A Foggy Day… in Your Brain

Coffee Beans_0I don’t know about you, but I thoroughly enjoy my 16 ounces of coffee a day.  I savor it and draw those two cups out as long as I can.  I relish the taste and adore the aroma.  And, I thought they would cut through what I’ve discovered is called ‘brain fog.’

To be honest, I’d never heard the term before.  Maybe I live too sheltered a life… or maybe I just didn’t realize it had anything to do with me.  After all, I don’t do drugs or drink.  I do get eight hours of sleep a night, follow the renal diet, and exercise just about every day.  So what does brain fog have to do with me or any other renal patient?

You probably know this blog is posted on as many Chronic Kidney Disease Facebook pages as I could find.  These are not for medical advice, but for sharing ideas and information – always with the warning that none of us are doctors.  That’s the same warning I mention in the blog.Book Cover

I receive daily notices of who posted what where.  I noticed a question about brain fog and was surprised at the responses.  The question asked who else suffered this cloudiness of thought and what stage they were in.

Once I understood what brain fog was, I imagined the responses would all mention end stage.  They didn’t.  I saw all stages from 2 through 5 mentioned.  I was grabbed by the fact that no one in stage 1 had responded and that’s when brain fog became the topic of today’s blog.

According to integrative medicine expert Dr. Isaac Eliaz, when experiencing brain fog:

“…people feel as if there is a thick fog dampening their mind. While the medical and mental health establishments don’t generally recognize brain fog as a condition, it’s a surprisingly common affliction that affects people of all ages. Symptoms include pervasive absentmindedness, muddled thought processes, poor memory recall, difficulty processing information, disorientation, fatigue, and others.”

You can read more at http://www.rodalenews.com/brain-fog.brain

Sound familiar?  Maybe that explains why you couldn’t find the tea bags in their usual spot even though they were there.  Or why you didn’t speak with the person you meant to about a certain subject (Yep, me and SlowItDown with a potential community), but just chatted instead.

While this is interesting, what does it have to do with renal disease?  I know there are readers who only want to read about subjects that affect us as sufferers of this disease.  I know because I get a good laugh when they ask what a particular blog has to do with renal disease.  It’s obvious they haven’t read the blog since the blog is ONLY about renal disease, but just commented instead.  But, more importantly, that’s why I write the blog.

So I did what I love to do: researched the topic. Here’s what I found:

www.naturopathconnect.com offered me my first insight into how our kidneys and brain fog are connected.

“Make sure your liver and kidneys are not overloaded or congested. When your liver and kidneys are not functioning well, they are less able to clear your system of the multitude of toxins that float around in your bloodstream. When your body is overloaded with toxins, your brain suffers as well….Dehydration may be a key factor in less-than-optimal kidney function, so water is essential to keep the kidneys in tip-top shape.”

Got it – toxins.  Uh, what toxins?  And how do they affect the brain, I wondered.  Back to researching.blood

Dr. Martin Morrell of healthtap.com offered an explanation. However, this is not an endorsement of him or the site.  I am not a fan of asking online doctors unfamiliar with your particular medical history for advice.

“… if your blood urea increases, which is supposed to be cleared by your kidneys, this ‘poison’ will affect the ability of the brain to work properly.”

Oh, blood urea. Well that explains it. But how can I explain blood urea?  I’ll allow the experts to do that.

http://www.patient.co.uk/health/routine-kidney-function-blood-test has the simplest explanation.

“Urea is a waste product formed from the breakdown of proteins. Urea is usually passed out in the urine. A high blood level of urea (‘uraemia’) indicates that the kidneys may not be working properly, or that you are dehydrated (have a low body water content).”

In the U.S., we call this test B.U.N. or Blood Urea Nitrogen Blood Test.  So as I understand it, if your protein intake is high, more urea is produced.  But since your kidneys are already compromised by CKD,  the toxins remaining in your body are not eliminated as well and are still in the blood that flows through your brain.  That’s logical.

blood_test_vials_QAThe more urea remaining in your system, the more sluggish your brain.  It does sound like a perfectly formed ‘if-then’ equation from probability theory. The only difference here is that this is not a theory, but, rather, what we may encounter as CKD patients.

What to do?  What to do?  Obviously, keeping our protein intake low will help.  My renal diet limits me to five ounces of protein a day. I rarely ingest more protein than that. Well, bully for me!  So how else can I alleviate my sometimes brain fog?

I was all over the web on this one and found that besides what I was already doing for my CKD, I could also avoid heavy metal (and I always thought that was a kind of music) exposure, use a blue light, get myself some natural sun light, check my medication side effects and lots more.  This is the stuff of several blogs.

It’s real.  Brain fog could be affecting you, especially if you have CKD.  And from what I’ve read, once you’ve gotten your CKD slowed down as much as possible, the other ‘fixes’ are easy.

Okay, so coffee’s not going to help here but I’ll drink it anyway.SlowItDown business card

I just got the report from my publishers.  Thanks to all of you who brought the book as Christmas, Chanukah, or Kwanzaa presents.  That was a good month for sales which allows me to donate even more books.

SlowItDown is slowly progressing. Interesting choice of words there. We have new educators in New York and Washington, D.C. and – frankly – need your help in finding the communities that need us.

Sweet 16Between birthday parties (Happy Sweet 16, Olivia Vlasity!) and graduations (Congratulates on that and acceptance to U. of A. College of Medicine, Jordan Mudery), and the chance to spend time doing nothing graduationwith Bear, this was almost the perfect weekend for me.  Here’s to many of those for you!

Until next week,

Keep living your life!