All of Me, uh, Us

When I was a little girl, I liked to listen to my father whistle ‘All of Me,’ written by Marks and Simon in 1931 when Charlie, my father, was just 16. Only a few years later, it became a sort of love language for my mother and him. Enter a former husband of my own and my children. When my folks visited from Florida and my then husband’s side of the family journeyed over to Staten Island from Brooklyn to visit them, they all sang the song with great emotion. (By then, Bell’s palsy had robbed my father of the ability to whistle.)

To this day, I start welling up when I hear that song. But then I started thinking about the lyrics:

“All of me
Why not take all of me?”

Suddenly, it popped. For us, those with chronic kidney disease, it should be:

“All of us

Why not take all of us?”

For research purposes. To “speed up health research breakthroughs.” For help in our lifetime. To spare future generations whatever it is we’re suffering… and not just for us, but for our children… and their children, too.

The National Institutes of Health has instituted a new research program for just that purpose, although it’s open to anyone in the U.S. over the age of 18 whether ill with any disease or perfectly healthy. While only English and Spanish are the languages they can accommodate at this time, they are adding other languages.

I’m going to devote most of the rest of this blog to them. By the way, I’m even more inclined to be in favor of this program because they launched on my first born’s birthdate: May 6. All of Us has its own inspiring welcome for you at https://launch.joinallofus.org/

This is how they explain who they are and what they intend to do:

“The goal is to advance precision medicine. Precision medicine is health care that is based on you as an individual. It takes into account factors like where you live, what you do, and your family health history. Precision medicine’s goal is to be able to tell people the best ways to stay healthy. If someone does get sick, precision medicine may help health care teams find the treatment that will work best.

To get there, we need one million or more people. Those who join will share information about their health over time. Researchers will study this data. What they learn could improve health for generations to come. Participants are our partners. We’ll share information back with them over time.”

You’ll be reading more about precision medicine, which I’ve written about before, in upcoming blogs. This is from All of Us’s website at https://www.joinallofus.org/en, as is most of the other information in today’s blog, and makes it easy to understand just what they are doing.

How It Works

Participants Share Data

Participants share health data online. This data includes health surveys and electronic health records. Participants also may be asked to share physical measurements and blood and urine samples.

Data Is Protected

Personal information, like your name, address, and other things that easily identify participants will be removed from all data. Samples—also without any names on them—are stored in a secure biobank.

Researchers Study Data

In the future, approved researchers will use this data to conduct studies. By finding patterns in the data, they may make the next big medical breakthroughs.

Participants Get Information

Participants will get information back about the data they provide, which may help them learn more about their health.

Researchers Share Discoveries

Research may help in many ways. It may help find the best ways for people to stay healthy. It may also help create better tests and find the treatments that will work best for different people.

I’m busy, too busy to take on even one more thing. Or so I thought. When I read the benefits of the program (above) and how easy it is to join (below), I realized I’m not too busy for this and it is another way to advocate for Chronic Kidney Disease awareness. So I joined and hope you will, too.

Benefits of Taking Part

Joining the All of Us Research Program has its benefits.

Our goal is for you to have a direct impact on cutting-edge research. By joining the program, you are helping researchers to learn more about different diseases and treatments.

Here are some of the benefits of participating in All of Us.

Better Information

We’re all human, but we’re not all the same. Often our differences—like age, ethnicity, lifestyle habits, or where we live—can reveal important insights about our health.

By participating in All of Us, you may learn more about your health than ever before. If you like, you can share this information with your health care provider.

Better Tools

The goal of the program is better health for all of us. We want to inspire researchers to create better tools to identify, prevent, and treat disease.

You may also learn how to use tools like mobile devices, cell phones and tablets, to encourage healthier habits.

Better Research

We expect the All of Us Research Program to be here for the long-term. As the program grows, the more features will be added. There’s no telling what we can discover. All thanks to participants like you.

Better Ideas

You’re our partner. And as such, you are invited to help guide All of Us. Share your ideas and let us know what works, and what doesn’t.

Oh, about joining:

Get Started – Sign Up

Here’s a quick overview of what you’ll need to do to join.

1

Create an Account

You will need to give an email address and password.

2

Fill in the Enrollment and Consent Forms

The process usually takes 18-30 minutes. If you leave the portal during the consent process, you will have to start again from the beginning.

3

Complete Surveys and More

Once you have given your consent, you will be asked to complete online health surveys. You may be asked to visit a partner center. There, you’ll be asked to provide blood and urine samples and have your physical measurements taken. We may also ask you to share data from wearables or other personal devices.

Before I leave you today, I have – what else? – a book give away. The reason? Just to share the joy that’s walked into my life lately. It’s easy to share the troubles; why not the joys? If you haven’t received one of my books in a giveaway before, all you have to do is be the first person to let me know you want this copy of SlowItDownCKD 2017.

 

I need to get back to that online health survey for All of Us now.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

 

Published in: on May 21, 2018 at 10:38 am  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

We, the People Who Have CKD…

Happy Independence Day! Here in the United States, we usually celebrate with fireworks and bar-b-ques that may include renal friendly foods, at fireworksleast at my house. We take our pets inside and try to shield them from the sounds of the fireworks that make them so uncomfortable and then we try to enjoy the heat, the sun, and the parades.

I’m all for Independence Day celebrations, but shy away from them myself. I’m like our pets; I can do without the noise. Since getting older (or medically ‘elderly,’ which always gives me a giggle), I can also do without the heat and the crowds. We used to have renal friendly bar-b-ques at our house, but now our kids are older and visit fiancés, go to bachelorette weekend celebrations, or go camping in other states during this long holiday weekend.

And I realize I do not want to be that far from what is euphemistically called a ‘restroom’ here in Arizona for all that long. There could be many reasons for that, my elderly state (Humph!); a urinary tract infection (UTI); a weak bladder; or interstitial cystitis.

A reader and good online friend – another Texas connection, by the way – asked me to write about interstitial cystitis today. There seems to be some confusion among us – meaning Chronic Kidney Disease patients – between chronic UTIs and interstitial cystitis.Digital Cover Part 2 redone - Copy

UTI is a descriptive term we probably all know since we have CKD and have to be aware of them. We have to be careful they don’t spread to the bladder and, eventually (but rarely), to the kidneys.  That can cause even more kidney damage. I explained a bit more in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2:

“The second nephrologist to treat me referred me to an urologist when he realized I was on my fifth UTI in the same summer and he suspected this one had spread to my bladder. The urologist actually had me look through the cystoscope (I’m adding this today: a sort of long, narrow tube inserted to view both the urethra and bladder) myself to reassure me that the lower urinary tract infection had not spread to the upper urinary tract where the bladder is located.”

We know we have to be vigilant.  That’s where interstitial cystitis comes in. Let’s take a look at SlowItDownCKD 2015 for more information about cystitis:

“Another standby, WebMD, at http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/understanding-bladder-infections-basic-information explains:

‘Bladder infections are known as cystitis or inflammation of the bladder. They are common in women, but very rare in men. More than half of all women get at least one bladder infection at some time in their lives. However, a man’s chance of getting cystitis increases as he ages, due to in part to an increase in prostate size….

SlowItDownCKD 2015 Book Cover (76x113)Bladder infections are not serious if treated right away. But they tend to come back in some people. Rarely, this can lead to kidney infections, which are more serious and may result in permanent kidney damage. So it’s very important to treat the underlying causes of a bladder infection and to take preventive steps to keep them from coming back.’”

Okay so we get the cystitis part of the condition, but what does interstitial mean? MedicineNet at http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=9587defines it this way:

“Pertaining to being between things, especially between things that are normally closely spaced. The word interstitial is much used in medicine and has specific meaning, depending on the context. For instance, interstitial cystitis is a specific type of inflammation of the bladder wall.”

Hang on, just one more definition. This one is from the Mayo Clinic at http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/interstitial-cystitis/basics/definition/con-20022439

“Interstitial cystitis (in-tur-STISH-ul sis-TIE-tis) — also called painful bladder syndrome — is a chronic condition in which you experience bladder pressure, bladder pain and sometimes pelvic pain, ranging from mild discomfort to severe pain. Your bladder is a hollow, muscular organ that stores urine. The bladder expands until it’s full and then signals your brain that it’s time to urinate, communicating through the pelvic nerves. This creates the urge to urinate for most people. With interstitial cystitis, these signals get mixed up — you feel the need to urinate more often and with smaller volumes of urine than most people….”bladder

Hmmm, then this is clearly not a UTI. So why do we have to be careful about it? Time to look at the causes – or not. According to The National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases at http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/urologic-disease/interstitial-cystitis-painful-bladder-syndrome/Pages/facts.aspx,

“Researchers are working to understand the causes of IC/PBS and to find effective treatments.

…Scientists believe IC/PBS may be a bladder manifestation of a more general condition that causes inflammation in various organs and parts of the body.”

* IC means interstitial cystitis; PBS is painful bladder syndrome

Maybe we should be looking at the cure instead – or not. “At this time there is no cure for interstitial cystitis (IC).” But ichelp does mention a number of possible treatments, some of which we cannot use as CKD patients since they may harm the kidneys. Take a look for yourself at: http://www.ichelp.org/diagnosis-treatment/

Whoa! No definitive cause, no cure, and treatments which may harm our kidneys. Where’s the good news in this?  Take another look at the information from The National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases again. Notice the word ‘inflammation’?

Bingo. CKD is also an inflammatory disease and may be that “more general condition that causes inflammation in various organs and parts of the body.” Wait, I just remembered this from The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1:DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAIL

“Cancer is a disease caused by inflammation, just as Chronic Kidney Disease is.  By the way, it’s said that alkaline foods are a better way of eating should cancer rear its ugly head in your life.”

So it all comes back to inflammation.  Say, didn’t I recently write a blog about acidity vs. alkaline and inflammation?  Now there’s a good way to avoid the heat, the sun, and the parades of Independence Day. Stay inside (maybe while someone is bar-b-queuing renal friendly food outside) and peruse old blog posts.

What is itUntil next week,

Keep living your life!

Renal Sally Port

Sometimes things just pop into a writer’s head for no reason at all. The title of this week’s blog did that over and over again. Okay, I thought, I’ll go with it.  Only one problem: I didn’t know what a sally port was and why I should be writing about a renal one.

BearandmeHmmmm, I did marry a military man. I asked. He explained but I wanted to see it in writing. Hence, this definition from The Merriam-Webster Dictionary at http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sally%20port:

1:  a gate or passage in a fortified place for use by troops making a sortieSally port

2:  a secure entryway (as at a prison) that consists of a series of doors or gates

Oh, now I got it. I immediately thought of Fort Wadsworth on Staten Island where I took my little children to Civil War reenactments. There were scary, dank areas between the port and the base which were enclosed between large old gates at either end. No sun got in and it echoed in there. It was a place of fascination and fear for my little ones. What did that have to do with our kidneys?

Then I thought of having visited the friend I’d written about in the hospital when his bipolar medications needed immediate adjustment. One door was unlocked for me, I entered. That door was relocked behind me and another unlocked in front of me. That was a sally port, too.

Our gaggle of grown children has told us enough about ‘Orange is the New Black’ that our interest was piqued. Then Bear read my Hunter College Dascha PolancoAlumni News Letter and saw that Dascha Polanco – a major character in the series – also graduated from Hunter, although not exactly the same year I did. Those seemed like good enough reasons to give the series a try. It was set in a prison with a series of sally ports to enter or exit.

Now it was more than clear. A sally port is a security feature to guard entry and exit. Good, one half of the renal sally port secret revealed. Now, do our kidneys have sally ports?

This is the structure of your kidney. It’s clear there are three ways in or out of the kidney: the veins, the arteries, and the ureters. Let’s take a look at each to see which, if any, is a sally port.  Blood Oxygen Cycle Picture 400dpi jpg

In What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, it was explained that the renal (kidney) artery brings the unfiltered blood into the kidney:

What is it“Your kidneys have about a million nephrons, which are those tiny structures that produce urine as part of the body’s waste removal process. Each of them has a glomerulus or network of capillaries.  This is where the blood from the renal artery is filtered.  The glomerulus is connected to a renal tubule, something so small that it is microscopic. The renal tubule is attached to a collection area.  The blood is filtered. Then the waste goes through the tubules to have water and chemicals balanced according to the body’s present needs. Finally, the waste is voided via your urine to the tune of 50 gallons of fluid filtered by the kidneys DAILY.  The renal vein uses blood vessels to take most of the blood back into the body.”

Well, what about the renal vein? Here’s how I explained it in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2:

“If you look at a picture of your kidney, you’ll see that blood with wastes in it is brought to the kidneys by the renal artery and clean blood is exited Part 2from the kidneys by the renal vein.  Your kidneys are already compromised which means they are not doing such a great job of filtering your blood.”

Well, if the renal artery is the sally port for the blood entering your kidneys, the renal vein sounds like the more important renal sally port since it’s allowing that poorly filtered blood back into your blood stream.

Oh wait, we forgot the ureter.   There’s an explanation from the presently-being-published SlowItDownCKD 2015 about that.

Many thanks to the ever reliable MedicineNet at http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=2472 for the following.

SlowItDownCKD 2015 Book cover“A hollow organ in the lower abdomen that stores urine. The kidneys filter waste from the blood and produce urine, which enters the bladder through two tubes, called ureters. Urine leaves the bladder through another tube, the urethra. In women, the urethra is a short tube that opens just in front of the vagina. In men, it is longer, passing through the prostate gland and then the penis. Also known as urinary bladder and vesical.”

Uh, no, there’s nothing in that description that indicates the urethra is a sally port.

So… the renal vein then.  How does this poor excuse for allowing filtered blood back into our blood stream affect us? (I do admit that it seems it’s more the fault of the damaged glomeruli than the renal vein acting as a sally port.)

For one thing, we become one of the one-in-three at risk for Chronic Kidney Disease … and that’s only in America. For another, our bodily functions differently as do our minds. I included this not-so-pleasing information from EurekAlert! in a 2012 post in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1:

Decreased kidney function leads to decreased cognitive functioning

“Decreased kidney function is associated with decreased cognitive functioning in areas such as global cognitive ability, abstract reasoning and DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAILverbal memory, according to a study led by Temple University. This is the first study describing change in multiple domains of cognitive functioning in order to determine which specific abilities are most affected in individuals with impaired renal function.”

But there’s more. According to the National Kidney Foundation at https://www.kidney.org/news/newsroom/factsheets/FastFacts, this is what is our kidneys are NOT doing for us as well as they should since we have CKD:

  • Regulate the body’s fluid levels
  • Filter wastes and toxins from the blood
  • National Kidney MonthRelease a hormone that regulates blood pressure
  • Activate Vitamin D to maintain healthy bones
  • Release the hormone that directs production of red blood cells
  • Keep blood minerals in balance (sodium, phosphorus, potassium)

I’m glad I got the term renal sally port out of my system, but I wish the news had been better.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

What a Weird Dream

Part 2I woke up today realizing I’d been dreaming about my bladder.  Sometimes that’s a somatic clue to wake up and empty it, but I’d done that already. Hmmm, was I being told to look into the different aspects of the bladder?  Oh, maybe the dream DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAILwas pointing toward the connection between Chronic Kidney Disease and the bladder. By now, you’ve probably realized everything in my world points to CKD.

To my way of thinking, if I were going to dream of anything CKD related, I should have been dreaming about the photos of you reading one of my books in a weird place that you’ve posted on SlowItDownCKD’s Facebook page to win a free copy of The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1. That would make sense, wouldn’t it?

What is it

But, no.  It was the bladder.  Okay, then, let’s take a look at the bladder. As usual, we’ll start at the beginning with a definition. Many thanks to the ever reliable MedicineNet at http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=2472 for the following:

A hollow organ in the lower abdomen that stores urine. The kidneys filter waste from the blood and produce urine, which enters the bladder through two tubes, called ureters. Urine leaves the bladder through another tube, the urethra. In women, the urethra is a short tube that opens just in front of the vagina. In men, it is longer, passing through the prostate gland and then the penis. Also known as urinary bladder and vesical.

Notice the mention of the kidneys. Notice also the urine flows from the kidneys to the bladder, not vice versa.  Doesn’t help much to explain the dream.  I wonder if a bladder infection might explain more.

Another standby, WebMD, at http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/understanding-bladder-infections-basic-information explains:

Bladder infections are known as cystitis or inflammation of the bladder. They are common in women, but very rare in men. More than half of all women get at least one bladder infection at some time in their lives. However, a man’s chance of getting cystitis increases as he ages, due to in part to an increase in prostate size….

Bladder infections are not serious if treated right away. But they tend to come back in some people. Rarely, this can lead to kidney infections, which are more serious and may result in permanent kidney damage. So it’s very important to treat the underlying causes of a bladder infection and to take preventive steps to keep them from coming back.kidney location

Oh, so repeated bladder infections can lead to kidney infections, although rarely.  Maybe we’d better take a look at the symptoms of bladder infections… just in case, you understand.

This was the point in my research that I once again appreciated how user friendly, yet detailed, the Mayo Clinic is. The following information may be found at http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/urinary-tract-infection/basics/symptoms/con-20037892

Part of urinary tract affected      Signs and symptoms

Kidneys (acute pyelonephritis)   Upper back and side (flank) painurinary-tract-infection-uti-picture

High fever

Shaking and chills

Nausea

Vomiting

Bladder (cystitis)                            Pelvic pressure

Lower abdomen discomfort

Frequent, painful urination

Blood in urine

Urethra (urethritis)                        Burning with urination

Let’s change direction here and take a look at pyelonephritis since that involves the kidneys.

at http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/kidney-disease/pyelonephritis-kidney-infection/Pages/index.aspx has this information.

Pyelonephritis is caused by a bacterium or virus infecting the kidneys. Though many bacteria and viruses can cause pyelonephritis, the bacterium Escherichia coli is often the cause. Bacteria and viruses can move to the kidneys from the bladder or can be carried through the bloodstream from other parts of the body. A UTI in the bladder that does not move to the kidneys is called cystitis.

However, the site carefully explains that a bladder infection or a structural abnormality that causes urine to flow back into the kidneys are the two most usual causes.  So we’re back to looking at bladder infections after this little detour.

Location of KidneysFor information about what might cause a bladder infection, I shot over to Healthline at http://www.healthline.com/health/bladder-infection#Overview1

Bladder infections are caused by germs or bacteria that enter through the urethra and travel into the bladder. Normally, the body is able to remove the bacteria by clearing it out during urination. Sometimes, however, the bacteria attach to the walls of the bladder and multiply quickly, overwhelming the body’s ability to destroy them, resulting in a bladder infection.

Simple, direct, and to the point. Here we are knowing what a bladder infection is, what the symptoms are, and how we might have developed one.  But, what do we do about it?

UTI OTC testFirst of all, verify that you have UTI or urinary tract infection since the kidneys, the urethra, and the bladder are part of this system. OTC or over the counter test strips for this purpose are available, although I seem to remember they are not effective if you’ve passed menopause.  That was seven years ago when I had my first and last bladder infection, so things may have changed.  You can also make an appointment with your doctor to verify. Usually, a high white blood cell count will indicate you’re fighting some sort of infection.

All right, let’s say you home test and see you’re fighting an infection. Now what? Well, you can try the usual home remedies of cranberry juice and uber hydration, but you have CKD.  You have to act fast before a UTI becomes a bladder infection which may lead to a kidney infection.

My advice?  Call your doctor.  He or she may prescribe an antibiotic which will hopefully clear up the infection in just a few days.  A bladder infection does not have to lead to a kidney infection or be serious… unless you ignore it.

I have spent every day of the last eight years working diligently to protect my kidneys, slow down the progress of Chronic Kidney Disease, and raise GFRmy GFR when I can.  I, for one, am not willing to jeopardize my kidney function because I didn’t jump on what I thought might be a UTI.  Won’t you join me in taking immediate action should you have the symptoms?  Remember the connections between the urethra, the bladder, and the kidneys.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!