Kidney Healthy Food Labels?

How many of you remember the KidneyX competition? Let me refresh your memories, just in case. This is from this year’s January 13th, blog:

“Redesign Dialysis Phase II

Building off the success of KidneyX’s inaugural prize competition, Redesign Dialysis Phase I, Phase II challenges participants to build and test prototype solutions, or components of solutions, that can replicate normal kidney functions or improve dialysis access. Up to 3 winners will each be awarded $500,000.

Submissions are due by 5:00 ET on January 31, 2020.

Who Can Participate?

You can submit a solution even if you did not submit anything in Phase I….

What is KidneyX Looking for in Redesign Dialysis, Phase II?

We are seeking prototype solutions that address any of these categories:

  • Blood Filtration (filtering blood to remove waste and excess fluid)
  • Electrolyte Homeostasis (maintaining appropriate levels of key minerals in the blood)
  • Volume Regulation (regulating the amount of and/or removing excess fluid).
  • Toxin Removal and Secretion (removing, limiting or preventing toxins in the bloodstream).
  • Filtrate Drainage and Connectivity (removing excess filtrate after processing; connectivity issues for filtration, processing, and exterior drainage)
  • Dialysis Access (vascular, peritoneal, blood circuit, or alternative (e.g., GI tract) access)

… design targets, as well as the categories themselves, were developed based on the Kidney Health Initiative’s Technology Roadmap for Innovative Approaches to Renal Replacement Therapy, which is an excellent resource to learn more about technical and scientific needs in this space.

Tests of the prototype’s function or performance should demonstrate rigor, reproducibility, and statistical analysis….

You can learn more at https://www.kidneyx.org/prizecompetitions/RedesignDialysisPhase.”

I was lucky enough to have one of the phase I winners contact me re a two question survey about his entry. That led to a few emails back and forth which resulted in Anthony’s guest blog today….

“My name is Anthony, and I was recently chosen as a winner in the KidneyX, ‘Patient Innovator Challenge’ competition. KidneyX is a recently formed partnership between the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the American Society of Nephrology (ASN).  According to their website, they were established ‘to accelerate innovation in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of kidney disease.’  The competition welcomed the public to submit ideas on how to improve therapeutic options and the quality of life for those living with kidney disease.

As a former employee of a dialysis company, I always thought that there was something more that could be done in terms of the prevention and treatment of people living with kidney disease. The lack of awareness and research around kidney disease was always a concern to me. Quite frankly I never stopped thinking about it, even after my departure from the industry.  Then one day, I came up with an idea that I believe will solve a lot of problems within the CKD community. My solution is ‘Kidney Healthy’ food labels.

Food labels are a major factor in dictating consumer food purchases today. With major food labels such as ‘gluten free’ and ‘organic’ leading the way, many consumers are now allowing food labels to dictate their purchasing decisions. Consumers are now demanding more transparency in the foods they eat, and food labels serve as a driving force for consumers to take control of their health.

The statistics on kidney disease are not very promising. According to the National Kidney Foundation, Chronic Kidney Disease, or CKD affects an estimated 37 million people in the United States, which equates to 15% of the population. 468,000 of those individuals are currently on dialysis (End Stage Renal Disease), a treatment that cost this country $89,000 per patient each year, which equates to a cost of almost $42 billion dollars a year. According to The Kidney Project, ESRD is increasing in the United States by 5% each year, so it’s only inevitable that this cost is going to continue to increase as the years go by. In addition, two million people suffer from ESRD worldwide; this number is increasing by 5-7% each year.

I believe ‘Kidney Healthy’ food labels could serve as a universal solution to slow down the progression, lower the cost, create better patient outcomes, and ultimately bring more awareness to those living with (and without) Chronic Kidney Disease.

I decided to submit my idea to the KidneyX ‘Patient Innovator Challenge’ competition, and was so honored to be chosen as a winner.  Although I do understand that when it comes to kidney disease, there really isn’t a ‘one diet fits all,’ I still would love to live in a world where kidney patients can rely on a universal food label (such as organic or gluten-free). Obviously a food certification process would have to be created to establish this label, or labels for that matter (CKD Stage 1, 2, 3, etc. label), but my goal is to have a more standardized approach to the kidney diet for patients by way of ‘Kidney Healthy’ food labels.

My next step is to get my idea in front of the CKD community. I am currently conducting an independent research project that I need your help with. I believe that creating Kidney Healthy Food labels (similar to organic and gluten-free) will assist in slowing down the progression of Chronic Kidney Disease, and preserve a better quality of life for both CKD and ESRD patients.

As a member of the CKD Community, Please take this 2 Question Survey to help. Your participation is greatly appreciated!

When you are finished, please forward this survey to the CKD community to assist in helping.

Here is the link to the survey:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/KidneyHealthyFoodLabels

 

In other news, those who were interested in Flavis’s low protein, low sodium, low phosphorous products may find their Ditali appealing. We enjoyed the delicate taste of this pasta. By the way, their chocolate chip cookies were pretty good, too.

Keep yourselves as safe as you can during the lock down. Lock down is better than die any day and we are especially open to the virus with our compromised immune systems. Keep that in mind when you start to get restless.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

What’s That Got to Do with My Occupation?

I’ve written about neuropathy, but what is this occupational therapy that may treat it? I know about physical therapy and have made use of it when necessary. Remember a few years ago when knee surgery was indicated? Physical therapy helped me avoid the surgery.

This time I was offered gabapentin for the neuropathy. That’s a drug usually used for epilepsy which can also help with neuropathy. I would explain how it works, but no one seems to know. I had two problems with this drug:

  1. Gabapentin became a controlled substance in England as of April of this year. England always seem to be one step ahead of the U.S. re medications.
  2. It is not suggested if you have kidney disease.

My other option was occupational therapy. That’s the one I chose. Let’s backtrack a bit for a definition of occupational therapy. Thank you to my old buddy (since college over 50 years ago) the Merriam-Webster Dictionary at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/occupational%20therapy for the following definition.

“therapy based on engagement in meaningful activities of daily life (such as self-care skills, education, work, or social interaction) especially to enable or encourage participation in such activities despite impairments or limitations in physical or mental functioning”

That got me to wondering just how occupational therapy differed from physical therapy, the kind of therapy with which I was already familiar. I went to my old buddy again, but this time at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/physical%20therapy for any hints I could pick up from the definition for physical therapy.

“therapy for the preservation, enhancement, or restoration of movement and physical function impaired or threatened by disease, injury, or disability that utilizes therapeutic exercise, physical modalities (such as massage and electrotherapy), assistive devices, and patient education and training”

Made sense to me. Physical therapy was for the movement of the body, while occupational therapy was to help you carry out the tasks of your daily life. For example, it takes me longer to write a blog because my tingling, yet numb, fingers often slip into the spaces between the keys on the keyboard. Another example is that I now use a cane since I can’t tell if my tingling, yet numb, feet are flat on the floor as I walk.

Something I found interesting about occupational therapy is that it uses many forms of therapy that were once considered alternative medicine… like electrical energy. What’s that you say? You’d like an example?

Well, here you go. My therapist uses a machine called a Havimat. The following is from the National Stem Cell Institute at https://nsistemcell.com/hivamat-how-it-relieves-edema/  and explains what the Havimat can do and how.

“….The therapist connects an electronic lead to his/her wrist while the patient grasps a small cylinder grip. The vinyl gloves that the therapist wears prevents the circuit of electric current from closing, thus creating the ‘push-pull’ effect that penetrates deeply into tissues. Meanwhile, the patient’s experience is one of a pleasant, deep massage maintained by the therapist’s gentle pressure as he/she directs the deep oscillation.

…. The therapy “un-dams” trapped fluid. Tissues are decongested and edema is significantly reduced. This shrinks swelling in the area being treated. Hivamat has been shown to be exceptionally effective in relieving lymphedema when used by therapists to enhance manual lymphatic drainage.

…. Besides the reduction of edema, therapists use Hivamat for ridding tissues of toxins [Gail here: like chemotherapy.]  When used by a certified therapist during a manipulation technique known as manual lymphatic drainage, the therapy improves lymph fluid movement. This encourages better flow through the lymphatic system, which then carries away metabolic waste and toxins more quickly. Hivamat also promotes the production of lymphocytes, which improve the function of the immune system. [Gail here again: as CKD patients, our immune systems are compromised.]”

There is one thing, though. Apparently, the Havimat is NOT suggested if there is an active tumor. Uh-oh, I had three treatments with the Havimat before I uncovered that fact. I’ll have to speak with my therapist today and find out why she didn’t know that. But it is clear that using electrical energy as treatment is another case of what was formerly considered alternative medicine becoming mainstream medicine.

Topic switch. I’ve written about the American Association of Kidney Patients (AAKP), precision care, and clinical trials many times before. You’re probably already aware of the new initiative for patient care. AAKP wants your help in doing their part as far as patient experience with this survey.

“As part of AAKP’s National Strategy, we have expanded our

capacities to involve a far larger, and more representative, number

of patients in research opportunities and clinical trials. The

results of these research opportunities and clinical trials will help

create a clearer understanding of the patient experience and help

shape the future of kidney disease treatment and care. AAKP is

fully committed to changing the status quo of kidney care

and to better aligning treatment to personal aspirations.

To achieve this goal, the AAKP Center for Patient Research &

Education is working with top researchers to ensure that the

patient voice, patient preferences and patient perceptions are

heard.

AAKP is very pleased to partner with Northwestern University

and University of Pennsylvania on an important research

project organ donation.

Please consider taking part in this online survey and help

shape the future of kidney care for you and those yet to

be diagnosed.

Volunteers Needed for Research Study!

Researchers at Northwestern University and University of Penn-

sylvania invite kidney transplant candidates to participate

in a survey about your opinions of research done on donor

organs. Such research aims to help organs work better and

make more organs available for transplantation.

Your responses will help to improve the informed consent

process for transplant candidates.

You are eligible to participate if you:

•  Are 18+ years old

•  Speak English

•  Are currently a transplant candidate on the waitlist for only

    one organ

This anonymous survey is voluntary, and will take about 45

minutes of your time.

Your decision about participating will not affect your place on

the waiting list. Your participation may help improve the informed

consent process for transplant candidates.

Find out more information and take the survey by clicking

the link below [Gail here yet again: Don’t forget to click

control at the same time.]:

https://redcap.nubic.northwestern.edu/redcap/surveys/index.php?s=TEMXLDLF8A

Thank you to those taking part in the survey for helping

AAKP help those awaiting a transplant.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!