Giving It Away

Good-bye to National Kidney Month and a belated hello to National Donor Month. I don’t usually write about transplants and don’t know that much about them, so you and I will be learning together today. Restricting this blog to solely kidney transplants, there’s still quite a bit to write about. 

There are many reasons for needing a kidney transplant. The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services’s Health Resources & Services Administration’s Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network provides the following list of reasons: 

Kidney Diagnosis Categories>Kidney Diagnoses
GLOMERULAR DISEASESAnti-GBM; Chronic Glomerulonephritis: Unspecified; Chronic Glomerulosclerosis: Unspecified; Focal Glomerularsclerosis; Idio/Post-Inf Crescentic; Glomerulonephritis; IGA Nephropathy; Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome; Membranous Glomerulonephritis; Mesangio-Capillary 1 Glomerulonephritis; Mesangio-Capillary 2 Glomerulonephritis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Alport’s Syndrome; Amyloidosis; Membranous Nephropathy; Goodpasture’s Syndrome; Henoch-Schoenlein Purpura; Sickle Cell Anemia; Wegeners Granulomatosis
DIABETESDiabetes: Type I Insulin Dep/Juvenile Onset; Diabetes: Type II Insulin Dep/Adult Onset; Diabetes: Type I Non-insulin Dep/Juv Onset; Diabetes: Type II Non-insulin Dep/Adult Onset
POLYCYSTIC KIDNEYSPolycystic Kidneys
HYPERTENSIVE NEPHROSCLEROSISHypertensive Nephrosclerosis
RENOVASCULAR AND OTHER VASCULAR DISEASESChronic Nephrosclerosis: Unspecified; Malignant Hypertension; Polyarteritis; Progressive Systemic Sclerosis; Renal Artery Thrombosis; Scleroderma
CONGENITAL, RARE FAMILIAL, AND METABOLIC DISORDERSCongenital Obstructive Uropathy; Cystinosis; Fabry’s Disease; Hypoplasia/Dysplasia/Dysgenesis/Agenesis; Medullary Cystic Disease; Nephrophthisis; Prune Belly Syndrome
TUBULAR AND INTERSTITIAL DISEASESAcquired Obstructive Nephropathy; Analgesic Nephropathy; Antibiotic-induced Nephritis; Cancer Chemotherapy-Induced Nephritis; Chronic Pyelonephritis/Reflex; Nephropathy; Gout; Nephritis; Nephrolithiasis; Oxalate Nephropathy; Radiation Nephritis; Acute Tubular Necrosis; Cortical Necrosis; Cyclosporin Nephrotoxicity; Heroin Nephrotoxicity; Sarcoidosis; Urolithiasis
NEOPLASMSIncidental Carcinoma; Lymphoma; Myeloma; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Wilms’ Tumor
RETRANSPLANT/GRAFT FAILURERetransplant/Graft Failure
OTHEROther Rheumatoid Arthritis; Other Familial Nephropathy

Quite a few of these reasons should look familiar to you if you’ve been reading the blog regularly since I’ve written about them. You can use the topics dropdown to the right of the blog if you’d like to refresh your memory about specific reasons. 

Let’s take a look at some astounding numbers. Unfortunately, The National Kidney Foundation could only offer statistics from 2014. Very few sources separate donations specifically by organ, so we’re lucky to have even these older numbers.  

“There are currently 121,678 people waiting for lifesaving organ transplants in the U.S. Of these, 100,791 await kidney transplants. (as of 1/11/16) … 

The median wait time for an individual’s first kidney transplant is 3.6 years and can vary depending on health, compatibility and availability of organs … 

In 2014, 17,107 kidney transplants took place in the US. Of these, 11,570 came from deceased donors and 5,537 came from living donors… 

On average: 

Over 3,000 new patients are added to the kidney waiting list each month… 

13 people die each day while waiting for a life-saving kidney transplant… 

Every 14 minutes someone is added to the kidney transplant list… 

In 2014, 4,761 patients died while waiting for a kidney transplant. Another, 3,668 people became too sick to receive a kidney transplant… “ 

Fewer kidney transplants are being performed during the current pandemic. The American Kidney Fund explains why: 

“Because living-donor kidney transplants require two hospital beds and post-surgical recovery care in the hospital, we are hearing that a growing number of transplant centers are temporarily putting living-donor transplants on hold. This both preserves the availability of hospital beds for emergencies and COVID-19 patients, and also keeps non-infected people out of the hospital…. 

The coronavirus spreads easily from person to person, and can be spread by people who do not show symptoms of COVID-19. This puts anyone who has a compromised immune system—including transplant patients who take immunosuppressive drugs—at an increased risk of becoming infected. 
 
Even with social distancing, the virus is still spreading in communities. Newly transplanted patients would be especially vulnerable during their recovery period after transplant surgery. 
 
Another obstacle hospitals face is the need to test deceased donors for the coronavirus. Transplanting an organ from a coronavirus-positive patient could present a grave risk to the recipient. With limited test kits needed for living patients, and the lag time between testing and getting results, some hospitals may have to forgo testing—and procuring organs from—deceased donors…. 

Because COVID-19 is a serious respiratory illness, the most critical patients must be put on ventilators. Ventilators are normally used to keep an organ donor patient alive who is medically brain-dead so that their organs may be removed and transplanted. Those ventilators may be needed for COVID-19 patients instead….” 

Fewer transplants or not, I was curious about how it’s decided who is eligible for a kidney transplant. Nebraska Medicine had the answer in simple terms we can all understand: 

“In order to be eligible to receive a kidney transplant: 

You must have chronic irreversible kidney disease that has not responded to other medical or surgical treatments. You are either on dialysis or may require dialysis in the near future. 

You must qualify for and be able to tolerate major surgery. 

You and your family members/support system must be able to understand the risks and benefits of transplantation, including the long-term need for close medical follow-up and lifelong need for anti-rejection therapy. 

You and your family must be able to accept the responsibilities, including financial, that are part of the long-term care you will need after transplantation. 

Exclusion 

You may not be eligible to receive a kidney transplant due to: 

The presence of some other life-threatening disease or condition that would not improve with transplantation. This could include certain cancers, infections that cannot be treated or cured, or severe, uncorrectable heart disease. 

A history of chronic noncompliance including, but not limited to, medical treatments, medications or other behaviors that would affect your ability to fully care for yourself after transplantation. 

A history of chronic and ongoing drug and/or alcohol abuse that cannot be successfully treated before transplantation, putting you at risk for continued harmful behavior after transplantation. 

A history of serious psychiatric disorders that cannot be successfully treated before transplantation, and that would be considered a high risk for ongoing or increased severity of the psychiatric disorder after transplantation.” 

Note: Weight is included in your tolerability for major surgery. 

There’s so much more to write about re kidney transplant. Next week, we’ll talk about the process itself. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! 

Mg or Magnesium to You and Me

We usually think of Mg (mg) as the abbreviation for milligrams. Lately, I’ve been hearing a lot about Mg as the symbol for magnesium. In fact, a friend all the way across the country in Florida sent me an article about it from her local town paper. That got me to thinking. I haven’t written about magnesium in over three years. Has anything new been uncovered about this particular electrolyte? But first we need to know what I wrote about it in SlowItDownCKD 2017.  

“The medical dictionary part of The Free Dictionary by Farlex at http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/magnesium tells us: 

‘An alkaline earth element (atomic number 12; atomic weight 24.3) which is an essential mineral required for bone and tooth formation, nerve conduction and muscle contraction; it is required by many enzymes involved in carbohydrate, protein and nucleic acid metabolism. Magnesium is present in almonds, apples, dairy products, corn, figs, fresh leafy greens, legumes, nuts, seafood, seeds, soybeans, wheat germ and whole grains. Magnesium may be useful in treating anxiety, asthma and cardiovascular disease; it is thought to prevent blood clots, raise HDL-cholesterol, lower LDL-cholesterol, reduce arrhythmias and blood pressure, and to help with depression, fatigue, hyperactivity and migraines.’ 

All this by an electrolyte that constitutes only 1% of extra cellular fluid? I’m beginning to suspect that magnesium is the under explained electrolyte. 

All right then, what happens if you have too little magnesium?

The U.S. Dept. of Health & Human Services of the National Institutes of Health at https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Magnesium-HealthProfessional/ lays it out for us: 

‘Early signs of magnesium deficiency include loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, and weakness. As magnesium deficiency worsens, numbness, tingling, muscle contractions and cramps, seizures, personality changes, abnormal heart rhythms, and coronary spasms can occur …. Severe magnesium deficiency can result in hypocalcemia or hypokalemia (low serum calcium or potassium levels, respectively) because mineral homeostasis is disrupted….’ 

Well, who’s at risk for magnesium deficiency? The same source tells us: 

‘Magnesium inadequacy can occur when intakes fall below the RDA [Gail here today: RDA is the Recommended Dietary Allowances] but are above the amount required to prevent overt deficiency. The following groups are more likely than others to be at risk of magnesium inadequacy because they typically consume insufficient amounts or they have medical conditions (or take medications) that reduce magnesium absorption from the gut or increase losses from the body. 

People with gastrointestinal diseases 
The chronic diarrhea and fat malabsorption resulting from Crohn’s disease, gluten-sensitive enteropathy (celiac disease), and regional enteritis can lead to magnesium depletion over time …. Resection or bypass of the small intestine, especially the ileum, typically leads to malabsorption and magnesium loss …. 

People with type 2 diabetes [Gail again today: That’s me.] 
Magnesium deficits and increased urinary magnesium excretion can occur in people with insulin resistance and/or type 2 diabetes…. The magnesium loss appears to be secondary to higher concentrations of glucose in the kidney that increase urine output …. 

People with alcohol dependence 
Magnesium deficiency is common in people with chronic alcoholism…. In these individuals, poor dietary intake and nutritional status; gastrointestinal problems, including vomiting, diarrhea, and steatorrhea (fatty stools) resulting from pancreatitis; renal dysfunction with excess excretion of magnesium into the urine; phosphate depletion; vitamin D deficiency; acute alcoholic ketoacidosis; and hyperaldosteronism secondary to liver disease can all contribute to decreased magnesium status …. 

Older adults 
Older adults have lower dietary intakes of magnesium than younger adults …. In addition, magnesium absorption from the gut decreases and renal magnesium excretion increases with age …. Older adults are also more likely to have chronic diseases or take medications that alter magnesium status, which can increase their risk of magnesium depletion ….’” 

Okay, that was then. Let’s see if there’s more news now.  Oh, look at that! I found lots of goodies at https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Magnesium-HealthProfessional/ which is one of the same sites I used in 2017. I suggest you check this site for even more information about magnesium and your health. 

Table 1: Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) for Magnesium  

Age Male Female Pregnancy Lactation 
Birth to 6 months 30 mg* 30 mg*   
7–12 months 75 mg* 75 mg*   
1–3 years 80 mg 80 mg   
4–8 years 130 mg 130 mg   
9–13 years 240 mg 240 mg   
14–18 years 410 mg 360 mg 400 mg 360 mg 
19–30 years 400 mg 310 mg 350 mg 310 mg 
31–50 years 420 mg 320 mg 360 mg 320 mg 
51+ years 420 mg 320 mg   

*Adequate Intake (AI) 
 

Table 2: Selected Food Sources of Magnesium  

Food Milligrams 
(mg) per 
serving 
Percent 
DV* 
Pumpkin seeds, roasted, 1 ounce 156 37 
Chia seeds, 1 ounce 111 26 
Almonds, dry roasted, 1 ounce 80 19 
Spinach, boiled, ½ cup 78 19 
Cashews, dry roasted, 1 ounce 74 18 
Peanuts, oil roasted, ¼ cup 63 15 
Cereal, shredded wheat, 2 large biscuits 61 15 
Soymilk, plain or vanilla, 1 cup 61 15 
Black beans, cooked, ½ cup 60 14 
Edamame, shelled, cooked, ½ cup 50 12 
Peanut butter, smooth, 2 tablespoons 49 12 
Potato, baked with skin, 3.5 ounces 43 10 
Rice, brown, cooked, ½ cup 42 10 
Yogurt, plain, low fat, 8 ounces 42 10 
Breakfast cereals, fortified with 10% of the DV for magnesium, 1 serving 42 10 
Oatmeal, instant, 1 packet 36 
Kidney beans, canned, ½ cup 35 
Banana, 1 medium 32 
Salmon, Atlantic, farmed, cooked, 3 ounces 26 
Milk, 1 cup 24–27 
Halibut, cooked, 3 ounces 24 
Raisins, ½ cup 23 
Bread, whole wheat, 1 slice 23 
Avocado, cubed, ½ cup 22 
Chicken breast, roasted, 3 ounces 22 
Beef, ground, 90% lean, pan broiled, 3 ounces 20 
Broccoli, chopped and cooked, ½ cup 12 
Rice, white, cooked, ½ cup 10 
Apple, 1 medium 
Carrot, raw, 1 medium 2” 

As mentioned in my earlier blog on magnesium: 

“Quick, go check your lab results. You’ll notice there’s no magnesium level. If you’d like your magnesium tested, you or your doctor need to order a specific test for that. Some labs will allow you to order your own magnesium test; others will require a doctor’s orders.” 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life!