All of Me, uh, Us

When I was a little girl, I liked to listen to my father whistle ‘All of Me,’ written by Marks and Simon in 1931 when Charlie, my father, was just 16. Only a few years later, it became a sort of love language for my mother and him. Enter a former husband of my own and my children. When my folks visited from Florida and my then husband’s side of the family journeyed over to Staten Island from Brooklyn to visit them, they all sang the song with great emotion. (By then, Bell’s palsy had robbed my father of the ability to whistle.)

To this day, I start welling up when I hear that song. But then I started thinking about the lyrics:

“All of me
Why not take all of me?”

Suddenly, it popped. For us, those with chronic kidney disease, it should be:

“All of us

Why not take all of us?”

For research purposes. To “speed up health research breakthroughs.” For help in our lifetime. To spare future generations whatever it is we’re suffering… and not just for us, but for our children… and their children, too.

The National Institutes of Health has instituted a new research program for just that purpose, although it’s open to anyone in the U.S. over the age of 18 whether ill with any disease or perfectly healthy. While only English and Spanish are the languages they can accommodate at this time, they are adding other languages.

I’m going to devote most of the rest of this blog to them. By the way, I’m even more inclined to be in favor of this program because they launched on my first born’s birthdate: May 6. All of Us has its own inspiring welcome for you at https://launch.joinallofus.org/

This is how they explain who they are and what they intend to do:

“The goal is to advance precision medicine. Precision medicine is health care that is based on you as an individual. It takes into account factors like where you live, what you do, and your family health history. Precision medicine’s goal is to be able to tell people the best ways to stay healthy. If someone does get sick, precision medicine may help health care teams find the treatment that will work best.

To get there, we need one million or more people. Those who join will share information about their health over time. Researchers will study this data. What they learn could improve health for generations to come. Participants are our partners. We’ll share information back with them over time.”

You’ll be reading more about precision medicine, which I’ve written about before, in upcoming blogs. This is from All of Us’s website at https://www.joinallofus.org/en, as is most of the other information in today’s blog, and makes it easy to understand just what they are doing.

How It Works

Participants Share Data

Participants share health data online. This data includes health surveys and electronic health records. Participants also may be asked to share physical measurements and blood and urine samples.

Data Is Protected

Personal information, like your name, address, and other things that easily identify participants will be removed from all data. Samples—also without any names on them—are stored in a secure biobank.

Researchers Study Data

In the future, approved researchers will use this data to conduct studies. By finding patterns in the data, they may make the next big medical breakthroughs.

Participants Get Information

Participants will get information back about the data they provide, which may help them learn more about their health.

Researchers Share Discoveries

Research may help in many ways. It may help find the best ways for people to stay healthy. It may also help create better tests and find the treatments that will work best for different people.

I’m busy, too busy to take on even one more thing. Or so I thought. When I read the benefits of the program (above) and how easy it is to join (below), I realized I’m not too busy for this and it is another way to advocate for Chronic Kidney Disease awareness. So I joined and hope you will, too.

Benefits of Taking Part

Joining the All of Us Research Program has its benefits.

Our goal is for you to have a direct impact on cutting-edge research. By joining the program, you are helping researchers to learn more about different diseases and treatments.

Here are some of the benefits of participating in All of Us.

Better Information

We’re all human, but we’re not all the same. Often our differences—like age, ethnicity, lifestyle habits, or where we live—can reveal important insights about our health.

By participating in All of Us, you may learn more about your health than ever before. If you like, you can share this information with your health care provider.

Better Tools

The goal of the program is better health for all of us. We want to inspire researchers to create better tools to identify, prevent, and treat disease.

You may also learn how to use tools like mobile devices, cell phones and tablets, to encourage healthier habits.

Better Research

We expect the All of Us Research Program to be here for the long-term. As the program grows, the more features will be added. There’s no telling what we can discover. All thanks to participants like you.

Better Ideas

You’re our partner. And as such, you are invited to help guide All of Us. Share your ideas and let us know what works, and what doesn’t.

Oh, about joining:

Get Started – Sign Up

Here’s a quick overview of what you’ll need to do to join.

1

Create an Account

You will need to give an email address and password.

2

Fill in the Enrollment and Consent Forms

The process usually takes 18-30 minutes. If you leave the portal during the consent process, you will have to start again from the beginning.

3

Complete Surveys and More

Once you have given your consent, you will be asked to complete online health surveys. You may be asked to visit a partner center. There, you’ll be asked to provide blood and urine samples and have your physical measurements taken. We may also ask you to share data from wearables or other personal devices.

Before I leave you today, I have – what else? – a book give away. The reason? Just to share the joy that’s walked into my life lately. It’s easy to share the troubles; why not the joys? If you haven’t received one of my books in a giveaway before, all you have to do is be the first person to let me know you want this copy of SlowItDownCKD 2017.

 

I need to get back to that online health survey for All of Us now.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

 

Published in: on May 21, 2018 at 10:38 am  Leave a Comment  
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Movin’ On Up

Considering my family’s history, I’m vigilant about having colonoscopies. This year, however, there was an additional test – an endoscopy. You may have heard of this as an upper endoscopy, EGD or esophagogastroduodenoscopy. The names are interchangeable. Whatever you call it, I was intrigued.

What is an endoscopy, you ask. According to the Mayo Clinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/endoscopy/basics/why-its-done/PRC-20020363:

An upper endoscopy is used to diagnose and, sometimes, treat conditions that affect the upper part of your digestive system, including the esophagus, stomach and beginning of the small intestine (duodenum).

Okay, but that doesn’t explain what the procedure is. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases at https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/diagnostic-tests/upper-gi-endoscopy can help us out here:

Upper GI endoscopy is a procedure in which a doctor uses an endoscope—a flexible tube with a camera—to see the lining of your upper GI tract. A gastroenterologist, surgeon, or other trained health care professional performs the procedure, most often while you receive light sedation to help you relax.

Relax? I was out like a light. First I was being shown was the device that was going to hold my mouth open and hold the tube that would be going down my throat, the next second I awoke in my room… or so it seemed.

Now the biggie: why have an endoscopy in the first place? I went to Patient Platform Limited at https://patient.info/health/gastroscopy-endoscopy and found this,

A gastroscopy may be advised if you have symptoms such as:

• Repeated (recurring) indigestion.
• Recurring heartburn.
• Pains in the upper tummy (abdomen).
• Repeatedly being sick (vomiting).
• Difficulty swallowing.
• Other symptoms thought to be coming from the upper gut.

The sort of conditions which can be confirmed (or ruled out) include:

• Inflammation of the gullet (oesophagus), called oesophagitis. The operator will see areas of redness on the lining of the oesophagus.
• Stomach and duodenal ulcers. An ulcer looks like a small, red crater on the inside lining of the stomach or on the first part of the gut (small intestine) known as the duodenum.
• Inflammation of the duodenum (duodenitis) and inflammation of the stomach (gastritis).
• Stomach and oesophageal cancer.
• Various other rare conditions.

Wait a minute. I can already hear you asking what that has to do with Chronic Kidney Disease. Claire J. Grant, from the Lilibeth Caberto Kidney Clinical Research Unit in London, Canada, and her colleagues’ answer was reported in PhysciansEndoscopy at http://www.endocenters.com/chronic-kidney-disease-adversely-affects-digestive-function/#.WiLwjrpFxaQ,

“CKD adversely affects digestive function,” the authors write. “Abnormalities in digestive secretion and absorption may potentially have a broad impact in the prevention and treatment of both CKD and its complications.”

Not good. We know that CKD requires close monitoring and life style changes. This may be another facet of the disease to which we need to pay attention.

I had some biopsies while I was under sedation. Nope, didn’t feel a thing.

But I now know I have gastritis and an irregular Z-line. The silver lining here is that I don’t have Helicobacter pylori or H. pylori, a type of bacteria that infects the stomach which can be caused by chronic gastritis. Mine seems to be the food caused kind. Generally it’s alcohol or caffeine, spicy foods, chocolate, or high fat foods that can cause this problem. I don’t drink, eat spicy or high fat foods, and rarely eat chocolate, but nooooooooooooooooo, please don’t take away those two luscious cups of coffee a day.

I wasn’t sure what this Z-line thing was so started poking around on the internet, since I didn’t catch it before seeing the gastroenterologist for my after visit appointment. Dr. Sidney Vinson, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences/UAMS College of Medicine explained:

This refers to the appearance of the tissue where the esophagus and stomach meet. The z-line is a zig-zag line where these 2 different type tissues meet. Occasionally it can be irregular and protrude more into the esophagus and not have the typical appearance. This is generally a benign condition but can occasionally represent mild barrett’s esophagus, a precancerous change caused by reflux.

My source was HealthTap at https://www.healthtap.com/user_questions/198269-in-regards-to-upper-gi-endoscopy-what-is-an-irregular-z-line

Apparently my normal duodenum was biopsied to see if my doctor could find a reason for the pain I was experiencing in the upper stomach. Well, it was more discomfort than pain, but he wanted to be certain there wasn’t an ulcer… and there were no ulcers. Yay!

Hmmm, I have gastritis which is an inflammation and CKD, which is an inflammatory disease. Which came first? Did it matter? If I treat one will the other improve? I’ve been following the renal diet for all nine years since my diagnose and have made the appropriate life style changes, too.

What more could I do? There’s the ever present to struggle to lose weight. That could help. I wasn’t willing to take more medication as my gastroenterologist understood and accepted. I was already taking probiotics. I examined the little booklet produced by Patient Point that I was given more closely ignoring all the advertisements for medication.

Look at that. It seems sleeping on your left side can help. “Since your stomach curves to your left, part of it will be lower than your esophagus.” I can do that, although I wonder if it will be awkward while wearing the BiPap.

I also learned that skipping late night snacks and eating smaller meals would be helpful since there would be less acid produced by smaller meals and I wouldn’t have to deal with acid while I slept if I stopped eating at least two hours before bedtime. Acid is produced to help digest your food.

For Thanksgiving, I was part of a video produced by Antidote Me (the clinical trial matching program I wrote about several weeks ago). The topic was What I Am Thankful to Medical Research for. I think I can safely add endoscopy to that list. https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Mwv-vBRgzRFe8-Mg6Rs7uUIXMOgOMJHX/view

I was also invited to participate in two separate book signings and have a video from one of them. I’ll post it as soon as I can figure out how since I don’t own the rights yet. Oh, I feel a new year’s resolution coming on – learn more about the technology I need for my writing.

Until next week,
Keep living your life!

TED Doesn’t Talk to Me; But YouTube Does

After last week’s accolades for the blog about apps for kidney disease, I thought I would keep on the electronic trail and jump right over to one of the big boys: TED Talks. I was both excited and a bit apprehensive since this is new territory for me. I have heard some of my children talk about them, but never explored these talks for myself.

downloadWhat new information could I learn here? Would it be easier or harder to understand? And just what were T.E.D. Talks anyway?  Doing what I like to do best, I jumped in for a bit of research.

This is directly from the TED website at www.ted.com:

“TED is a nonpartisan nonprofit devoted to spreading ideas, usually in the form of short, powerful talks. TED began in 1984 as a conference where Technology, Entertainment and Design converged, and today covers almost all topics — from science to business to global issues — in more than 110 languages. Meanwhile, independently run TEDx events help share ideas in communities around the world.”

IMG_2982Considering what’s been going on with our insane politics this election, I thought I would check the meaning of nonpartisan just to make sure it had a meaning other than the one I’d been hearing bantered around. According to the Encarta Dictionary, it means “not belonging to, supporting, or biased in favor of a political party.” I wasn’t so sure that’s what it meant for TED, so I used the synonym function in Word; that made much more sense: impartial, unaligned, unbiased, unprejudiced, neutral, and so on.

Now that we know what TED is, let’s plunge right in and do some exploring. I searched Chronic Kidney Disease and got no hits. That’s all right; a synonym is renal disease. I’ll search that. All that came up was “Timothy Ihrig: What we can do to die well.” That’s not exactly what I was looking for.

I know, I’ll type in kidney failure. Hmmm, that didn’t work very well, either. I found two interesting talks, “Siddhartha Mukherjee: Soon we’ll cure diseases with a cell, not a pill” and “Anthony Atala: Printing a human kidney,” as well as two blogs that may have peripherally included CKD. No, these were not the talks about living with CKD that I’d hoped to find.

What other term could I search? I know, how about just-plain-kidney? I got three pages of hits which weren’t really hits at all if you were looking for living with Chronic Kidney Disease. While TED Talks cover a variety of interesting topics, I don’t think they’re CKD specific right now.  Maybe in the future…

I was a little crestfallen, but then I remembered that when I first decided to FullSizeRender (2)become a CKD Awareness Advocate and wrote What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, I made a couple of YouTubes as marketing devices. They were terrible, but did include some helpful information. You can see this for yourself at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8VcVYhhrixg and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nRsUNxv7ajA.

When you’ve picked yourself up from the floor after getting your belly laughs at my expense (cringe), start exploring YouTube for CKD information by looking at the side bar on each of my woebegone entries into the world of YouTube.  The list of videos continues and goes on and on. Yay!

FullSizeRender (3)

Of course, just as when you’re looking online – or choosing a book – or a blog to follow, you need to be careful to separate the wheat from the chaff. There are charlatans and scammers here, just as there are respected physicians and patients bravely sharing their stories.

But what is YouTube anyway? https://www.youtube.com/yt/about/tells us:

“Launched in May 2005, YouTube allows billions of people to discover, watch and share originally-created videos. YouTube provides a forum for people to youtubeconnect, inform, and inspire others across the globe and acts as a distribution platform for original content creators and advertisers large and small.

YouTube is a Google company.”

You’ll also find some YouTubes I posted that show friends, family, even me dancing either the Blues or East Coast Swing. My point? Anyone can post anything provided it does not include:

Nudity or sexual content

Violent or graphic content

Hateful content

Spam, misleading metadata, and scams

Harmful or dangerous content

Copyright (Me, here, this refers to copyrighted material.)

Threats

You can read more about these community guidelines at https://www.youtube.com/yt/policyandsafety/communityguidelines.html.

I chose one or two posts to see the quality we can find here. (Very funny, no, this is not a case of I- wouldn’t-want-to-be-a-member-of-any-club- that-lets-me-in.) I noticed one of the physicians I’d had contact with as an advocate, Dr. Robert Provenzano, posted about the causes of CKD on 2/3/09 at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CjZCKBOoeQo which was highly informative… but getting close to seven years old.

I wanted something more recent and found it at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n1_srNUJkjE. This one by Danuta Trzebinska, MD, of US San Diego Health, deals with possible symptoms of CKD and was posted last year.

But then I found YouTube about a kidney cleanses which could be harmful to already damaged kidneys. Dr. Josh Axe at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3AqPE-j3Eq0 was not particularly targeting CKD patients, but as a new CKD patient, how could you know that? Some of the herbs he suggests are harmful to ALREADY COMPROMISED kidneys. You need to be careful about which videos are for those with CKD and which are for those without CKD. Of course, you’re IMG_2980checking everything you see with your nephrologist before you act on it. Right? You are, aren’t you? You’ve got to protect your kidneys, so please (Let’s make that pretty please.) do.

I’m wondering what other electronic helps I could explore. We’ve looked at apps, TED Talks, and YouTube. What other electronic aids do you know about that I don’t? I’ll be more than happy to explore them for myself which means I’ll be exploring them for you, too, since they’re going to end up being the next blog.

halloweenwitchvintageimagegraphicsfairyToday is Halloween. You know those treats? Why not treat yourself by not eating them? It’s hard, but it can be done.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Pro on Probiotics?

probioticsMy husband takes probiotics and they work for him. This is why he takes them, as explained by http://www.theralac.com/why-take-probiotics.aspx:

“For healthy people, probiotics can help boost the immune system and increase the absorption of important minerals and nutrients. For people with digestive problems, probiotics can be taken in higher doses to help regain digestive balance.”

I thought they might be worth a try, but my nephrologist disagreed.  We had our discussion about this right after I’d been a guest on a radio show during which the pros and cons of using probiotics for chronic kidney disease were discussed. This was just about the same time the information I’d requested from Kibow arrived.  This is from their website at www.Kibow.com:

“Certain probiotic microorganisms can utilize urea, uric acid and creatinine and other toxins as its nutrients for growth. Overloaded and impaired kidneys have a buildup of these poisonous wastes in the bloodstream. Probiotic microorganisms multiply, thereby creating a greater diffusion of these uremic toxins from the circulating blood across the lining of the intestinal walls into the bowel. This increased microbial growth is excreted along with the feces (which is normally 50% microbes by weight).

Enteric toxin reduction technology uses probiotic organisms to transform the colon into a blood cleansing agent, which, with the aid of microbes, indirectly removes toxic wastes and helps eliminate them as fecal matter. Consequently, a natural treatment for kidney failure is possible to maintain a healthy kidney function with the oral use of Renadyl™. The patented, proprietary probiotics in Renadyl™ have been clinically tested and shown to be safe, free of serious side effects, and effective in helping the body rid itself of harmful toxins when taken for as long as 6 months.”

Let’s slow down a bit.  We’ll need some definitions, so I turned to my favorite user friendly online medical dictionary, www.merriam-webster.com for the following:

CREATININE: (I know you know this one; this is just a reminder) a white crystalline strongly basic compound C4H7N3O formed from creatine and found especially in muscle, blood, and urine

ENTERIC: of, relating to or affecting the intestines; broadly:  alimentary

PROBIOTIC: a preparation (as a dietary supplement) containing a live bacterium (as lactobacilli) that is taken orally to restore beneficial bacteria to the body; also:  a bacterium of such a preparation

UREA: a substance that contains nitrogen, is found in the urine of mammals and some fish, and is used in some kinds of fertilizerdictionary

URIC ACID: a white odorless and tasteless nearly insoluble acid C5H4N4O3 that is the chief nitrogenous waste present in the urine especially of lower vertebrates (as birds and reptiles), is present in small quantity in human urine, and occurs pathologically in renal calculi {a little help here, this means a concretion usually of mineral salts around organic material found especially in hollow organs or ducts} and the tophi of gout

What I found on Kibow is a mouthful… and an advertisement.  I am not endorsing Renadyl.  However, there is an animation at http://www.renadyl.com/How-Renadyl-works which visually clarifies the information above. While I understood the process better after watching the animation, I’m still leery of that six month warning, especially after I found this at the bottom of one of their pages:

“* These statements have not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease. Results may vary.”

In addition, this product contains psyllium seed husk, something I was cautioned to avoid. It seems my nephrologist is not the only one who feels this way. http://www.metamuciladvisor.com/avoid-psyllium-and-metamucil-in-kidney-disease/ is the webpage of Metamucil, a product whose main ingredient is psyllium.  However, this conscientious company also posts this information on their website:

Psyllium Products and Their Minerals

There are certain psyllium products that contain a large amount of minerals that individuals with kidney disease cannot process. Some psyllium products contain high volumes of psyllium seed huskspotassium, sodium and magnesium, which if a person with kidney disease consumes can cause a lot of problems. If an individual’s physician gives permission on taking psyllium then they need to make sure the psyllium product follows their restricted diet.

Fluids Required With Psyllium

When consuming psyllium six to eight glasses of water must be consumed to keep from having any uncomfortable side effects. This can be a problem for an individual with kidney disease since the kidneys cannot effectively filter the fluid. Since the proper amount of fluid cannot be consumed this can cause side effects and make the natural fiber less effective.

Things to Consider

One of the number one complaints in individuals with kidney disease is constipation due to the fact fluid restrictions, vegetables and more. Since there are many restrictions an individual has with kidney disease with their diet there are other safe options to choose from. Discuss these other safe options with your physician to relieve constipation.

Maybe it’s just me, but I don’t understand why someone with kidney disease would want to take a product that will harm them.  As a matter of fact, I don’t understand why Kibow, the makers of Renadyl, don’t post such a warning on their site. Hmmm, I wonder if the  “…safe, free of serious side effects, and effective in helping the body rid itself of harmful toxins when taken for as long as 6 months” statement included in their material IS their warning.  And just how many people catch that one sentence anyway?

At http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00760162, I did find the record of a study filed by Kibow in 2009, but not the results of the six month trial.  The record was processed on November 9, 2014 which is very recent.  Either I don’t know how to find the outcomes of the trial or they are simply not there. I suspect the latter.

I have no intention of vilifying Kibow, but do find this to be another case of be careful what you choose to take, very careful.  Watch the small print, talk to your nephrologist before making any decisions, and make sure you guard whatever you have left of your kidney function.

Book CoverThank you for your continued interest in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease. Keep in mind what a terrific holiday gift this is… and that next year, you’ll be able to gift the same person with What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease’s little sister: The Book of Blogs.

Until next week,

Keep living your life.