All of Me, uh, Us

When I was a little girl, I liked to listen to my father whistle ‘All of Me,’ written by Marks and Simon in 1931 when Charlie, my father, was just 16. Only a few years later, it became a sort of love language for my mother and him. Enter a former husband of my own and my children. When my folks visited from Florida and my then husband’s side of the family journeyed over to Staten Island from Brooklyn to visit them, they all sang the song with great emotion. (By then, Bell’s palsy had robbed my father of the ability to whistle.)

To this day, I start welling up when I hear that song. But then I started thinking about the lyrics:

“All of me
Why not take all of me?”

Suddenly, it popped. For us, those with chronic kidney disease, it should be:

“All of us

Why not take all of us?”

For research purposes. To “speed up health research breakthroughs.” For help in our lifetime. To spare future generations whatever it is we’re suffering… and not just for us, but for our children… and their children, too.

The National Institutes of Health has instituted a new research program for just that purpose, although it’s open to anyone in the U.S. over the age of 18 whether ill with any disease or perfectly healthy. While only English and Spanish are the languages they can accommodate at this time, they are adding other languages.

I’m going to devote most of the rest of this blog to them. By the way, I’m even more inclined to be in favor of this program because they launched on my first born’s birthdate: May 6. All of Us has its own inspiring welcome for you at https://launch.joinallofus.org/

This is how they explain who they are and what they intend to do:

“The goal is to advance precision medicine. Precision medicine is health care that is based on you as an individual. It takes into account factors like where you live, what you do, and your family health history. Precision medicine’s goal is to be able to tell people the best ways to stay healthy. If someone does get sick, precision medicine may help health care teams find the treatment that will work best.

To get there, we need one million or more people. Those who join will share information about their health over time. Researchers will study this data. What they learn could improve health for generations to come. Participants are our partners. We’ll share information back with them over time.”

You’ll be reading more about precision medicine, which I’ve written about before, in upcoming blogs. This is from All of Us’s website at https://www.joinallofus.org/en, as is most of the other information in today’s blog, and makes it easy to understand just what they are doing.

How It Works

Participants Share Data

Participants share health data online. This data includes health surveys and electronic health records. Participants also may be asked to share physical measurements and blood and urine samples.

Data Is Protected

Personal information, like your name, address, and other things that easily identify participants will be removed from all data. Samples—also without any names on them—are stored in a secure biobank.

Researchers Study Data

In the future, approved researchers will use this data to conduct studies. By finding patterns in the data, they may make the next big medical breakthroughs.

Participants Get Information

Participants will get information back about the data they provide, which may help them learn more about their health.

Researchers Share Discoveries

Research may help in many ways. It may help find the best ways for people to stay healthy. It may also help create better tests and find the treatments that will work best for different people.

I’m busy, too busy to take on even one more thing. Or so I thought. When I read the benefits of the program (above) and how easy it is to join (below), I realized I’m not too busy for this and it is another way to advocate for Chronic Kidney Disease awareness. So I joined and hope you will, too.

Benefits of Taking Part

Joining the All of Us Research Program has its benefits.

Our goal is for you to have a direct impact on cutting-edge research. By joining the program, you are helping researchers to learn more about different diseases and treatments.

Here are some of the benefits of participating in All of Us.

Better Information

We’re all human, but we’re not all the same. Often our differences—like age, ethnicity, lifestyle habits, or where we live—can reveal important insights about our health.

By participating in All of Us, you may learn more about your health than ever before. If you like, you can share this information with your health care provider.

Better Tools

The goal of the program is better health for all of us. We want to inspire researchers to create better tools to identify, prevent, and treat disease.

You may also learn how to use tools like mobile devices, cell phones and tablets, to encourage healthier habits.

Better Research

We expect the All of Us Research Program to be here for the long-term. As the program grows, the more features will be added. There’s no telling what we can discover. All thanks to participants like you.

Better Ideas

You’re our partner. And as such, you are invited to help guide All of Us. Share your ideas and let us know what works, and what doesn’t.

Oh, about joining:

Get Started – Sign Up

Here’s a quick overview of what you’ll need to do to join.

1

Create an Account

You will need to give an email address and password.

2

Fill in the Enrollment and Consent Forms

The process usually takes 18-30 minutes. If you leave the portal during the consent process, you will have to start again from the beginning.

3

Complete Surveys and More

Once you have given your consent, you will be asked to complete online health surveys. You may be asked to visit a partner center. There, you’ll be asked to provide blood and urine samples and have your physical measurements taken. We may also ask you to share data from wearables or other personal devices.

Before I leave you today, I have – what else? – a book give away. The reason? Just to share the joy that’s walked into my life lately. It’s easy to share the troubles; why not the joys? If you haven’t received one of my books in a giveaway before, all you have to do is be the first person to let me know you want this copy of SlowItDownCKD 2017.

 

I need to get back to that online health survey for All of Us now.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

 

Published in: on May 21, 2018 at 10:38 am  Leave a Comment  
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We, the People Who Have CKD…

Happy Independence Day! Here in the United States, we usually celebrate with fireworks and bar-b-ques that may include renal friendly foods, at fireworksleast at my house. We take our pets inside and try to shield them from the sounds of the fireworks that make them so uncomfortable and then we try to enjoy the heat, the sun, and the parades.

I’m all for Independence Day celebrations, but shy away from them myself. I’m like our pets; I can do without the noise. Since getting older (or medically ‘elderly,’ which always gives me a giggle), I can also do without the heat and the crowds. We used to have renal friendly bar-b-ques at our house, but now our kids are older and visit fiancés, go to bachelorette weekend celebrations, or go camping in other states during this long holiday weekend.

And I realize I do not want to be that far from what is euphemistically called a ‘restroom’ here in Arizona for all that long. There could be many reasons for that, my elderly state (Humph!); a urinary tract infection (UTI); a weak bladder; or interstitial cystitis.

A reader and good online friend – another Texas connection, by the way – asked me to write about interstitial cystitis today. There seems to be some confusion among us – meaning Chronic Kidney Disease patients – between chronic UTIs and interstitial cystitis.Digital Cover Part 2 redone - Copy

UTI is a descriptive term we probably all know since we have CKD and have to be aware of them. We have to be careful they don’t spread to the bladder and, eventually (but rarely), to the kidneys.  That can cause even more kidney damage. I explained a bit more in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2:

“The second nephrologist to treat me referred me to an urologist when he realized I was on my fifth UTI in the same summer and he suspected this one had spread to my bladder. The urologist actually had me look through the cystoscope (I’m adding this today: a sort of long, narrow tube inserted to view both the urethra and bladder) myself to reassure me that the lower urinary tract infection had not spread to the upper urinary tract where the bladder is located.”

We know we have to be vigilant.  That’s where interstitial cystitis comes in. Let’s take a look at SlowItDownCKD 2015 for more information about cystitis:

“Another standby, WebMD, at http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/understanding-bladder-infections-basic-information explains:

‘Bladder infections are known as cystitis or inflammation of the bladder. They are common in women, but very rare in men. More than half of all women get at least one bladder infection at some time in their lives. However, a man’s chance of getting cystitis increases as he ages, due to in part to an increase in prostate size….

SlowItDownCKD 2015 Book Cover (76x113)Bladder infections are not serious if treated right away. But they tend to come back in some people. Rarely, this can lead to kidney infections, which are more serious and may result in permanent kidney damage. So it’s very important to treat the underlying causes of a bladder infection and to take preventive steps to keep them from coming back.’”

Okay so we get the cystitis part of the condition, but what does interstitial mean? MedicineNet at http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=9587defines it this way:

“Pertaining to being between things, especially between things that are normally closely spaced. The word interstitial is much used in medicine and has specific meaning, depending on the context. For instance, interstitial cystitis is a specific type of inflammation of the bladder wall.”

Hang on, just one more definition. This one is from the Mayo Clinic at http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/interstitial-cystitis/basics/definition/con-20022439

“Interstitial cystitis (in-tur-STISH-ul sis-TIE-tis) — also called painful bladder syndrome — is a chronic condition in which you experience bladder pressure, bladder pain and sometimes pelvic pain, ranging from mild discomfort to severe pain. Your bladder is a hollow, muscular organ that stores urine. The bladder expands until it’s full and then signals your brain that it’s time to urinate, communicating through the pelvic nerves. This creates the urge to urinate for most people. With interstitial cystitis, these signals get mixed up — you feel the need to urinate more often and with smaller volumes of urine than most people….”bladder

Hmmm, then this is clearly not a UTI. So why do we have to be careful about it? Time to look at the causes – or not. According to The National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases at http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/urologic-disease/interstitial-cystitis-painful-bladder-syndrome/Pages/facts.aspx,

“Researchers are working to understand the causes of IC/PBS and to find effective treatments.

…Scientists believe IC/PBS may be a bladder manifestation of a more general condition that causes inflammation in various organs and parts of the body.”

* IC means interstitial cystitis; PBS is painful bladder syndrome

Maybe we should be looking at the cure instead – or not. “At this time there is no cure for interstitial cystitis (IC).” But ichelp does mention a number of possible treatments, some of which we cannot use as CKD patients since they may harm the kidneys. Take a look for yourself at: http://www.ichelp.org/diagnosis-treatment/

Whoa! No definitive cause, no cure, and treatments which may harm our kidneys. Where’s the good news in this?  Take another look at the information from The National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases again. Notice the word ‘inflammation’?

Bingo. CKD is also an inflammatory disease and may be that “more general condition that causes inflammation in various organs and parts of the body.” Wait, I just remembered this from The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1:DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAIL

“Cancer is a disease caused by inflammation, just as Chronic Kidney Disease is.  By the way, it’s said that alkaline foods are a better way of eating should cancer rear its ugly head in your life.”

So it all comes back to inflammation.  Say, didn’t I recently write a blog about acidity vs. alkaline and inflammation?  Now there’s a good way to avoid the heat, the sun, and the parades of Independence Day. Stay inside (maybe while someone is bar-b-queuing renal friendly food outside) and peruse old blog posts.

What is itUntil next week,

Keep living your life!

Connected

dictionaryFull Definition of connected from the Merriam-Webster Dictionary

 1:  joined or linked together

2:  having the parts or elements logically linked together <presented a thoroughly connected view of the problem>

3:  related by blood or marriage

4:  having social, professional, or commercial relationships <a well-connected lawyer>

5: of a set:  having the property that any two of its points can be joined by a line completely contained in the set; also:  incapable of being separated into two or more closed disjoint subsets

Growing up in New York, I often heard the word used to suggest someone was associated with the Mafia.  You know, like you see in gangster movies. But, that’s not what today’s blog is about. It’s about the connection among all the chronic ailments you have. That would be the second definition.

Before we start, I need to remind you that I’m not a doctor and have never claimed to be one. This is my thinking from my research. This blog was sparked by a conversation on the Facebook page Stage 3 ‘n 4 CKD Kidneybeaners Gathering Place and Robin Rose who got me to thinking about the connection between CKD and inflammation. Maybe it will give you something to think about, too.

PubMed, part of the U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19083024 tells us:banner-nihlogo

“Inflammation is the response of the vasculature or tissues to various stimuli. An acute and chronic pro-inflammatory state exists in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), contributing substantially to morbidity and mortality. … Inflammation contributes to the progression of CKD by inducing the release of cytokines and the increased production and activity of adhesion molecules, which together contribute to T cell adhesion and migration into the interstitium, subsequently attracting pro-fibrotic factors. Inflammation in CKD also causes mortality from cardiovascular disease by contributing to the development of vascular calcifications and endothelial dysfunction. … “

In that one quotation, you have the definition of inflammation and its causes. I thought I’d try easing into this difficult explanation.

DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAILIn The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1, I accepted the connection, but without thought:

“And to answer your question about what colon cancer has to do with Chronic Kidney Disease, you have to remember you are medically compromised already. Cancer is a disease caused by inflammation, just as Chronic Kidney Disease is.”

That’s two chronic diseases caused by inflammation: CKD and colon cancer. There are more, many more.

By the time I wrote The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2, I was aware that sinusitis is another inflammatory disease.

“According to Canada.com at http://bodyandhealth.canada.com/channel_section_details.asp?text_id=5694&channel_id=1020&relation_id=70842:Digital Cover Part 2 redone - Copy

‘The narrowed nasal passageway caused by a deviated septum can cause mucus to become blocked by preventing the drainage of mucus from a sinus into the nasal cavity. Excess mucus inside the sinuses presents an attractive environment for bacteria, leading to a sinus infection. This in turn causes inflammation of the sinuses (sinusitis), and because it can happen regularly, chronic sinusitis can occur.’”

That’s three chronic diseases caused by inflammation: CKD, colon cancer, and sinusitis. But there are more, many more.

Last year, I wrote SlowItDownCKD 2015 and included this information:

“Another standby, WebMD, at http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/understanding-bladder-infections-basic-information explains:

‘Bladder infections are known as cystitis or inflammation of the bladder. They are common in women, but very rare in men. More than half of all women get at least one bladder infection at some time in their lives. However, a man’s chance of getting cystitis increases as he ages, due to in part to an increase in prostate size….”

SlowItDownCKD 2015 Book Cover (76x113)That’s four diseases caused by inflammation: CKD, colon cancer, sinusitis, and cystitis. But there are more, many more.

According to MedicineNet at http://www.medicinenet.com/psoriasis/article.htm :

“Psoriasis is a noncontagious skin condition that produces plaques of thickened, scaling skin. The dry flakes of skin scales are thought to result from the excessively rapid proliferation of skin cells triggered by inflammatory chemicals produced by specialized white blood cells called lymphocytes. Psoriasis commonly affects the skin of the elbows, knees, and scalp.”

That’s five diseases caused by inflammation: CKD, colon cancer, sinusitis, cystitis, and psoriasis. But there are more, many more.

Let’s not forget rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis.com at http://arthritis.com/rheumatoid_arthritis_symptoms tells us:

“Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease where the body’s immune system attacks normal joint tissues, causing inflammation of the joint lining.

rheumThis inflammation of the joint lining (called the synovium) can cause pain, stiffness, swelling, warmth, and redness. The affected joint may also lose its shape, resulting in loss of normal movement. RA is an ongoing disease, with active periods of pain and inflammation, known as flares, alternating with periods of remission, when pain and inflammation disappear.”

That’s six diseases caused by inflammation: CKD, colon cancer, sinusitis, cystitis, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. But there are more, many more.

I wouldn’t lose hope even though inflammation seems to be the common thread in chronic disease, though. According to an article in last year’s Blood Purification Journal at https://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/368940 , simple lifestyle modifications can help with inflammation:

“Chronic inflammation should be regarded as a common comorbid condition in CKD and especially in dialysis patients. A number of interventions have been proven to be safe and effective in well-designed clinical studies. This includes such inexpensive approaches as modification of physical activity and dietary supplementation. “

For example:  Dr. Richard Synder, O.D.,  suggested an alkaline/anti-inflammatory based diet when he guest blogged.

If you know an expert in the field of Chronic Kidney Disease and inflammation, let me know who that is so I can contact them to ask if they’d like to guest blog for us.

I know you each have a great deal more to say about Chronic Kidney Disease and inflammation… and so do I, so before you protest that this isn’t all there is to the topic: you’re right, but one weekly blog can only go so far. Please feel free to comment about other inflammatory diseases and how they’re affecting your CKD. I only mentioned six of them.

Until next week,Book Cover

Keep living your life!

I Saw It!

I am so excited!  I watched my kidneys produce urine in live time.  Location of Kidneys

I know, I know: slow down.  Here’s the back story. Remember I wrote about having a bladder infection for the first time in about five years? During consultation with my primary care physician (PCP) about which antibiotic was safe for me, she pointed out that I had taken Ciprofloxacin before with no ill effects and that it was kidney safe. This is a  medication used to kill the bacteria causing an infection.

Okay, I felt comfortable taking it again without speaking to my nephrologist.  However, the 250 mg. twice a day I ingested for five days didn’t do the trick. I waited one day after finishing the prescription and then tested my urine with the same test strips I wrote about in May 25th’s post…and got the same positive results for leukocytes: elevated, which meant infection.

bladderBack to my PCP for more testing. After an in office urine test also showed leukocytes, Dr. Zhao ordered the urine sample be sent to the lab to be cultured, and both a renal and a bladder ultrasound for me. Both the ultrasounds came back normal. She is a very thorough doctor, especially when it comes to my Chronic Kidney Disease or anything that might affect it.  It is possible for infection to move up to the kidneys from the bladder. Luckily, that didn’t happen in my case. Here are the urine culture results from the lab which arrived well into my second regiment of Cipro:

Culture shows less than 10,000 colony forming units of bacteria per milliliter of urine. This colony count is not generally considered to be clinically significant.

Okay, so here I was taking 500 mg. twice a day for my second regiment of antibiotics.  This time I had checked with my nephrologist because of the doubled dosage and taking the second regiment so soon after the first. He gave his approval.

Cipro, like most other drugs, may have side effects.  I hadn’t realized why I was so restless and anxious.  Those are two of the not-so-often-encountered side effects, but I have nothing else to pin these strange (for me) feelings on. My uncustomarily anxiety was causing dissention in the family and interfering with my enjoyment of the life I usually love. After digging deep into possible side effects, I see why.  The funny thing is that all I had to do was read about these possible, but not likely, side effects to feel less anxious and restless.  I had a reason for these feelings; they sad facewould soon dissipate. I could live with that time limited discomfort.

Before taking the ultrasounds, I needed to drink 40 oz. of water – yep, almost two thirds of my daily allowance – and hold it in my bladder for an hour. I started joking with Wendy, the ultrasound technician, as soon as I got into the room.  You know, the usual: Hurry up before I float away, I can’t cross my knees any tighter, that sort of thing.

She was a lovely person who responded with kindness. When she realized I was super interested in what was on the screen, she started explaining what I was seeing to me and turned the screen so I could see what she was seeing. The bladder ultrasound was interesting… and colorful.

But the kidney ultrasound was magic!  I watched as my kidneys produced urine and the urine traveled down to the bladder.  This was real.  This was happening inside my body. And I was watching it in real time.

What is itIn What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, I discuss one of the jobs of the kidneys:

They filter as many as 200 quarts of blood per day to rid us of roughly two quarts of waste and extra water.

I was watching the extra water move from my kidneys to my bladder!  I was probably watching the blood being filtered in the kidneys, too, but that was not as clear to me.

Well, what do you know?  It seems the National Kidney Foundation is running a campaign to make the public aware of that, too.  This is what the foundation has to say about the campaign.

The National Kidney Foundation (NKF) has launched a cheeky campaign to promote kidney health and motivate people to get their urine screened.

EverybodyPees is an irreverent, educational animated music video plus a website (www.everybodypees.org) that focuses on the places people pee. EverybodyPees_PostersV3_Page_5The number one goal of the campaign is to link one of the kidneys’ primary functions — the production of urine — to overall kidney health. Pee is important because urine testing can reveal the earliest signs of kidney damage.

“Our research has shown that half of Americans don’t understand that healthy kidneys are responsible for creating urine,” said Kevin Longino, interim CEO of the National Kidney Foundation. “Urine also happens to hold the key to catching kidney disease, especially among the 73 million Americans who are at risk. The message may be unconventional, but it is educational and actionable – get your urine checked for kidney health.”

Kidney disease is at an alarming proportion in the United States. Over 26 million American adults have kidney disease and most don’t know it.  More than 40% of people who go into kidney failure each year fail to see a nephrologist before starting dialysis — a key indicator that kidney disease isn’t being identified in its earliest stages.Healthy%20Kidney

“People aren’t getting the message that they can easily identify kidney disease through inexpensive, simple tests,” said Jeffrey Berns, MD, President of the National Kidney Foundation. “Keeping kidneys top-of-mind in the restroom will hopefully remind people that they should be asking about their kidneys when they visit their healthcare professional, especially if they have diabetes, high blood pressure, a family history of kidney failure, or are over age 60.”

NKF-logo_Hori_OBEverybodyPees is NKF’s first attempt to tackle a serious national health problem from a relatable, consumer angle. The campaign was produced in collaboration with Publicis LifeBrands Medicus.

“We are flipping public health education messaging on its head –using humor to get our message across and foregoing scare tactic messaging” Longino said. “We’re going out on a limb with our core message on urine testing, but we need to take risks if we’re going to alter the course of kidney disease in this country.”

Being who I am, I prefer ‘urine’ to ‘pee,’ but that wouldn’t be half as catchy, would it?

Consider The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Parts 1 and 2 as bathroom reading while you’re urinating – uh, peeing – so we can get some more reviews. And always, let us know about any new CKD books you discover.

Until next week,Part 2Digital Cover Part 1

Keep living your life!

 

A Cautionary Tale 

Memorial DayToday is Memorial Day here in the U.S. It’s a celebration of our fallen warriors, the ones who fought for us so we wouldn’t have to fight for ourselves… and it began as a celebration of freed slaves honoring those who fought for their freedom way back in 1865. As Time.com at http://time.com/3894406/who-invented-memorial-day/ phrases it:

On May 1, 1865, freed slaves gathered in Charleston, South Carolina to commemorate the death of Union soldiers and the end of the American Civil War. Three years later, General John Logan issued a special order that May 30, 1868 be observed as Decoration Day, the first Memorial Day.

I married a retired military man. Memorial Day has had more meaning for me in the last eight years than ever before in my life.  It’s been a revelation, as our wedding invitation stated:

The Retired Lieutenant Colonel

Paul Arthur Garwood

and

The Former Wannabe Hippie4wedding

Gail Rae

Invite you to our wedding reception

Thank you again to all those who gave their lives so I wouldn’t have to.

Being a bit dramatic here, I also sort of saved my own life last week by saving my kidneys from further damage.  I know, I know. There’s no comparison, but it sure is a good way to get into today’s topic.

I wrote about dreaming about my bladder last week.  Well, I decided I needed to take that dream a bit more seriously. Off I went to my local pharmacy for an over the counter (OTC) urinary tract infection (UTI) kit.

I chose the Azo Brand because it is

the same urinary tract infection test used in many doctor’s offices, to determine if the bacteria that cause a UTI are present. {The description continues.} Then call your doctor with the results. The most reliable, over-the-counter UTI home test available, AZO Test Strips offer two UTI tests in one – including both Leukocyte (white blood cells) and Nitrite tests – which makes them more reliable than nitrite-only tests. (Doctors look for Leukocytes as well as Nitrites in diagnosing UTIs.)

test-strips-right_3Leukocytes are higher when you are fighting an infection. Unfortunately, that’s any infection. So what about nitrites?

When the urinary tract is infected by harmful bacteria then it leads to the development of nitrites as a byproduct. The kidneys are responsible for filtering the blood and for the elimination of unwanted waste materials from the body. However, they are incapable of filtering out the nitrites. The nitrites can however travel from the kidneys into the bladder and get stored there. They are then passed out along with the urine. Therefore the presence of nitrites in urine is generally an indication of the presence of a urinary tract infection.

Thank you for that information, Diseases List at http://diseaseslist.org/nitrites-in-urine/  Notice our kidneys are NOT at fault for once.

So far, so good.  I mean bad.  You take the test by urinating on a dipstick.  First you urinate for a second or two, then hold the dipstick under the urine stream, and then sort of mop up the excess urine.  Pay attention when you do this or it can get messy.

There were three test strips with accompanying color charts in the box.  I took all three. (Did I ever tell you about a family member who took the same OTC pregnancy test a dozen times just to be sure?  This doubt must run in the family.) You guessed it. All three were not just positive for UTI, but highly positive.

As you know, doctors don’t prescribe medication over the phone so I tried to make an appointment with my primary care doctor.  She is much sought after and had no openings that week, much less that day. She is part of a practice so I took an appointment with another doctor in the practice, one I had seen a time or two before under the same circumstances.

He had my chart in front of him.  I was wearing a medical alert bracelet. I told him three times I had Chronic Kidney Disease. In addition to ordering ciprofloxacin 250 mg. – which is safe for certain stages of CKD for certain periods of time at certain dosages – he ordered phenazopyridine 200 mg. for the pain. He kept talking about not being alarmed when it changed the color of my urine.

I didn’t feel like he’d heard a word I said.  I wasn’t too worried, because I always check with the pharmacist before taking any new medication.  She was alarmed, told me not to buy this medication, and that she would be contacting this doctor to tell him prescribing phenazopyridine for anyone with CKD was inappropriate.  This is the second time this has happened since I was diagnosed with CKD.

The National Institutes of Health warn that you tell your doctor if you’ve had kidney problems should he/she prescribe this drug.  I did… a NIHminimum of three times. This is what Drugs.com at http://www.drugs.com/mtm/phenazopyridine.html had to say about this pain reliever.

What is the most important information I should know about phenazopyridine?

You should not use phenazopyridine if you have kidney disease.

Okay, beating a dead horse here (I’m just so damned annoyed!), so let’s see if we can figure out why CKD patients should not be using this drug. Uh-oh, MedicineNet at http://www.medicinenet.com/phenazopyridine-oral/article.htm tells us

Although the exact mechanism of action is unknown, phenazopyridine is thought to provide relief of symptoms of UTIs by acting as a local anesthetic on the lining of the urinary tract.

All right, let’s try this another way then.  Why shouldn’t CKD patients take this drug? After looking at Wikipedia – even taking into account that anyone can edit these entries – I’m wondering why anyone would take it at all. It’s a form of Azo dye.

Less frequently it can cause a pigment change in the skin or eyes, to a noticeable yellowish color. This is due to a depressed excretion via the kidneys causing a buildup of the drug in the skin, and normally indicates a need to discontinue usage.

kidney functionWhat! Exits via the kidneys? Excretion can be depressed?  Nope, not for me, not for you either. Take a look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phenazopyridine

Here’s the caution: sure we trust our doctors and those doctors they trust, but check with your pharmacist, too.

Hey, where are the weirdest places to read my CKD books entries?  We got some really weird ones, but we want to see yours.  The contest runs until the end of the month.  That’s plenty of time to snap a picture and post it. Not on FB?  Include it as a comment on the blog or email it.  You can even post it on Twitter.Digital Cover Part 2 redone - Copy

Book Cover

Until next week,

Keep living your life!DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAIL

What a Weird Dream

Part 2I woke up today realizing I’d been dreaming about my bladder.  Sometimes that’s a somatic clue to wake up and empty it, but I’d done that already. Hmmm, was I being told to look into the different aspects of the bladder?  Oh, maybe the dream DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAILwas pointing toward the connection between Chronic Kidney Disease and the bladder. By now, you’ve probably realized everything in my world points to CKD.

To my way of thinking, if I were going to dream of anything CKD related, I should have been dreaming about the photos of you reading one of my books in a weird place that you’ve posted on SlowItDownCKD’s Facebook page to win a free copy of The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1. That would make sense, wouldn’t it?

What is it

But, no.  It was the bladder.  Okay, then, let’s take a look at the bladder. As usual, we’ll start at the beginning with a definition. Many thanks to the ever reliable MedicineNet at http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=2472 for the following:

A hollow organ in the lower abdomen that stores urine. The kidneys filter waste from the blood and produce urine, which enters the bladder through two tubes, called ureters. Urine leaves the bladder through another tube, the urethra. In women, the urethra is a short tube that opens just in front of the vagina. In men, it is longer, passing through the prostate gland and then the penis. Also known as urinary bladder and vesical.

Notice the mention of the kidneys. Notice also the urine flows from the kidneys to the bladder, not vice versa.  Doesn’t help much to explain the dream.  I wonder if a bladder infection might explain more.

Another standby, WebMD, at http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/understanding-bladder-infections-basic-information explains:

Bladder infections are known as cystitis or inflammation of the bladder. They are common in women, but very rare in men. More than half of all women get at least one bladder infection at some time in their lives. However, a man’s chance of getting cystitis increases as he ages, due to in part to an increase in prostate size….

Bladder infections are not serious if treated right away. But they tend to come back in some people. Rarely, this can lead to kidney infections, which are more serious and may result in permanent kidney damage. So it’s very important to treat the underlying causes of a bladder infection and to take preventive steps to keep them from coming back.kidney location

Oh, so repeated bladder infections can lead to kidney infections, although rarely.  Maybe we’d better take a look at the symptoms of bladder infections… just in case, you understand.

This was the point in my research that I once again appreciated how user friendly, yet detailed, the Mayo Clinic is. The following information may be found at http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/urinary-tract-infection/basics/symptoms/con-20037892

Part of urinary tract affected      Signs and symptoms

Kidneys (acute pyelonephritis)   Upper back and side (flank) painurinary-tract-infection-uti-picture

High fever

Shaking and chills

Nausea

Vomiting

Bladder (cystitis)                            Pelvic pressure

Lower abdomen discomfort

Frequent, painful urination

Blood in urine

Urethra (urethritis)                        Burning with urination

Let’s change direction here and take a look at pyelonephritis since that involves the kidneys.

at http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/kidney-disease/pyelonephritis-kidney-infection/Pages/index.aspx has this information.

Pyelonephritis is caused by a bacterium or virus infecting the kidneys. Though many bacteria and viruses can cause pyelonephritis, the bacterium Escherichia coli is often the cause. Bacteria and viruses can move to the kidneys from the bladder or can be carried through the bloodstream from other parts of the body. A UTI in the bladder that does not move to the kidneys is called cystitis.

However, the site carefully explains that a bladder infection or a structural abnormality that causes urine to flow back into the kidneys are the two most usual causes.  So we’re back to looking at bladder infections after this little detour.

Location of KidneysFor information about what might cause a bladder infection, I shot over to Healthline at http://www.healthline.com/health/bladder-infection#Overview1

Bladder infections are caused by germs or bacteria that enter through the urethra and travel into the bladder. Normally, the body is able to remove the bacteria by clearing it out during urination. Sometimes, however, the bacteria attach to the walls of the bladder and multiply quickly, overwhelming the body’s ability to destroy them, resulting in a bladder infection.

Simple, direct, and to the point. Here we are knowing what a bladder infection is, what the symptoms are, and how we might have developed one.  But, what do we do about it?

UTI OTC testFirst of all, verify that you have UTI or urinary tract infection since the kidneys, the urethra, and the bladder are part of this system. OTC or over the counter test strips for this purpose are available, although I seem to remember they are not effective if you’ve passed menopause.  That was seven years ago when I had my first and last bladder infection, so things may have changed.  You can also make an appointment with your doctor to verify. Usually, a high white blood cell count will indicate you’re fighting some sort of infection.

All right, let’s say you home test and see you’re fighting an infection. Now what? Well, you can try the usual home remedies of cranberry juice and uber hydration, but you have CKD.  You have to act fast before a UTI becomes a bladder infection which may lead to a kidney infection.

My advice?  Call your doctor.  He or she may prescribe an antibiotic which will hopefully clear up the infection in just a few days.  A bladder infection does not have to lead to a kidney infection or be serious… unless you ignore it.

I have spent every day of the last eight years working diligently to protect my kidneys, slow down the progress of Chronic Kidney Disease, and raise GFRmy GFR when I can.  I, for one, am not willing to jeopardize my kidney function because I didn’t jump on what I thought might be a UTI.  Won’t you join me in taking immediate action should you have the symptoms?  Remember the connections between the urethra, the bladder, and the kidneys.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!