magnesium and carbon dioxide are all electrolytes that the kidneys help keep in balance… and, according to this blood test, were. Suffice it to say, the anion gap deals with the body’s acidity. At this point, I decided the rest of the Comprehensive Metabolic Panel was just too technical for me. But the not knowing was probably worse than the knowing, so I forced myself to investigate them.

Protein, Total looks for an indication of kidney (I was right to research this) or liver function. Albumin, produced in the liver, deals with a certain pressure between blood and tissue fluids. Globulin was being tested for any degenerative, inflammatory and infectious processes (like CKD?).

I was beginning to feel I was re-inventing the wheel, but knew I was still a little too fragile to understand what the doctor was explaining, even if I did take notes. Again, I ignored ratios, deciding I could always get to that on the next round of tests if they turned out to be important, in range or not.

Calcium is more than we were told it is as children.  Yes, it does relate to bone metabolism, but it also deals with muscle contraction to name only one of its several jobs. It helps with trauma, infection and stress, too.

Alkaline phosphatase, if elevated, indicates a liver, bone or intestinal problem, possibly cancer. Alt and Ast meant nothing to me but, again, were tests to indicate liver damage or dysfunction. Bilirubin, Total is the test to see just how much of it from damaged or old, dead red cells remained in the blood when the hemoglobin broke down.

There’s far more to explain about this blood test even before we get to the urine test, but it will have to wait.  The material, while simplified, is too technical to absorb too much at one reading, so: more next time.  Have a fun, healthy weekend!