B.U.N. No, not bun. B.U.N.

Let’s consider this part 2 of last week’s blog since all these terms and tests and functions are intertwined for Chronic Kidney Disease patients. Thanks to reader Paul (not my Bear, but another Paul) for emphatically agreeing with me about this.

Bing! Bing! Bing! I know where to start. This is from The National Kidney Disease Education Program at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ information about being tested for CKD.

“If necessary, meaning if your kidney function is compromised, your pcp will make certain you get to a nephrologist promptly.  This specialist will conduct more intensive tests that include:

Blood:

BUN –

BUN stands for blood urea nitrogen. Urea nitrogen is what forms when protein breaks down.”

If you read last week’s blog about creatinine, you know there’s more to the testing than that and that more of the information is in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2. No sense to repeat myself so soon.

Let’s take this very slowly. I don’t think it necessary to define blood, but urea? Maybe. I found this in SlowItDownCKD 2015:

“But how can I explain blood urea?  I’ll allow the experts to do that.

http://www.patient.co.uk/health/routine-kidney-function-blood-test has the simplest explanation.

‘Urea is a waste product formed from the breakdown of proteins. Urea is usually passed out in the urine. A high blood level of urea (‘uraemia’) indicates that the kidneys may not be working properly or that you are dehydrated (have low body water content).’

In the U.S., we call this test B.U.N. or Blood Urea Nitrogen Blood Test.  So as I understand it, if your protein intake is high, more urea is produced.  But since your kidneys are already compromised by CKD, the toxins remaining in your body are not eliminated as well….”

You with me so far? If there’s suspicion of CKD, your nephrologist tests your serum creatinine (see last week’s blog) and your BUN.  Wait a minute; I haven’t explained nitrogen yet. Oh, I see; it has to be defined in conjunction with urea.

Thanks to The National Kidney Foundation at https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/understanding-your-lab-values for clearing this up:

“Urea nitrogen is a normal waste product in your blood that comes from the breakdown of protein from the foods you eat and from your body metabolism. It is normally removed from your blood by your kidneys, but when kidney function slows down, the BUN level rises. BUN can also rise if you eat more protein, and it can fall if you eat less protein.”

So now the reason for this protein restriction I wrote about in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease should be clear.

“So, why is protein limited? One reason is that it is the source of a great deal of phosphorus. Another is that a number of nephrons were already destroyed before you were even diagnosed. Logically, those that remain compensate for those that are no longer viable. The remaining nephrons are doing more work than they were meant to. Just like a car that is pushed too hard, there will be constant deterioration if you don’t stop pushing. The idea is to stop pushing your remaining nephrons to work even harder in an attempt to slow down the advancement of your CKD.  Restricting protein is a way to reduce the nephrons’ work.”

This is starting to sound like a rabbit warren – one piece leads to another, which verves off to lead to another, and so forth and so on. All right, let’s keep going anyway.

Guess what. Urea is also tested via the urine. Nothing like confusing the issue, at least to those of us who are lay people like me. Let’s see if Healthline at http://www.healthline.com/health/urea-nitrogen-urine#overview1 can straighten this out for us.

“Your body creates ammonia when it breaks down protein from foods. Ammonia contains nitrogen, which mixes with other elements in your body, including carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen to form urea. Urea is a waste product that is excreted by the kidneys when you urinate.

The urine urea nitrogen test determines how much urea is in the urine to assess the amount of protein breakdown. The test can help determine how well the kidneys are functioning, and if your intake of protein is too high or low. Additionally, it can help diagnose whether you have a problem with protein digestion or absorption from the gut.”

Hmmm, these two don’t sound that different to me other than what is being analyzed for the result – blood (although blood serum is used, rather than whole blood) or urine.

What about BUN to Creatinine tests? How do they fit in here? After all, this is part 2 of last week’s blog about creatinine. Thank you to Medicine Net at http://www.medicinenet.com/creatinine_blood_test/article.htm for explaining. “The BUN-to-creatinine ratio generally provides more precise information about kidney function and its possible underlying cause compared with creatinine level alone.”

Dizzy yet? I think that’s enough for one day.

In other news, the price of all my Chronic Kidney Disease books has been reduced by 20%. I think more people will avail themselves of this information if they cost less… and that’s my aim: CKD awareness. If you belong to Kindle’s share program, you can take advantage of the fact that the price there was reduced to $1.99. You can also loan my books to a Kindle friend or borrow them from one for free for 14 days. Or you can ask your local librarian to order all five books, another way of reading them free. I almost forgot: as a member of Kindle Unlimited and the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library, you also read the books for free although you do need to pay your usual monthly subscription fee.

Students: Please be aware that some unscrupulous sites have been offering to rent you my books for a term for much more than it would cost to buy them. I’ve succeeded in getting most of them to stop this practice, but more keep popping up.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

TED Doesn’t Talk to Me; But YouTube Does

After last week’s accolades for the blog about apps for kidney disease, I thought I would keep on the electronic trail and jump right over to one of the big boys: TED Talks. I was both excited and a bit apprehensive since this is new territory for me. I have heard some of my children talk about them, but never explored these talks for myself.

downloadWhat new information could I learn here? Would it be easier or harder to understand? And just what were T.E.D. Talks anyway?  Doing what I like to do best, I jumped in for a bit of research.

This is directly from the TED website at www.ted.com:

“TED is a nonpartisan nonprofit devoted to spreading ideas, usually in the form of short, powerful talks. TED began in 1984 as a conference where Technology, Entertainment and Design converged, and today covers almost all topics — from science to business to global issues — in more than 110 languages. Meanwhile, independently run TEDx events help share ideas in communities around the world.”

IMG_2982Considering what’s been going on with our insane politics this election, I thought I would check the meaning of nonpartisan just to make sure it had a meaning other than the one I’d been hearing bantered around. According to the Encarta Dictionary, it means “not belonging to, supporting, or biased in favor of a political party.” I wasn’t so sure that’s what it meant for TED, so I used the synonym function in Word; that made much more sense: impartial, unaligned, unbiased, unprejudiced, neutral, and so on.

Now that we know what TED is, let’s plunge right in and do some exploring. I searched Chronic Kidney Disease and got no hits. That’s all right; a synonym is renal disease. I’ll search that. All that came up was “Timothy Ihrig: What we can do to die well.” That’s not exactly what I was looking for.

I know, I’ll type in kidney failure. Hmmm, that didn’t work very well, either. I found two interesting talks, “Siddhartha Mukherjee: Soon we’ll cure diseases with a cell, not a pill” and “Anthony Atala: Printing a human kidney,” as well as two blogs that may have peripherally included CKD. No, these were not the talks about living with CKD that I’d hoped to find.

What other term could I search? I know, how about just-plain-kidney? I got three pages of hits which weren’t really hits at all if you were looking for living with Chronic Kidney Disease. While TED Talks cover a variety of interesting topics, I don’t think they’re CKD specific right now.  Maybe in the future…

I was a little crestfallen, but then I remembered that when I first decided to FullSizeRender (2)become a CKD Awareness Advocate and wrote What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, I made a couple of YouTubes as marketing devices. They were terrible, but did include some helpful information. You can see this for yourself at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8VcVYhhrixg and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nRsUNxv7ajA.

When you’ve picked yourself up from the floor after getting your belly laughs at my expense (cringe), start exploring YouTube for CKD information by looking at the side bar on each of my woebegone entries into the world of YouTube.  The list of videos continues and goes on and on. Yay!

FullSizeRender (3)

Of course, just as when you’re looking online – or choosing a book – or a blog to follow, you need to be careful to separate the wheat from the chaff. There are charlatans and scammers here, just as there are respected physicians and patients bravely sharing their stories.

But what is YouTube anyway? https://www.youtube.com/yt/about/tells us:

“Launched in May 2005, YouTube allows billions of people to discover, watch and share originally-created videos. YouTube provides a forum for people to youtubeconnect, inform, and inspire others across the globe and acts as a distribution platform for original content creators and advertisers large and small.

YouTube is a Google company.”

You’ll also find some YouTubes I posted that show friends, family, even me dancing either the Blues or East Coast Swing. My point? Anyone can post anything provided it does not include:

Nudity or sexual content

Violent or graphic content

Hateful content

Spam, misleading metadata, and scams

Harmful or dangerous content

Copyright (Me, here, this refers to copyrighted material.)

Threats

You can read more about these community guidelines at https://www.youtube.com/yt/policyandsafety/communityguidelines.html.

I chose one or two posts to see the quality we can find here. (Very funny, no, this is not a case of I- wouldn’t-want-to-be-a-member-of-any-club- that-lets-me-in.) I noticed one of the physicians I’d had contact with as an advocate, Dr. Robert Provenzano, posted about the causes of CKD on 2/3/09 at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CjZCKBOoeQo which was highly informative… but getting close to seven years old.

I wanted something more recent and found it at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n1_srNUJkjE. This one by Danuta Trzebinska, MD, of US San Diego Health, deals with possible symptoms of CKD and was posted last year.

But then I found YouTube about a kidney cleanses which could be harmful to already damaged kidneys. Dr. Josh Axe at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3AqPE-j3Eq0 was not particularly targeting CKD patients, but as a new CKD patient, how could you know that? Some of the herbs he suggests are harmful to ALREADY COMPROMISED kidneys. You need to be careful about which videos are for those with CKD and which are for those without CKD. Of course, you’re IMG_2980checking everything you see with your nephrologist before you act on it. Right? You are, aren’t you? You’ve got to protect your kidneys, so please (Let’s make that pretty please.) do.

I’m wondering what other electronic helps I could explore. We’ve looked at apps, TED Talks, and YouTube. What other electronic aids do you know about that I don’t? I’ll be more than happy to explore them for myself which means I’ll be exploring them for you, too, since they’re going to end up being the next blog.

halloweenwitchvintageimagegraphicsfairyToday is Halloween. You know those treats? Why not treat yourself by not eating them? It’s hard, but it can be done.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

We, the People Who Have CKD…

Happy Independence Day! Here in the United States, we usually celebrate with fireworks and bar-b-ques that may include renal friendly foods, at fireworksleast at my house. We take our pets inside and try to shield them from the sounds of the fireworks that make them so uncomfortable and then we try to enjoy the heat, the sun, and the parades.

I’m all for Independence Day celebrations, but shy away from them myself. I’m like our pets; I can do without the noise. Since getting older (or medically ‘elderly,’ which always gives me a giggle), I can also do without the heat and the crowds. We used to have renal friendly bar-b-ques at our house, but now our kids are older and visit fiancés, go to bachelorette weekend celebrations, or go camping in other states during this long holiday weekend.

And I realize I do not want to be that far from what is euphemistically called a ‘restroom’ here in Arizona for all that long. There could be many reasons for that, my elderly state (Humph!); a urinary tract infection (UTI); a weak bladder; or interstitial cystitis.

A reader and good online friend – another Texas connection, by the way – asked me to write about interstitial cystitis today. There seems to be some confusion among us – meaning Chronic Kidney Disease patients – between chronic UTIs and interstitial cystitis.Digital Cover Part 2 redone - Copy

UTI is a descriptive term we probably all know since we have CKD and have to be aware of them. We have to be careful they don’t spread to the bladder and, eventually (but rarely), to the kidneys.  That can cause even more kidney damage. I explained a bit more in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2:

“The second nephrologist to treat me referred me to an urologist when he realized I was on my fifth UTI in the same summer and he suspected this one had spread to my bladder. The urologist actually had me look through the cystoscope (I’m adding this today: a sort of long, narrow tube inserted to view both the urethra and bladder) myself to reassure me that the lower urinary tract infection had not spread to the upper urinary tract where the bladder is located.”

We know we have to be vigilant.  That’s where interstitial cystitis comes in. Let’s take a look at SlowItDownCKD 2015 for more information about cystitis:

“Another standby, WebMD, at http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/understanding-bladder-infections-basic-information explains:

‘Bladder infections are known as cystitis or inflammation of the bladder. They are common in women, but very rare in men. More than half of all women get at least one bladder infection at some time in their lives. However, a man’s chance of getting cystitis increases as he ages, due to in part to an increase in prostate size….

SlowItDownCKD 2015 Book Cover (76x113)Bladder infections are not serious if treated right away. But they tend to come back in some people. Rarely, this can lead to kidney infections, which are more serious and may result in permanent kidney damage. So it’s very important to treat the underlying causes of a bladder infection and to take preventive steps to keep them from coming back.’”

Okay so we get the cystitis part of the condition, but what does interstitial mean? MedicineNet at http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=9587defines it this way:

“Pertaining to being between things, especially between things that are normally closely spaced. The word interstitial is much used in medicine and has specific meaning, depending on the context. For instance, interstitial cystitis is a specific type of inflammation of the bladder wall.”

Hang on, just one more definition. This one is from the Mayo Clinic at http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/interstitial-cystitis/basics/definition/con-20022439

“Interstitial cystitis (in-tur-STISH-ul sis-TIE-tis) — also called painful bladder syndrome — is a chronic condition in which you experience bladder pressure, bladder pain and sometimes pelvic pain, ranging from mild discomfort to severe pain. Your bladder is a hollow, muscular organ that stores urine. The bladder expands until it’s full and then signals your brain that it’s time to urinate, communicating through the pelvic nerves. This creates the urge to urinate for most people. With interstitial cystitis, these signals get mixed up — you feel the need to urinate more often and with smaller volumes of urine than most people….”bladder

Hmmm, then this is clearly not a UTI. So why do we have to be careful about it? Time to look at the causes – or not. According to The National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases at http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/urologic-disease/interstitial-cystitis-painful-bladder-syndrome/Pages/facts.aspx,

“Researchers are working to understand the causes of IC/PBS and to find effective treatments.

…Scientists believe IC/PBS may be a bladder manifestation of a more general condition that causes inflammation in various organs and parts of the body.”

* IC means interstitial cystitis; PBS is painful bladder syndrome

Maybe we should be looking at the cure instead – or not. “At this time there is no cure for interstitial cystitis (IC).” But ichelp does mention a number of possible treatments, some of which we cannot use as CKD patients since they may harm the kidneys. Take a look for yourself at: http://www.ichelp.org/diagnosis-treatment/

Whoa! No definitive cause, no cure, and treatments which may harm our kidneys. Where’s the good news in this?  Take another look at the information from The National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases again. Notice the word ‘inflammation’?

Bingo. CKD is also an inflammatory disease and may be that “more general condition that causes inflammation in various organs and parts of the body.” Wait, I just remembered this from The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1:DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAIL

“Cancer is a disease caused by inflammation, just as Chronic Kidney Disease is.  By the way, it’s said that alkaline foods are a better way of eating should cancer rear its ugly head in your life.”

So it all comes back to inflammation.  Say, didn’t I recently write a blog about acidity vs. alkaline and inflammation?  Now there’s a good way to avoid the heat, the sun, and the parades of Independence Day. Stay inside (maybe while someone is bar-b-queuing renal friendly food outside) and peruse old blog posts.

What is itUntil next week,

Keep living your life!

Still Getting Birthday Gifts… like OAB

happy birthdayBear has just spoiled me and spoiled me for this birthday. It was not a special birthday, just a birthday. His reasoning, “I’m celebrating being with you for another year.” Which, of course, made me think. My first thought? I realized how much I liked being adored by the man I love.

My second?  Time changes things.  Your weight changes.  Your hair color changes.  Even your height changes. There are those that say aging is a problem. I say if you’re aging, you’re alive so it’s not a problem, but rather something to which you need to adapt.

Part of the birthday celebration was an overnight at The Desert Rose Bed and Breakfast in Cottonwood. The place was unique. They house animals they’ve rescued: llamas, cats, chickens. I thought the llamas were the most picture worthy, but then I’d never seen the kind of fluffed out rooster they had. Up the hill was a goat farm. For a city woman like me, this was heaven.

Except – there was this – there were no hand rails on the steep path from the house to the animals. Nor were there steps. The runoff from a recent hose cleaning of some apparatus near the house caused the loose gravel covered road to be slick. So we took teeny little ‘old person’ steps while the owner, a young woman possibly in her thirties, practically scampered. We got to see the animals, but we had to adapt how we got to them due to our age related capabilities.llama

The private bath was another eye opener for me. Bear opted for the room with the spa. It was so relaxing and could have even been romantic except that there were no grab rails. We slipped, we fell, we worried if Bear broke his foot.  But it was supposed to be romantic!

Oh well. There was also the kind of shower I’d only seen in magazines.  You know the kind that could easily fit six people (uh, not my style) with two separate shower heads – one on each end of the shower. This was a new toy for me, until the floor got wet. Again, no grab rails. There was no safety mat on the shower floor, either. So we tried to hold on to the walls. Hah! They were tile that was just as slippery.

You get the point?  This was a beautiful, romantic, upscale bathroom… and wasted on us because there were no safety features to accommodate our gifts from aging. Of course, not everyone would have felt this way, but we each have neuropathy which can make balancing difficult.

shoqweIn addition to grab bars in our at home bathrooms, we have no area rugs anywhere in the house. This is to cut down on the possibility of tripping. When our primary care doctor suggested ways to prevent injuring ourselves, we listened. Bear’s time flat on his back after his foot surgery convinced us we never wanted to go through that again. For me, with my ‘age related’ macular degeneration, we also use ultra-bright LED bulbs throughout the house.

Okay, so where am I going with this? I’m circling in on the kidneys via urination. Remember the kidneys produce urine which is stored in the bladder.  I wanted to know what was usual for people ‘our age’ and why. After all, I’d made the bathrooms as safe as possible understanding that one or the other of us was going to get up during the night to urinate.

I turned to The Cleveland Clinic at http://health.clevelandclinic.org/2015/12/stop-full-bladder-killing-sleep/ for some help.

“If you’re urinating more than eight times in 24 hours, that’s too much. A lot depends on your age. And if you’re between age 65-70 and going more than twice a night, you should make an appointment with your doctor. Also, see a doctor if you are getting up more than once a night if you are between age 60-65, and more than three times each night if you are age 70 or older. While your bladder’s capacity does not necessarily decrease with age, the prevalence of overactive bladder increases with age.”

Apparently, an overactive bladder may also lead to increased falls. Not fair! We’re already dealing with the neuropathy to avoid this. Oh, right. “…if you’re aging, you’re alive so it’s not a problem, but rather something to which you need to adapt.”detrusor

I wonder if aging is a factor because the detrusor (bladder muscle) ages right along with the rest of you.  A long time ago, I explained that my Chronic Kidney Disease was caused by nothing more than growing older. I hate to admit it, but it does make sense. All of you ages when you age, not just certain parts.

What is itBirthday giveaway for What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease! All you have to do to win is be one of the first three people to enter the contest and follow SlowItDownCKD on Twitter. Here’s link to enter for a chance to win: https://giveaway.amazon.com/p/542abbec7a52e10a#ln-fo

I hope you’re keeping an eye on P2P’s Chronic Illness Buy and Sell’s contest. I’ll be gifting a copy of one of my Chronic Kidney Disease Books to three different winners.  Each winner will receive a different book. This one started February 1st and runs until St. Valentine’s Day.  Here’s the address: http://www.facebook.com/groups/P2PBuy.Sell. You do need to be a member of the group, tag yourself in a comment below the announcement of the contest, and be involved with kidney disease as a patient or caretaker.

My accountant (Yep, working on those this week.) thinks I’m nuts to be part of so many giveaways and contests, but my mission… no, my passion… is to get information about Chronic Kidney Disease out to as many people as I can, in as many ways as I can, for as long as I can.

IMG_1398

To that end, Phoenix area readers, please let me know if you are interested in joining Team SlowItDownCKD for this year’s kidney walk at Chase Stadium on Sunday, April 17.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Blood and Thunder, Without the Thunder

I’ve been thinking a lot about blood lately and realize it’s time for a refresher about blood and CKD. It’s been doctor-visits-week for me and each one of them wanted to talk about blood test numbers… because I have Chronic Kidney Disease and my numbers are the worst they’ve been in seven years.Blood Oxygen Cycle Picture 400dpi jpg

This made me realize how very little I remember when it comes to how CKD affects your blood.  Soooo, I’m going right back to the very beginning. According to National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases at http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-communication-programs/nkdep/a-z/kidney-disease-mean-for-me/Pages/default.aspx, this is how:

“CKD means that your kidneys are damaged and can’t filter blood like they should. This damage can cause wastes to build up in your body. It can also cause other problems that can harm your health.”

By the way, this is a reader friendly page with visuals that the organization freely shares. You’ve seen them in my books and blogs. There is no medicalese here, nor is there any paternalism.  I like their style.

The National Kidney Foundation at https://www.kidney.org/kidneydisease/aboutckd explains in more detail.

“If kidney disease gets worse, wastes can build to high levels in your blood and make you feel sick. You may develop complications like high blood pressure, anemia (low blood count), weak bones, poor nutritional health and nerve damage. Also, kidney disease increases your risk of having heart and blood vessel disease. These problems may happen slowly over a long period of time.”

Maybe seven years is that ‘long period of time’, not that I have heart or blood vessel disease that I know of. But I do have high blood pressure which may have contributed to the development of the CKD. Circular, isn’t it? High blood pressure may cause CKD, but CKD may also cause high blood pressure.  Or is it possible that the two together can cause ever spiraling high blood pressure and worsening CKD?

Book CoverI’m going to go back to What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease here for some basic definitions that may be helpful in understanding today’s blog.

Albumin:   Water soluble protein in the blood.

Chronic Kidney Disease:  Damage to the kidneys for more than three months, which cannot be reversed but may be slowed.

Hypertension: A possible cause of CKD, 140/90 mm Hg is currently considered hypertension, a risk factor for heart disease and stroke, too. (New guidelines say these numbers are for CKD patients.)

Nephrons: The part of the kidney that actually purifies and filters the blood.

Let’s take a detour to see how sodium can affect high blood pressure which can affect so many other conditions.  This is a quote from Healthline.com at http://www.healthline.com/health/fast-food-effects-on-body which appeared The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2.

“Too much sodium helps to retain water, so it can cause general bloating and puffiness. Sodium can contribute to high blood pressure {Which, as we know, is the second leading cause of CKD} or enlarged heart muscle. If you have congestive heart failure, cirrhosis, or KIDNEY DISEASE {My bolding and capitalization in this paragraph.}, too much salt can contribute to a dangerous build-up of fluid. Excess sodium may also increase risk for kidney stones, KIDNEY DISEASE, and stomach cancer.

High cholesterol and high blood pressure are among the top risk factors for heart disease and stroke.”Part 2

Oh my! Sodium, high blood pressure, enlarged heart muscle, stroke, heart disease, dangerous fluid build-up. They all can be inter-related. And that’s the problem with CKD:  your blood is not being filtered as it should be. There’s waste buildup in your blood now.

It’s that same not well filtered blood that flows through your body possibly causing hearing problems, as was discussed in a previous blog.  It’s that same not well filtered blood that flows through your body possibly causing your high blood pressure. It’s that same not well filtered blood that flows through your body possibly causing “swelling in your anklesvomitingweakness, poor sleep, and shortness of breath.” (Thank you WebMD at http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/understanding-kidney-disease-basic-information for that last quote.)

I’m sorry to say this all makes sense.  All these conditions are inter-related and they may be caused by CKD, or high blood pressure which causes CKD, or both.

blood pressure 300dpi jpg

I see something I’ve ignored here. I have high blood pressure and I have CKD… and a lot of microalbumin in my urine.  This is new, and it’s a bit scary. Oh, all right, a lot scary.  I write about it so I have to research it and therefore, allay my fear by learning about it.

What did I learn about microalbumin, you ask? The MayoClinic at http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/microalbumin/basics/definition/prc-20012767 says it in the simplest manner.

“A urine microalbumin test is a test to detect very small levels of a blood protein (albumin) in your urine. A microalbumin test is used to detect early signs of kidney damage in people who have a risk of kidney disease.Unhealthy%20Kidney

Healthy kidneys filter waste from your blood and keep the healthy components, such as proteins like albumin. Kidney damage can cause proteins to leak through your kidneys and leave your body in your urine. Albumin (al-BYOO-min) is one of the first proteins to leak when kidneys become damaged.”

At first, I laughed it off; I already know I have CKD. Until I saw the results for this test, but I’ve requested what we used to call a do-over when we were kids and my doctor saw the value in that.

Ready for some good news?

Both The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 and The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2 have indexes now. I promised them before Christmas and Kwanzaa and I delivered. Sort of, that is.  Amazon came through right away; B&N.com will take another five weeks or so.Digital Cover Part 1

Happy, happy holidays to all of you.  I’ll see you once more before 2016. Talk about time flying!

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

I Saw It!

I am so excited!  I watched my kidneys produce urine in live time.  Location of Kidneys

I know, I know: slow down.  Here’s the back story. Remember I wrote about having a bladder infection for the first time in about five years? During consultation with my primary care physician (PCP) about which antibiotic was safe for me, she pointed out that I had taken Ciprofloxacin before with no ill effects and that it was kidney safe. This is a  medication used to kill the bacteria causing an infection.

Okay, I felt comfortable taking it again without speaking to my nephrologist.  However, the 250 mg. twice a day I ingested for five days didn’t do the trick. I waited one day after finishing the prescription and then tested my urine with the same test strips I wrote about in May 25th’s post…and got the same positive results for leukocytes: elevated, which meant infection.

bladderBack to my PCP for more testing. After an in office urine test also showed leukocytes, Dr. Zhao ordered the urine sample be sent to the lab to be cultured, and both a renal and a bladder ultrasound for me. Both the ultrasounds came back normal. She is a very thorough doctor, especially when it comes to my Chronic Kidney Disease or anything that might affect it.  It is possible for infection to move up to the kidneys from the bladder. Luckily, that didn’t happen in my case. Here are the urine culture results from the lab which arrived well into my second regiment of Cipro:

Culture shows less than 10,000 colony forming units of bacteria per milliliter of urine. This colony count is not generally considered to be clinically significant.

Okay, so here I was taking 500 mg. twice a day for my second regiment of antibiotics.  This time I had checked with my nephrologist because of the doubled dosage and taking the second regiment so soon after the first. He gave his approval.

Cipro, like most other drugs, may have side effects.  I hadn’t realized why I was so restless and anxious.  Those are two of the not-so-often-encountered side effects, but I have nothing else to pin these strange (for me) feelings on. My uncustomarily anxiety was causing dissention in the family and interfering with my enjoyment of the life I usually love. After digging deep into possible side effects, I see why.  The funny thing is that all I had to do was read about these possible, but not likely, side effects to feel less anxious and restless.  I had a reason for these feelings; they sad facewould soon dissipate. I could live with that time limited discomfort.

Before taking the ultrasounds, I needed to drink 40 oz. of water – yep, almost two thirds of my daily allowance – and hold it in my bladder for an hour. I started joking with Wendy, the ultrasound technician, as soon as I got into the room.  You know, the usual: Hurry up before I float away, I can’t cross my knees any tighter, that sort of thing.

She was a lovely person who responded with kindness. When she realized I was super interested in what was on the screen, she started explaining what I was seeing to me and turned the screen so I could see what she was seeing. The bladder ultrasound was interesting… and colorful.

But the kidney ultrasound was magic!  I watched as my kidneys produced urine and the urine traveled down to the bladder.  This was real.  This was happening inside my body. And I was watching it in real time.

What is itIn What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, I discuss one of the jobs of the kidneys:

They filter as many as 200 quarts of blood per day to rid us of roughly two quarts of waste and extra water.

I was watching the extra water move from my kidneys to my bladder!  I was probably watching the blood being filtered in the kidneys, too, but that was not as clear to me.

Well, what do you know?  It seems the National Kidney Foundation is running a campaign to make the public aware of that, too.  This is what the foundation has to say about the campaign.

The National Kidney Foundation (NKF) has launched a cheeky campaign to promote kidney health and motivate people to get their urine screened.

EverybodyPees is an irreverent, educational animated music video plus a website (www.everybodypees.org) that focuses on the places people pee. EverybodyPees_PostersV3_Page_5The number one goal of the campaign is to link one of the kidneys’ primary functions — the production of urine — to overall kidney health. Pee is important because urine testing can reveal the earliest signs of kidney damage.

“Our research has shown that half of Americans don’t understand that healthy kidneys are responsible for creating urine,” said Kevin Longino, interim CEO of the National Kidney Foundation. “Urine also happens to hold the key to catching kidney disease, especially among the 73 million Americans who are at risk. The message may be unconventional, but it is educational and actionable – get your urine checked for kidney health.”

Kidney disease is at an alarming proportion in the United States. Over 26 million American adults have kidney disease and most don’t know it.  More than 40% of people who go into kidney failure each year fail to see a nephrologist before starting dialysis — a key indicator that kidney disease isn’t being identified in its earliest stages.Healthy%20Kidney

“People aren’t getting the message that they can easily identify kidney disease through inexpensive, simple tests,” said Jeffrey Berns, MD, President of the National Kidney Foundation. “Keeping kidneys top-of-mind in the restroom will hopefully remind people that they should be asking about their kidneys when they visit their healthcare professional, especially if they have diabetes, high blood pressure, a family history of kidney failure, or are over age 60.”

NKF-logo_Hori_OBEverybodyPees is NKF’s first attempt to tackle a serious national health problem from a relatable, consumer angle. The campaign was produced in collaboration with Publicis LifeBrands Medicus.

“We are flipping public health education messaging on its head –using humor to get our message across and foregoing scare tactic messaging” Longino said. “We’re going out on a limb with our core message on urine testing, but we need to take risks if we’re going to alter the course of kidney disease in this country.”

Being who I am, I prefer ‘urine’ to ‘pee,’ but that wouldn’t be half as catchy, would it?

Consider The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Parts 1 and 2 as bathroom reading while you’re urinating – uh, peeing – so we can get some more reviews. And always, let us know about any new CKD books you discover.

Until next week,Part 2Digital Cover Part 1

Keep living your life!

 

What a Weird Dream

Part 2I woke up today realizing I’d been dreaming about my bladder.  Sometimes that’s a somatic clue to wake up and empty it, but I’d done that already. Hmmm, was I being told to look into the different aspects of the bladder?  Oh, maybe the dream DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAILwas pointing toward the connection between Chronic Kidney Disease and the bladder. By now, you’ve probably realized everything in my world points to CKD.

To my way of thinking, if I were going to dream of anything CKD related, I should have been dreaming about the photos of you reading one of my books in a weird place that you’ve posted on SlowItDownCKD’s Facebook page to win a free copy of The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1. That would make sense, wouldn’t it?

What is it

But, no.  It was the bladder.  Okay, then, let’s take a look at the bladder. As usual, we’ll start at the beginning with a definition. Many thanks to the ever reliable MedicineNet at http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=2472 for the following:

A hollow organ in the lower abdomen that stores urine. The kidneys filter waste from the blood and produce urine, which enters the bladder through two tubes, called ureters. Urine leaves the bladder through another tube, the urethra. In women, the urethra is a short tube that opens just in front of the vagina. In men, it is longer, passing through the prostate gland and then the penis. Also known as urinary bladder and vesical.

Notice the mention of the kidneys. Notice also the urine flows from the kidneys to the bladder, not vice versa.  Doesn’t help much to explain the dream.  I wonder if a bladder infection might explain more.

Another standby, WebMD, at http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/understanding-bladder-infections-basic-information explains:

Bladder infections are known as cystitis or inflammation of the bladder. They are common in women, but very rare in men. More than half of all women get at least one bladder infection at some time in their lives. However, a man’s chance of getting cystitis increases as he ages, due to in part to an increase in prostate size….

Bladder infections are not serious if treated right away. But they tend to come back in some people. Rarely, this can lead to kidney infections, which are more serious and may result in permanent kidney damage. So it’s very important to treat the underlying causes of a bladder infection and to take preventive steps to keep them from coming back.kidney location

Oh, so repeated bladder infections can lead to kidney infections, although rarely.  Maybe we’d better take a look at the symptoms of bladder infections… just in case, you understand.

This was the point in my research that I once again appreciated how user friendly, yet detailed, the Mayo Clinic is. The following information may be found at http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/urinary-tract-infection/basics/symptoms/con-20037892

Part of urinary tract affected      Signs and symptoms

Kidneys (acute pyelonephritis)   Upper back and side (flank) painurinary-tract-infection-uti-picture

High fever

Shaking and chills

Nausea

Vomiting

Bladder (cystitis)                            Pelvic pressure

Lower abdomen discomfort

Frequent, painful urination

Blood in urine

Urethra (urethritis)                        Burning with urination

Let’s change direction here and take a look at pyelonephritis since that involves the kidneys.

at http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/kidney-disease/pyelonephritis-kidney-infection/Pages/index.aspx has this information.

Pyelonephritis is caused by a bacterium or virus infecting the kidneys. Though many bacteria and viruses can cause pyelonephritis, the bacterium Escherichia coli is often the cause. Bacteria and viruses can move to the kidneys from the bladder or can be carried through the bloodstream from other parts of the body. A UTI in the bladder that does not move to the kidneys is called cystitis.

However, the site carefully explains that a bladder infection or a structural abnormality that causes urine to flow back into the kidneys are the two most usual causes.  So we’re back to looking at bladder infections after this little detour.

Location of KidneysFor information about what might cause a bladder infection, I shot over to Healthline at http://www.healthline.com/health/bladder-infection#Overview1

Bladder infections are caused by germs or bacteria that enter through the urethra and travel into the bladder. Normally, the body is able to remove the bacteria by clearing it out during urination. Sometimes, however, the bacteria attach to the walls of the bladder and multiply quickly, overwhelming the body’s ability to destroy them, resulting in a bladder infection.

Simple, direct, and to the point. Here we are knowing what a bladder infection is, what the symptoms are, and how we might have developed one.  But, what do we do about it?

UTI OTC testFirst of all, verify that you have UTI or urinary tract infection since the kidneys, the urethra, and the bladder are part of this system. OTC or over the counter test strips for this purpose are available, although I seem to remember they are not effective if you’ve passed menopause.  That was seven years ago when I had my first and last bladder infection, so things may have changed.  You can also make an appointment with your doctor to verify. Usually, a high white blood cell count will indicate you’re fighting some sort of infection.

All right, let’s say you home test and see you’re fighting an infection. Now what? Well, you can try the usual home remedies of cranberry juice and uber hydration, but you have CKD.  You have to act fast before a UTI becomes a bladder infection which may lead to a kidney infection.

My advice?  Call your doctor.  He or she may prescribe an antibiotic which will hopefully clear up the infection in just a few days.  A bladder infection does not have to lead to a kidney infection or be serious… unless you ignore it.

I have spent every day of the last eight years working diligently to protect my kidneys, slow down the progress of Chronic Kidney Disease, and raise GFRmy GFR when I can.  I, for one, am not willing to jeopardize my kidney function because I didn’t jump on what I thought might be a UTI.  Won’t you join me in taking immediate action should you have the symptoms?  Remember the connections between the urethra, the bladder, and the kidneys.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!