Giving Credit Where Credit is Due

I’ve been feeling awfully thankful these past few weeks. Nothing like a health challenge or two to make you realize just how much you have to be grateful for. 

I’m not sure if you know it or not, but my husband – Paul Garwood, better known as Bear – has been my photographer for over a decade. Periodically I’ll think to mention it but, to be honest, haven’t mentioned that I am amazed by how he’s continued to do this (and do it well) despite his own health challenges. Thank you, Bear. 

But let’s not stop there. I’ve been highly active in the Chronic Kidney Disease Awareness Movement for over a decade. During that time, I’ve met others on the same path. The American Association of Kidney Patients has honored one of our own with a National Award and I’d like to honor him, too. 

“Organization Category: Urban Kidney Alliance, a Baltimore-based non-profit, focused on advocating, and empowering individuals in urban cities at-risk for chronic kidney disease (CKD) and other conditions. Award accepted by Founder, Steven Belcher, RN” 

Steve not only interviewed me on his show May 20th of this year, but guest blogged while I was laid up. Thank you, Steve. 

There are others, many in fact, that I’ve omitted. To you, I offer my apologies.   

My final gratitude for today’s blog goes to our kidneys. I’ve just learned that they produce glucose. Is that common knowledge? It was new to me and I wanted to know exactly how they do that. This is what sparked my interest: 

“…traditionally, the kidneys have not been considered an important source of glucose (except during acidosis or after prolonged fasting), with most clinical discussions on glucose dysregulation centering on the intestine, pancreas, liver, adipose tissue, and muscle…. More recently, however, the full significance of the kidneys’ contribution to glucose homeostasis, under both physiologic and pathologic conditions, has become well recognized, and is thought to involve functions well beyond glucose uptake and release. Besides the liver, the kidney is the only organ capable of generating sufficient glucose (gluconeogenesis) to release into the circulation, and it is also responsible for filtration and subsequent reabsorption or excretion of glucose…. These findings have provided considerable insight into the myriad of pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in the development of hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) ….”  

The above is from AJMC at https://www.ajmc.com/view/ace005_12jan_triplitt_s11 and can probably use some explanation. First of all, AJMC is The American Journal of Managed Care and is actually for research outcomes. However, we find the information we need wherever we can. Let’s get to some of the explanations we may need. 

I started out by checking the glossary in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Diseasethe first book I wrote about CKD way back in 2010. 

Glucose: The main sugar found in the blood. In diabetes, the body doesn’t adequately control natural and ingested sugar.” 

That helps, but we need more definitions. Thank goodness for my all-time favorite dictionary,The Merriam-Webster Dictionary: 

“acidosis: an abnormal condition characterized by reduced alkalinity of the blood and of the body tissues 

adipose tissue: connective tissue in which fat is stored and which has the cells distended by droplets of fat 

homeostasis: a relatively stable state of equilibrium or a tendency toward such a state between the different but interdependent elements or groups of elements of an organism, population, or group 

hyperglycemia: excess of sugar in the blood 

pathologic(al): … altered or caused by disease; also, indicative of disease 

pathophysiology: the physiology of abnormal states, specifically the functional changes that accompany a particular syndrome or disease 

physiologic(al): … characteristic of or appropriate to an organism’s healthy or normal functioning 

type 2 diabetes mellitus: a common form of diabetes mellitus that develops especially in adults and most often in obese individuals and that is characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from impaired insulin utilization coupled with the body’s inability to compensate with increased insulin production — called also non-insulin-dependent diabetes, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, type 2 diabetes mellitus” 

Can you hear me laughing? I’m beginning to feel like I’m back in the classroom teaching a vocabulary lesson. 

Okay, so what happens if we apply all these definitions to the AJMC quote? For one thing, the one that I found so surprising, we discover that the kidneys do generate glucose. Why is that so surprising, you ask. Well, if you’re like me, all you’ve known is that the kidneys regulate glucose. Hmmm, and how do they do that? 

According to Medscape.com at https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/983678-overview#a4

“Under normal circumstances, the kidney filters and reabsorbs 100% of glucose, approximately 180 g (1 mole) of glucose, each day. The glucose transporters expressed in the renal proximal tubule ensure that less than 0.5 g/day (range 0.03-0.3 g/d) is excreted in the urine of healthy adults. More water than glucose is reabsorbed resulting in an increase in the glucose concentration in the urine along the tubule. Consequently the affinity of the transporters for glucose along the tubule increases to allow for complete reabsorption of glucose from the urine.” 

I know, I know. We need to take a look at these tubules they talk about. That’s what Wikipedia is for. Take a look at https://bit.ly/3pqlF5k for more specific information. 

“The proximal tubule is the segment of the nephron in kidneys which begins from the renal pole of the Bowman’s capsule to the beginning of loop of Henle.” 

This goes back to basic kidney anatomy, but if you’re anything like me, you need a reminder every once in a while. Keep in mind, also, that ‘renal’ is another way of saying kidney. Rather than explain what the Bowman’s capsule and the loop of Henle are, I’ve included a good illustration above. So, the kidneys regulate the glucose in our blood just as they regulate waste products. 

Again and again, readers ask me questions to which I need to respond, “I’m not a doctor and have never claimed to be one. You really need to ask your nephrologist.” That’s the truth. When I write a blog about a topic – especially a reader requested topic – I’m learning, just as you are. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life!