What’s New?

Here we are in the fourth week of National Kidney Month. I caught myself wondering if I were up to date on anything and everything new in the world of kidney disease. I receive emails every day about this or that happening in the kidney community, but how many of them refer to what’s new? I decided to find out. 

I started with a general search and found quite a bit. Let’s start with this paper which was published on January 5th of this year. Since I’ve just had an expensive new crown made, this one on ScienceDaily caught my eye: 

“Lead author Dr Praveen Sharma, from the Periodontal Research Group at the University of Birmingham’s School of Dentistry, said: ‘This is the first paper to quantify the causal effect of periodontitis on kidney function and vice-versa as well as the first to elucidate the pathways involved. 

It showed that even a modest reduction in gum inflammation can benefit renal function. Given the relative ease of achieving a 10% reduction in gum inflammation, through simple measures like correct brushing techniques and cleaning between the teeth, these results are very interesting.’ ” 

Reminder: periodontis is gum infection which can become so serious that you lose teeth and possibly even affects the bone under your teeth. The ‘dont’ part of the word means teeth, while ‘peri’ means around. By this time in reading the blog, we can figure out that ‘itis’ means inflammation. Keep up the brushing and flossing, folks. This may help you save your kidneys. 

Just a week later, on January 12th, EuerkAlert! announced: 

“While investigating the underlying causes of a rare skin disorder, a researcher at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) discovered a previously unknown mechanism in the kidneys that is important for regulating levels of magnesium and calcium in the blood. 

The discovery, described in the journal Cell Reports, highlights the role of a previously little-studied gene called KCTD1. The gene directs production of a protein that regulates the kidney’s ability to reabsorb magnesium and calcium from urine and return it to the bloodstream.” 

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service’s National Institutes of Health’s Office of Dietary Supplements,  

“Magnesium is a nutrient that the body needs to stay healthy. Magnesium is important for many processes in the body, including regulating muscle and nerve function, blood sugar levels, and blood pressure and making protein, bone, and DNA.” 

According to the same agency

“The body needs calcium to maintain strong bones and to carry out many important functions. Almost all calcium is stored in bones and teeth, where it supports their structure and hardness. 

The body also needs calcium for muscles to move and for nerves to carry messages between the brain and everybody part. In addition, calcium is used to help blood vessels move blood throughout the body and to help release hormones and enzymes that affect almost every function in the human body.” 

I remember being flabbergasted upon discovering that the kidneys produce glucose. Can you imagine how my mind is reeling to learn that it also regulates the levels of magnesium and calcium in the blood? Maybe instead of telling me to drink my milk for calcium, my mom should have been telling me to keep an eye on my kidney function… not that we even knew what the kidneys were back then. [By we, I mean my mom and me.] 

But wait, there’s more. [Why do I feel like a 2 a.m. television ad?] Many important discoveries started as experiments with fruit flies. Hopefully, this one announced on January 26th is another of those: 

“In a new paper published in the journal Molecules, alum Cassandra Millet-Boureima (MSc 19) and Chiara Gamberi, affiliate assistant professor of biology, write that melatonin was found to reduce cysts in the renal tubules of fruit flies. These tubules are also found in more complex mammals, including humans, where they are called nephrons. This study, which builds on previous studies by Millet-Boureima and Gamberi, was co-authored by Roman Rozencwaig and Felix Polyak of BH Bioscience in Montreal. 

The researchers hope that their findings can be applied to treating people suffering from autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. ADPKD is a genetic chronic and progressive disease characterized by the growth of dozens of cysts in the nephrons. It is incurable and affects approximately 12.5 million worldwide.” 

Thank you to Medical Dialogues for this information. You may need a reminder about ADPKD, so here it is from PDK Foundation

“Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is one of the most common, life-threatening genetic diseases. In ADPKD, fluid-filled cysts develop and enlarge in both kidneys, eventually leading to kidney failure.” 

May as well define melatonin, too, don’t you think? My favorite dictionary helped us out here: 

“a vertebrate hormone that is derived from serotonin, is secreted by the pineal gland especially in response to darkness, and has been linked to the regulation of circadian rhythms.” 

We are vertebrates, meaning we have a backbone. The pineal gland is sometimes called the third eye, which makes sense now since it responds to darkness, just as our eyes do. 

There are a few more just this year alone, but I think we have room for just one more in today’s blog. 

“Oxygen is essential for human life, but within the body, certain biological environmental conditions can transform oxygen into aggressively reactive molecules called reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can damage DNA, RNA, and proteins. Normally, the body relies on molecules called antioxidants to convert ROS into less dangerous chemical species through a process called reduction. But unhealthy lifestyles, various diseases, stress, and aging can all contribute to an imbalance between the production of ROS and the body’s ability to reduce and eliminate them. The resulting excessive levels of ROS cause ‘oxidative stress,’ which can disrupt normal cellular functions and increase the risk of diseases like cancer, neurodegeneration, kidney dysfunction, and others, which are all accompanied by severe inflammation. 

Since oxidative stress is associated with various serious diseases, its detection within living organs offers a route to early diagnosis and preventive treatment, and is, thus, a matter of considerable interest to scientists working in the field of biomedicine. Recent international collaboration between the Japanese National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology (QST), Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, and Sofia University St. Kliment Ohridski in Bulgaria led to a promising technology for this purpose: a novel quantum sensor. Their work is published in the scientific journal Analytical Chemistry2021.” 

This was from their January 29th press release. Here we have another valuable theory of inquiry. 

My head is swimming. There’s so much new research re keeping our kidneys healthy. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life!