The Dynamic Duo 

Sorry Batman, not yours. I’m writing about Chronic Kidney Disease and diabetes. For a decade, I’ve been told diabetes is the number one cause of CKD. Got it… and (as you know) CKD. Then I learned that CKD can cause diabetes. Ummm, okay, I guess that sort of makes sense. And then, oh my, I developed diabetes. But how? I’d never questioned how that worked before, but I certainly did now.

Let’s go back to the beginning here. First of all, what is diabetes? I included this information in SlowItDownCKD 2013:

“According to MedicalNewsToday at https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/info/diabetes:

‘Diabetes, often referred to by doctors as diabetes mellitus, describes a group of metabolic diseases in which the person has high blood glucose (blood sugar), either because insulin production is inadequate, or because the body’s cells do not respond properly to insulin, or both. Patients with high blood sugar will typically experience polyuria (frequent urination), they will become increasingly thirsty (polydipsia) and hungry (polyphagia).’”

Guilty on all three counts as far as symptoms. It gets worse. I uncovered this fact in SlowItDownCKD 2014:

“According to Diabetes.co.uk at https://www.diabetes.co.uk/how-does-diabetes-affect-the-body.html,

‘The kidneys are another organ that is at particular risk of damage as a result of diabetes and the risk is again increased by poorly controlled diabetes, high blood pressure and cholesterol.’”

This is getting more and more complicated. But again, how is diabetes damaging my kidneys?

It seemed to me that I had just posted a fact about this on SlowItDownCKD’s Facebook page, so I checked. Yep, I did on September 7th.

“Did you know that high glucose levels can make your red blood cells stiffen? This hinders your blood circulation.”

And this affects the kidneys how? Let’s think about this a minute. Way back when I wrote What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, I included this information:

“A renal artery carries the blood, waste and water to the kidneys while a renal vein carries the filtered and sieved waste from the kidneys.”

The American Society of Hematology at http://www.hematology.org/Patients/Basics/ tells us there are four parts of the blood:

  1. Red blood cells
  2. White blood cells
  3. Plasma
  4. Platelets

Hmmm, so red blood cells compose one quarter of your blood and high glucose can make them stiffen. To me, that means a quarter of your blood will be working against you.  Not what we need… especially when we’re already dealing with Chronic Kidney Disease.

Back to my original question (again): How do high glucose levels affect the kidneys?

Thank you to the National Kidney Foundation at https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/Diabetes-and-Kidney-Disease-Stages1-4 for exactly the answer I was looking for:

  • Blood vessels inside your kidneys. The filtering units of the kidney are filled with tiny blood vessels. Over time, high sugar levels in the blood can cause these vessels to become narrow and clogged. Without enough blood, the kidneys become damaged and albumin (a type of protein) passes through these filters and ends up in the urine where it should not be.
  • Nerves in your body. Diabetes can also cause damage to the nerves in your body. Nerves carry messages between your brain and all other parts of your body, including your bladder. They let your brain know when your bladder is full. But if the nerves of the bladder are damaged, you may not be able to feel when your bladder is full. The pressure from a full bladder can damage your kidneys.
  • Urinary tract. If urine stays in your bladder for a long time, you may get a urinary tract infection. This is because of bacteria. Bacteria are tiny organisms like germs that can cause disease. They grow rapidly in urine with a high sugar level. Most often these infections affect the bladder, but they can sometimes spread to the kidneys.

I would say I’m heart… uh, kidney…broken about this development, but the truth is I’m not. I don’t like it; I don’t want it, but I can do something about it. I’d already cut out complex carbs and sugar laden foods in an abortive attempt to lose weight for my health. Well, maybe my daughter’s wedding on October 6th had something to do with that decision, too.

The point is, I’ve started. I’m aware of the carbohydrates in food and I’m learning how to control my intake of them… just as I’m aware that I have to break in the shoes for the wedding. Something new has to be gotten used to. I’ve had a head start.

Why the emphasis on carbs, you ask. I turned to my old favorite The National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases at https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/diabetes/overview/diet-eating-physical-activity/carbohydrate-counting  for help:

“When you eat foods containing carbohydrates, your digestive system breaks down the sugars and starches into glucose. Glucose is one of the simplest forms of sugar. Glucose then enters your bloodstream from your digestive tract and raises your blood glucose levels. The hormone insulin, which comes from the pancreas or from insulin shots, helps cells throughout your body absorb glucose and use it for energy. Once glucose moves out of the blood into cells, your blood glucose levels go back down.”

If you’ve got diabetes, your body either is not producing enough insulin or not interacting well with the insulin it is producing. Measuring my blood sugar levels when I awaken in the morning has shown me that when I’m sleeping – when I cannot help my blood sugar levels come down by eating protein or exercising, even in my dreams – is when I have the highest blood sugar. During the day I can keep it under control.

And that’s where my medication comes in. The usual – Metformin – can cause nausea, which I deal with more often than not, so that was out. However, a new medication on the market just might do the trick. It’s only been a few days, but I do notice my blood sugar upon waking is getting lower each day. This medication is not a panacea. I still have to be careful with my food, exercise daily, and sometimes counteract a high carb food with a protein. I’m not there yet, but I’m learning.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Banting

I can just about hear you asking, “What in heaven’s name is banting?” You know I like to read Victorian murder mysteries, right? The one I’m reading now is Murder on the Minneapolis by Anita Davison. In it, she has one character discuss a method of losing weight by strict eating limitations publicized by William Banting. I find it amusing that he was a celebrated undertaker, not that this had anything to do with the dietary restrictions.

According to Wikipedia – which is open to public editing –

“In 1863, Banting wrote a booklet called Letter on Corpulence, Addressed to the Public… which contained the particular plan for the diet he followed. It was written as an open letter in the form of a personal testimonial. Banting accounted all of his unsuccessful fasts, diets, spa and exercise regimens in his past, then described the dietary change which finally had worked for him, following the advice of a physician. His own diet was four meals per day, consisting of meat, greens, fruits, and dry wine. The emphasis was on avoiding sugar, saccharine matter, starch, beer, milk and butter. Banting’s pamphlet was popular for years to come, and would be used as a model for modern diets…. Initially, he published the booklet at his personal expense. The self-published edition was so popular that he determined to sell it to the general public. The third and later editions were published by Harrison, London. Banting’s booklet remains in print as of 2007, and is still available on-line. …He undertook his dietary changes at the suggestion of Soho Square physician Dr. William Harvey, who in turn had learnt of this type of diet, but in the context of diabetes management, from attending lectures in Paris by Claude Bernard.”

It’s starting to sound familiar, isn’t it? As Chronic Kidney Disease patients, and certainly if you’re also diabetic, we’re often told by our doctors to lose weight.

Have you heard of the Keto Diet? As a matter of fact, the app for that was included in last week’s blog. That’s one way to lose weight, but it’s too protein and fat heavy for CKD patients. Another way is to count carbohydrates or Bant.

I find it fascinating how the things I’m interested in seem to dovetail sometimes. For example, Chronic Kidney Disease, losing weight, Victorian murder mysteries, and banting.

I know. We need to back track a bit. Let’s start with carbohydrates. What are they anyway? According to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/carbohydrate , they are:

“any of various neutral compounds of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen (such as sugars, starches, and celluloses) most of which are formed by green plants and which constitute a major class of animal foods”

Here’s a list of carbohydrates from The American Diabetes Association at http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/what-can-i-eat/understanding-carbohydrates/carbohydrate-counting.html:

• grains like rice, oatmeal, and barley
• grain-based foods like bread, cereal, pasta, and crackers
• starchy vegetables like potatoes, peas and corn
• fruit and juice
• milk and yogurt
• dried beans like pinto beans and soy products like veggie burgers
• sweets and snack foods like sodas, juice drinks, cake, cookies, candy, and chips

Now that we have a definition and examples of carbohydrates, why limit them? The MayoClinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/weight-loss/in-depth/low-carb-diet/art-20045831 has that one covered.

“Your body uses carbohydrates as its main fuel source. Complex carbohydrates (starches) are broken down into simple sugars during digestion. They’re then absorbed into your bloodstream, where they’re known as blood sugar (glucose). In general, natural complex carbohydrates are digested more slowly and they have less effect on blood sugar. Natural complex carbohydrates provide bulk and serve other body functions beyond fuel.

Rising levels of blood sugar trigger the body to release insulin. Insulin helps glucose enter your body’s cells. Some glucose is used by your body for energy, fueling all of your activities, whether it’s going for a jog or simply breathing. Extra glucose is usually stored in your liver, muscles and other cells for later use or is converted to fat.

The idea behind the low-carb diet is that decreasing carbs lowers insulin levels, which causes the body to burn stored fat for energy and ultimately leads to weight loss.”

Wait a minute. What are these “complex carbohydrates” they mention? This is what I found on MedlinePlus at https://medlineplus.gov/ency/imagepages/19529.htm:

“Complex carbohydrate foods provide vitamins, minerals, and fiber that are important to the health of an individual. The majority of carbohydrates should come from complex carbohydrates (starches) and naturally occurring sugars, rather than processed or refined sugars, which do not have the vitamins, minerals, and fiber found in complex and natural carbohydrates. Refined sugars are often called ‘empty calories’ because they have little to no nutritional value.”

Got it. Complex carbohydrates provide what our bodies need, but too much of them can raise our blood glucose levels or turn to fat.

If there are complex carbohydrates, does that mean there are simple ones, too? Healthline (Thank you again for including this blog among the six best kidney blogs of 2016 & 2017, Healthline.) at https://www.healthline.com/health/food-nutrition/simple-carbohydrates-complex-carbohydrates#2 was succinct in describing these:

“Carbohydrates are made up of three components: fiber, starch, and sugar. Fiber and starch are complex carbs, while sugar is a simple carb. Depending on how much of each of these is found in a food determines its nutrient quality.”

Just in case you’re not sure which foods to avoid, Everyday Health at https://www.everydayhealth.com/diet-nutrition/diet/good-carbs-bad-carbs/ has a beginner’s list for us:

• Soda
• Candy
• Cookies
• Pastries and desserts
• Sweetened beverages, such as lemonade or iced tea
• Energy drinks
• Ice cream

Before you ask, fruits and low fat or nonfat milk do contain simple carbohydrates, but these are healthy for you. You still have to include the milk in your phosphorous count on the renal diet.

This is amazing! Some blogs just flow while I get to the point of just about tearing my hair out to write others (Hey, stress is not good for CKD.) This one flowed.

Congratulations to Christine Barnard from South Africa. She was the first person to let me know she’d read last week’s blog. Instead of winning just one book, she won four: SlowItDownCKD 2012; The Book of Blog: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2; SlowItDownCKD 2015; and SlowItDownCKD 2016. Why? Because she mentioned that there are few sources of Chronic Kidney Disease information in South Africa. Christine, please be sure to email me your physical address. Use SlowItDownCKD@gmail.com.

Until next week,
Keep living your life!