This Former Hippy Wannabe Likes HIPAA

Each day, I post a tidbit about, or relating to, Chronic Kidney Disease on SlowItDownCKD’s Facebook page. This is the quote from Renal and Urology News that I posted just a short while ago:

“Patients with stage 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease (CKD) who were managed by nephrology in addition to primary care experienced greater monitoring for progression and complications, according to a new study.”

My primary care physician is the one who caught my CKD in the first place and is very careful about monitoring its progress. My nephrologist is pleased with that and feels he only needs to see me once a year. The two of them work together well.

From the comments on that post, I realized this is not usual. One of my readers suggested it had to do with HIPPA, so I decided to look into that.

The California Department of Health Care Services (Weird, I know, but I liked their simple explanation.) at http://www.dhcs.ca.gov/formsandpubs/laws/hipaa/Pages/1.00WhatisHIPAA.aspx defined HIPPA and its purposes in the following way:

“HIPAA is the acronym for the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act that was passed by Congress in 1996. HIPAA does the following:

• Provides the ability to transfer and continue health insurance coverage for millions of American workers and their families when they change or lose their jobs;
• Reduces health care fraud and abuse;
• Mandates industry-wide standards for health care information on electronic billing and other processes; and
• Requires the protection and confidential handling of protected health information”

Got it. Let’s take a look at its last purpose. There is an infogram from HealthIT.gov at https://www.healthit.gov/sites/default/files/YourHealthInformationYourRights_Infographic-Web.pdf  which greatly clarifies the issue. On item on this infogram caught my eye:

“You hold the key to your health information and can send or have it sent to anyone you want. Only send your health information to someone you trust.”

I always send mine to one of my daughters and Bear… and my other doctors if they are not part of the hospital system most of my doctors belong to.

I stumbled across National Conference of State Legislatures at http://www.ncsl.org/research/health/hipaa-a-state-related-overview.aspx and learned more than I even knew existed about HIPAA. Take a look if you’d like more information. I finally tore myself away from the site to get back to writing the blog after following links for about an hour. It was fascinating, but not germane to today’s blog.

Okay, so sharing. In order to share the information from one doctor that my other doctors may not have, I simply fill out an Authorization to Release Medical Information form. A copy of this is kept in the originating doctor’s files. By the way, it is legal for the originating doctor to charge $.75/page for each page sent, but none of my doctors have ever done so.

I know, I know. What is this about doctors being part of the hospital system? What hospital system? When I first looked for a new physician since the one I had been using was so far away (Over the usual half-an-hour-to-get-anywhere-in-Arizona rule), I saw that my new PCP’s practice was affiliated with the local hospital and thought nothing of it.

Then Electronic Health Records came into widespread use at this hospital. Boom! Any doctor associated with that hospital – and that’s all but two of my myriad doctors – instantly had access to my health records. Wow, no more requesting hard copies of my health records from each doctor, making copies for all my other doctors, and then hand delivering or mailing them. No wonder I’m getting lazy; life is so much easier.

Back to HealthIt.gov for more about EHR. This time at https://www.healthit.gov/buzz-blog/electronic-health-and-medical-records/emr-vs-ehr-difference/:

“With fully functional EHRs, all members of the team have ready access to the latest information allowing for more coordinated, patient-centered care. With EHRs:

• The information gathered by the primary care provider tells the emergency department clinician about the patient’s life threatening allergy, so that care can be adjusted appropriately, even if the patient is unconscious.
• A patient can log on to his own record and see the trend of the lab results over the last year, which can help motivate him to take his medications and keep up with the lifestyle changes that have improved the numbers.
• The lab results run last week are already in the record to tell the specialist what she needs to know without running duplicate tests.
• The clinician’s notes from the patient’s hospital stay can help inform the discharge instructions and follow-up care and enable the patient to move from one care setting to another more smoothly.”

Did you notice the part about what a patient can do? With my patient portal, I can check my labs, ask questions, schedule an appointment, obtain information about medications, and spot trends in my labs. Lazy? Let’s make that even lazier. No more appointments for trivial questions, no more leaving phone messages, no more being on hold for too long. I find my care is quicker, more accessible to me, and – believe it or not – more easily understood since I am a visual, rather than an audial, person.

Kudos to American Association of Kidney Patients for postponing their National Patient Meeting in St. Petersburg from last weekend to this coming spring. The entire state of Florida was declared in a state of emergency by the governor due to the possible impact of Hurricane Irma. The very next day, AAKP acted to postpone placing the safety of its members over any monetary considerations. If I wasn’t proud to be a member before (and I was), I certainly am now.

Aha! That gives me five found days to separate The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 and The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2 each into two separate books with indexes. I never was happy with the formatting of those two. I plan to reward myself after this project. How, you ask. By writing a book of short stories. I surmise that will be out next year sometime. Meanwhile, there’s always Portal in Time, a time travel romance. Geesh! Sometimes I wonder at all my plans.

Until next week,
Keep living your life!

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It’s the Heat AND the Humidity

Hawaii is so beautiful… and Maui so healing. There was just one thing, though. I somehow managed to forget how humid it is. As you may or may not remember, after we’d come back from the Caribbean and from San Antonio last year, I vowed never to go to a humid climate during the summer again. Well, Maui was Bear’s 71st birthday present so maybe that’s why I so conveniently forgot my vow.

Here’s why I shouldn’t have. This is updated from SlowItDownCKD 2016.

ResearchGate at https://www.researchgate.net/publication/263084331_Climate change and Chronic Kidney Disease published a study from the Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research from February of 2014 (That’s over three years ago, friends.) which included the following in the conclusion:

“Our data suggest that burden of renal diseases may increase as period of hot weather becomes more frequent. This is further aggravated if age advanced and people with chronic diseases like diabetes and hypertension.”

That makes sense, but how will this happen exactly? I included this June, 2010, article in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1. Apparently, heat (and humidity) has been an acknowledged threat to our kidneys for longer than we’d thought.

“.…Dr. HL Trivedi of the Institute of Kidney Diseases and Research Centre (IKDRC) said, ‘…. Rapid water loss causes the kidney’s functioning to slow down, resulting in temporary or permanent kidney failure.’ Extreme heat causes rapid water loss, resulting in acute electrolyte imbalance. The kidney, unable to cope with the water loss, fails to flush out the requisite amount of Creatinine and other toxins from the body. Coupled with a lack of consistent water intake, this brings about permanent or temporary kidney failure, explain experts.”

The article can be viewed directly at http://www.dnaindia.com/health/report_heat-induced-kidney-ailments-see-40pct-rise_1390589 and is from “Daily News & Analysis.”

By the time this book’s twin, The Book of Blogs: Moderate Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2, was ready for publication, the (then) spokesman for The National Kidney Foundation – Dr. Leslie Spry – had this to say about heat and humidity:

“Heat illness occurs when body temperature exceeds a person’s ability to dissipate that heat and is commonly diagnosed when the body temperature approaches 104 degrees Fahrenheit and when humidity is greater than 70 percent. Once the humidity is that high, sweating becomes less effective at dispersing body heat, and the core body temperature begins to rise.”

The entire article is at http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leslie-spry-md-facp/heat-illness_b_1727995.html.

Oh, so humidity affects sweating and body heat rises. Humidity greater than 70%. That covers almost the entire time we were in the Caribbean and Texas (and now Hawaii). Well, what’s the connection between heat illness and CKD then?

The CDC offers the following advice to avoid heat illness:

“People with a chronic medical condition are less likely to sense and respond to changes in temperature. Also, they may be taking medications that can worsen the impact of extreme heat. People in this category need the following information.
• Drink more water than usual and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink.
• Check on a friend or neighbor, and have someone do the same for you.
• Check the local news for health and safety updates regularly.
• Don’t use the stove or oven to cook——it will make you and your house hotter.
• Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
• Take cool showers or baths to cool down….”

Uh-oh, we’re already in trouble. Look at the first suggestion: our fluid intake is restricted to 64 oz. (Mine is, check with your nephrologist for yours.) I know I carefully space out my fluids – which include anything that can melt to a liquid – to cover my entire day. I can’t drink more water than usual and, sometimes – on those rare occasions when I’ve been careless – have to wait until I’m thirsty to drink.

Diabetes is the foremost cause of CKD. I was curious how heat affected blood sugar so I popped over to Information about Diabetes at http://www.informationaboutdiabetes.com/lifestyle/lifestyle/how-heat-and-humidity-may-affect-blood-sugar and found this:

1. If our body is low on fluids, the kidneys receive less blood flow and work less effectively. This might cause blood glucose concentrations to rise.
2. If someone’s blood sugar is already running high in the heat, not only will they lose water through sweat but they might urinate more frequently too, depleting their body’s fluids even more.

There’s more at the website if this interests you.

According to the U.S. Department of Veterans’ Affairs at https://www.visn9.va.gov/VISN9/news/vhw/summer07/humidity.asp,
“Hot weather can lead to dehydration, heat exhaustion and heat stroke, but the dangers increase when you add humidity to the mix. When the temperature rises above 70F and the humidity registers more than 70 percent, you need to be on the alert.

Who’s most at risk?
People with high blood pressure, heart disease, lung disease or kidney disease (I made that bolded.) are most vulnerable to the effects of humid conditions, as are those over age 50. Other risk factors that can affect your body’s ability to cool itself include being obese; having poor circulation; following a salt-restricted diet; drinking alcohol; having inefficient sweat glands; and taking diuretics, sedatives, tranquilizers or heart or blood pressure medication.”

So, pretty much, the way to deal with heat and humidity having an effect on your (and my) CKD is to avoid it. That doesn’t mean you have to move, you know. Staying in air conditioning as long as you can so your body is not overheated and can better handle this kind of weather will help. Wearing a hat and cool clothes will also help. I certainly relearned the value of wearing cotton this past week. It’s a fabric that breathes. I’ll bet that this is how those CKD patients who live in humid areas deal with it. Feedback, anyone? Robin? Mark?

Now for some great, unrelated news: One of our daughters gave Bear the best birthday present. She and her husband FaceTimed us in Maui on Bear’s birthday to tell us we’re going to be grandparents. This is a first for them… and for us. To make this even better – as if that were possible – little one is expected on our anniversary. I love the ebb and flow of the universe, don’t you?

Until next week,
Keep living your life!

And Then There Are Bhutan and India

There’s a fellow on Facebook whose name caught my eye. A little background first. My older daughter is called.Nima, That’s a Tibetan name which means ‘the sun.’ Since my children’s father was studying Tibetan psychology at the time, we were going to name our second child Tashi. That means ‘good fortune.’

After some heart searching talks, we decided this child would be not only our second, but our last. It is a tradition in my Jewish religion to name a child after honored, deceased members of the family. There were still beloved people to be honored, so Tashi was voted out. Yet, I have always liked the name.

Now that you know why I like the name, you’re probably asking yourself what this has to do with Bhutan. That’s where the follow on Facebook whose name caught my eye lives and – surprise – he is a Chronic Kidney Disease Awareness Advocate. We don’t have regular contact with each other, but I do read the posts on his Facebook Tashi Namgay Kidney page.

Now I’ll bet you want to know just where Bhutan is. As you can see from the map, it’s in Southeast Asia and is surrounded by India except for the northern border which is shared by China.
This small country has an active CKD community. The Bhutan Kidney Foundation was Tashi’s baby. He was persistent about instituting this foundation in Bhutan and finally succeeded in 2012.

This is from their website at http://www.bhutankidneyfoundation.org/

OBJECTIVES:
• To promote overall well-being of kidney patients in Bhutan.
• To raise awareness among general public on kidney related diseases in coordination with relevant agencies and stakeholders.
• To ensure all kidney patients have easy access to affordable care and services.
• To raise funds and facilitate underprivileged and needy patients to undergo transplant even though RGoB currently bears the entire medical costs besides other financial assistance.
• To support establishment of renal and other organ transplantation programmes in Bhutan in near future.
• To encourage, promote and facilitate legal organ donations.
• To provide necessary support and services to other organ-related patients as well.
• To explore international funds amongst health supporting organizations around the globe for the purposes of carrying out research on causes of rampant kidney failures in Bhutan so that in near future, the disease may be contained.

They also have a Facebook page with the same name. As a matter of fact, I mentioned that page just recently in the June 12th blog, although I didn’t realize at that time that Tashi was the prime mover behind the Bhutan Kidney Foundation.

According to World Life Expectancy at http://www.worldlifeexpectancy.com/country-health-profile/bhutan, Bhutan ranks 46th in the world for deaths due to kidney disease. That equates to a little less than 19 deaths per 100,000 people as of 2014. Bhutan’s population was only approximately 765,000 people at that time.With the rise in CKD in Bhutan, Tashi’s work to education the citizens about the disease is much needed.

What about India? Does they also promote CKD Awareness? Indeed, so much so that Subash Singh invited me to post the blog on his Mani Trust Facebook page. Mani Trust deals with all kinds of help for the people living in India, not just CKD. There are food initiatives, clean-ups, any kind of humanitarian undertaking they can think of.

I, of course, am only going to deal with CKD in India. According to MedIndia.net – one of the first health websites in India and one I’ve used before – at http://www.medindia.net/health_statistics/health_facts/kidney-facts.htm,

“There are approximately 7.85 million people suffering from chronic kidney failure in India…. In India 90% patients who suffer from kidney disease are not able to afford the cost of treatment.”

Reminder, it was an Indian doctor who was responsible for this blog’s existence. When What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney was published, he contacted me wanting the information for his patients who were so poor they could rarely afford the bus fare to the clinic. The book became the first blog posts.

Now I wish now that I had saved his email and his name. But who knew six years ago that SlowItDownCKD would be winning kidney health blog awards and be the source of six more CKD books?

Back to CKD activity in India. Oh my! India ranks a whopping 24th in the world for kidney related deaths. That was almost 22 people per 100,000 in 2014. At that time, India’s population was 1,271,702,542. For comparison, the population of the U.S. for the same year was 325,120,000.

This is from BioMedCentral at http://bmcnephrol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2369-13-10. Due to space constraints, I have not reproduced the entire chart. By the way,  BioMedCentral is the home to BMC Nephrology, which is an open access journal.

The number of cases reported from each zone (me here: of India) in the different years

Year
2006            13,231
2007            11,196
2008            11,644
2009            10,188
2010*            6,388

*Till Sep 30, 2010

Apparently, most of the CKD in India is caused by diabetic nephropathy. I turned to my old favorite WebMD for a definition. This one is at http://www.webmd.com/diabetes/tc/diabetic-nephropathy-topic-overview#1.

Nephropathy means kidney disease or damage. Diabetic nephropathy is damage to your kidneys caused by diabetes. In severe cases it can lead to kidney failure. But not everyone with diabetes has kidney damage.

Healthline, a well-respected health information site, at http://www.healthline.com/health/type-2-diabetes/diabetic-neuropathy#types3 tells us:

Diabetic neuropathy is caused by high blood sugar levels sustained over a long period of time. Other factors can lead to nerve damage, such as:

• damage to the blood vessels, such as damage done by high cholesterol levels
• mechanical injury, such as injuries caused by carpal tunnel syndrome
• lifestyle factors, such as smoking or alcohol use

Low levels of vitamin B-12 can also lead to neuropathy. Metformin (Glucophage), a common medicine used to manage the symptoms of diabetes, can cause lower levels of vitamin B-12.

So much to digest, umm, I mean understand.

It seems to me that while CKD is burgeoning world wide (although as we see in the chart, come countries are lowering the incidence of the disease), but so is CKD awareness… and that gives me hope. I haven’t written about them here, but the European countries each have their own kidney organizations. I remember writing about some of the Caribbean and African countries. If there’s a particular country that interests you which I haven’t covered, leave me a comment.

Until next week,
Keep living your life!

Updated

 

 

 

You may have seen the pictures of the updates we’ve been making to our home on Facebook or Instagram. Now, it seemed to me that if I could update my home, I could update SlowItDownCKD’s social media. So I did. The website at www.gail-raegarwood.com is totally SlowItDownCKD now, as are the Instagram, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Pinterest accounts. Of course, the blog was next. I liked my updates, but realized some of the new organizations on the blogroll (the list to the right of the blog) may be unknown to you.

No problem. I’ll just introduce them to you. Allow me to make the introductions…

We’ll go alphabetically down the roll here. The American Association of Kidney Patients, The American Kidney Fund, and The American Society of Nephrology are not new. Just in case you need a reminder of what each is, I’ve linked their titles to the organization. Just click on one of them to go to their websites, as you usually do for any title on the blogroll.

This brings us to The International Federation of Kidney Foundations. This is directly from the young (established 1999) organization’s website:
The International Federation of Kidney Foundations leads the way in the prevention and treatment of kidney disease, through its Membership on all continents around the world. The Federation was formed to foster international collaboration and the exchange of ideas that will improve the health, well-being and quality of life of individuals with kidney disease. We hope to achieve this by advocating for improved health care delivery as well as adopting and disseminating standards of best practice of treatment and care. We facilitate education programs for member organisations, promote research, communicate with other organisations and exchange ideas, particularly those concerning fund raising….
The IFKF helps facilitate the establishment of more kidney foundations and to help existing foundations become more dynamic and effective. Worldwide, most individuals with chronic kidney disease or hypertension are not diagnosed until long after the illness has developed. Moreover, when they are diagnosed they are too often treated sub-optimally or not at all. In many parts of the world, once end stage kidney failure occurs, patients do not have access to dialysis or kidney transplantation.
IFKF members join together with ISN members and kidney patient associations, to celebrate World Kidney Day annually in March, to influence general physicians, primary healthcare providers, health officials and policymakers and to educate high risk patients and individuals.

I’ve been interested in the global effects of Chronic Kidney Disease since I started preparing for Landmark’s 2017 Conference for Global Transformation at which I presented this past May. Writing two articles for their journal opened my eyes- yet again – to the fact that this is not just a local problem, but a worldwide problem. That’s why I included Kidney Diseases Death Rate By Country, On a World Map in the blogroll. I mapped out the statistics I found here on a trifold map to exhibit at the conference. Seeing the numbers spread all over the world was startling, to say the least.

Here is their 2015 global CKD information:
In 2015, the Asian nations of India and China fared the worst when it came to the number of deaths due to this degenerative health condition per thousand people. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) data (I’m interrupting. Would you like a link to WHO on the blogroll?), India had the highest number of kidney diseases deaths. The data put the figure at an astounding 257.9 per 1,000 people. China had the second highest number of deaths due to kidney diseases. Here, the number stood at 187.4 per 1,000 people. Though not as bad as the two Asian nations, the United States was also grappling with the problem of kidney diseases deaths in 2015. The nation had 59.8 deaths (per 1,000 people) due to kidney diseases, while Indonesia, which occupied the fourth place, had an estimated 43 deaths (per 1,000 people) due to kidney diseases. Nations such as Egypt, Germany, Mexico, Philippines, Brazil, Thailand and Japan reported deaths between 20 and 40 (per 1,000 people) due to kidney-related diseases. But, on the positive side, there were many nations in the world where a negligible number of people died due to kidney diseases. It is a noteworthy fact that countries such as Maldives, Vanuatu, Iceland, Grenada, Comoros, Belize, and many others, reported a zero figure in 2015.

But then I wanted to cover more localized information about CKD, so I included The National Chronic Kidney Disease, Fact Sheet, 2017. This is basically facts with pictograms that make the information about the United States’ CKD information more visual and easier to grasp. The information is more distressing each year the site is updated.

Fast Stats

• 30 million people or 15% of US adults are estimated to have CKD.*

• 48% of those with severely reduced kidney function but not on dialysis are not aware of having CKD.

• Most (96%) people with kidney damage or mildly reduced kidney function are not aware of having CKD.

After several sites that are not new, the last new site, other than direct links to SlowItDownCKD’s kidney books, is The Kidney & Urology Foundation of America. Why did I include that? Take a look at their website. You’ll find this there:
The Kidney & Urology Foundation focuses on care and support of the patient, the concerns of those at risk, education for the community and medical professionals, methods of prevention, and improved treatment options.
What Sets Us Apart?
The Kidney & Urology Foundation of America is comprised of a dedicated Executive Board, medical advisors, educated staff and volunteers who provide individualized support to patients and their families. Adult nephrologists and transplant physicians comprise our Medical Advisory Board, Board – certified urologists serve on the Urology Board, and pediatric nephrologists and urologists represent the Council on Pediatric Nephrology and Urology.
We are a phone call or e-mail click away from getting you the help you need to cope with a new diagnosis, a resource for valuable information on kidney or urologic diseases, a window into current research treatment options or a link to a physician should you need one.

Are there any organizations I’ve left out that you feel should be included? Just add a comment and I’ll be glad to take a look at them. I am convinced that the only way we’re going to get any kind of handle on Chronic Kidney Disease as patients is by keeping each other updated.

Until next week,
Keep living your life!

Here, There, and Everywhere

I was thinking about the AAKP Annual National Meeting coming up in September. You see, I’ve never been to one. Years ago, when I first started writing about Chronic Kidney Disease a reader asked if I’d be there. I was almost a decade younger then and had lots on my plate: teaching college classes, acting, writing, being an active mother, and getting used to my new diagnose. I had no time to run off to meet a bunch of people with the same disease. I didn’t even know anyone there!

Yep, things have changed for me. I’ve retired from both education and acting as of 2013, my children are out of the house although we still have almost daily contact, and I’m better at dealing with CKD. So I’m going. I thought you might like to know something about this group since it was started by patients for patients.

AAKP is the acronym for the American Association of Kidney Patients. I am flabbergasted that six patients in Brooklyn, New York, started this group in 1969 while they were undergoing dialysis and that today AAKP reaches one million people at all stages of kidney disease. I’m a member as of last week. Did I mention that membership is free? This year’s meeting will be in St. Petersburg, Florida from September 8th to the 10th.

I also shied away because I thought they’d have nothing to offer me since I’m stage 3 and the association was started by dialysis patients. I was wrong. Some of the General Sessions deal with national policy and kidney disease, innovations in kidney disease care, patient centered kidney disease care, and the kidney friendly diet. This is not all of them, just the ones I’m interested in.

The smaller Breakout Sessions that might interest others in the early or moderate stages of CKD are social media, dental health, clinical trials, staying active, veterans’ health, lab values, and vaccinations. But that’s not all: there’s even lunch with the experts on the first two days. The topics range from transplant, caregiver, advocacy, cooking, and support groups to acute kidney injury. I mentioned those areas that interest me, but there’s more, far more.

Before I start to sound like I’m selling you a product, here’s their web site so you can explore this association and national meeting for yourself: https://aakp.org.

Let’s say you don’t want to travel. How else can you partake of the kidney patient world, the part of it that doesn’t deal with going to the nephrologist or renal dietician? Well, have you heard of Renal Support Network at http://www.rsnhope.org/? Lori Hartwell has had kidney disease since she was two years old and wanted to instill hope in those with the disease. Now you understand the URL. There are also podcasts about kidney disease at http://www.rsnhope.org/kidneytalk-podcast/ or you can go through the menu on their home page.

Here’s something you can do to help other kidney patients and maybe, just maybe, see your work in print.

Calling all Storytellers who have kidney disease, Share your Experience!

Enter RSN’s 15th Annual Essay Contest.
This year’s theme is “Describe a positive decision that you have made about your healthcare.”
First Prize: $500, Second Prize: $300, Third Prize: $100
Winning essays will be published on RSNhope.org and in Live&Give newsletter

Lori was especially helpful to me when I was first starting out in CKD awareness advocacy. I think you’ll find something of interest to you on her website, although I’ll bet it won’t be the same something for any two people. What I especially like is the Health Library with articles on varied subjects.

Further afield, The Bhutan Kidney Foundation is doing an Amazonian job of spreading kidney disease awareness. I am constantly reading about their walks and educational meetings, as well as governmental initiatives. I think they may even have a Facebook page. Let me go check. Hi again. I’m back and they do.

Have you heard of Mani Trust? This is an India based group that strives to provide humanitarian help to individuals and their country, including those suffering from kidney disease. We know this is not a Western-part-of-the-world-only problem, but I wonder if we realize just how widespread it is.

Remember I told you about the CKD awareness presentation I offered at a global conference several weeks ago? I found astounding facts from World Life Expectancy at http://www.worldlifeexpectancy.com. One of the most striking facts I included in that presentation is that globally 864,226 people  died of kidney disease last year. That makes kidney disease number 15 in the cause of death hit parade.

In Malaysia, there were 2,768 deaths due to kidney disease, over 2% of the country’s total population. In Albania, there were 443, that’s also close to 2% of the country’s total population. Ghana had 2,469 deaths, which is 1.3%.  Egypt? 15,820, which is almost 3½ %. Here in the United States, there were 59,186 deaths, which is almost 3% of our population. What’s my point?

Kidney disease is a global problem. I don’t know what I can do to help in other countries in other parts of the world, but I do know what I can do to help here… and what you can do to help here. If you’re able to, attend the national meetings and local conferences about kidney disease and spread whatever new information you’ve learned. If you are unable to travel, keep your eye on the Facebook kidney disease pages which often have files and delve into them. Share this information, too. If you don’t travel and you’re not on a computer, register for mailing lists and share information from them, too. Of course, check everything you read with your nephrologist before you share and use the advice yourself.

 

You’ll find a blog roll – a list of kidney care and awareness organizations – on the right side of my blog. Why not explore some of these and see which ones appeal to you? If you like them, you’ll read them. And, hopefully, if you read them, you’ll share the information. According to the latest CDC findings, more than one out of every seven people in the United States has CKD. Let’s try to change those figures. By the way, you can read more about this at https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/pdf/kidney_factsheet.pdf.

Until next week,
Keep living your life!

Women and Water (Men, too)

Welcome to March: National Kidney Month and Women’s History Month. I’m going to fudge a bit on the ‘History’ part of that as I did last month with Black History Month. I don’t often have guest bloggers, but this month will feature two women as guest bloggers in honor of Women’s History Month. The first is Jessica Walter, who sent me the following email last month:

Hi There,

I am a freelance health and food writer, I have teamed up with a small senior lifestyle advice site, I worked with them to develop a complete guide on how to eat better and be healthier from a dietary point of view. This includes detailed information on why being hydrated is so important. … you can check out the article here:

https://www.senioradvisor.com/ blog/2017/02/7-tips-on- developing-better-eating- habits-in-your-senior-years/.

I liked what Jessica had to say and how easily it could be adapted not only for senior Chronic Kidney Disease patients, but all Chronic Kidney Disease patients.

In addition, she sent me this short article about hydration and CKD. It’s easy to read and has some information we constantly need to be reminded of.

Staying Hydrated When You Have Chronic Kidney Disease

We all know that drinking water is important for our health, and monitoring fluid intake is critical for those with chronic kidney disease. Too much water can be problematic, but so can too little. Dehydration can be serious for those with chronic kidney disease. If you are suffering from vomiting, diarrhea, fever, or diabetes, or if you urinate frequently, you may become dehydrated because you are losing more fluid than you are taking in. For those without chronic kidney disease, the solution is to increase the intake of water until the body is sufficiently hydrated.

Since dehydration can decrease blood flow to the kidneys, and as fluid intake must be controlled in patients with chronic kidney disease, it’s important to closely monitor their fluid intake and loss in these circumstances.

Recognizing The Signs

The first step is to recognize the physical signs of dehydration. You may have a dry mouth or dry eyes, heart palpitations, muscle cramps, lightheadedness or fainting, nausea, or vomiting. You may notice a decrease in your urine output. Weight loss of more than a  pound or two over a few days can also be an indicator of dehydration. If you are taking ACE inhibitors and ARBs, such as lisinopril, enalapril, valsartan, or losartan, or water pills or diuretics, these medications can harm your kidneys if you become dehydrated. It is doubly important to be aware of signs of dehydration if you are on any of these medications.

Steps to Take

To rehydrate your body, start by increasing your intake of water and ensure that you are eating plenty of fruits and vegetables. (Me here: remember to stay within your renal diet guidelines for fruits, vegetables, and fluids.)If you cannot keep water down, or if increased consumption doesn’t alleviate the signs of dehydration, contact your health care provider  immediately.

They may also recommend a different fluid than plain water since electrolytes and minerals can also be reduced if you are dehydrated, but you may still need to watch your intake of potassium, phosphorus, protein, and sodium. Your doctor may recommend an oral rehydration solution that will restore your body to a proper level of hydration. If you have a fluid restriction because you are on dialysis, you should consult your healthcare provider if you have issues with or questions about hydration. Taking in or retaining too much fluid when you have these restrictions can lead to serious complications, including headaches, swelling, high blood pressure and even stroke. Carefully monitoring your fluid intake and watching for signs of dehydration will help you to avoid the consequences of dehydration.

I’ve blogged many times over the last six years about hydration. I’m enjoying reading this important material from another’s point of view. I’m sorry Jessica’s grandmother had to suffer this, but I’m also glad Jessica chose to share her writing about it with us.

 

This June, 2010, article included in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 furthers explains:

“.…Dr. HL Trivedi of the Institute of Kidney Diseases and Research Centre (IKDRC) said, ‘…. Rapid water loss causes the kidney’s functioning to slow down, resulting in temporary or permanent kidney failure.’

Extreme heat causes rapid water loss, resulting in acute electrolyte imbalance. The kidney, unable to cope with the water loss, fails to flush out the requisite amount of Creatinine and other toxins from the body. Coupled with a lack of consistent water intake, this brings about permanent or temporary kidney failure, explain experts.”

The article can be viewed directly at http://www.dnaindia.com/health/report_heat-induced-kidney-ailments-see-40pct-rise_1390589 and is from “Daily News & Analysis.”

The CDC also offers advice to avoid heat illness:

“People with a chronic medical condition are less likely to sense and respond to changes in temperature. Also, they may be taking medications that can worsen the impact of extreme heat. People in this category need the following information.

  • Drink more water than usual and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Check the local news for health and safety updates regularly.
  • Don’t use the stove or oven to cook——it will make you and your house hotter.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Take cool showers or baths to cool down.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you or someone you know experiences symptoms of heat-related illness(http://www.cdc.gov/extremeheat/warning

It’s clear we need to keep an eye on our hydration. While we’re doing that, keep the other eye out for SlowItDownCKD 2016 purposely available on World Kidney Day on Amazon.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

At Last: Cuba

img_4287I’ve been saying for a couple of weeks now that I would write about Cuba, or rather The Republic of Cuba since that is the country’s official title. That’s where I spent my Groundhog’s Day 70th birthday in the company of my husband, brother, and sister-in-law. By the way, whenever we travel together, they are the best part of the trip no matter what we see or where we go.

But I digress; Cuba is a beautiful country with friendly people and colorful buildings painted in those colors the government approves … in addition to free education and free medical care. Considering Cuba is a country run by The Communist Party, maybe this universal medical and education isn’t as free as we might think.

Let’s take a look at the education first since you can’t have nephrologists without education. While there is free education, you need to be loyal to the government and perform community service as the ‘price’ of receiving it. I wasn’t clear about how you demonstrated “loyal to the government,” but the Cubanos (as the Cuban people refer to themselves) politely declined to discuss this.

The education includes six years of basics of reading, writing, and arithmetic – the same 3 Rs we study in grade school in the USA. After that, there are three years of img_4006middle school with traditional school subjects that are taught pretty much anywhere. But then things change. Cubanos can attend what we might consider a traditional high school for three years or a vocational school for three years.  This is also when marching in parades and community service begins.

Nephrologists would have chosen the traditional high school. After that, there’s another five to six years of university for their medical degree. Not everyone attends university; students need to pass certain exams in order to be allowed to attend… something we’re used to hearing. So now our doctor has become a doctor. What additional education is needed to become a nephrologist?

I tried to question the people I met in ports of call, but again they declined to answer in full. From the little bit I got from them and the even less I could garner from the internet: all medical students need to do a residency in General Medicine. If you want to go on to a specialty – like Nephrology – you need to do an additional residency in that field.

Well, what about the medicine itself? What do Cubano doctors know about nephrology?

According to Radio Angulo – Cuba’s information radio – on November 23 of last year,

img_4040“The positive development of this specialty began with the triumph of the Revolution in 1959, as Dr. Charles Magrans Buch, full professor and professor emeritus, told Granma International. Magrans began practicing his profession in 1958 in the Clinico de 26, today the Joaquin Albarran Clinical-Surgical Teaching Hospital, home to the Dr. Abelardo Buch Lopez Institute of Nephrology.”

Granma International describes itself as The Official Voice of the Communist Party of Cuba Central Committee.

As for the quality of the medical schools,

“…Cuba trains young physicians worldwide in its Latin American School of Medicine (ELAM). Since its inception in 1998, ELAM has graduated more than 20,000 doctors from over 123 countries. Currently, 11,000 young people from over 120 nations follow a career in medicine at the Cuban institution.”  You can read more about ELAM in Salim Lamrani’s blog in the 8/8/14 edition of The Huffington Post at http://www.huffingtonpost.com/salim-lamrani/cubas-health-care-system-_b_5649968.html

Yesterday, I stumbled upon this which is also from Granma: “The Cuban Institute of Nephrology is celebrating its 50th anniversary this December 1st, having provided more than 5,000 kidney transplants and 3,125 patients with dialysis.”

So, nephrology is not new to Cuba nor is there a dearth of opportunities to study this specialty. Keep in mind that this is government run health care. There aren’t img_4142any private clinics or hospitals in Cuba.

And how good is that health care system? This is from the 4/9/14 HavanaTimes.org:

“Boasting health statistics above all other countries in Latin America and the Caribbean (and even the United States), Cuba’s healthcare system has achieved world recognition and been endorsed by the World and Pan-American Health Organizations and the United Nations.”

HavanaTimes.org is not part of the government. Some of their writers have been blacklisted, while others have been questioned. Somehow, that makes me feel more secure that their information is not the party line but more truthful. I don’t mean to say the government is dishonest, but I prefer information from private sources in this case.

Before you get your passport in order and book a trip to Cuba for medical reasons, you should know  “…it is not legal for Americans to go to Cuba as medical tourists….” This information is from Cuba Medical Travel Adviser & Guide at http://www.doctorcuba.com/. What I found curious is that it is not illegal for Cuban doctors to treat American patients in Cuba. Do Americans disguise themselves as being from other countries to obtain the low cost, high quality medical treatment Cuba has to offer? How can they do that if a passport is needed to enter the country? Maybe I’m naïve.

img_4213Cuban medicine follows a different model than that of the USA. A general (family) doctor earns about $20 a month with free housing and food.  His or her mornings are spent at the clinic with the afternoons reserved for house calls. Doctors treat patients and/or research. Preventive medicine is the norm with shortages of medication and supplies a constant problem.

You have to remember that I have limited access to information about Cuba (as does the rest of the world), and am not so certain my even more limited Spanish – which is not even Cubano Spanish – and the limited English of the Cubanos I spoke with has allowed me to fully understand the answers I was given to the questions I asked.

It’s been fun sharing what I think I learned with you since it brought the feeling of being in Cuba right back. Can you hear the music?  I’ve got to get up to dance.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!IMG_2979

Updates, Anyone?

FullSizeRender (2)Several months ago, an Arizona reader asked me to meet her for lunch to talk over her Chronic Kidney Disease journey and mine. I was open to the idea and glad to be able to share ideas with each other. Uh-oh, during the conversation, while trying to share my iPhone apps with her, I discovered that one of those I use to help me is no longer available to new installers. That got me to thinking about what else may have changed in the CKD electronic world.

Time to back track just a bit. I have an iPhone and look for apps for those. Many of the apps I looked at are also available for Androids, iPads, and iPod Touch. According to GCFLearnFree.org – a program of Goodwill Community Foundation® and Goodwill Industries of Eastern NC Inc.® (GIENC®)  – at http://www.gcflearnfree.org/computerbasics/understanding-applications/1/,

“Simply put, an app is a type of software that allows you to perform specific tasks. Applications for desktop or laptop computers are sometimes called desktop applications, while those for mobile devices are called mobile apps.”

During an internet search, I found that NephCure which provides “detailed information about the diseases that cause Nephrotic Syndrome (NS) and Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis (FSGS)” (and was one of the first organizations to interview me about CKD, by the way) – at http://nephcure.org/livingwithkidneydisease/managing-your-care/kidney-health-tracking-tools/helpful-mobile-apps/ was way ahead of me in discussing apps. This is what’s on their website:

Diet and Nutrition Apps

  • 02-77-6660_ebe_myfoodcoachappKidneyAPPetite– Gives daily summaries of key nutrients for kidney health, check the nutritional value of foods before you eat it, and provides printable summaries to refer to. Great for patients on a renal diet! Cost: Free,  Device: iOS
  • Pocket Dietitian– Created by a Nephrologist, allows you to choose your health conditions and dietary restrictions to see recommended foods as well as keep track of what you have eaten. You can even see your past nutrition in graph form. Cost: Free,  Device: iOS and Android
  • My Food Coach– is designed to help you understand and manage all of your nutritional requirements. This app offers personalized nutrition information, recipes and meal plans. Cost: Free,  Device: iOS and Android
  • HealthyOut– Enables you to search and order nearby healthy food and browse for healthy options while out to eat. You can even choose a specific diet such as gluten free! Cost: Free, Device: iOS and Android

kidneyapp

  • Restaurant Nutrition– Allows you to search restaurants and look at nutritional values, locate nearby restaurants, and keep a food journal. The Restaurant Nutrition application shows nutritional information of restaurant foods. Cost: Free, Device: iOS and Android

While I could easily go to most of the apps’ websites by clicking on the name while I held down the control button, this was not the case with Pocket IMG_2982Dietician. I was able to find it and lots of descriptive information about it in the Google Play store, but kept getting the message that I had no devices. The help function on the site was not helpful.

I have KidneyAPPetite on my phone, but keep using KidneyDiet instead. It keeps track of the 3 Ps (protein, potassium, and the one missing from food labels: phosphorous), sodium, calories, carbohydrates, cholesterol, and fat, and fluid intake. The very nice part of the app? You can add the foods you eat that are not on the food list provided. Unfortunately, this is the one I mentioned in the first paragraph. This is what’s presently on their website:

The KidneyDiet® app is no longer being sold or supported. It, and all your data, will continue to reside on your device unless you delete it.

Thank you for your patronage. We hope KidneyDiet® has helped you.

Sincerely,
The KidneyDiet® Team

FullSizeRender (3)I consider this a great loss for those looking for a simple nutritional app for their CKD.

What about My Food Coach? It has an extra feature that my favorite lacked: a warning when a recipe would bring you over your renal diet limits. It’s recipe oriented, which doesn’t endear it to me since I like to experiment cooking my big five ounces of protein daily with my three different size servings of different fruits that are on my renal diet. I also avoid red meat.

HealthyOut, while not specifically for CKD, does have a function for the Mediterranean diet which is more often than not recommended for us. I thought this was a hoot since it never occurred to me that you can check restaurant foods by the restaurant name. I am adding this app to my iPhone.

Restaurant Nutrition is another app offered by Google Play, which means I can’t even get into it. I did get through to the reviews and couldn’t find any positive ones. I didn’t see the point in pursuing this any further.IMG_2980

There are even kidney disease games, such as KidneyWarrior, to teach yourself and your loved ones about your disease. This is the author’s description of the game:

“A new hero emerges to fight a dreadful illness. A quest to save his father. A brand NEW approach to mobile gaming •Play as Glo, a young hero on his exciting adventure to save his father •SHOOT, SMACK, and SPIN your way through 3 different and exciting stages, packed with hours of gaming •LEARN about what kidneys do and how kidney disease affects people worldwide Created on behalf of Project ARK, an organization focused to support research efforts on combating kidney disease. As a high school organization, Project ARK seeks to raise awareness on campus and within the community.”

To borrow a term from a now defunct cigarette brand: We’ve come a long way, baby!

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Deep in the Heart of Texas

Last week I wrote that I’d tell you about our Texas trip this week and that’s just what I’ll do… sort of. We were in San Antonio for the Air Force Basic Training Graduation of a close family friend. I hadn’t wanted to go. The rest of the family was driving 14 hours straight. I thought they were insane.

It turned out I was right about that, but I am glad I went anyway.  The next day, our friend proposed to his girlfriend – who just happened to be our daughter – at The Riverwalk’s Secret Waterfall, Airmen escort and all. THAT was worth the ride. And we got to know his family better, understand them more, and value their company.  As they say in the ad, secret“Priceless.”

There was only one fly in the ointment. While the temperature was manageable for us since we live in Arizona, the humidity was not for the same reason. For my other than U.S. readers (and there are quite a few of them since I have 107,000 readers in 106 countries), Arizona’s usual humidity is low, very low. We do have a three minute rainy season in August (Okay, maybe it’s a teensy bit more than three minutes.) when it rises, but that’s not the norm.

Last week, the humidity in San Antonio, Texas, was between 68% and 72%. Even the air conditioning in the hotel bowed before it.  Our Airman had Air Force logoscheduled the entire weekend for us: The Airman’s run on an open field, late lunch at a restaurant with no available indoor seating, graduation on the parade field, an afternoon on The Riverwalk. There’s more, but you get the idea.  All of it outdoors, all of it in 68% to 72% humidity, all of it uncomfortable as can be.

And, it turns out, all of it not great for a Chronic Kidney Disease patient. Why? Well, that’s the topic of today’s blog. ResearchGate at https://www.researchgate.net/publication/263084331_Climate_change_and_Chronic_Kidney_Disease published a study from the Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research from February of 2014 (That’s over two years ago, friends.) which included the following in the conclusion:

“Our data suggest that burden of renal diseases may increase as period of hot weather becomes more frequent. This is further aggravated if age advanced and people with chronic diseases like diabetes and hypertension.”DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAIL

That makes sense, but how will this happen exactly? I included this June, 2010, article in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1. Apparently, heat (and humidity) has been an acknowledged threat to our kidneys for longer than we’d thought.

“.…Dr. HL Trivedi of the Institute of Kidney Diseases and Research Centre (IKDRC) said, ‘…. Rapid water loss causes the kidney’s functioning to slow down, resulting in temporary or permanent kidney failure.’

Extreme heat causes rapid water loss, resulting in acute electrolyte imbalance. The kidney, unable to cope with the water loss, fails to flush out the requisite amount of Creatinine and other toxins from the body. Coupled with a lack of consistent water intake, this brings about permanent or temporary kidney failure, explain experts.”

The article can be viewed directly at http://www.dnaindia.com/health/report_heat-induced-kidney-ailments-see-40pct-rise_1390589 and is from “Daily News & Analysis.”

By the time this book’s twin, The Book of Blogs: Moderate Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2, was ready for publication, the (then) NKF-logo_Hori_OBspokesman for The National Kidney Foundation – Dr. Leslie Spry – had this to say about heat and humidity:

“Heat illness occurs when body temperature exceeds a person’s ability to dissipate that heat and is commonly diagnosed when the body temperature approaches 104 degrees Fahrenheit and when humidity is greater than 70 percent. Once the humidity is that high, sweating becomes Digital Cover Part 2 redone - Copyless effective at dispersing body heat, and the core body temperature begins to rise.”

The entire article is at http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leslie-spry-md-facp/heat-illness_b_1727995.html

Oh, so humidity affects sweating and body heat rises.  Humidity greater than 70%. That covers almost the entire time we were in Texas. Well, what’s the connection between heat illness and CKD then?

The CDC offers the following advice to avoid heat illness:

“People with a chronic medical condition are less likely to sense and respond to changes in temperature. Also, they may be taking medications that can worsen the impact of extreme heat. People in this category need the following information.

  • Drink more water than usual and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Check the local news for health and safety updates regularly.
  • Don’t use the stove or oven to cook——it will make you and your house hotter.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Take cool showers or baths to cool down.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you or someone you know experiences symptoms of heat-related illness(http://www.cdc.gov/extremeheat/warning.html).”

bottled waterUh-oh, we’re already in trouble. Look at the first suggestion: our fluid intake is restricted to 64 oz. (Mine is, check with your nephrologist for yours.) I know I carefully space out my fluids – which include anything that can melt to a liquid – to cover my entire day. I can’t drink more water than usual and, sometimes – on those rare occasions when I’ve been careless – have to wait until I’m thirsty to drink.

Diabetes is the foremost cause of CKD. I was curious how heat affected blood sugar so I popped over to Information about Diabetes at http://www.informationaboutdiabetes.com/lifestyle/lifestyle/how-heat-and-humidity-may-affect-blood-sugar and found this:

  1. If our body is low on fluids, the kidneys receive less blood flow and work less effectively. This might cause blood glucose concentrations to rise.
  2. If someone’s blood sugar is already running high in the heat, not only will they lose water through sweat but they might urinate more frequently too, depleting their body’s fluids even more.

There’s more at the website if this interests you.

So, pretty much, the way to deal with heat and humidity having an effect on your (and my) CKD is to avoid it. That doesn’t mean you have to move, you know.  Stay in air conditioning as long as you can so your body is not overheated and can better handle this kind of weather. Wearing a hat and cool clothes will also help. I certainly learned the value of wearing cotton this past week. It’s a fabric that breathes.

What is itUntil next week,SlowItDownCKD 2015 Book Cover (76x113)

Keep living your life!

Still Getting Birthday Gifts… like OAB

happy birthdayBear has just spoiled me and spoiled me for this birthday. It was not a special birthday, just a birthday. His reasoning, “I’m celebrating being with you for another year.” Which, of course, made me think. My first thought? I realized how much I liked being adored by the man I love.

My second?  Time changes things.  Your weight changes.  Your hair color changes.  Even your height changes. There are those that say aging is a problem. I say if you’re aging, you’re alive so it’s not a problem, but rather something to which you need to adapt.

Part of the birthday celebration was an overnight at The Desert Rose Bed and Breakfast in Cottonwood. The place was unique. They house animals they’ve rescued: llamas, cats, chickens. I thought the llamas were the most picture worthy, but then I’d never seen the kind of fluffed out rooster they had. Up the hill was a goat farm. For a city woman like me, this was heaven.

Except – there was this – there were no hand rails on the steep path from the house to the animals. Nor were there steps. The runoff from a recent hose cleaning of some apparatus near the house caused the loose gravel covered road to be slick. So we took teeny little ‘old person’ steps while the owner, a young woman possibly in her thirties, practically scampered. We got to see the animals, but we had to adapt how we got to them due to our age related capabilities.llama

The private bath was another eye opener for me. Bear opted for the room with the spa. It was so relaxing and could have even been romantic except that there were no grab rails. We slipped, we fell, we worried if Bear broke his foot.  But it was supposed to be romantic!

Oh well. There was also the kind of shower I’d only seen in magazines.  You know the kind that could easily fit six people (uh, not my style) with two separate shower heads – one on each end of the shower. This was a new toy for me, until the floor got wet. Again, no grab rails. There was no safety mat on the shower floor, either. So we tried to hold on to the walls. Hah! They were tile that was just as slippery.

You get the point?  This was a beautiful, romantic, upscale bathroom… and wasted on us because there were no safety features to accommodate our gifts from aging. Of course, not everyone would have felt this way, but we each have neuropathy which can make balancing difficult.

shoqweIn addition to grab bars in our at home bathrooms, we have no area rugs anywhere in the house. This is to cut down on the possibility of tripping. When our primary care doctor suggested ways to prevent injuring ourselves, we listened. Bear’s time flat on his back after his foot surgery convinced us we never wanted to go through that again. For me, with my ‘age related’ macular degeneration, we also use ultra-bright LED bulbs throughout the house.

Okay, so where am I going with this? I’m circling in on the kidneys via urination. Remember the kidneys produce urine which is stored in the bladder.  I wanted to know what was usual for people ‘our age’ and why. After all, I’d made the bathrooms as safe as possible understanding that one or the other of us was going to get up during the night to urinate.

I turned to The Cleveland Clinic at http://health.clevelandclinic.org/2015/12/stop-full-bladder-killing-sleep/ for some help.

“If you’re urinating more than eight times in 24 hours, that’s too much. A lot depends on your age. And if you’re between age 65-70 and going more than twice a night, you should make an appointment with your doctor. Also, see a doctor if you are getting up more than once a night if you are between age 60-65, and more than three times each night if you are age 70 or older. While your bladder’s capacity does not necessarily decrease with age, the prevalence of overactive bladder increases with age.”

Apparently, an overactive bladder may also lead to increased falls. Not fair! We’re already dealing with the neuropathy to avoid this. Oh, right. “…if you’re aging, you’re alive so it’s not a problem, but rather something to which you need to adapt.”detrusor

I wonder if aging is a factor because the detrusor (bladder muscle) ages right along with the rest of you.  A long time ago, I explained that my Chronic Kidney Disease was caused by nothing more than growing older. I hate to admit it, but it does make sense. All of you ages when you age, not just certain parts.

What is itBirthday giveaway for What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease! All you have to do to win is be one of the first three people to enter the contest and follow SlowItDownCKD on Twitter. Here’s link to enter for a chance to win: https://giveaway.amazon.com/p/542abbec7a52e10a#ln-fo

I hope you’re keeping an eye on P2P’s Chronic Illness Buy and Sell’s contest. I’ll be gifting a copy of one of my Chronic Kidney Disease Books to three different winners.  Each winner will receive a different book. This one started February 1st and runs until St. Valentine’s Day.  Here’s the address: http://www.facebook.com/groups/P2PBuy.Sell. You do need to be a member of the group, tag yourself in a comment below the announcement of the contest, and be involved with kidney disease as a patient or caretaker.

My accountant (Yep, working on those this week.) thinks I’m nuts to be part of so many giveaways and contests, but my mission… no, my passion… is to get information about Chronic Kidney Disease out to as many people as I can, in as many ways as I can, for as long as I can.

IMG_1398

To that end, Phoenix area readers, please let me know if you are interested in joining Team SlowItDownCKD for this year’s kidney walk at Chase Stadium on Sunday, April 17.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

It Would Have Been Nice…

NYC I’m just back from a wonderful week in New York where people traveled great distances to see me, gladly opened their homes to me, and introduced me to interesting – very interesting – people. Between my family and friends, I haven’t felt this loved in a long time…and I always feel loved.

But one thing bothered me. I couldn’t seem to get enough fruit and vegetables each day since I was staying with people who ate differently from me, had different schedules than I did, and took me out to restaurants quite a bit.

Some days, there were no vegetables at all in my diet.  I didn’t like that, so I started playing around with ideas of how I could avoid this problem when next I travel visiting others. I seem to have no problem when I’m by myself during my travels.

This time, I had stopped at little markets on my way from one place to another, but no one was willing to sell me half a banana (for example) and, considering the timing of my market visits, some hadn’t received their fresh fruit and vegetable deliveries yet or had already sold out of them.  Mind you, I’m not talking about big chain supermarkets here. There weren’t any near the elevated or subway train stations I used.fruits and veggies

That’s when I remembered Janet Cook who is a Juice Plus representative, so I took a look at her website. On, my! This is a product I wish I had discovered before being diagnosed with Chronic Kidney Disease.

This is how Juice Plus+ describes itself on her website at http://janetcook.juiceplus.com/content/JuicePlus/en/what-is-juice-plus/what-is-juice-plus.html

Juice Plus+ is whole food based nutrition, including juice powder concentrates from 30 different fruits, vegetables and grains. Juice Plus+ helps bridge the gap between what you should eat and what you do eat every day. Not a multivitamin, medicine, treatment or cure for any disease, Juice Plus+ is made from quality ingredients carefully monitored from farm to capsule to provide natural nutrients your body needs to be at its best.

No great claims, just common sense getting the fruits and vegetables you may be missing every day.  Natural nutrients. Oh, joy! But wait… what’s this about concentrate?

The Cambridge Dictionary at http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/english/concentrate offers us both the noun (name) and verb (action) definitions for concentrate.

Noun – a substance from which water or other substances have been removed

Verb – to make a ​substance ​stronger or ​purer by ​removing ​water or other ​substances

We’re used to the noun definition, but did you realize that, according to the definition of the word as a verb, concentration makes a substance stronger?

I scoured the website for the concentration’s equivalence of each fruit and vegetable but couldn’t find them. Then I realized that’s futile. If they are in the mix, how can you figure out how much of it is in the concentrate?

Janet was quick to offer me the name and email address of their consulting doctor when I explained my quandary to her. I liked that: transparency about their product.

She’d also asked me repeatedly which fruits and vegetables I couldn’t have.  Much to my chagrin, I realized I’d never answered her. I downloaded the ingredients in two of their products and compared them to the Northern Arizona Council on Renal Nutrition Diet which I follow.

 Juice Plus+ Orchard & Garden Blend

20 FRUITS, VEGETABLES, AND GRAINS

  • Apple • Acerola Cherry • Beet • Cranberry • Date • Orange • Pineapple • Papaya • Peach • Prune • Broccoli • Brown Rice Bran • Cabbage • Carrot • Garlic • Kale • Oat Bran • Parsley • Spinach • Tomato •

Juice Plus+ Orchard, Garden Blend & Vineyard Blend

30 FRUITS, VEGETABLES, AND GRAINS

  • Apple • Acerola Cherry • Beet • Cranberry • Date • Orange • Pineapple • Papaya • Peach • Prune • Broccoli • Brown Rice Bran • Cabbage • Carrot • Garlic • Kale • Oat Bran • Parsley • Spinach • Tomato • Artichoke • Bilberry • Blackberry • Black Currant • Blueberry • Cocoa • Concord grape • Cranberry • Elderberry • Pomegranate • Raspberry •

Again, I was taken with the transparency.  However, I found another problem for CKD patients here. I am restricted to 3000 mg. of potassium and 800 mg. of phosphorous daily.  Artichokes and dates are high potassium food. And don’t forget the products are concentrated which means the potassium count will be even higher.  Brans, bilberry, and cocoa are high in phosphorous.

Then there’s the problem that our kidneys are not so great at filtering waste from our bodies when we have CKD. That means the excess potassium and phosphorous stay in our bodies longer and more of it stays.

Globe-ArtichokeAccording to WebMD at http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/hyperkalemia-causes-symptoms-treatments?page=2

Hyperkalemia {That’s the medical term for excess potassium.} is a common cause of life-threatening heart rhythm changes, or cardiac arrhythmias. It can lead to an emergency condition called ventricular fibrillation. In this condition, the lower parts of your heart flutter rapidly instead of pumping blood.

Untreated, an extremely high amount of potassium in your blood can make your heart stop beating, causing death.

Excess phosphorous is a bit more complicated. Healthline at http://www.healthline.com/health/phosphorus-in-diet#TooMuchPhosphorous6 informs us of the following.cocoa

According to the NIH {This refers to the National Institutes of Health.}, it’s rare to have too much phosphorus in your blood (NIH, 2011). Typically, this problem only develops in people with kidney disease or those who have problems regulating their calcium.

However, too much phosphate can be toxic. An excess of the mineral can cause diarrhea, as well as a hardening of organs and soft tissue.

Having too much phosphorus in your blood can also cause it to combine with calcium, forming mineral deposits in your muscles.

High levels of phosphorus can also affect your body’s ability to effectively use other minerals, such as iron, calcium, magnesium, and zinc.

What is itThere’s more discussion of how CKD can affect the amounts of what we can tolerate and why in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease. This is one of the topics I found the most confusing when I was first diagnosed.

Am I disappointed that I can’t take this product? A little, but not enough to take the chance of hastening the decline of my kidney function even further. Everything we put in our mouths – food or medication – affects our CKD.

Say, were you part of the book giveaway?  Would you like me to congratulate you publicly on the blog? Let me know.  And look for another giveaway when the indexes for the twins are done.IMG_1398

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Time Flies When You’re Having Fun

IMG_1625Last week, Bear and I were in Las Vegas for a mini-family reunion. It was my mother’s nephew’s… let’s just say it was a combination of blood relatives and those we consider relatives without the blood connection.

What with the complimentary hotel room at the absolutely gorgeous SLS (which we understand was formerly the Sahara) and the gift of tickets to the outrageous show ‘Diva’ (male impersonators of female celebrities), an edifying tour of The Neon Boneyard, a family Las Vegas style buffet at Red Rock Casino, and a leisurely stroll down the overly-stimulating Fremont Street, we had a wonderful time.

I even got in my usual 20 minutes of gambling. I don’t really have tolerance or a liking for it, but it seemed the right thing to do since that was why the hotel gave us the two nights gratis. I won.IMG_1638

But in another way, I lost. My cousin Amy wasn’t there. She was part of this family. Her husband was there. Her uncle was there. Her mother and brothers were, but she wasn’t.  Three years ago she died of cancer.

She died within one week of my dearest, closest buddy on earth who also died of cancer. My buddy died of colorectal cancer. She’d refused any contact with the medical community for the last decade of her life and she paid the ultimate price for it.  A colonoscopy could have saved her life.

Almost five years ago, I had a colonoscopy… and now it’s time to have one again.  While this is not my favorite activity, I am willing to do so since cancer runs in my family and I’ve already had a bleeding polyp. These are not issues I usually share and, yes, it’s a bit awkward for me but if I can convince even one person who’s presently nauseated just thinking about colonoscopy to have one, it’s worth my personal discomfort.

While the term is becoming common, not everyone knows what a colonoscopy is. WebMd at http://www.webmd.com/colorectal-cancer/colonoscopy-16695 explains.

colonoscopy Colonoscopy is a test that allows your doctor to look at the inner lining of yoularge intestine (rectum and colon). He or she uses a thin, flexible tube called a colonoscope to look at the colon. A colonoscopy helps find ulcerscolon polyps, tumors, and areas of inflammation or bleeding. During a colonoscopy, tissue samples can be collected (biopsy) and abnormal growths can be taken out. Colonoscopy can also be used as a screening test to check for cancer or precancerous growths in the colon or rectum (polyps).

The colonoscope is a thin, flexible tube that ranges from 48 in. (122 cm) to 72 in. (183 cm) long. A small video camera is attached to the colonoscope so that your doctor can take pictures or video of the large intestine (colon). The colonoscope can be used to look at the whole colon and the lower part of the small intestine. A test called sigmoidoscopy shows only the rectum and the lower part of the colon.

Before this test, you will need to clean out your colon (colon prep). Colon prep takes 1 to 2 days, depending on which type of prep your doctor recommends. Some preps may be taken the evening before the test. For many people, the prep for a colonoscopy is more trying than the actual test. Plan to stay home during your prep time since you will need to use the bathroom often. The colon prep causes loose, frequent stools and diarrhea so that your colon will be empty for the test. The colon Normalprep may be uncomfortable and you may feel hungry on the clear liquid diet. If you need to drink a special solution as part of your prep, be sure to have clear fruit juices or soft drinks to drink after the prep because the solution tastes salty.

You have CKD; this is not the prep you will be using.

The National Institute of Health at https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/colonoscopy.html suggests you have a colonoscopy for the following reasons.

  • To look for early signs of cancer in the colon and rectum. It may be part of a routine screening, which usually starts at age 50.
  • To look for causes of unexplained changes in bowel habits
  • To evaluate symptoms like abdominal pain, rectal bleeding, and weight loss

Let’s talk about prep a bit more. You cannot take the usually prescribed Fleet enemas or anything with oral sodium phosphate. Get it?  Sodium?  Phosphate?  Both bad news for CKDers.  One possible alternative is a polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution such as Miralax.  As usual, check with your nephrologist.

DucolaxDucolax is also often prescribed as prep for the procedure, but everydayhealth.com at http://www.everydayhealth.com/drugs/dulcolax-laxative makes clear it’s not automatically safe for CKD patients. (Bisacodyl is the compound name; Ducolax is the brand name.)  Take note of the first item on the list.

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely use bisacodyl:

  • kidney disease;
  • trouble swallowing;
  • a history of bowel obstruction, diverticulitis, ulcerative colitis, or other intestinal disorder; or
  • if you are taking a diuretic (“water pill”).

This is decidedly turning into a two part blog.  More on the curiously challenging concept of colonoscopy next week.

We’re not the only ones who took a vacation. Here’s a picture of the man behind the title of Loyal Reader, Geo De Angelo, on his vacation:

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Meanwhile, back at the ranch (better known as my office), I wonder if you’re one of the winners in the GiveAway for What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney DiseaseWhat is it. You know, the GiveAway in which I paid for ten of each eighth book bought. If you are, please announce yourself either here in the comments section, on the Facebook page – https://www.facebook.com/WhatHowearlyCKD – or on Twitter @SlowItDownCKD so we can publicly congratulate you. If you haven’t seen the GiveAway yet, you can at http://www.amazon.com/What-How-Did-Get-Chronic/dp/1457502143/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1445197041&sr=8-1&keywords=What+Is+It+and+How+Did+i+gET+IT%3F+Early+stage+chronic+kidney+disease.

If you missed it, no worries.  I’m presently working on a different sort of GiveAway with a certain Facebook Kidney Disease Support Group.  More on that next week when I have all the details. Oh, and let’s not forget about the twins (presently being indexed) …IMG_1398

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Proof Positive

Name

Standard Range

 5/29/15  9/4/15
TSH

0.450 – 4.500 uIU/mL

 1.900  3.480

diabetes

Name

Standard Range

5/29/15 9/4/15
Microalbumin, Urine

0.0 – 17.0 ug/mL

29.7 38.9

Glomerulus-Nephron 300 dpi jpg

How’s that for proof positive of what stress can do to you?  Other values also shot up, some past the normal range. While .57 to 1.00 mg/dL is within range for creatinine, I knew mine was a bit beyond this range. Now it’s shot up from 1.02 to 1.12.

My glucose – which I’ve spent over a year getting and keeping in range – went up from 94 to 117 mg/dL. The normal range is 65-99.

And my GFR? Oh no, down to 51 from 56.  So now I’m a stressed, sicker person.

Mind you, this was unavoidable stress. There was a medical emergency in the family (No, it’s not me.) and, by default, I was the one handling it. There simply wasn’t anyone else to do it at the time and it had to be dealt with immediately.  It was that kind of emergency.

There went the carefully orchestrated seven hours of sleep a night.  A 36 hour round trip to New Jersey with snatches of sleep here and there killed that.

There went the carefully orchestrated daily exercise. I couldn’t leave the patient alone long enough to even walk the airports… and the patient was incapable of doing it, anyway.

There went the carefully orchestrated ingestion of 64 fluid oz. It was catch as catch can since you can’t bring water into the gate area and they only had flavored or mineral infused water for sale once you passed the entry area.

There went the carefully orchestrated renal diet.  No, wait, that one I was very, very careful about.  I just drove the restaurant servers nuts with all my modifications. I figured if I could hold on to that, maybe I wouldn’t do as much damage to my kidneys and sugar levels as I feared I might.

Now that I’ve started in medias res (Latin for in the midst of things. Something I remember from long, long ago at Hunter College…even in an emergency.), let’s backtrack a little.  The obvious mystery is mg/dL. I have responded ‘huh?’ to this before. It means milligrams per deciliter.

Convert Deciliters To Fluid Ounces

Quantity Deciliters Fluid Ounces

(Courtesy of http://www.csgnetwork.com/directvolcvtdl2fo.html)

You’re probably familiar with mg. if you take any prescription medication.  As for deciliter? (I love that I remember so much from college almost 45 years ago.) That means 1/10 of a liter or 3.8 ounces. For the sake of full disclosure, I did have to look up the equivalent in ounces. So you see, there wasn’t that much change in my values, but enough for me – and my PCP – to notice.

Book CoverTo be perfectly honest, I had to use What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease as my bible to even understand these results.  Odd how you forget what you spent so much time learning… especially during an emergency.

TSH means Thyroid Stimulating Hormone. This is what I wrote about it.

“Part of the CBC [comprehensive blood test] which measures your triiodothyronine, which is a thyroid hormone that plays an important role in controlling your metabolism.  If the T3 reading is abnormal, then the T4 test is ordered to find out what the problem might be.

So it’s really a test to see if you need another test to check your thyroid function.  Notice how much closer I came to needing that secondary test while I was under stress. Although I was still within normal range, that was a significant jump.  No wonder my metabolism is screwed up. That is governed by your thyroid.

As for the Microalbumin, Urine, I was out of bounds there and, frankly, that worries me. This

“tests for micro, or very small amounts, of albumin in the urine. Ur stands for urine. Albumin is a form of protein that is water soluble. Urine is a liquid, a form of water, so the albumin should have been dissolved. Protein in the urine may be an indication of kidney disease.”

Well, I know I have Chronic Kidney Disease and I don’t like this indication that stress is making it worse. I’ve worked too hard for the last eight years to let this happen.

I’m hoping the renal dietician can help me get back on track when I see her later today. I follow the renal diet that was designed for me, but now I believe it needs some tweaking.food label

I’ve also been declared pre-diabetic since the last time I saw her.  Although I’ve been to see a diabetes counselor for several months, I’m wondering if today’s appointment with the renal nutritionist will give me ideas about how to include the pre-diabetes diet in the kidney disease diet.

I was down at my Primary Care Doctor’s appointment this past week; I won’t deny it. Add these test results to the family medical emergency plus 9/11 (I watched the buildings from my classroom window and went to more memorials that week than any 10 people should have to go to in a year.) and  unexpected death of a neighbor and I really wasn’t myself.  I finally asked her, “What’s the point of all my hard work if I end up with these results?”

Being the kind of person she is and the kind of doctor she is, she reminded me it was my hard work that kept my rising values from rising even more. Funny, but that got me right back on track.  Thank you to my PCP and other concerned doctors like her.

Talking about testing, here’s something locals should know about and it’s this Saturday, folks.

11990439_10204944411870363_4775265224050810062_n

Call me crazy, but I’m having quite a bit of fun indexing The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 and The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2. It seems to me that I’d rather be doing that or researching than working on my fiction.  Hmmmm, what am I telling myself?

IMG_1398

 

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Sailing, Naturally

Wow!  I just spent the past three days at a Landmark Wisdom Unlimited course and discovered that my already terrific life is even more than terrific than I thought. The theme was loosely, “What do you like about your life?” I was one of those that just kept going and growing my list again and again. Sharing Chronic Kidney Disease awareness was high on that list.

Talking about sharing, I casually mentioned to my daughter Nima – researcher par excellence – that I was looking for information about natural Nimapreventatives and/or cures for sea sickness.  Most of today’s research came from her immediately jumping on my comment.  Then I casually mentioned to her that she might consider a job as a writer’s research assistant.  She’s a talented person in many areas (I guarantee you this is not just mother pride), and this is one of them.

Bear and I are still about six weeks out from my very first cruise.  I’ve managed all the business, such as the tickets, the land excursions, the hotels for before and after, etc. What I’m still working on is the cautions about motion sickness made by my sister-in-law – Judy Peck. Last week I wrote about over the counter medical solutions and their relationship to CKD.  This week, we go the natural path.IMG_0959 (1)

That said (written), I must caution you in my turn.  Natural aids have neither been tested nor approved by the Federal Drug Administration.  Even if you’re not in favor of the FDA, remember that dosages and timing of natural aids have not been tested either.  Also, see page 87 of What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease.

In other words, if anything in today’s blog catches your interest, please check with your nephrologist before you even think of taking whatever the product is.  I am not a doctor, have never claimed to be one, and want you to understand that you and your nephrologist are the final arbitrators of what is safe for your kidneys and what is not.

Ready?  Here we go. First off, we have WebMD at http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/acupressure-bands-for-motion-sickness-topic-overview. This is the one that caught my eye right away.

These bands use pressure, electricity, or both to stimulate the P6 acupuncture point. This point is located about two finger-widths from the crease on the underside of the wrist. The elastic bands usually have a raised surface that applies pressure on the wrist. Practitioners of acupuncture and acupressure believe stimulation of this point may stop nausea and vomiting.Adult Pack

Reminder: this is not an endorsement of this particular brand, simply a representation of what the band looks like and how it’s used.

Neither side effects nor effectiveness have been proven, so I’m wondering how I can test this before we cruise.  In New York, I would have jumped on the Staten Island ferry.  Wait, I never got seasick on the ferry, so that wouldn’t work.  Hmmm, I didn’t get seasick on the cruises around Manhattan Island either.

Maybe I’m one of those people who just doesn’t get seasick. But just in case you are, I’ll write about what else Nima found for us.

Many thanks to both my daughter for finding this and the HerbalShop.com at http://herbalshop.com/Acupressure/Acupressure_12.html for these

charts showing the acupressure points that can help.

Again, I don’t see how this can harm the kidneys, but I do urge you to talk with your nephrologist beforehand.  I found an equal number of articles in favor of and opposed to acupressure in the treatment of CKD, but none about using it for seasickness if you have CKD.  Interesting.

Now I’m wondering if this is my favorite natural seasickness aid. Of course, you can use a mixture of methods.  By the way, you don’t need to massage all these pressure points.  One or two may do the trick.

Nima also found an interesting (I think) article on yoga for seasickness on The Art of Living site at http://www.artofliving.org/in-en/yoga/health-and-wellness/yoga-for-motion-sickness. However, I have to admit my ignorance.  I understood very little of it since it mentioned positions a non-yogi – like me – would have to research and probably, more realistically, learn from a teacher – say as in a class.

The article didn’t mention CKD so I attempted to research yoga + chronic kidney disease + seasickness.  That didn’t work, so I kept rearranging the order of the search terms and still got no hits. I don’t see how yoga can hurt, other than sprains and strains if it’s all new to you, but I hesitate to say this is okay when I’m not your nephrologist.

Then there was this on Ask Dr. Mao at http://www.askdrmao.com/questions-and-answers/ginger-for-nausea/

Ginger has been used as food and medicine for millennia. Ginger’s modern use dates back to the early 1980s, when a scientist named D. Mowrey noticed that ginger-filled capsules reduced his nausea during an episode of flu. Subsequent research ultimately led to approve ginger being used as a treatment for indigestion and motion sickness.

Cup of Tea in MorningGinger is typically not as effective as standard drugs for motion sickness, but it has the advantage of not causing drowsiness. Some physicians recommend ginger over other motion sickness drugs for older individuals who are unusually sensitive to drowsiness or loss of balance.

However, the National Kidney Foundation does caution that ginger could interfere with your prescription medication.  While not specially aimed at the CKD population, this is the first I noticed any mention of “motion sickness drugs” and “loss of balance” in the same sentence. Odd that a medication aimed at relieving such symptoms can actually be a cause of one.

I have no intention of becoming seasick on our two cruises (the second in the Caribbean in September to celebrate said sister-in-law’s birthday and the 48th anniversary she will be sharing with my brother, Paul), but you know I’ll be bringing the acupressure chart and one of the seasickness bands with me… should my nephrologist concur.

Book Cover

I have a favor to ask: if you have read either of The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, please write a review onDigital Cover Part 1 Amazon.com.  This is what one reader had to say in his review,

If you have kidney disease, like I do, you can relate to what Gail Rae-Garwood has written here… very useful…

Until next week,Part 2

Keep living your life!

Facebook and CKD

Victorian clockIt’s been a slow weekend with me really wondering if I were sick or just fatigued.  Fatigued won, so here I am back on track – just a little slower.  I love it when things work out the way I want them to, even if it’s an almost the way I want them to.

I’m lucky.  I have plenty of support here from Bear, the daughters and the almost sons-in-law, and the neighbors.  But many people don’t have others to talk to, much less do for them.  That’s why I’ll be writing about online support groups today.

The blog has a major presence on Facebook.  That started with Aaron Milton’s invitation to join P2P, (Peer To Peer) – Support for The Chronically Ill and Friends & Family several years ago.

This is a closed group of 6,198 members with invitation by email. As with most closed groups, the idea is for the members to be able to freely discuss whatever troubles them.  I’ve also noticed lots of support for other than illness issues here… and loads of sharing happinesses.Book Cover

Although I do not have a transplant, shortly after What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease was published, Rex and Linda Maus asked me to post this weekly blog on The Transplant Community Outreach’s page under the heading KIDNEY MATTERS.

I remember trying to dissuade them from this idea since I only knew about early stage, but they were adamant… and I’m still posting the blog there. This is a public support page with 5,633 members.  I’ve received a number of comments indicating that all stages of CKD patients are welcome.TCO

Then there’s The Renal Patient Support Group (RPSG) Facebook & BlogSpot, another closed group, with 5,305 members. I find this group extremely interactive concerning rides, requests for new information, and information about local treatment centers that you won’t find elsewhere. Their Shahid Muhammed has added a link to this blog on their page.

people talkingChronic Kidney Disease, End Stage Renal Failure is a smaller (71 members) closed group.  It is quite homey and inviting. When I go there, I feel like I’m visiting my neighbor.  That doesn’t mean it’s not worthwhile, though.  Sometimes you need that homey feel to understand what you’re reading. Betheny Whipple does a fine job of welcoming the members.

Kidney Disease, Diet Ideas, and Help 1 with 7,611 members is another closed group.  You can usually like a closed group to join or inbox the administrator.  This is how they describe the group:

“This is a closed, private group run by genuine Kidney patients for people with Kidney Disease including Dialysis to Transplant also for Carers to be able to offer and receive their support and knowledge in complete privacy from your friends on Facebook, to cover all aspects including discussing openly and sharing ideas on how each of our members is coping , how it affects us in day to day living, medications, side effects also their Diets , Drinks and lifestyle in accordance to our individual requirements and to also share ideas and recipes for CKD.
ALWAYS SEEK MEDICAL ADVICE BEFORE TRYING ANYTHING NEW. “

All the Facebook support groups remind you they are not doctors.  It is important for you to remember that so you check with your nephrologist before trying anything new.  Better safe than sorry.cadesus

Notice, too, that most support groups welcome family, friends, caregivers, and others somehow involved with the kidney disease patient.  The groups usually do not discriminate, but welcome all who are interested.

One of the newer groups is Kris Osborne’s Women’s Renal Failure Support Group, a closed group with 579 members. There is a free give and take about (surprise!) specifically women’s issues.  While I’m post-menopausal myself, I find I especially enjoy the younger women’s baby-shots-5posts about whether and if they can become pregnant, the hints and advice they give each other, and their generous support along this difficult journey for CKD sufferers. (Must be the wanna-grandmother in me rooting them along.)

Larry W. Green’s People of Color Renal, Kidney, Dialysis, and Transplant Support  is not restricted to people of color, although there are many posts that deal specifically with this group of particularly at risk for CKD people. It is a closed group with 207 members.  I think he nails the problem with reaching minorities in his description:1399816_10151944012192488_153026929_o

“People of Color Renal, Kidney, Dialysis and Transplant Support Group is for sharing information on people who are close to renal failure, dialysis or on dialysis or who have had a kidney transplant in the hopes of educating and offering support. Renal failure is the most prevalent among the minority communities but they are the least informed with options of dealing with this epidemic. This group is just not for minorities only but for all concerned with End Stage Renal Disease.”

By the way, the key word in all these support groups is ‘sharing.’

There are many other groups I post in because I feel they are so worthwhile in their efforts to educate CKD sufferers by sharing information AND by allowing them to vent, question, rant, and – of course – providing an opportunity for their members to support each other.sad face

Some of the others are: GM Kidney Information Network, Kidney/Renal Failure Support Group Durban, Kidney disease isn’t for sissies, Kidney Disease is Not a Joke Group, Kidney Disease in Saudi Arabia, Kidneys-R-Us (Not an organ selling site.  This is illegal in the U.S.), World Kidney Network, UK Kidney Support, National Kidney Foundation, Canadian Kidney Connection, and The Bhutan Kidney Foundation.

I know I’ve left out some really good support sites, but I’ll plead lack of space.  Some of the foreign sites are excellent and it’s fun to see how they deal with CKD differently than we do in the U.S.  Well, maybe my sense of fun is different from yours, but I enjoy it.

I haven’t included any addresses because all you need to do is go to Facebook, and cut and paste the group name in the search bar.  Ready, set, go!

Wait! I do want to end on a personal note of congratulations.  Friday night was the August birthday dinner for my sweet husband – Bear, my youngest daughter – Abby, and our wonderful almost son-in-law, Sean.  There were three different kinds of goodies, including ice cream cupcakes, a confetti cake (that I baked) and a Black Forest Cake.  Guess who didn’t have any of these.firworks

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Awwww, Do I Have To?

 

blues

That, ladies and gentlemen, is my internal dialogue every day when it’s time to exercise… except when my exercise for the day is Sustainable Blues at the Blooze Bar on Sundays at 5. (32 St.  & Cactus, just in case you were thinking of flying out to Phoenix, Arizona, to join us.)

Here’s a link to a YouTube showing me dancing there, after the lesson, with the charming Robert Mullen: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3XFAd6eh1MA. Just copy and paste it into your search function.

Anyway, back to the answer to my question. My answer to myself is inevitably a resounding, YES!!! Okay, I know I have Chronic Kidney Disease – still holding at stage 3, thank you very much – and need to exercise to slow down the progression of the disease.  But why?  I mean, how does that help?

I’m going to quote heavily from What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease here. I’ve already done the research to answer the question but, quite frankly, have forgotten what I found. It’s in the book.Book signing

Got your digital edition pulled up on your reading device so you can do a phrase search?  Great.  For those using the print version of the book (OMG, I feel like I’m teaching college again.), let’s turn to page 100 in Chapter 10: Getting the Necessary Exercise.

I knew exercise was important to control my weight.  It would also improve my blood pressure and lower my cholesterol and triglyceride levels. The greater your triglycerides, the greater the risk of increasing your creatinine.  There were other benefits, too, although you didn’t have to have CKD to enjoy them: better sleep, and improved muscle function and strength. But, as with everything else you do that might impinge upon your health, check with your doctor before you start.

I researched, researched and researched again.  Each explanation of what exercise does for the body was more complicated than the last one I read.  Keeping it simple, basically, there’s a compound released by voluntary muscle contraction.  It tells the body to repair itself and grow stronger. The idea is to start exercising slowly and then intensify your activity.

  Yikes!  There are some terms there those of you without the book may not know.  Here’s a little glossary for you:

blood pressure 300dpi jpgBlood pressure: the pressure exerted by the blood against the walls of blood vessels. Blood pressure depends on the strength of the heartbeat, thickness and
volume of the blood, the elasticity of the artery walls, and general health. (Encarta Dictionary)

Cholesterol: while the basis for both sex hormones and bile, can cause blockages if it accumulates in the lining of a blood vessel. (What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease)

Creatinine: chemical waste product that’s produced by our muscle metabolism and to a smaller extent by eating meat. (MayoClinic.org)

Triglycerides: a type of fat found in your blood. Too much of this type of fat may raise the risk of coronary artery disease, especially in women. (Medline Plus)

I’ve used different sources for the definitions so as to bring you the most easily understood ones.  After all, we’re not doctors here.GFR

Okay, I get it.  Exercise is absolutely necessary since CKD prevents your body from adequately filtering wastes – like creatinine – from itself.

Now my task was to find more exercise that I don’t mind doing… like blues dancing. Even though I seem to be dancing at half time, I come out of the bar thoroughly soaked despite the air conditioning.  That’s my personal indicator for effective exercise.

After almost a year (Bear’s surgery and recuperation, remember?) we went to the gun range yesterday.  I had decided several years back that I no longer want to compete, even though the Single Action Shooters’ Society competitions were fun to a point, but I did still want to target shoot.Rae%208x10%205792%20Sepia%20TinType[1]

On a whim, I started playing with the internet to see if target shooting burned enough calories to be considered exercise.

Whoopee!  It does!  It burns almost as many calories as half an hour on the stationary bike and uses a whole bunch of different muscles.  Don’t believe me?  Take a look at the calorie counter at: http://www.fitday.com/webfit/burned/calories_burned_Pistol_shooting_or_trap_shooting_standing.html.  Oh goody, another exercise I enjoy.

I have to admit that I enjoy the stationary bike, too, IF one of ‘my’ shows is on TV or I have a good book.  I’m wondering how long I can do this type of exercise, though, since my knees have started declaring their presence in a demanding, non-loving way. Enter knee supports.

And, yes, I still do the Leslie Sansone Walking Tapes I described in the book, but you’ve got to remember that your body becomes accustomed to a certain kind of exercise and then it isn’t as effective anymore… and I was wearing knee supports for this, too.

water walkingI do the water walking I wrote about a few blogs back (no knee supports) as often as I can.  Of course, no sooner did I decide I liked it then monsoon season started here.  It’s certainly not as bad as it’s been in years past, but I’m still not going into a pool when there’s rain.  And then, there are the haboobs (dust storms).  No thanks, I’ll find some kind of indoor exercise if there’s a warning for one of those.

By the way, we are not alone in exercising more.  We may do it because we have to, but the whole country is interested in exercising lately. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention eNews headline of 5/15/14, “Neighborhood Support of Physical Activity on the Rise.”

I’ll be publishing this blog from New York where we will have traveled to see family and friends.  I’ve already got it figured out.  We’ll be gone eight days, so I’m taking the knee supports and plan to walk my brains out.

And stairs!  New York buildings have loads of stair.  My brother actually lives on the 11th floor of his building.  I could walk up to his apartment!

Well, unless another, more fun opportunity for exercise presents itself. I wonder if dragging two big pieces of luggage on rollers count?

Until next week (when I’ll be back in lovely monsoony, habooby Arizona),

Keep living your life!

Let The Sun Shine…

Here we are in lovely, warm, sunny Florida.  But you just left lovely, warm, sunny Arizona, you may say and you’d be right.  We’re here to see family and friends, one of whom is over 65 and has dropped over 60 pounds via exercise and diet.  Jo is my inspiration!

I’ve wanted Bear to meet my brothers for a bunch of years now. This is an opportunity for him to meet one of them, Paul Peck, and his gracious wife, Judy.  Come to think of it, I haven’t seen them since Abby’s college graduation.

Then there’s my New York cousin, Nina Peck and her partner, Sandra, who just happened (ha ha) to move five minutes away from my brother.  That’s another one I haven’t seen in a bunch of years.

Of course, I get to bring the book to Florida, too.  Some of the medical departments of the colleges there are following me on Twitter, but I don’t think any clinics or private sector doctors are.  Good, another way for me to spread the word. The Table

Oh, right, hot weather and CKD. The rules for CKD patients in potentially hot weather are the same anywhere in the world.

According to Dr. Leslie Spry, a National Kidney Foundation spokesperson, “Heat illness occurs when body temperature exceeds a person’s ability to dissipate that heat and is commonly diagnosed when the body temperature approaches 104 degrees Fahrenheit and when humidity is greater than 70 percent. Once the humidity is that high, sweating becomes less effective at dispersing body heat, and the core body temperature begins to rise.” The entire article is at: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leslie-spry-md-facp/heat-illness_b_1727995.html

We don’t worry about humidity in Arizona, but this is Florida.  No disrespect meant, but I clearly remembering telling my mother, Belle Peckolick, that Florida felt like taking a shower and not drying off.  She was living there at the time and just laughed.  She’d been a New Yorker, so the humidity was a higher dose of what she was used to.

Now’s the time to wear the hat you (meaning I) bought for just that purpose, but forgot was in the trunk of the car.  Otherwise, melanoma just might be a possible drawback of a day in the sun.  Melanoma.com tells us,

“Melanoma is the most serious type of skin cancer. It begins in skin cells called melanocytes. Though melanoma is predominantly found on the skin, it can even occur in the eye (uveal melanoma).

Melanocytes are the cells that make melanin, which gives skin its color. Melanin also protects the deeper layers of the skin from the sun’s harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays.

melanomaWhen people spend time in the sunlight, the melanocytes make more melanin and cause the skin to tan. This also happens when skin is exposed to other forms of ultraviolet light (such as in a tanning booth). If the skin receives too much ultraviolet light, the melanocytes may begin to grow abnormally and become cancerous.”

You are not only heating up your body by being out in hot weather, but exposing yourself to the sun’s ultraviolet light. Use that hat to shade some of your body.

DaVita reminds us to use sunscreen with at least 15 spf.  Don’t forget if you’re swimming – which this aqua-phobe won’t be although I’m looking forward to walking on the beach – you need to slather more on after each dip. You can read more of their hot weather tips, some for dialysis patients, at http://www.davita.com/kidney-disease/overview/living-with-ckd/seven-summertime-precautions-for-people-with-kidney-disease/e/4894

You know you need to drink water during hot weather, but is there a difference among waters?  Yes, there is.  As a CKD patient, your fluid intake is probably restricted (mine is 64 oz. which includes coffee, tea, juice, ice cream, sherbet, and Jell-O.  You get the picture: anything liquid or liquid in a frozen or jelled form.)

Mary Ellen Herndon, a renal nutritionist warns us, “Many drinks labeled as water are loaded with sugar and empty calories. Even though these drinks have ‘water’ in their name, drinking them regularly may cause weight gain and may increase your risk of obesity.”  For the rest of the article, go to http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2012/08/6-tips-choosing-water-drink.html?utm_medium=twitter&utm_source=twitterfeed

According to WebMD at http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/chronic-kidney-disease-home-treatment, we also need to be careful about exercising during the hot weather.  I don’t mean stop, simply make certain you are not becoming dehydrated.  Stay away from energy drinks!  As an older adult, I’ve become aware that I can dehydrate more easily when I exercise – especially since my kidneys are not working at top capacity.

Don’t be intimidated by the sun.  We can benefit from the sun if we’re cautious about it. Fifteen minutes or so a day of sunshine can elevate your vitamin D naturally.  Wearing a shirt to cover some of your body can help you protect yourself from the ultraviolet rays while you’re indulging in some free vitamin D production.

Be sure to protect your eyes, too.  This is a direct quote from the DaVita site mentioned above: “Sunglasses protect your eyes in the same way that sunscreen protects your skin from harmful sun damage. Your sunglasses should block at least 99% of UVB rays and 50% of UVA rays. Wraparound sunglasses and other styles that completely cover the eyes are best.” This information is good for anyone, chronic kidney disease sufferer or not.wraparound sunglasses

Excuse me while I see if I can interest any of my friends or family into visiting Epcot with  me.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

National Kidney Month is Over, But You Still Need to Be Aware

All this National Kidney Month activity has only served to make me – and hopefully you – just how very aware of our kidneys we need to be.  I found that reminding myself of what they do and how they do it only renewed my passion to get the book into the hands of every newly diagnosed CKD patient and/or their friends, family, neighbors, colleagues, doctors, nurses and nutritionists.

So, I came up with an idea.  You know the book is already available at http://www.myckdexperience.com, www. Amazon.com & www. B&N.com. It’s in digital form on the two bookstore sites.  Now I’m going to make it available here.

I’m a writer, not a business person but I have figured out that I can send you the book directly. All you need to do is send your mailing information to:  myckdexperience@gmail.com and deposit $12.00 in my PayPal account: Peckolick. Yep, you’re right: that is a savings off the usual $12.95 price. Consider it a reward for helping me get the book out there.

I’ve been in Chattanooga, Tennessee, for an entire week. The Renal Symposium only took one day, but why fly through three time zones for just one day? So, I stayed to site see. I’ve been to the aquarium, Ruby Falls, The Lookout Mountain Incline, Rock City, St. Elmo, The Hunter Museum, a Moon Pie factory distributor’s and so many more attractions…. and I’ve discovered that I know quite a bit about traveling with early stage CKD.

I purposely chose a hotel with an exercise room, but haven’t used it once.  This is one of those manageable cities so I’ve walked for miles each day instead.  I’m getting older now, so I only walk two or three miles but with all the site seeing I’m barely aware of  how much I’m walking.

Most hotel rooms have microwaves and small refrigerators these days, as well as coffee machines. The first day I was here, besides setting up my table for the symposium, I walked 1/2 mile each way to stock up on bottled water, fresh fruit and some vegetables that were already cleaned and cut.  My breakfast each day was a cup of my beloved coffee, 15 grapes, half a banana and half a cup of celery.  No rushing to get out for breakfast, no ordering food I wasn’t comfortable eating and no searching for a restaurant.

What thrills me is that I no longer have to work at knowing what I can eat; it’s been long enough that I just know.  Menus don’t confuse me anymore.  If I can’t get a child sized portion or a senior citizen sized portion (They simply don’t exist here. Congratulations, Arizona on being sensitive to your senior citizens in this respect), I can eat as much as I’m permitted to on the renal diet and put the rest in the refrigerator for tomorrow’s dinner.

That’s another thing.  Since the renal diet is so restrictive and I’m already eating some fruit (actually two thirds of my daily fruit allotment) and vegetables at my improvised in-room breakfast, I only eat one full meal out.  By the way, that’s also saves you money you can use for the site seeing and trinkets for the folks back home (Wait until you see your Moon Pie tee shirt, Bear.) I try to eat my protein and starch allotments at this meal since it’s so easy to find restaurant meals consisting of this kind of food. Notice I’ve still got a fruit and two vegetables left.  That allowed me to try a local treat: zucchini with onions baked in cheese with bread crumbs on top.  I doubt the cheese was low fat or low sodium – oh well, I know it wasn’t because I asked – but I used my option to break the diet every once in a great while. Yummy.

I heard about another local favorite: peanuts dipped in Coca Cola.  Hmmmm, maybe I’m glad neither peanuts nor Coca Cola is on the renal diet.  In case you didn’t know, Coca Cola was first distributed in Chattanooga.

I used whatever food units I had left over for late in the evening snacks: animal crackers, ice cream, even a salt-less pretzel.  This was the most difficult part of the eating day.  It was severely tempting to fall into the I’m-on-vacation-and-I-can-break-the-renal-diet mentality.  I did once or twice and was sorry I did.  I’m not used to rich cakes or gooey candy anymore and paid for it.  That time spent in the bathroom could have been spent seeing more of this surprisingly beautiful city.  I didn’t expect the headache (and no aspirin permitted, of course), but experiencing this once or twice convinced me all over again that I just wasn’t that person who could eat whatever she wanted any more.

You also have to be careful about the bottled water you buy.  Dansani adds minerals, the very ones we don’t need as CKDers, to theirs.  Apparently, they’ve got the contract for all the local sites here, but I found an acceptable substitute for when I couldn’t get any other kind: unsweetened lemonade. I also learned to keep extra bottled water in my room and take a bottle of it WITH me to the sites so I wasn’t stuck with something I couldn’t be comfortable drinking.

I’ve not only learned everything I ever wanted to and more about the Civil War battles and natural wonders of Chattanooga, but also that I’m pretty comfortable traveling with CKD. Here’s hoping this week’s post has been inspiration for you to get yourself psyched about that vacation you were wondering if you could take.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!