How Rare is This?

I have been hearing about so many different kinds of kidney disease that I’d forgotten which I’d written about. UMOD nephropathy is one that has kept coming up this past week or so. That got me to thinking… yep, I did write about it once before. It seems I had trouble getting any information at that time. Let’s try again. 

To start, here is some of the information about the disease that I included in SlowItDownCKD 2019. 

This is what the U.S. National Library of Medicine at bit.ly/3sykq5O had to say: 

‘Many individuals with uromodulin-associated kidney disease develop high blood levels of a waste product called uric acid. Normally, the kidneys remove uric acid from the blood and transfer it to urine. In this condition, the kidneys are unable to remove uric acid from the blood effectively. A buildup of uric acid can cause gout, which is a form of arthritis resulting from uric acid crystals in the joints. The signs and symptoms of gout may appear as early as a person’s teens in uromodulin-associated kidney disease. 

Uromodulin-associated kidney disease causes slowly progressive kidney disease, with the signs and symptoms usually beginning during the teenage years. The kidneys become less able to filter fluids and waste products from the body as this condition progresses, resulting in kidney failure. Individuals with uromodulin-associated kidney disease typically require either dialysis to remove wastes from the blood or a kidney transplant between the ages of 30 and 70. Occasionally, affected individuals are found to have small kidneys or kidney cysts (medullary cysts).’” 

By the way, the U.S. National Library of Medicine is part of the National Institutes of Health. 

I suspected I could find more information since almost two years have passed and I did. The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD), which is part of the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences which, in turn, is part of the National Institutes of Health (just as the U.S. National Library of Medicine is) at Bit.ly/35KOalW offered the following:   

Autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease due to UMOD mutations (ADTKD–UMOD) is an inherited disorder that causes a gradual loss of kidney function that eventually leads to the need for kidney transplantation or dialysis between the ages of 30 and 70. Patients with ADTKD-UMOD have high blood levels of uric acid before kidney failure develops, and some affected individuals may develop gout. Gout is a form of arthritis (inflammation) that occurs often in the big toe, ankle, knee, or other joints…. ADTKD-UMOD is caused by a mistake (mutation) in the UMOD gene, which leads to the build-up of the altered uromodulin protein in the tubules [Gail here: These are small tubes in your kidneys.] the kidney, leading to slow loss of kidney function. ADTKD-UMOD is inherited in a dominant pattern in families. It is diagnosed based on the symptoms, laboratory testing, family history and genetic testing. Many of the symptoms of ADTKD-UMOD can be treated with medication. For patients whose kidney function worsens to end-stage kidney disease, kidney transplant and dialysis can be used. The long-term outlook for people with ADTKD-UMOD is good, though patients may require dialysis or kidney transplantation between the ages of 30 and 70….” 

I was having a bit of trouble with the different names of the disease, so I turned to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1356/ for clarification: 

“Autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease caused by UMOD pathogenic variants (ADTKD-UMOD) was previously known as familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy type 1 (FJHN1), medullary cystic kidney disease type 2 (MCKD2), and UMOD-associated kidney disease (or uromodulin-associated kidney disease)” 

The NCBI is ultimately also part of (surprise!) the National Institutes of Health. 

Well, that helped but you may also need this definition found in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease’s Glossary: 

Nephropathy: Kidney disease.” 

Hmmm, come to think of it, we could use a few more definitions. Thank you to Medline Plus for the definitions: 

Uremic acid: Uric acid is a chemical created when the body breaks down substances called purines. Purines are normally produced in the body and are also found in some foods and drinks. Foods with high content of purines include liver, anchovies, mackerel, dried beans and peas, and beer. 

UMOD gene: The UMOD gene provides instructions for making a protein called uromodulin. This protein is produced by the kidneys and then excreted from the body in urine. The function of uromodulin remains unclear, although it is known to be the most abundant protein in the urine of healthy individuals. Researchers have suggested that uromodulin may protect against urinary tract infections. It may also help control the amount of water in urine. 

This is quite a bit of information, but we still need the symptoms? According to Wake Forest Baptist Health at bit.ly/3oRN7s8

“There are three common features of this disease: 

Patients develop chronic kidney failure with loss of kidney function beginning in the teenage years and progressing to the need for dialysis or kidney transplantation at an age between 30 and 70 years. Patients have few or no symptoms of kidney disease when they are diagnosed. 

Usually, affected individuals are found to have some loss of kidney function when they undergo blood testing by their doctor as part of a general health screening. A blood test called the serum creatinine level is performed. If the blood creatinine level is above 1, this is usually abnormal and means the kidney is not removing the creatinine from the blood well enough. …. Frequently the doctor does not know why the serum creatinine level is high. Even if a kidney biopsy (the removal of a small piece of kidney tissue) is performed, a correct diagnosis is frequently not made. 

The patient has gout or some member of the family has a history of gout …. Affected individuals have high blood uric acid levels, and this leads to gout. Every affected individual in the family may not have gout, but there are usually at least one or two people in the family who have gout. Gout frequently involves the big toe, the foot, or the knee. The big toe will become extremely tender, and even placing a sheet on the toe will cause pain. In this condition, gout occurs in the late teenage years in both men and women. (In contrast, gout developing in the normal adult population tends to occur in overweight men in their 30’s to 50’s). Family members may develop bumps on their joints called tophi that are deposits of uric acid. 

The disease is likely to be inherited. If a person has the disease, their children have a 1 out of 2 (50%) chance of having the disease. The disease does not skip a generation, though a parent may be less severely affected than their child, and may not have gout or other signs of kidney disease for some time. Therefore, there is usually a strong family history of the condition.” 

Unfortunately, there is no cure for this rare disease – there are medications available to treat the symptoms. Only 400 people worldwide suffer from UMOD Nephropathy. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! 

A New Year, New Kidney Disease Information

Happy New Year! Or, at least, that’s what I’m hoping for. I fervently believe the more you know, the better you can handle whatever’s happening in your world. That’s why, today, I’m exploring yet another term pertaining to kidney disease that I hadn’t been aware of. Oh my, how many, many types of kidney disease am I (and possibly you) unaware of?  

This one is membranous glomerulonephritis. I sort of-maybe-suspected what it might be, but I wanted to know for sure so I turned to Healthline – who bestowed a couple of awards on this blog a few years ago – at https://www.healthline.com/health/membranous-nephropathy for something more in the way of a definition. 

“Your kidneys are made up of a number of different structures that aid in the removal of wastes from your blood and the formation of urine. Glomerulonephritis (GN) is a condition in which changes in the structures of your kidney can cause swelling and inflammation. 

Membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) is a specific type of GN. MGN develops when inflammation of your kidney structures causes problems with the functioning of your kidney. MGN is known by other names, including extramembranous glomerulonephritis, membranous nephropathy, and nephritis.” 

It’s hard to know where to start in exploring this disease. Let’s take the easy way and start with a definition of nephritis from… ta da, you guessed it – my all-time favorite dictionary, the Merriam Webster at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/nephritis.  

“acute or chronic inflammation of the kidney caused by infection, degenerative process, or vascular disease” 

I’m going back to the beginning of my blog journey to What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease for the following definitions. 

“Acute: Extremely painful, severe or serious, quick onset, of short duration; the opposite of chronic. 

 Chronic: Long term; the opposite of acute.” 

By the way, you can click on the title of the book if you’re interested in purchasing it from Amazon. 

So, basically, nephritis means a kidney problem. But membranous glomerulonephritis is something more specific in that it is a kind of GN or glomerulonephritis. Back to the dictionary for the definition of glomerulonephritis: 

“acute or chronic nephritis that involves inflammation of the capillaries of the renal glomeruli, has various causes (such as streptococcal infection, lupus, or vasculitis) or may be of unknown cause, and is marked especially by blood or protein in the urine and by edema, and if untreated may lead to kidney failure” 

Ah, so now we know what part of the kidneys are involved. Do you remember what the glomeruli are? Just in case you don’t, here’s how ‘s Lexicon at https://www.lexico.com/en/definition/glomerulus  defines this plural noun: 

“a cluster of nerve endings, spores, or small blood vessels, in particular a cluster of capillaries around the end of a kidney tubule, where waste products are filtered from the blood.” 

Now we’re getting somewhere. Let’s keep digging. Membranous glomerulonephritis is a specific GN. I went directly to MedlinePlus, which is part of the National Institutes of Health, which in turn is part of The U.S. National Library of Medicine at https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000472.htm

“Membranous nephropathy is caused by the thickening of a part of the glomerular basement membrane. The glomerular basement membrane is a part of the kidneys that helps filter waste and extra fluid from the blood. The exact reason for this thickening is not known. 

The thickened glomerular membrane does not work normally. As a result, large amounts of protein are lost in the urine. 

This condition is one of the most common causes of nephrotic syndrome. This is a group of symptoms that include protein in the urine, low blood protein level, high cholesterol levels, high triglyceride levels, and swelling. Membranous nephropathy may be a primary kidney disease, or it may be associated with other conditions. 

The following increase your risk for this condition: 

Cancers, especially lung and colon cancer 

Exposure to toxins, including gold and mercury 

Infections, including hepatitis B, malaria, syphilis, and endocarditis 

Medicines, including penicillamine, trimethadione, and skin-lightening creams 

Systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, Graves disease, and other autoimmune disorders 

The disorder occurs at any age, but is more common after age 40.” 

Being only a bit more than a year out from cancer, I was getting nervous so I went to the National Kidney Foundation at https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/membranous-nephropathy-mn for a list of symptoms. 

“Swelling in body parts like your legs, ankles and around your eyes (called edema) 

Weight gain 

Fatigue 

Foaming of the urine caused by high protein levels in the urine (called proteinuria) 

High fat levels in the blood (high cholesterol) 

Low levels of protein in the blood” 

These symptoms struck me as so common that I wanted to know just how usual membranous glomerulonephritis was. After checking numerous sites, the consensus I found was that this is not a common disease. Thank goodness! 

Even though it’s not common, we still might want to know what to do if we were diagnosed with membranous glomerulonephritis, especially since I discovered that this may be considered an autoimmune disease. This is how the Mayo Clinic suggested the disease be treated: 

“Treatment of membranous nephropathy [Gail here: That’s a synonym for membranous glomerulonephritis.] focuses on addressing the cause of your disease and relieving your symptoms. There is no certain cure. 

However, up to three out of 10 people with membranous nephropathy have their symptoms completely disappear (remission) after five years without any treatment. About 25 to 40 percent have a partial remission. 

In cases where membranous nephropathy is caused by a medication or another disease — such as cancer — stopping the medication or controlling the other disease usually improves the condition.” 

There is much more detailed treatment information on their website at mayoclinic.in/354QFPU.    

That is a bit more reassuring. Thank you to all the readers who use terms I hadn’t heard of before and/or ask questions about topics that are new to me. May this year be kinder to us than the last one. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! 

Learning Every Day

 Chronic Kidney Disease is all over my world. You know when you have your ears open for a certain term, you seem to hear it all the time? That’s what my life has been like for the last dozen years. When I noticed a comment in a Facebook kidney disease support group about Action myoclonus–renal failure (AMRF) syndrome, I was stunned. Here was yet another possible kidney disease I’d never heard of. 

As defined by MedlinePlus, a division of the National Health Institutes (which is a division of the U.S. National Library of Medicine) at http://bit.ly/2KY6EI8,  

“Action myoclonus–renal failure (AMRF) syndrome causes episodes of involuntary muscle jerking or twitching (myoclonus) and, often, kidney (renal) disease. Although the condition name refers to kidney disease, not everyone with the condition has problems with kidney function.” 

I was intrigued and wanted to know more. So, I did what I usually do when that happens. I poked around everywhere I could think of on the internet. My first hit was on The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), which is part of The U.S. National Library of Medicine at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK333437/

“Action myoclonus – renal failure (AMRF) syndrome typically comprises a continuum of two major (and ultimately fatal) manifestations: progressive myoclonic epilepsy (PME) and renal failure; however, in some instances, the kidneys are not involved. Neurologic manifestations can appear before, simultaneously, or after the renal manifestations. Disease manifestations are usually evident in the late teens or early twenties. In the rare instances in which renal manifestations precede neurologic findings, onset is usually in late childhood / early adolescence but can range to the fifth or sixth decade.” 

Uh-oh, epilepsy. One of my children has that. Luckily for her, she doesn’t have CKD. But we still need more information… or, at least, I do. For instance, how does the illness progress? 

Rare Disease InfoHub at http://bit.ly/37Qgo0h answered this particular question. 

“The movement problems associated with AMRF syndrome typically begin with involuntary rhythmic shaking (tremor) in the fingers and hands that occurs at rest and is most noticeable when trying to make small movements, such as writing. Over time, tremors can affect other parts of the body, such as the head, torso, legs, and tongue. Eventually, the tremors worsen to become myoclonic jerks, which can be triggered by voluntary movements or the intention to move (action myoclonus). These myoclonic jerks typically occur in the torso; upper and lower limbs; and face, particularly the muscles around the mouth and the eyelids. Anxiety, excitement, stress, or extreme tiredness (fatigue) can worsen the myoclonus. Some affected individuals develop seizures, a loss of sensation and weakness in the limbs (peripheral neuropathy), or hearing loss caused by abnormalities in the inner ear (sensorineural hearing loss). Severe seizures or myoclonus can be life-threatening.” 

But we haven’t looked at the kidneys yet. How are they involved in those who develop kidney problems from this rare disease? Let’s go back to MedlinePlus to see what we can find. Don’t be surprised that the answer is fairly general: 

“When kidney problems occur, an early sign is excess protein in the urine (proteinuria). Kidney function worsens over time, until the kidneys are no longer able to filter fluids and waste products from the body effectively (end-stage renal disease).” 

Do you remember what proteinuria is? Here’s a reminder from my first CKD book – What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease – in case you’ve forgotten: 

“Protein in the urine, not a normal state of being” 

Hmmm, proteinuria is exactly what it sounds like. That got me to thinking: How does the protein get into the urine in the first place? 

“Protein gets into the urine if the kidneys aren’t working properly. Normally, glomeruli, which are tiny loops of capillaries (blood vessels) in the kidneys, filter waste products and excess water from the blood. 

Glomeruli pass these substances, but not larger proteins and blood cells, into the urine. If smaller proteins sneak through the glomeruli, tubules (long, thin, hollow tubes in the kidneys) recapture those proteins and keep them in the body. 

However, if the glomeruli or tubules are damaged, if there is a problem with the reabsorption process of the proteins, or if there is an excessive protein load, the proteins will flow into the urine.” 

Thank you to a trusted site, The Cleveland Clinic at http://cle.clinic/3nTjLZI for helping us out here.

The important point here is that proteinuria, or albumin as it is often called, prevents the substances that belong in your blood stream from fully remaining there to help you: 

“Blood contains two main kinds of proteins: albumin and globulins. Blood proteins help your body produce substances it needs to function. These substances include hormones, enzymes and antibodies. 

Usually, the amount of total protein in your blood is relatively stable.” 

I’d gone back to the reliable Cleveland Clinic for this information. 

I don’t know about you as you read today’s blog, but I found writing it exhausting. Of course, that may be due to the fact that Christmas Eve and Christmas Day have just passed. I’m not quite as vigilant as I usually am about the renal diet during certain celebrations. Considering that Bear’s Lutheran and I’m Jewish, that was a lot of celebrating. I see my exhaustion as an endorsement to get right back on the kidney diet. 

Here’s hoping your Chanukah, Christmas, Boxing Day, and Kwanza were as happy as you’d hoped under the restrictions of small group gatherings, six foot distancing, and mask wearing. We stayed home alone using the phone and Facetime to be with family.  

It was… different. But more importantly, it was safe. Keep in mind that you’re already immuno-compromised simply by having CKD. If you no longer have a spleen like me (Thanks, pancreatic cancer.), you’re even more immunocompromised. Hugs are the best, but they could be deadly for us. Stay safe. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life!