Any Veterans Here?

Veterans Day was Saturday, although many schools and businesses chose to celebrate it on Friday. That confused me since I mistakenly thought all national holidays falling on the weekend in the U.S. were celebrated on the following Monday. Once that was straightened out for me, I wondered if we were the only country to honor those who fought for us.

According to The United States Department of Veterans Affairs at https://www.va.gov/opa/vetsday/vetday_faq.asp, we’re not:

Q. Is Veterans Day celebrated in other countries?

A. Yes, a number of countries honor their veterans each year on November 11, although the name and types of commemorations differ somewhat from Veterans Day celebrations in the United States. For example, Canada and Australia observe “Remembrance Day” on November 11, and Great Britain observes “Remembrance Day” on the Sunday nearest to November 11. There are similarities and differences between these countries’ Remembrance Day and America’s Veterans Day. Canada’s observance is actually quite similar to the U.S. celebration, in that the day is intended to honor all who served in Canada’s Armed Forces. However, unlike in the U.S., many Canadians wear red poppy flowers on November 11 in honor of their war dead. In Australia, Remembrance Day is very much like America’s Memorial Day, a day to honor that nation’s war dead.

In Great Britain, the day is commemorated by church services and parades of ex-service members in Whitehall, a wide ceremonial avenue leading from London’s Parliament Square to Trafalgar Square. Wreaths of poppies are left at the Cenotaph, a war memorial in Whitehall, which was built after the First World War. At the Cenotaph and elsewhere in the country, a two-minute silence is observed at 11 a.m., to honor those who lost their lives in wars.

There are 600,000 veterans with kidney disease in the U.S. Considering that kidney disease is a medically dischargeable disease (Can you imagine soldiers in the field trying to stick to the renal diet?), I began to wonder just how our veterans were being treated once they were no longer active military.

I went to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases at http://bit.ly/2ABGeli for the following information:

The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the Veteran population is estimated to be 34% higher than in the general population, due to demographic differences and the existence of significant co-morbidities associated with CKD in the Veteran population—diabetes mellitus and hypertension. VA currently cares for over 600,000 Veterans with kidney disease in their 153 medical treatment facilities or 800 community based outreach clinics (CBOC’s) across the United States. Those Veterans who progress to kidney failure are treated either at home or in one of the 70 VA dialysis units, or if dialysis services are not directly available, may be treated in the community under VA contracted care. Currently over 15,000 Veterans receive care directly by VA or through the community under VA contracted care. Eligible Veterans may also elect to receive dialysis care in the community using Medicare or other personal health benefits programs. Renal transplantation is also offered through the VA as a regionalized service at 5 centers.

Wait a minute. Why did “demographic differences and the existence of significant co-morbidities associated with CKD in the Veteran population—diabetes mellitus and hypertension” lead to a whopping 34% of veterans having kidney disease?

I know when Bear spoke with me about his 25 year military career, he talked of people with different ethnic backgrounds from different parts of the country… some from different parts of the world.

I remembered writing this in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease:

“…Native American, Alaskan Native, Hispanic, Pacific Islander or Afro-American ethnic groups…have a 15 to 17% higher occurrence of CKD.”

And I was off and running. Last Veterans Day’s Huffington Post was able to help out here.

“According to the U.S. Department of Defense, as of 2012 there were over 22,000 American Indians and Alaska Natives on active duty, and the 2010 Census identified over 150,000 American Indian and Alaska Native veterans.”

You can read the entire article at https://www.huffingtonpost.com/national-museum-of-the-american-indian/american-indians-serve-in-the-us-military_b_7417854.html.

And Hispanics? Journalist Erika L. Sanchez wrote in 2013 that over 157, 000 Hispanics served in the military then. By the way, her article at http://nbclatino.com/2013/01/01/u-s-military-a-growing-latino-army/ gives the rest of us a little insight into the Latino community’s military leanings.

I hesitate to come up with the number of Pacific Islanders serving in the military since the information is even older than that for Native Americans and Alaskan Natives (Did you notice they were grouped together?) or Hispanics. It’s also included with that of Asians, so the categories are Asian-Pacific Islanders rather than Pacific Islanders.

As for Afro-Americans or Blacks – readers, which name do you prefer? – the closest I can figure out is that 370,842 Blacks or 16% of the Blacks in the United States served in the U.S. military… in 2011.

None of these statistics is current. It takes time for the military to collect and compose their data, but I had been hoping for numbers that were a little more timely.

And now the biggie: just how much is The Veterans Administration spending on veterans with kidney disease?

Finally, a fairly current article. In April of this year, MedPage Today at https://www.medpagetoday.com/meetingcoverage/nkf/64668 offered this information from Kristen Monaco’s article:

Rajiv Saran, MD, of the University of Michigan, and colleagues found the total cost of CKD care in the Department of Veterans Affairs healthcare system increased from $12 billion in 2006 to $19 billion in 2014 in current dollars. Adjusted for inflation, the increase was 26%, the researchers reported as a late-breaking abstract at the National Kidney Foundation’s 2017 Spring Clinical Meeting.

More than three-fourths of the VA’s aggregate spending each year on CKD patients was dedicated to patients with either stage 3a or 3b disease. However, the average cost per patient to treat increased with each worsening stage of CKD, with non-dialysis stage 5 CKD being the most expensive.

To all those who served, whether or not you developed kidney disease, thank you from the bottom of my heart.

 

Until next week,
Keep living your life!