Recreating Creatinine

I throw a lot of terms around as if we all understood them. Sorry for that. One reader made it clear he needed more information about creatinine. In another part of my life, I belong to a community that calls reviewing or further explanation of a certain topic recreating… and today I’m going to recreate creatinine.

Let’s start in the beginning. This is what I wrote in the beginning of my CKD awareness advocacy in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease :

“Creatinine is a waste product of muscle activity. What actually happens is that our bodies use protein to build muscles and repair themselves. This used protein becomes an amino acid which enters the blood and ends up in the liver where it is once again changed.  This time it’s changed into urea which goes through the kidneys into the urine.

The harder the muscles work, the more creatinine that is produced and carried by the blood to the kidneys where it also enters the urine.  This in itself is not toxic, but measuring the urea and creatinine shows the level of the clearance of the harmful toxins the body does produce.  These harmful toxins do build up if not voided until a certain level is reached which can make us ill. Working kidneys filter this creatinine from your blood.  When the blood levels of creatinine rise, you know your kidneys are slowing down.  During my research, I discovered that a non-CKD patient’s blood is cleaned about 35 times a day. A CKD patient’s blood is cleaned progressively fewer times a day depending upon the stage of the patient’s disease.”

Got it. Well, I did have to read it a couple of times to get it straight in my mind. Now what? Let’s see what more information I can find about what this means to a CKD patient. The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 contains the following explanation from DaVita,

“Because there are often no symptoms of kidney disease, laboratory tests are critical. When you get a screening, a trained technician will draw blood that will be tested for creatinine, a waste product. If kidney function is abnormal, creatinine levels will increase in the blood, due to decreased excretion of creatinine in the urine. Your glomerular filtration rate (GFR) will then be calculated, which factors in age, gender, creatinine and ethnicity. The GFR indicates the person’s stage of Chronic Kidney Disease which provides an evaluation of kidney function.”

I thought you might want to know more about this test, so I turned to The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2 since I remembered including The National Kidney Disease Education Program at The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ information (including some reminders about definitions) concerning the process of being tested for CKD.

  1. “A blood test checks your GFR, which tells how well your kidneys are filtering.…

2. A urine test checks for albumin. Albumin is a protein that can pass into the urine when the kidneys are damaged.

If necessary, meaning if your kidney function is compromised, your PCP will make certain you get to a nephrologist promptly.  This specialist will conduct more intensive tests that include:

Blood:

BUN – BUN stands for blood urea nitrogen.

Creatinine The creatinine blood test measures the level of creatinine in the blood. This test is done to see how well your kidneys work.

Urine:

Creatinine clearance – The creatinine clearance test helps provide information about how well the kidneys are working. The test compares the creatinine level in urine with the creatinine level in blood.”

Aha! So there are two different creatinine readings: blood or serum and urine. By the way, MedicineNet at http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=5470 defines serum as “The clear liquid that can be separated from clotted blood. Serum differs from plasma, the liquid portion of normal unclotted blood containing the red and white cells and platelets. It is the clot that makes the difference between serum and plasma.”

This is starting to get pretty complex. It seems that yet another test for CKD can be conducted with a urine sample. This is from SlowItDown 2015.

“In recent years, researchers have found that a single urine sample can provide the needed information. In the newer technique, the amount of albumin in the urine sample is compared with the amount of creatinine, a waste product of normal muscle breakdown. The measurement is called a urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR). A urine sample containing more than 30 milligrams of albumin for each gram of creatinine (30 mg/g) is a warning that there may be a problem. If the laboratory test exceeds 30 mg/g, another UACR test should be done 1 to 2 weeks later. If the second test also shows high levels of protein, the person has persistent proteinuria, a sign of declining kidney function, and should have additional tests to evaluate kidney function.

Thank you to the National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse, A service of the NIH, at http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseases/pubs/proteinuria/#tests for that information.”

Is there more to know about creatinine? Uh-oh, this savory little tidbit was reprinted in SlowItDownCKD 2016 from an earlier book.

“.…Dr. HL Trivedi of the Institute of Kidney Diseases and Research Centre (IKDRC) said, ‘…. Rapid water loss causes the kidney’s functioning to slow down, resulting in temporary or permanent kidney failure.’

Extreme heat causes rapid water loss, resulting in acute electrolyte imbalance. The kidney, unable to cope with the water loss, fails to flush out the requisite amount of Creatinine and other toxins from the body. Coupled with a lack of consistent water intake, this brings about permanent or temporary kidney failure, explain experts.”

This seems to be calling for a Part 2. What do you think? There’s still BUN and albumin to deal with. Let me know what else you’d like to see included in that blog.

Have I mentioned that I’ll be presenting a display about CKD Awareness at Landmark’s Conference for Global Transformation? Or that both an article and an update about CKD Awareness will be included in their journal?

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Once Upon a Time, Not So Long Ago…

I always think of myself as a lucky mother… which makes me laugh out loud since – as a retired New York City high school and college teacher – I’m used to hearing that as half a word. But I do refer to being a parent.McKee

Here’s an example of why: I have everything I want, so when my first born asked me what I wanted for Mother’s Day this year I told her I wanted research (She’s an excellent researcher.) into the history of Chronic Kidney Disease. Guess what I got.

I am writing a novel that deals with time travel back to 1885 and needed this information to continue. I knew Chronic Kidney Disease was a relatively new field of medicine, but hadn’t expected it to be this new.

My daughter was astonished at how little she could get, but then again, there isn’t much history is there? So get ready for a (short) history lesson that combines my daughter’s research and mine.

Glomerulus-Nephron 300 dpi jpgIn the 1700’s kidney diseases weren’t recognized for what they were and not often diagnosed, although people were dying of urea poisoning or dropsy.  Urea poisoning is what we now refer to as urea in the blood. Is this starting to sound familiar?

As for dropsy, MedicineNet at http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=13311 defines this as

An old term for the swelling of soft tissues due to the accumulation of excess water….The Middle English dropesie came through the Old French hydropsie from the Greek hydrops which in turn came from the Greek hydor meaning water.

Today we call it edema and usually give the cause of it. For instance, if you have CKD, during your office visit the nephrologist will press on the skin of your leg to see if you have edema caused by CKD.

There’s a theory that Mozart may have died of CKD caused by recurrent urinary tract infections. This has been tossed around in fiction about Mozart’s life (Have you read Mozart’s Wife by Juliet Waldron? It’s an excellent historical fiction.), but there seem to be some circumstances validating this. You can read more about this at http://ukrocharity.org/2012/08/diary-of-a-kidney-lover-did-mozart-die-of-kidney-disease/

brightLet’s move up to 1827 and meet Dr. Richard Bright who worked at Guy’s Hospital in London. You may know of him already as The Father of Nephrology, although he also researched diseases of other parts of the body such as the heart, liver, pancreas, and pulmonary system.  Bright’s Disease, now called glomerulonephritis, is defined by the Mayo Clinic at http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/glomerulonephritis/basics/definition/con-20024691 as

inflammation of the tiny filters in your kidneys (glomeruli). Glomeruli remove excess fluid, electrolytes and waste from your bloodstream and pass them into your urine. Also called glomerular disease, glomerulonephritis can be acute — a sudden attack of inflammation — or chronic — coming on gradually.

Although this designation held for over a century, we now call it nephritis, which is an inflammation of the kidneys. And what is CKD if not an inflammatory disease?

Not quite 100 years later, it was discovered that not all proteinuria (protein in the urine or ‘protein spill’) was considered dangerous. This is from the History of Nephrology by Neil Turner at http://historyofnephrology.blogspot.com/2014/11/marathon-nephritis-and-postural.html

proteinProteinuria after exertion was first described in 1878. It was memorably characterised by Collier in 1907 in a systematic report on 156 Oxford rowers training for the ‘Torpids’.  57% of urine samples taken 1-1.5h after vigorous rowing contained protein.  Smaller studies in other populations of athletes gave similar results. He compared these results with the historically recorded lifespans of 294 participants in the University Boat Race – they were longer than average.  This made it seem unlikely that post-exertional proteinuria conveyed a bad long term prognosis. 

I wonder how frustrated Dr. Bright became when he first suspected that hypertension had a strong effect on the kidneys, but had no way to prove that theory since the first practical sphygmomanometer wasn’t yet available. It wasn’t brought to the U.S. until 1901, but was available earlier in Britain in an earlier form which was difficult to obtain, manipulate, and calibrate as you can see from the picture.Mahomeds Sphygmograph

With all our outcry about following a low sodium diet, it was a bit shocking to realize that when this was first suggested as a way to avoid edema in 1949, it was practically dismissed. It wasn’t until the 1970s that the importance of a low sodium diet in Chronic Kidney Disease was acknowledged.

We’ll end this extremely brief history of nephrology with the words of nephrologist Veeraish Chauhan from his “A Brief History of the Field of Nephrology” at http://kidneydisease.about.com/od/Kidney-Disease/fl/A-Brief-History-of-the-Field-of-Nephrology.htm in which he emphasizes how young the field of modern nephrology is.

 Dr. Smith was an American physician and physiologist who was almost single handedly responsible for our current understanding of how the kidneys work. He dominated the field of twentieth century Nephrology so much that it is called the “Smithian Era of Renal Physiology“. He wrote the veritable modern Bible of Nephrology titled, The Kidney: Structure and Function in Health and Disease. This was only in 1951.

51 years. That was only 64 years ago, ladies and gentlemen. That was during my lifetime. I can’t imagine what my life would be like if these discoveries had never been made… or if I would have a life at all.

Do you have any more tidbits about the history of nephrology to share with us? If so, just add a comment.

What is it

On the book front, I wonder how many of you are aware that you don’t need to buy my books to read them. Are you a member of Amazon Prime or is someone in your household? Then you can borrow the books from the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library for free.  Do you have a favorite library? Then you can ask your librarian to order the book and once it arrives, read it for free. You can also borrow library books for free on your Kindle, but first you need to make certain your library has a copy. Then there’s BookLending.com. Enter the title and borrow it for free.  You can also lend it for free. I’m also looking into Lendleme.com, but haven’t explored it enough to recommend it yet.IMG_1398

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

I Saw It!

I am so excited!  I watched my kidneys produce urine in live time.  Location of Kidneys

I know, I know: slow down.  Here’s the back story. Remember I wrote about having a bladder infection for the first time in about five years? During consultation with my primary care physician (PCP) about which antibiotic was safe for me, she pointed out that I had taken Ciprofloxacin before with no ill effects and that it was kidney safe. This is a  medication used to kill the bacteria causing an infection.

Okay, I felt comfortable taking it again without speaking to my nephrologist.  However, the 250 mg. twice a day I ingested for five days didn’t do the trick. I waited one day after finishing the prescription and then tested my urine with the same test strips I wrote about in May 25th’s post…and got the same positive results for leukocytes: elevated, which meant infection.

bladderBack to my PCP for more testing. After an in office urine test also showed leukocytes, Dr. Zhao ordered the urine sample be sent to the lab to be cultured, and both a renal and a bladder ultrasound for me. Both the ultrasounds came back normal. She is a very thorough doctor, especially when it comes to my Chronic Kidney Disease or anything that might affect it.  It is possible for infection to move up to the kidneys from the bladder. Luckily, that didn’t happen in my case. Here are the urine culture results from the lab which arrived well into my second regiment of Cipro:

Culture shows less than 10,000 colony forming units of bacteria per milliliter of urine. This colony count is not generally considered to be clinically significant.

Okay, so here I was taking 500 mg. twice a day for my second regiment of antibiotics.  This time I had checked with my nephrologist because of the doubled dosage and taking the second regiment so soon after the first. He gave his approval.

Cipro, like most other drugs, may have side effects.  I hadn’t realized why I was so restless and anxious.  Those are two of the not-so-often-encountered side effects, but I have nothing else to pin these strange (for me) feelings on. My uncustomarily anxiety was causing dissention in the family and interfering with my enjoyment of the life I usually love. After digging deep into possible side effects, I see why.  The funny thing is that all I had to do was read about these possible, but not likely, side effects to feel less anxious and restless.  I had a reason for these feelings; they sad facewould soon dissipate. I could live with that time limited discomfort.

Before taking the ultrasounds, I needed to drink 40 oz. of water – yep, almost two thirds of my daily allowance – and hold it in my bladder for an hour. I started joking with Wendy, the ultrasound technician, as soon as I got into the room.  You know, the usual: Hurry up before I float away, I can’t cross my knees any tighter, that sort of thing.

She was a lovely person who responded with kindness. When she realized I was super interested in what was on the screen, she started explaining what I was seeing to me and turned the screen so I could see what she was seeing. The bladder ultrasound was interesting… and colorful.

But the kidney ultrasound was magic!  I watched as my kidneys produced urine and the urine traveled down to the bladder.  This was real.  This was happening inside my body. And I was watching it in real time.

What is itIn What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, I discuss one of the jobs of the kidneys:

They filter as many as 200 quarts of blood per day to rid us of roughly two quarts of waste and extra water.

I was watching the extra water move from my kidneys to my bladder!  I was probably watching the blood being filtered in the kidneys, too, but that was not as clear to me.

Well, what do you know?  It seems the National Kidney Foundation is running a campaign to make the public aware of that, too.  This is what the foundation has to say about the campaign.

The National Kidney Foundation (NKF) has launched a cheeky campaign to promote kidney health and motivate people to get their urine screened.

EverybodyPees is an irreverent, educational animated music video plus a website (www.everybodypees.org) that focuses on the places people pee. EverybodyPees_PostersV3_Page_5The number one goal of the campaign is to link one of the kidneys’ primary functions — the production of urine — to overall kidney health. Pee is important because urine testing can reveal the earliest signs of kidney damage.

“Our research has shown that half of Americans don’t understand that healthy kidneys are responsible for creating urine,” said Kevin Longino, interim CEO of the National Kidney Foundation. “Urine also happens to hold the key to catching kidney disease, especially among the 73 million Americans who are at risk. The message may be unconventional, but it is educational and actionable – get your urine checked for kidney health.”

Kidney disease is at an alarming proportion in the United States. Over 26 million American adults have kidney disease and most don’t know it.  More than 40% of people who go into kidney failure each year fail to see a nephrologist before starting dialysis — a key indicator that kidney disease isn’t being identified in its earliest stages.Healthy%20Kidney

“People aren’t getting the message that they can easily identify kidney disease through inexpensive, simple tests,” said Jeffrey Berns, MD, President of the National Kidney Foundation. “Keeping kidneys top-of-mind in the restroom will hopefully remind people that they should be asking about their kidneys when they visit their healthcare professional, especially if they have diabetes, high blood pressure, a family history of kidney failure, or are over age 60.”

NKF-logo_Hori_OBEverybodyPees is NKF’s first attempt to tackle a serious national health problem from a relatable, consumer angle. The campaign was produced in collaboration with Publicis LifeBrands Medicus.

“We are flipping public health education messaging on its head –using humor to get our message across and foregoing scare tactic messaging” Longino said. “We’re going out on a limb with our core message on urine testing, but we need to take risks if we’re going to alter the course of kidney disease in this country.”

Being who I am, I prefer ‘urine’ to ‘pee,’ but that wouldn’t be half as catchy, would it?

Consider The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Parts 1 and 2 as bathroom reading while you’re urinating – uh, peeing – so we can get some more reviews. And always, let us know about any new CKD books you discover.

Until next week,Part 2Digital Cover Part 1

Keep living your life!

 

They’re Not Twins

Kidney ArizonaMarch is National Kidney Month here in the United States.  That makes it an even better time to have yourself screened for Chronic Kidney Disease. 28 million people have it and quite a few of them don’t know it.  Don’t be one of them.  All it takes is a simple blood test and a simple urine test.

Talking about blood and urine tests, I mentioned in passing on one or two of my blogs that your values and the reference range values on your lab tests may differ according to the lab you use, and loads of physical factors such as: being adequately hydrated, having voided your bladder, having gotten enough sleep, even how the specimens were handled.

I was in the unique position of taking these two tests once and then again two weeks later. Had the due date of the tests for each doctor been closer, I might have combined them and had the results of the one set of tests sent to each doctor. But my nephrologist needed his tests two weeks before my appointment, and my primary care physician {pcp} needed hers no less and no more than every three months since she was monitoring my bmpliver for the effect of a medication.

She was checking primarily for my cholesterol levels {which are better than ever and finally all within range, thank you very much!} and included the other tests because she is one thorough doctor. He, my nephrologist, was much more concerned with my kidney function.

The reference range values from the two different labs I used were not twins. For example, Sonora Quest, the lab my nephrologist uses, has the acceptable range for creatinine as 0.60 – 1.40.  But my pcp uses LabCorp. which states that it is 0.57 – 1.00 mg/dL. If you look to the right, you’ll see an older test result using mg/dL.

I wasn’t really sure what mg/dL meant, so I looked it up. According to the Free Dictionary at http://acronyms.thefreedictionary.com/mg%2fdL, this means

Milligrams per Deciliter

That was my reaction, too, so I used the same dictionary for both words used in the definition.  Milligrams means

A unit of mass equal to one thousandth (10-3) of a gram

while deciliter means

100 cubic centimeters

We are talking small here!Book Cover

The results for this test were a little different, too.  On February 10th, it was 1.11, which was not out of range for Sonora Quest.  But two weeks later, it was 1.1 – ever so slightly lower – which was out of range for LabCorp. This is a bit confusing.

Let’s go back to What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease to see if we can shed some light on this. On page 21 {Use the word search if you’re using the digital version of the book.}, I wrote

A higher creatinine result could mean the kidneys were not adequately filtering this element from the blood.

By the way,

Creatinine is a chemical waste product that’s produced by your muscle metabolism and to a smaller extent by eating meat.

Thank you to The Mayo Clinic at http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/creatinine/basics/definition/prc-20014534 for this clarification.

All I can say is that seemed like earth shattering information when I was first diagnosed with CKD.  Now that it’s seven years late, it just means I have CKD.  It’s sort of like reiterating I have this slow decline in the deterioration of my kidney function no matter which acceptable range we use.

Another difference in value ranges was BUN.  This is your urea nitrogen. Medline Plus at blood drawhttp://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003474.htm explains

BUN stands for blood urea nitrogen. Urea nitrogen is what forms when protein breaks down.

This could be a ‘Who cares?’  statement except that the BUN is used to measure your kidney health. Sonora Quest’s acceptable range is 8-25 mg/dL, while my LabCorp’s is 8-27. At the first lab, my value was 22 and at the other, two weeks later, it was 17. Both were in range, but let’s say – just for argument’s sake – my value had been 26.  Would that mean I was out of range?  It would at one lab, but not the other.  I think I just answered my own question as to why I need to have my doctor interpret my lab results even though I can read them myself.

Well, what makes these levels go up or down? Thank you WebMD for this simple to understand answer.

If your kidneys are not able to remove urea from the blood normally, your BUN level rises. Heart failure, dehydration, or a diet high in protein can also make your BUN level higher. Liver disease or damage can lower your BUN level. A low BUN level can occur normally in the second or third trimester of pregnancy.

Aha!  We know that as CKD patients we are restricted to five ounces of protein a day. Why combine an inability to “remove urea from the blood normally” with an overabundance of protein?

Hopefully, some of the questions you didn’t even know you had were answered today.

Part 2I’m sorry if you missed out on your free copy of The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1  by being the third buyer during the last part of February. While I’ve used up my freebies for that book, I’m now working on a free day for The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2 on World Kidney Day, March 12.  Keep watching for more news about this as Amazon and I keep working on it.

Again, if you’d like to join us for the Kidney Walk on April 19 at Chase Stadium in Phoenix, why not go to the Walk’s website at http://kidneywalk.kintera.org/faf/home/default.asp?ievent=1125145 and join our team, Team SlowItDown. We’ll be looking forward to seeing you there.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Urine or You’re Out

How odd that urine is so important to us.  Make no mistake; if you have Chronic Kidney Disease, you’re always keeping an eye on it.  I’m pretty sure you all know about the color chart to see if you’re hydrating enough.  If you don’t hydrate enough, your kidneys can’t do their jobs as well… and they’re already struggling to do them. This is the least complicated urine hydration chart I’ve seen.urine hydration

Of course, I’ll go back to remind you of just what the jobs of your kidneys are.  My source?  My first book about our disease, What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, page 7.

They filter as many as 200 quarts of blood per day to rid us of roughly two quarts of waste and extra water.

These two organs, the master chemists of our bodies, have several functions: regulating the fluid balance in the body, providing vital hormones, producing erythropoietin, and producing the renin that regulates blood pressure. This is why CKD patients need to be careful about sodium, Book Coverpotassium, chloride, calcium, magnesium, and phosphates. Your nutritionist may not even mention magnesium to you since this constitutes only 1% of extra cellular fluid. Additional important jobs of the kidneys are removing liquid waste from your body and balancing the minerals in the body. The two liquid waste products are urea which has been broken down from protein by the digestive system and creatinine which is a byproduct of muscle activity.

Wait a minute; I think we need to go even further back.  A picture of the urinary tract would probably be helpful here, too.urinary

Okay, now I can start writing about your urine. I’m pretty sure I mentioned in an earlier blog how disturbed I was to be one point over the normal range for microalbumin. Here’s a definition of just what that is.

Micro, or very small amounts, of albumin in the urine. Ur stands for urine. {As in the test for proteinuria.} Albumin is a form of protein that is water soluble. Urine is a liquid, a form of water, so the albumin should have been dissolved. Protein in the urine may be an indication of kidney disease.

Read that last sentence again. There seems to be a Catch 22 here. As a Chronic Kidney Disease patient for the last seven years, this has never shown up in a urine test for me before. I am including both the 24 hour variety and the random {Dipstick} variety in that never.

So now we know about microalbumin.  What about proteinuria?  Notice the ur in the word.  We just learned that means urine.  This is another indication of kidney disease.  I have never been out of acceptable range for this.  According to WebMd at http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/proteinuria-protein-in-urine

Healthy kidneys do not allow a significant amount of protein to pass through their filters. But filters damaged by kidney disease may let proteins such as albumin leak from the blood into the urine.

Glomerulus-Nephron 300 dpi jpgFilters?  This diagram of the glomerulus may help.

If albumin is a protein, are proteinuria and microalbumin the same? Well, no.  Health Communities at http://www.healthcommunities.com/proteinuria-and-microalbuminuria/overview-of-proteinuria.shtml tells us

Albumin is particularly useful in absorbing bodily fluid into the blood. Because the albumin molecule is relatively small, it is often among the first proteins to enter the urine after glomeruli are damaged. Therefore, even minor kidney dysfunction is detectable with proper diagnosis of microalbuminuria.

All right, got it?  Albumin is a protein.  It will show up as microalbumin in your urine test.  It may also show up as proteinuria since albumin is a protein. Once upon a time, you always needed to conduct a 24 hour urine test for this information, but…

In recent years, researchers have found that a single urine sample can provide the needed information. In the newer technique, the amount of albumin in the urine sample is compared with the amount of creatinine, a waste product of normal muscle breakdown. The measurement is called a urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR). A urine sample containing more than 30 milligrams of albumin for each gram of creatinine (30 mg/g) is a warning that there may be a problem. If the laboratory test exceeds 30 mg/g, another UACR test should be done 1 to 2 weeks later. If the second test also shows high levels of protein, the person has persistent proteinuria, a sign of declining kidney function, and should have additional tests to evaluate kidney function.

Thank you to the National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse {A service of the NIH} at http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseases/pubs/proteinuria/#tests for that information.banner-nihlogo

And that is where creatinine comes in and why you need to be aware of your creatinine levels in your urinalysis. By the way, blood tests will also report the amount of albumin and creatinine in your blood. This could promote another discussion, one about Blood Urea Nitrogen tests, but it would be out of place here since that’s not part of the urine.

As you can see this is a complex topic.  You need to be aware of what the color of your urine can tell you about your hydration – whether or not you have Chronic Kidney Disease – and monitor both your microalbumin and proteinuria, as well as your creatinine.

41DsvandphL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-stThe Book of BlogsAnother complex topic is editing the new print books.  The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 and The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2 aren’t quite ready.  I’m working with a new publisher and we’re just getting to know each other’s styles.  The good part about that is you get two books for the price of one on Amazon.com digital until the print books are ready.  Look for The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease.  Once the print copies are ready, I promise a day of the digital copy for free… if that perk is still available to me at that time.

I don’t know about you, but I get just as tired from overdoing it for good things as well as bad.  This weekend was a test of how well I could adhere to my renal diet with date day, a memorial dinner, and a celebratory champagne brunch.  Being human, I blew it on ice cream.  My pounding heart and lightheadedness have convinced me: no more sugar treats!  Although, some of my non-CKD friends report the same symptoms upon a sugar overdose…

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

What If You Don’t Go?

NYCWe just got back from New York, which included stays in three different places. Only one- my buddy’s pied `a terre in Bay Ridge had a private bath… one bathroom for the two of us.  In my niece’s house on Long Island, we shared two bathrooms with two other adults and four children.  In Manhattan, we shared two baths with twenty other tourists. This didn’t exactly make for instant bathroom use when you needed it.

To add insult to injury, I’ve grown very accustomed to Arizona’s immaculate public bathrooms with automatic faucets, flushes, soap dispensers, and towels. Let’s just say New York has quite a bit of room for improvement in this area. The end result was that I didn’t use the facilities as often as I needed to.

And I started wondering… what’s happens to the urine you don’t void?

toliet First things first: according to National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC), A service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)National Institutes of Health (NIH)  at http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseases/pubs/yoururinary/#points,

“The amount of urine a person produces depends on many factors, such as the amounts of liquid and food a person consumes and the amount of fluid lost through sweat and breathing.”

It was New York; it was not only hot, it was humid.  I was drinking my allotted 64 ounces of liquid daily. I was breathing – as usual – and I was sweating (perspiring?) quite a bit. Of course, I was eating, too.

In What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Kidney Disease, I explained that Book signing

“Ingested food and liquid are digested in the stomach and bowels, and then absorbed in the blood.  A renal artery carries the blood waste and water to the kidneys while a renal vein carries the filtered and sieved waste from the kidneys…..Additional important jobs of the kidneys are removing liquid waste from your body and balancing the minerals in the body. The two liquid waste products are urea which has been broken down from protein by the digestive system and creatinine which is a byproduct of muscle activity.

The problem with unregulated minerals, such as sodium and potassium is that these minerals are needed to remain healthy but too much in the bloodstream becomes toxic. The kidneys remove these toxins and change them into urine that enters the bladder via the ureter.  Look at the picture of a front view of your internal organs …. [You can see]  the kidneys, then the ureter above the bladder.  Below the bladder is the urethra, the passage to the outside of your body. This is, of course, a highly simplified explanation.  The toxins would build up and poison you if the kidneys were damaged.”

This is right at the beginning of the book on pages 2 and 3.

Now that we know how it works, we can go back to my original question: What if you don’t urinate when your bladder is full?urinary

Well, maybe we should explore the bladder a bit more. WebMD at http://www.webmd.com/urinary-incontinence-oab/picture-of-the-bladder tells us the following about the bladder:

“The bladder stores urine, allowing urination to be infrequent and voluntary. The bladder is lined by layers of muscle tissue that stretch to accommodate urine. The normal capacity of the bladder is 400 to 600 mL. During urination, the bladder muscles contract, and two sphincters (valves) open to allow urine to flow out. Urine exits the bladder into the urethra, which carries urine out of the body.”

So, there I was with a full bladder and my body telling me to empty it, but I didn’t.  What happened to the urine?

bladderIt’s time to mention that the ureters don’t have any way to stop the urine flowing back into the kidneys if you don’t void.  There are two sphincters at the bottom of your bladder leading into the urethra, but you can only voluntarily control one of them.

Interesting fact: the urethra is longer in men because it passes through the penis.  Sorry fact: because our urethras are shorter, we women are more prone to urinary tract infections.

Uh-oh, urine was moving back into my poor, already compromised kidneys. This urine flow back could further damage the capillaries and tubules making them even less effective at filtering my blood. The kidney’s pelvis and calyces – their central collection region – might become dilated, causing hydronephrosis.  Or I might end up with a kidney infection from the bacteria forced back in.  This is called pyelonephritis.

Hang on there.  I’m going to use the medical dictionary at http://www.merriam-webster.com/medical  for some definitions here.

CALYX (plural ca·lyx·es or ca·ly·ces  also ca·li·ces): a cuplike division of the renal pelvis surrounding one or more renal papillae

CAPILLARY a: resembling a hair especially in slender elongated form   b: having a very small borekidney interior

HYDRONEPHROSIS: cystic distension of the kidney caused by the accumulation of urine in the renal pelvis as a result of obstruction to outflow and accompanied by atrophy of the kidney structure and cyst formation

RENAL PAPILLA: the apex of a renal pyramid which projects into the lumen of a calyx of the kidney and through which collecting tubules discharge urine

RENAL PELVIS: a funnel-shaped structure in each kidney that is formed at one end by the expanded upper portion of the ureter lying in the renal sinus and at the other end by the union of the calyxes of the kidney  

TUBULE: a small tube; especially: a slender elongated anatomical channel

But, wait before you get all excited about the damage I’ve done to myself – or worse, yourself. You should know it would take a tremendous amount of flow back before any of this happens.  Be aware of your urge to urinate, follow through if you can, and don’t worry if you can’t every once in a while (But remember that I’m not a doctor.) And I wonder why I’ve felt the urge to urinate the whole time I’ve been writing today’s blog.

Many thanks to the oddly informative website http://www.straightdope.com/ for pointing me in the right direction for answers to my question. kidney-book-coverI have a question for all of you:  I am thinking of turning the previous blogs into a book; is that something you’d be interested in?

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

A Foggy Day… in Your Brain

Coffee Beans_0I don’t know about you, but I thoroughly enjoy my 16 ounces of coffee a day.  I savor it and draw those two cups out as long as I can.  I relish the taste and adore the aroma.  And, I thought they would cut through what I’ve discovered is called ‘brain fog.’

To be honest, I’d never heard the term before.  Maybe I live too sheltered a life… or maybe I just didn’t realize it had anything to do with me.  After all, I don’t do drugs or drink.  I do get eight hours of sleep a night, follow the renal diet, and exercise just about every day.  So what does brain fog have to do with me or any other renal patient?

You probably know this blog is posted on as many Chronic Kidney Disease Facebook pages as I could find.  These are not for medical advice, but for sharing ideas and information – always with the warning that none of us are doctors.  That’s the same warning I mention in the blog.Book Cover

I receive daily notices of who posted what where.  I noticed a question about brain fog and was surprised at the responses.  The question asked who else suffered this cloudiness of thought and what stage they were in.

Once I understood what brain fog was, I imagined the responses would all mention end stage.  They didn’t.  I saw all stages from 2 through 5 mentioned.  I was grabbed by the fact that no one in stage 1 had responded and that’s when brain fog became the topic of today’s blog.

According to integrative medicine expert Dr. Isaac Eliaz, when experiencing brain fog:

“…people feel as if there is a thick fog dampening their mind. While the medical and mental health establishments don’t generally recognize brain fog as a condition, it’s a surprisingly common affliction that affects people of all ages. Symptoms include pervasive absentmindedness, muddled thought processes, poor memory recall, difficulty processing information, disorientation, fatigue, and others.”

You can read more at http://www.rodalenews.com/brain-fog.brain

Sound familiar?  Maybe that explains why you couldn’t find the tea bags in their usual spot even though they were there.  Or why you didn’t speak with the person you meant to about a certain subject (Yep, me and SlowItDown with a potential community), but just chatted instead.

While this is interesting, what does it have to do with renal disease?  I know there are readers who only want to read about subjects that affect us as sufferers of this disease.  I know because I get a good laugh when they ask what a particular blog has to do with renal disease.  It’s obvious they haven’t read the blog since the blog is ONLY about renal disease, but just commented instead.  But, more importantly, that’s why I write the blog.

So I did what I love to do: researched the topic. Here’s what I found:

www.naturopathconnect.com offered me my first insight into how our kidneys and brain fog are connected.

“Make sure your liver and kidneys are not overloaded or congested. When your liver and kidneys are not functioning well, they are less able to clear your system of the multitude of toxins that float around in your bloodstream. When your body is overloaded with toxins, your brain suffers as well….Dehydration may be a key factor in less-than-optimal kidney function, so water is essential to keep the kidneys in tip-top shape.”

Got it – toxins.  Uh, what toxins?  And how do they affect the brain, I wondered.  Back to researching.blood

Dr. Martin Morrell of healthtap.com offered an explanation. However, this is not an endorsement of him or the site.  I am not a fan of asking online doctors unfamiliar with your particular medical history for advice.

“… if your blood urea increases, which is supposed to be cleared by your kidneys, this ‘poison’ will affect the ability of the brain to work properly.”

Oh, blood urea. Well that explains it. But how can I explain blood urea?  I’ll allow the experts to do that.

http://www.patient.co.uk/health/routine-kidney-function-blood-test has the simplest explanation.

“Urea is a waste product formed from the breakdown of proteins. Urea is usually passed out in the urine. A high blood level of urea (‘uraemia’) indicates that the kidneys may not be working properly, or that you are dehydrated (have a low body water content).”

In the U.S., we call this test B.U.N. or Blood Urea Nitrogen Blood Test.  So as I understand it, if your protein intake is high, more urea is produced.  But since your kidneys are already compromised by CKD,  the toxins remaining in your body are not eliminated as well and are still in the blood that flows through your brain.  That’s logical.

blood_test_vials_QAThe more urea remaining in your system, the more sluggish your brain.  It does sound like a perfectly formed ‘if-then’ equation from probability theory. The only difference here is that this is not a theory, but, rather, what we may encounter as CKD patients.

What to do?  What to do?  Obviously, keeping our protein intake low will help.  My renal diet limits me to five ounces of protein a day. I rarely ingest more protein than that. Well, bully for me!  So how else can I alleviate my sometimes brain fog?

I was all over the web on this one and found that besides what I was already doing for my CKD, I could also avoid heavy metal (and I always thought that was a kind of music) exposure, use a blue light, get myself some natural sun light, check my medication side effects and lots more.  This is the stuff of several blogs.

It’s real.  Brain fog could be affecting you, especially if you have CKD.  And from what I’ve read, once you’ve gotten your CKD slowed down as much as possible, the other ‘fixes’ are easy.

Okay, so coffee’s not going to help here but I’ll drink it anyway.SlowItDown business card

I just got the report from my publishers.  Thanks to all of you who brought the book as Christmas, Chanukah, or Kwanzaa presents.  That was a good month for sales which allows me to donate even more books.

SlowItDown is slowly progressing. Interesting choice of words there. We have new educators in New York and Washington, D.C. and – frankly – need your help in finding the communities that need us.

Sweet 16Between birthday parties (Happy Sweet 16, Olivia Vlasity!) and graduations (Congratulates on that and acceptance to U. of A. College of Medicine, Jordan Mudery), and the chance to spend time doing nothing graduationwith Bear, this was almost the perfect weekend for me.  Here’s to many of those for you!

Until next week,

Keep living your life!