Apps Again

Last week I mentioned kidney diet apps and that I suspected the ones I wrote about in SlowItDownCKD 2016 may be outdated or not exist anymore. Let’s jump right in before I need to get up from the computer to walk around for a while. I’ve been working on another book and been sitting here a long time. We all know that’s not good for us.

This is from SlowItDownCKD 2016:

“According to GCFLearnFree.org – a program of Goodwill Community Foundation® and Goodwill Industries of Eastern NC Inc.® (GIENC®) – at http://www.gcflearnfree.org/computerbasics/understanding-applications/1/,

‘Simply put, an app is a type of software that allows you to perform specific tasks. Applications for desktop or laptop computers are sometimes called desktop applications, while those for mobile devices are called mobile apps.’

During an internet search, I found that NephCure which provides ‘detailed information about the diseases that cause Nephrotic Syndrome (NS) and Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis (FSGS)’ (and was one of the first organizations to interview me about CKD, by the way) – at http://nephcure.org/livingwithkidneydisease/managing-your-care/kidney-health-tracking-tools/helpful-mobile-apps/ was way ahead of me in discussing apps. This is what’s on their website:

Diet and Nutrition Apps

• KidneyAPPetite – Gives daily summaries of key nutrients for kidney health, check the nutritional value of foods before you eat it, and provides printable summaries to refer to. Great for patients on a renal diet! Cost: Free, Device: iOS

• Pocket Dietitian – Created by a Nephrologist, allows you to choose your health conditions and dietary restrictions to see recommended foods as well as keep track of what you have eaten. You can even see your past nutrition in graph form. Cost: Free, Device: iOS and Android

• My Food Coach – is designed to help you understand and manage all of your nutritional requirements. This app offers personalized nutrition information, recipes and meal plans. Cost: Free, Device: iOS and Android

• HealthyOut – Enables you to search and order nearby healthy food and browse for healthy options while out to eat. You can even choose a specific diet such as gluten free! Cost: Free, Device: iOS and Android

• Restaurant Nutrition – Allows you to search restaurants and look at nutritional values, locate nearby restaurants, and keep a food journal. The Restaurant Nutrition application shows nutritional information of restaurant foods. Cost: Free, Device: iOS and Android

While I could easily go to most of the apps’ websites by clicking on the name while I held down the control button, this was not the case with Pocket Dietician. I was able to find it and lots of descriptive information about it in the Google Play store, but kept getting the message that I had no devices. The help function on the site was not helpful.

What about My Food Coach? It has an extra feature that my favorite lacked: a warning when a recipe would bring you over your renal diet limits. It’s recipe oriented, which doesn’t endear it to me since I like to experiment cooking my big five ounces of protein daily with my three different size servings of different fruits that are on my renal diet. I also avoid red meat.

HealthyOut, while not specifically for CKD, does have a function for the Mediterranean diet which is more often than not recommended for us. I thought this was a hoot since it never occurred to me that you can check restaurant foods by the restaurant name. I am adding this app to my iPhone.”

It looks like I was wrong. Most of these are still available. Unfortunately KidneyDiet, my all-time favorite, is no more. Neither is Restaurant Nutrition. But let’s see what other apps are available for us.

If sodium (salt) is a problem for you, there’s an app for that. According to For Your Kidney at http://foryourkidney.com/en/2016/01/04/5-best-apps-kidney-health/:

“Sodium One is a user friendly Sodium Counter app. Patients with High Blood Pressure or Chronic Kidney Disease can benefit from this app a lot. The App allows you to track water intake as well as exercise and weight history. The main focus of Sodium One however, is to manage your daily sodium allowance. The tracking is actually very accurate when it comes to calorie counts. A great extra is that this app does not require an internet connection.”
This is $0.99 and only available in IOS. That’s Apple.

I do want to mention there are apps specifically for those on dialysis. I have not included them in this blog, although NephCure did include KidneyAPPetite. An internet search for ‘dialysis apps,’ or something along that line, will help you find them.

I’ve tried a few other apps that were not dedicated to those with CKD and found moderate success with them. One is Keto, which bills itself as “Stupid Simple”… and it is. However, it’s limited to carbs, fat, and protein. You’re on your own for phosphorous, potassium, and sodium. Oh, KidneyDiet, come back! The nice part of Keto is that you can scan barcodes (Is that really one word these days?) and add your own foods and meals IF you upgrade from the basic free version. Their website at https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.venninteractive.ssketo  tells you this is only available for Android, but I have it on my IOS device.

Under Armour’s MyFitnessPal at https://freepps.top/apps/health-fitness/calorie-counter-myfitnesspal has been around for a while. Again, while this is not perfect for those with CKD, it is a great help. I like that you can set goals and request reminders about your goal, as well as add foods. Of course, Premium offers you a lot more… and charges you accordingly. Articles about exercise and weight pop up, too. And then there are recipes. Again, it doesn’t do the whole trick, although it does count potassium, protein, sodium and calories . What’s missing is phosphorous. The bonuses are carb, fat (by type, no less) cholesterol, fiber, sugar, vitamins A & C, calcium, and iron counters. This is also a free Apple app.

Lose It! at https://www.loseit.com/ is not as comprehensive for the CKD patient. It allows you to track fat, carbs, protein, and calories. Here, again, you can set your goals. You can even take pictures of your food to track it. However, I find I want something more CKD oriented with potassium, phosphorous, and sodium counters included. This looks like it may be a good app for weight loss, but I’m wondering how much help it is for the CKD patient.. This is a free Android app.

At this point, I stopped checking out apps. There are so many more in just a little over the year I last looked at apps. But they’re not quite for the likes of us. It looks like MyFitnessPal is the closest we can come to a kidney app, unless you’re on dialysis. Then I’d go for KidneyAPPetite.

Before I go, here’s a shameless plug for my new book. It’s Sort of Dark Places, available on Amazon and is not CKD related at all. I’ve fictionalized the stories people have told me about their most difficult times. I found it cathartic to write even though these are not my stories. Advance readers have told me they did, too. Give it a try.

In honor of the great Dr. Martin Luther King’s birthday, the first person who hasn’t already won a free book that lets me know they’ve read today’s blog wins a copy of SlowItDownCKD 2012.

Until next week,
Keep living your life!