Giving It Away

Good-bye to National Kidney Month and a belated hello to National Donor Month. I don’t usually write about transplants and don’t know that much about them, so you and I will be learning together today. Restricting this blog to solely kidney transplants, there’s still quite a bit to write about. 

There are many reasons for needing a kidney transplant. The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services’s Health Resources & Services Administration’s Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network provides the following list of reasons: 

Kidney Diagnosis Categories>Kidney Diagnoses
GLOMERULAR DISEASESAnti-GBM; Chronic Glomerulonephritis: Unspecified; Chronic Glomerulosclerosis: Unspecified; Focal Glomerularsclerosis; Idio/Post-Inf Crescentic; Glomerulonephritis; IGA Nephropathy; Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome; Membranous Glomerulonephritis; Mesangio-Capillary 1 Glomerulonephritis; Mesangio-Capillary 2 Glomerulonephritis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Alport’s Syndrome; Amyloidosis; Membranous Nephropathy; Goodpasture’s Syndrome; Henoch-Schoenlein Purpura; Sickle Cell Anemia; Wegeners Granulomatosis
DIABETESDiabetes: Type I Insulin Dep/Juvenile Onset; Diabetes: Type II Insulin Dep/Adult Onset; Diabetes: Type I Non-insulin Dep/Juv Onset; Diabetes: Type II Non-insulin Dep/Adult Onset
POLYCYSTIC KIDNEYSPolycystic Kidneys
HYPERTENSIVE NEPHROSCLEROSISHypertensive Nephrosclerosis
RENOVASCULAR AND OTHER VASCULAR DISEASESChronic Nephrosclerosis: Unspecified; Malignant Hypertension; Polyarteritis; Progressive Systemic Sclerosis; Renal Artery Thrombosis; Scleroderma
CONGENITAL, RARE FAMILIAL, AND METABOLIC DISORDERSCongenital Obstructive Uropathy; Cystinosis; Fabry’s Disease; Hypoplasia/Dysplasia/Dysgenesis/Agenesis; Medullary Cystic Disease; Nephrophthisis; Prune Belly Syndrome
TUBULAR AND INTERSTITIAL DISEASESAcquired Obstructive Nephropathy; Analgesic Nephropathy; Antibiotic-induced Nephritis; Cancer Chemotherapy-Induced Nephritis; Chronic Pyelonephritis/Reflex; Nephropathy; Gout; Nephritis; Nephrolithiasis; Oxalate Nephropathy; Radiation Nephritis; Acute Tubular Necrosis; Cortical Necrosis; Cyclosporin Nephrotoxicity; Heroin Nephrotoxicity; Sarcoidosis; Urolithiasis
NEOPLASMSIncidental Carcinoma; Lymphoma; Myeloma; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Wilms’ Tumor
RETRANSPLANT/GRAFT FAILURERetransplant/Graft Failure
OTHEROther Rheumatoid Arthritis; Other Familial Nephropathy

Quite a few of these reasons should look familiar to you if you’ve been reading the blog regularly since I’ve written about them. You can use the topics dropdown to the right of the blog if you’d like to refresh your memory about specific reasons. 

Let’s take a look at some astounding numbers. Unfortunately, The National Kidney Foundation could only offer statistics from 2014. Very few sources separate donations specifically by organ, so we’re lucky to have even these older numbers.  

“There are currently 121,678 people waiting for lifesaving organ transplants in the U.S. Of these, 100,791 await kidney transplants. (as of 1/11/16) … 

The median wait time for an individual’s first kidney transplant is 3.6 years and can vary depending on health, compatibility and availability of organs … 

In 2014, 17,107 kidney transplants took place in the US. Of these, 11,570 came from deceased donors and 5,537 came from living donors… 

On average: 

Over 3,000 new patients are added to the kidney waiting list each month… 

13 people die each day while waiting for a life-saving kidney transplant… 

Every 14 minutes someone is added to the kidney transplant list… 

In 2014, 4,761 patients died while waiting for a kidney transplant. Another, 3,668 people became too sick to receive a kidney transplant… “ 

Fewer kidney transplants are being performed during the current pandemic. The American Kidney Fund explains why: 

“Because living-donor kidney transplants require two hospital beds and post-surgical recovery care in the hospital, we are hearing that a growing number of transplant centers are temporarily putting living-donor transplants on hold. This both preserves the availability of hospital beds for emergencies and COVID-19 patients, and also keeps non-infected people out of the hospital…. 

The coronavirus spreads easily from person to person, and can be spread by people who do not show symptoms of COVID-19. This puts anyone who has a compromised immune system—including transplant patients who take immunosuppressive drugs—at an increased risk of becoming infected. 
 
Even with social distancing, the virus is still spreading in communities. Newly transplanted patients would be especially vulnerable during their recovery period after transplant surgery. 
 
Another obstacle hospitals face is the need to test deceased donors for the coronavirus. Transplanting an organ from a coronavirus-positive patient could present a grave risk to the recipient. With limited test kits needed for living patients, and the lag time between testing and getting results, some hospitals may have to forgo testing—and procuring organs from—deceased donors…. 

Because COVID-19 is a serious respiratory illness, the most critical patients must be put on ventilators. Ventilators are normally used to keep an organ donor patient alive who is medically brain-dead so that their organs may be removed and transplanted. Those ventilators may be needed for COVID-19 patients instead….” 

Fewer transplants or not, I was curious about how it’s decided who is eligible for a kidney transplant. Nebraska Medicine had the answer in simple terms we can all understand: 

“In order to be eligible to receive a kidney transplant: 

You must have chronic irreversible kidney disease that has not responded to other medical or surgical treatments. You are either on dialysis or may require dialysis in the near future. 

You must qualify for and be able to tolerate major surgery. 

You and your family members/support system must be able to understand the risks and benefits of transplantation, including the long-term need for close medical follow-up and lifelong need for anti-rejection therapy. 

You and your family must be able to accept the responsibilities, including financial, that are part of the long-term care you will need after transplantation. 

Exclusion 

You may not be eligible to receive a kidney transplant due to: 

The presence of some other life-threatening disease or condition that would not improve with transplantation. This could include certain cancers, infections that cannot be treated or cured, or severe, uncorrectable heart disease. 

A history of chronic noncompliance including, but not limited to, medical treatments, medications or other behaviors that would affect your ability to fully care for yourself after transplantation. 

A history of chronic and ongoing drug and/or alcohol abuse that cannot be successfully treated before transplantation, putting you at risk for continued harmful behavior after transplantation. 

A history of serious psychiatric disorders that cannot be successfully treated before transplantation, and that would be considered a high risk for ongoing or increased severity of the psychiatric disorder after transplantation.” 

Note: Weight is included in your tolerability for major surgery. 

There’s so much more to write about re kidney transplant. Next week, we’ll talk about the process itself. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! 

It Won’t Necessarily Get You High

About a million years ago, really in the 60s, I attended Hunter College of the City University of New York. Since it was located on Lexington Avenue and 68th Street, we had no campus. What we did have was a high raise building with what seemed to be to be huge elevators. They always smelled so sweet despite the number of bodies crammed in during the change of classes. Being an innocent, I couldn’t figure out why. 

One of my brothers was in the Air Force. When he came home on leave, I told him about this. He laughed. Being more worldly, he explained to me about cannabis. I wasn’t sure I believed him; that’s how innocent I was. Ah, but I realized I had noticed the same odor at parties I’d been invited to. 

Years later, a reader was offered medical marijuana and wanted to know if it would make him high. It wouldn’t. He chose to do without it then. 

When I had cancer, I was offered medical marijuana to replace the opioids I took after surgery. By this time, five decades after my college experience (or lack thereof), I was more than willing. Except… my oncologist explained that it would exacerbate the constipation I was enduring from the drugs I was already taking. I was already uncomfortable enough, so I decided against it. 

So, what is this cannabis of which I write? Surprise! Instead of my favorite dictionary, we’ll be using the Oxford Languages since it is more specific: 

“a tall plant with a stiff upright stem, divided serrated leaves, and glandular hairs. It is used to produce hemp fiber and as a drug. 

a dried preparation of the flowering tops or other parts of the cannabis plant, or a resinous extract of it ( cannabis resin), smoked or consumed, generally illegally, as a psychoactive (mind-altering) drug.” 

Hmmm, however does this make us high?  According to LiveScience at https://www.livescience.com/how-cannabis-high-works.html,  

“‘When a person smokes or inhales cannabis, THC [Gail here: THC is tetrahydrocannabinol, the part of cannabis that gives you a high.] ‘goes into your lungs and gets absorbed … into the blood,’ according to Daniele Piomelli, a professor of anatomy & neurobiology, biological chemistry, and pharmacology at the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine. Edibles take [sic] slightly longer trip through the liver, where enzymes transform THC into a different compound that takes a bit longer to have an effect on people’s perception of reality.”   

Wait a minute… the liver? I’m dealing with kidneys here. 

As reported on Healio at http://bit.ly/39j7WpD , Lisa Miller Hedin, BSN, RN, mentioned the following during her speech at the American Nephrology Nurses Association National Symposium last September. By the way, “Miller Hedin, the founder and CEO of the Medical Cannabis Training Academy, has been involved for 25 years in nephrology nursing and has spent the last 5 years researching cannabis treatment options.” 

“Cannabis is mostly eliminated by the liver and excreted into stool, Miller Hedin said. ‘Very little is eliminated by kidneys or dialysis.’ Cannabis is lipid soluble and can stay in a patient’s system for 80 days, she said.” 

Well, if a bit of it “is eliminated by kidneys or dialysis,” why are Chronic Kidney Disease patients using it at all? 

The nephrologist’s guide to cannabis and cannabinoids by Rein, Joshua L. Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA at http://bit.ly/39mfA2R gave me more insight.  

“Cannabis (marijuana, weed, pot, ganja, Mary Jane…) is the most commonly used federally illicit drug in the United States. As of December 2019, 33 states and the District of Columbia have medical cannabis programs. Eleven states and the District of Columbia have legalized recreational use. Several countries worldwide have legalized recreational use whereas many others have medical cannabis and decriminalization laws. The prevalence of cannabis use more than doubled between 2001 and 2013 in the United States… particularly among people over the age of 50 and even more so among those over 65 years …. These age groups are enriched with chronic illness including chronic kidney disease (CKD) that is associated with excess morbidity and mortality ….” 

Read that last line again. This time I did go to my favorite dictionary, the Merriam-Webster at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/morbidity for a specific definition – or definitions in this case – of morbidity, 

“1: the quality or state of being morbid especially: an attitude, quality, or state of mind marked by excessive gloom…  

2: a diseased state or symptom: ill health 

3: the incidence of disease: the rate of illness (as in a specified population or group) 
    also: the incidence of complications or undesirable side effects following surgery or medical                        treatment” 

I get it. We have pain. Cannabis can alleviate it without the use of opioids. But don’t necessarily expect to get high.     

Dr. Peter Grinspoon tells us via Harvard Medical School’s Harvard Health Publishing at  https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/medical-marijuana-2018011513085,   

“Least controversial is the extract from the hemp plant known as CBD (which stands for cannabidiol) because this component of marijuana has little, if any, intoxicating properties. Marijuana itself has more than 100 active components. THC (which stands for tetrahydrocannabinol) is the chemical that causes the ‘high’ that goes along with marijuana consumption. CBD-dominant strains have little or no THC, so patients report very little if any alteration in consciousness.” 

Healthline (Remember them?) at https://www.healthline.com/health/does-cbd-get-you-high#thc seems to have the definitive word on this: 

“CBD can have several positive effects. Some of these research-backed uses of CBD even suggest it may help you feel relaxed. That can feel a bit like a high, though it’s not intoxicating…. 

Research suggests CBD is beneficial for relieving symptoms of anxiety and depression. It might also ease inflammation and pain….  

The World Health Organization says CBD is safe. However, more research is still needed to understand the full spectrum of effects and possible uses. 

Despite general acceptance, some people may experience some side effects when they take CBD, especially at high concentrations. These side effects can include: 

diarrhea 

mild nausea 

dizziness 

excessive fatigue 

dry mouth 

If you take any prescription medications, talk with your doctor before using CBD. Some medicines may be less beneficial because of CBD. They could also interact and cause unintended side effects.” 

Reminder – cannabis is not legal in all states. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! 

They’re No Laughing Matter

I may have mentioned a time or two (or ten) that I was recently hospitalized again. This time it was for an abdominal incision hernia. Usually, this is outpatient surgery. However, the surgeon who made the original abdominal incision wanted to take no chances and arranged for me to stay in the hospital overnight. And that turned into five nights since he discovered another hernia under the one he’d expected to repair and then I kept running fevers. 

You probably know that you’re expected to start walking the day of (or the day after) surgery these days. It hastens your recovery. So, I walked the halls with the aid of a nurse and a walker, which fast became annoying although necessary (the walker, not the nurse). Apparently, I didn’t walk enough since for the time in her life, this 73 year developed bed sores.   

Photo by tegh 93 on Pexels.com

Bedsores? Certainly, that’s nothing to be ashamed of. Right? But there was that teeny little kernel of shame, as if I’d done something wrong and was being punished. Did it have to do with Chronic Kidney Disease? Why didn’t this happen during my other hospitalizations this last year? Of had I been just too out of it to realize I had bedsores during those hospitalizations?  

Come along with me as I figure this out. First of all, what are bedsores? The first thing I learned from my all-time favorite dictionary, The Merriam-Webster, at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bedsores is that it’s one compound word, not two separate words as I’d always believed. Here’s their definition: 

“an ulceration of tissue deprived of adequate blood supply by prolonged pressure 

— called also decubitus ulcer” 

Wait a minute. What’s an ulcer? According to the same dictionary, but this time at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ulcer

“a break in skin or mucous membrane with loss of surface tissue, disintegration and necrosis of epithelial tissue, and often pus” 

Okay, got it. Anyone know what “decubitus” means? I don’t. Back to the dictionary, guys. Well, will you look at that? The joke’s on us. That means “bedsore.” No kidding. Check it out for yourself at  https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/decubitus.  

Now that we know what a bedsore is, let’s see if it has anything to do with CKD. Just keep in mind that diabetes is the foremost cause of CKD. This is from Beacon Health System at https://www.beaconhealthsystem.org/library/diseases-and-conditions/bedsores-pressure-ulcers/ , 

“Medical conditions affecting blood flow. Health problems that can affect blood flow, such as diabetes and vascular disease, can increase the risk of tissue damage such as bedsores.” 

Uh-oh, Type 2 diabetic here. 

Did you know there are stages of bedsores? I didn’t, but emedicine at  

https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/190115-overview educated me: 

” Stage 1 pressure injury – Nonblanchable erythema [Gail here: that means reddening.] of intact skin 

Stage 2 pressure injury – Partial-thickness skin loss with exposed dermis 

Stage 3 pressure injury – Full-thickness skin loss 

Stage 4 pressure injury – Full-thickness skin and tissue loss 

Unstageable pressure injury – Obscured full-thickness skin and tissue loss 

Deep pressure injury – Persistent nonblanchable deep red, maroon or purple discoloration” 

We know that dermis is skin, but “nonblanchable”? We can figure this out. If you remember your high school French, you know that ‘blanch’ means white. Add ‘non’ and we get ‘not white.’ That’s what nonblachable means; your skin does not turn white if you press on it.  

Wow! Lots of new information today. Okay, so how do you know if you have a bedsore? For me, it was the pain. I didn’t even have to look. 

The Mayo Clinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/bed-sores/symptoms-causes/syc-20355893 tells us other symptoms: 

“Unusual changes in skin color or texture 

Swelling 

Pus-like draining 

An area of skin that feels cooler or warmer to the touch than other areas 

Tender areas” 

Come to think of it, the area in question was swollen, tender, and unusually warm. 

Now what? We know what bedsores are, what they have to do with CKD, that they are staged, and what the symptoms are. Ah, of course. What do you do once you have them? 

I was fortunate to come upon Johns Hopkins Medicine at https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/bedsores for the answer to my question. 

  • “Removing pressure on the affected area 
  • Protecting the wound with medicated gauze or other special dressings 
  • Keeping the wound clean 
  • Ensuring good nutrition 
  • Removing the damaged, infected, or dead tissue (debridement) 
  • Transplanting healthy skin to the wound area (skin grafts) 
  • Negative pressure wound therapy 
  • Medicine (such as antibiotics to treat infections)” 

I’m thankful that removing the pressure on the affected area and a local antibiotic were all I needed. However, those were uncomfortable days for me and I’d like to avoid going through them again. 

Here’s what I should have been doing in the hospital according to Victoria State Government’s Better Health Channel (Canada),  

“Skin care in hospital 

During a stay in hospital, your skin may be affected by the hospital environment, staying in bed or sitting in one position for too long, whether you are eating and drinking enough and your physical condition. Ask hospital staff to regularly check your skin, particularly if you feel any pain. 

There are some things that you can do to look after your skin, including: 

Keep your skin clean and dry.  

Avoid any products that dry out your skin. This includes many soaps, body washes and talcum powder. Ask for skin cleansers that are non-drying. Ask nursing staff or your pharmacist to give you options. 

Use a water-based moisturiser daily. Be careful of bony areas and don’t rub or massage them. Ask staff for help if you need it. 

Check your skin every day or ask for help if you are concerned. Let a doctor or nurse know if there are any changes in your skin, especially redness, swelling or soreness. 

If you are at risk of pressure sores, a nurse will change your position often, including during the night. 

Always use any devices given to you to protect your skin from tearing and pressure sores. These may include protective mattresses, seat cushions, heel wedges and limb protectors.  

Drink plenty of water (unless the doctor has told you not to). 

Eat regular main meals and snacks. Sit out of bed to eat if you can. 

Try to maintain your regular toilet routine.  

If you have a wound, a plan will be developed with you and your family or carers before you leave hospital. It will tell you how to dress and care for the wound.”  

And here I’d been priding myself on sitting the chair from day one. I should have changing my position in that chair more often. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! 

“klot” + “id” 

No, that’s not the result of misplacing my fingers on the keyboard. According to https://youglish.com/pronounce/clotted/english, this is the correct two syllable pronunciation of the word clotted. My all-time favorite dictionary, the Merriam-Webster, at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/clotted defines the adjective (word describing a noun) clotted as:

“1: a portion of a substance adhering together in a thick nondescript mass (as of clay or gum)

2 a: a roundish viscous lump formed by coagulation of a portion of liquid or by melting

b: a coagulated mass produced by clotting of blood”

You’re right – it’s the second definition we’ll be dealing with today. Why? A long-time reader was telling me about his blood clot when I suddenly realized I had no idea if there were any connection at all between Chronic Kidney Disease and blood clots.

As it turns out, there is.  The following is from the National Kidney Foundation at https://www.kidney.org/sites/default/files/Blood_Clots_And_CKD_2018.pdf:

“CKD may put you at higher risk for VTE. The reasons for this are not well understood. The connection may depend on what caused your CKD and how much kidney damage you have. No matter the reason, CKD may make it easier for your body to form blood clots. The risk for VTE is seen more often in people with nephrotic syndrome (a kidney problem that causes swelling, usually of the ankles, a high level of protein in the urine, and a low level of a protein called albumin in the blood).”

I have a question already. What is VTE? I found World Thrombosis Day’s explanation at www.worldthrombosisday.org › issue › vte the most helpful.

“Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a condition in which a blood clot forms most often in the deep veins of the leg, groin or arm (known as deep vein thrombosis, DVT) and travels in the circulation, lodging in the lungs (known as pulmonary embolism, PE).”

How could I have CKD for over a dozen years and not know this? Many thanks to my reader and online friend for bringing it up. 

Well, it’s back to the beginning for us. How is VTE diagnosed? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) at www.cdc.gov › ncbddd › dvt › diagnosis-treatment was helpful here.

“Duplex ultrasonography is an imaging test that uses sound waves to look at the flow of blood in the veins. It can detect blockages or blood clots in the deep veins. It is the standard imaging test to diagnose DVT. A D-dimer blood test measures a substance in the blood that is released when a clot breaks up.”

Let’s take a closer look at the D-dimer blood test. That’s another new one for me. My old standby, MedlinePlus (This time at https://medlineplus.gov/lab-tests/d-dimer-test/.) offered the following which more than satisfactorily answered my question.

“A D-dimer test looks for D-dimer in blood. D-dimer is a protein fragment (small piece) that’s made when a blood clot dissolves in your body.

Blood clotting is an important process that prevents you from losing too much blood when you are injured. Normally, your body will dissolve the clot once your injury has healed. With a blood clotting disorder, clots can form when you don’t have an obvious injury or don’t dissolve when they should. These conditions can be very serious and even life-threatening. A D-dimer test can show if you have one of these conditions.”

By the way, MedlinePlus is part of the U.S. National Library of Medicine which, in turn, is part of the National Institutes of Health.

This brings me to another question. How would you or your doctor even know you may need this test?

“According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about half of people with DVT don’t have symptoms. Any symptoms that do occur will be in the affected leg or the area where the clot is found. Symptoms can include:

pain

redness of the skin

warmth of the skin

swelling of the area

If the clot moves into the lungs and you develop PE, you may have symptoms such as:

chest pain, which may get worse when you breathe deeply or cough

coughing

coughing up blood

dizziness or even fainting

rapid shallow breathing, or tachypnea

rapid heartbeat

irregular heartbeat

shortness of breath”

Thank you to Healthline at https://www.healthline.com/health/dvt-vs-pulmonary-embolism for the above information.

Now we know what VTE is, what symptoms you may experience, and the test to take to confirm that you do, indeed, have VTE. You know what comes next. How do we treat VTE once it’s confirmed?

These are some, but not all, of the treatments that may be recommended. I discovered them on WebMD’s site at https://www.webmd.com/dvt/what-is-venous-thromboembolism.

“Blood thinners. These drugs don’t break up the clot, but they can stop it from getting bigger so your body has time to break it down on its own. They include heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, apixaban (Eliquis), edoxaban (Savaysa), rivaroxaban (Xarelto), and warfarin (Coumadin).

Clot-busting drugs. These medicines are injections that can break up your clot. They include drugs like tPA (tissue plasminogen activator).

Surgery. In some cases, your doctor may need to put a special filter into a vein, which can stop any future clots from getting to your lungs. Sometimes, people need surgery to remove a clot.

Even after you recover from a VTE and you’re out of the hospital, you’ll probably still need treatment with blood thinners for at least 3 months. That’s because your chances of having another VTE will be higher for a while.”

I’m still wondering how to avoid VTE. This is what The National Blood Clot Alliance at https://www.stoptheclot.org/learn_more/prevention_of_thrombosis/ suggested:

“Ask your doctor about need for ‘blood thinners’ or compression stockings to prevent clots, whenever you go to the hospital

Lose weight, if you are overweight

Stay active

Exercise regularly; walking is fine

Avoid long periods of staying still

Get up and move around at least every hour whenever you travel on a plane, train, or bus, particularly if the trip is longer than 4 hours

Do heel toe exercises or circle your feet if you cannot move around

Stop at least every two hours when you drive, and get out and move around

Drink a lot of water and wear loose fitted clothing when you travel

Talk to your doctor about your risk of clotting whenever you take hormones, whether for birth control or replacement therapy, or during and right after any pregnancy

Follow any self-care measures to keep heart failure, diabetes, or any other health issues as stable as possible”

And we have yet another reason to be extra cautious if you have CKD.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

 

Keep It Where It Belongs 

You’ve all read about my cancer dance in one blog or another. Thank goodness, that’s over. But there are residual effects like hand and foot neuropathy, chemo brain (akin to CKD’s brain fog), and – to my great surprise – abdominal incisional hernia after surgery. How did that happen, I wondered.

Get ready for this: those with Chronic Kidney Disease have a 12.8% higher incidence of abdominal incisional hernia according to a PubMed 2013 study published on ResearchGate’s site available at https://bit.ly/3kdvxfl,

“Chronic kidney disease is associated with impaired wound healing and constitutes an independent risk factor for incisional hernia development.”

(The percentage of abdominal incisional hernia among CKD patients was taken from the cohort in this abstract.)

According to the same study:

“Elevated uremia toxins may inhibit granulation tissue formation and impair wound healing, thereby promoting incisional hernia development.”

As Chronic Kidney Disease patients, we know the accumulation of uremia toxins as uremia. On to my favorite dictionary, the Merriam-Webster at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/uremia for a definition of uremia:

“1: accumulation in the blood of constituents normally eliminated in the urine that produces a severe toxic condition and usually occurs in severe kidney disease

2: the toxic bodily condition associated with uremia”

It gets worse. First, you have to know that I am considered ‘elderly,’ another surprise.  According to The World Health Organization at https://bit.ly/32sQq05:

“Most developed world countries have accepted the chronological age of 65 years as a definition of ‘elderly’ or older person….”

I’m 73 and here’s why you needed this information that I am of advancing age.

“The risk factors for incisional hernia following abdominal surgery include (ranked by relative risk):

Emergency surgery

Emergency surgery carries double the risk of elective surgery.

Wound type

BMI >25

Obese patients are more likely to develop an incisional hernia

Midline incision

There is a 74% risk increase compared to non-midline

Wound infection

This increases incisional hernia risk by 68%.

Pre-operative chemotherapy

Intra-operative blood transfusion

Advancing age

Pregnancy

Other less common risk factors include chronic cough, diabetes mellitus, steroid therapy, smoking, and connective tissue disease.”

Thank you TeachMeSurgery at https://bit.ly/2GYrOUH for this risk factor information.

I have so many risks factors. Foremost for me, of course, is Chronic Kidney Disease as demonstrated earlier in this blog, but also advancing age. Oh no, we’ll have to add obesity since my oncologist just told me my BMI is higher than 25 and must be lowered in order to keep the possibility of cancer reoccurrence to a minimum.  Then there’s midline incision. My scar runs down the middle of my front from the breasts to below the belly button. Oh, and let’s not forget pre-operative chemotherapy. I had plenty of that. Then there’s intra-operative blood transfusion… to the tune of six for me. I almost forgot to include diabetes mellitus. Hmm, I do believe I had steroid therapy during my chemotherapy treatments, too.

Now what? The hernia is right there, visibly noticeable along the scar line and I understand all the possible reasons it’s there. We all know I have to do something about it, but why? Healthline at https://www.healthline.com/health/hernia#complications answers that question for us.

“Sometimes an untreated hernia can lead to potentially serious complications. Your hernia may grow and cause more symptoms. It may also put too much pressure on nearby tissues, which can cause swelling and pain in the surrounding area.

A portion of your intestine could also become trapped in the abdominal wall. This is called incarceration. Incarceration can obstruct your bowel and cause severe pain, nausea, or constipation.

If the trapped section of your intestines doesn’t get enough blood flow, strangulation occurs. This can cause the intestinal tissue to become infected or die. A strangulated hernia is life-threatening and requires immediate medical care.”

Uh-oh. What can I do? My oncologist suggested a wait and see approach with a twist. I’m now wearing something similar to the belly band that pregnant women wear. The differences are that this is worn around my body to cover the hernia and is very tight in an attempt to have the hernia heal itself. Will this work? That remains to be seen.

What if it doesn’t? Well, there’s always surgery. The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) at https://bit.ly/3hsFHae tells us,

“The treatment options for incisional hernias are open surgery or minimally invasive surgery. Minimally invasive surgery is also called ‘keyhole surgery,’ or ‘laparoscopic’ surgery if it is performed on the abdomen.”

Wait a minute, laparoscopic surgery. What’s that? Let’s go to MedlinePlus to see what we can find out. This explanation was at https://bit.ly/2RmkS5R.

“Laparoscopic surgery is a surgical technique in which short, narrow tubes (trochars) are inserted into the abdomen through small (less than one centimeter) incisions. Through these trochars, long, narrow instruments are inserted. The surgeon uses these instruments to manipulate, cut, and sew tissue.”

That does seem less invasive, but it’s still surgery. Let’s take a look at recovery time for laparoscopic surgery vs. open surgery. Open surgery is just what it sounds like: you’re cut open.

“When the surgeons are equally skilled and a procedure is available as both an open procedure and a minimally invasive one, the minimally invasive technique almost always offers a lower risk of infection, shorter recovery times and equally successful outcomes.”

Mind you, sometimes keyhole or laparoscopic surgery is not a choice since the surgeon needs to work on a larger area. For example, I had open cancer surgery since not only the tumor, but also my gall bladder and spleen, needed to be removed. Sometimes, what starts out as minimally invasive surgery becomes open surgery when the surgeons run into a problem or realize they need to work on a larger internal area than they’d originally thought.

I still find it amazing how connected all parts of our body are… like Chronic Kidney Disease adding to affecting a scar to the point that a hernia develops.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!