Me and My Llama, Going to the Dentist Today

No, I’m not crazy and I’m not talking about one of the llamas living only a few miles from my home. Nor am I ignoring the rules of structure.

Today’s title is from the lyrics of a song sung on the children’s television show Sesame Street just about the time my first born (the ever interesting Ms. Nima Beckie)llama had her first dental appointment.  Believe me, it helped reduce her anxiety – and mine – about that appointment.

You guessed it.  I’ve been getting questions about Chronic Kidney Disease and dental health. I know some readers are saying, “Huh?” I did, too, until I did some research. (Maybe my brand should be, “I research so you don’t have to,” instead of “SlowItDownCKD”?)

By the way, in fulfilling an assignment for Landmark Worldwide’s Wisdom Unlimited course I discovered I first started researching in fifth grade.  My topic? Ladies in Waiting. My research results? Dismal.  I sure am glad those days of encyclopedias and library books only for research are over. Oh wait, I was writing about dental health.

You’ve already read my previous blogs about the safety of nitrous oxide (laughing gas) and Novocain, so today’s blog is going to be about the laughingconnection between CKD and dental problems.  If you remember that diabetes is the leading cause of CKD, you’ve already figured out that the diabetes itself could be causing the dental problems with people suffering from both CKD and diabetes.

But what about those of us who don’t have diabetes.  Why could we be prone to dental problems? I started my research with DaVita at http://www.davita.com/kidney-disease/overview/symptoms-and-diagnosis/dental-health-for-people-with-kidney-disease/e/4731

A study in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology reported that people with kidney disease and those on dialysis are more likely to have periodontal disease and other oral health problems than the general population. Buildup of bacteria in the mouth can cause infection. Because people with kidney disease have weakened immune systems, they are more susceptible to infections.

Journal of CLinical Perioldontolgy coverBone loss in the jaw can occur in those with kidney disease. Calcium imbalance contributes to loss of calcium from the bones resulting in weak bones. Weak bones can cause teeth to become loose and potentially fall out. The best way to help prevent bone loss is to make sure calcium and phosphorus levels stay within the goal range.

Oh, there is so much to go with there! I immediately started digging into What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease for whatever it was that was tickling my memory and found it in the glossary on page 136.

What is itVitamin D: Regulates calcium and phosphorous blood levels as well as promoting bone formation, among other tasks – affects the immune system.

We know vitamin D can be a real problem for us.  How many of you are taking vitamin D supplements? Notice my hand is raised, too.  How many of you read my blogs about vitamin D?  Good!  The rest of you, it might be a good idea to use the topic search to find and read them. You know, “I research so you don’t have to,” etc.

I’ve read again and again in the online support groups that there are major questions about controlling your phosphorous intake, specifically keeping it low. Keep that in mind when you think of CKD and dental health.

plaqueThe biggest part CKD plays in dental health and periodontic issues is that of lowering your immune system. Remember my writing about proteinuria, something you can develop with CKD? Quick reminder: this is just what it sounds like; protein leaks into the urine. The problem is that antibodies are made up of protein. Antibodies is defined by Dictionary.com at http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/antibodies as

A protein substance produced in the blood or tissues in response to a specific antigen, such as a bacterium or a toxin, that destroys or weakens bacteria and neutralizes organic poisons, thus forming the basis of immunity.

Lose lots of protein into your urine and you’re losing some of your immunity. In other words, you’re open to infection.

How do you get an infection in your mouth in the first place, you ask. Think about plaque. This is what the National Center for Biotechnology Information, part of the National Institutes of Health, offered at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK8259/

Dental decay is due to the irreversible solubilization of tooth mineral by acid produced by certain bacteria that adhere to the tooth surface in bacterial communities known as dental plaque.interior of tooth

In other words, you eat and the acid in your food combines with bacteria to form plaque which then starts to demineralize your tooth enamel.  Usually, you have the antibodies in your immune system to prevent cavities… although we probably all know someone without CKD who doesn’t.  You, as a CKD sufferer, do not have the necessary antibodies.  The CKD has already compromised your immune system.

This is what the University of Maryland Medical Center at http://umm.edu/health/medical/reports/articles/periodontal-disease has to say about gingivitis and periodontitis.gingivitis

Gingivitis is an inflammation of the gingiva, or gums. It is characterized by tender, red, swollen gums that bleed easily and may cause bad breath (halitosis). Gingivitis can be treated by good dental hygiene, proper diet, and stopping smoking. Untreated gingivitis can lead to periodontitis.

Periodontitis occurs when the gum tissues separate from the tooth and sulcus (Me, here. That means  the space between the tooth and the gum.) forming periodontal pockets. Periodontitis is characterized by:

Gum inflammation, with redness and bleeding

Deep pockets (greater than 3 mm in depth) that form between the gum and the tooth

Loose teeth, caused by loss of connective tissue structures and bone

Plenty of space for bacteria to sneak in and attack your already compromised immune system.

I realize this is light weight research for those who are already suffering from these ailments, but hoped only to enlighten those of us who’d never even considered these possibilities and maybe, just maybe, help you understand just a bit better.

Say, if you live in Arizona, don’t forget about this:

free Path to Wellness health screening in Mesa at Adelante Healthcare 1705 W. Main St. on the 20th from 8 to 1:30 this Saturday.

Until next week,Digital Cover Part 2 redone - CopyDIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAIL

Keep living your life!

The Coffee Blog

Last week’s blog discussed different kinds of drinks.  I mentioned that coffee is my favorite.  Since I’m still recovering from the second cataract surgery and we all know how good it feels to be self-indulgent when you’re recovering, this week’s blog is all about coffee.  I won’t be repeating what I included in last week’s blog, but there is quite a bit of medical information about coffee available.  Let me just pour myself a cup and I’ll tell you….

We’re smiling because we’ve just had COFFEE.

Really? Drinking Coffee Lowers Colon Cancer Risk

Over the years, most studies of the subject have been either small or plagued by methodological flaws. But recently a team of researchers at the National Cancer Institute followed half a million Americans over 15 years. The researchers looked in detail at their diets, habits and health, and found that people who drank four or more cups of coffee a day — regular or decaf — had a 15 percent lower risk of colon cancer compared with coffee abstainers. While the researchers could not prove cause and effect, they did find that the link was dose-responsive: Greater coffee consumption was correlated with a lower colon cancer risk. The effect held even after they adjusted their findings for factors like exercise, family history of cancer, body weight, and alcohol and cigarette use.

The address for this article is: http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/07/02/really-drinking-coffee-lowers-colon-cancer-risk/?partner=rss&emc=rss

And to answer your question about what colon cancer has to do with chronic kidney disease, you have to remember you are medically compromised already. Cancer is a disease caused by inflammation, just as chronic kidney disease  is.  By the way, it’s said that alkaline foods are a better way of eating should  cancer rear its ugly head in your life.

But that’s not all  drinking coffee can do for you:

Coffee Drinking Linked to Lower Death Risk

Older adults who drank coffee—caffeinated or decaffeinated—had a lower risk of death overall than others who did not, according a study by researchers from the National Cancer Institute and AARP. Coffee drinkers were less likely to die from heart disease, respiratory disease, stroke, injuries and accidents, diabetes, and infections.

You can find this information at http://blog.rwjf.org/publichealth/2012/05/17/public-health-news-roundup-may-17-2/

I am an older (thank you for that ‘er’) adult. I absolutely love coffee. I also have chronic kidney disease which may lead me down the primrose path to diabetes.  Perhaps I can prevent that?  Too bad I’m restricted to two cups a day.

This one can get a bit technical so I’ve copied the most easily understood part of it:

Coffee consumption inversely associated with risk of most common form of skin cancer

PHILADELPHIA — Increasing the number of cups of caffeinated coffee you drink could lower your risk of developing the most common form of skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma, according to a study published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

“Our data indicate that the more caffeinated coffee you consume, the lower your risk of developing basal cell carcinoma,” said Jiali Han, Ph.D., associate professor at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School in Boston and Harvard School of Public Health.

You can find the whole article at http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-07/aafc-cci062612.php

So coffee – formerly universally maligned by the medical community – now can help prevent colon and skin cancer and prolong your life.  I’m liking this very much, but we’re not done, folks.  I’m grinding (love being punny) the sources out right now.

 I am in heaven!  Look what I found at http://www.everydayhealth.com/diet-nutrition/0310/9-healthy-reasons-to-drink-coffee.aspx?xid=tw_weightloss_20120123_coffee (You’ll probably understand my over the top joy if you remember I’ve had both a root canal and a crown replacement so the dentist could reach the cavity underneath the crown  this summer.  Both were so expensive that, even with insurance, I’ll be paying them off well into the new year.)

9 Healthy Reasons to Indulge Your Coffee Cravings

 Coffee gets a bad rap, but study after study shows your java habit is actually good for you. From a lower stroke risk to fewer cavities, here are the best reasons to enjoy a cup or two.

“Coffee is incredibly rich in antioxidants, which are responsible for many of its health benefits,” says Joy Bauer, RD, nutrition and health expert for Everyday Health and The Today Show. Its caffeine content may also play a protective role in some health conditions, but many of coffee’s health perks hold up whether you go for decaf or regular.

According to this article, coffee can help avoid diabetes, skin cancer, stress, cavities, Parkinson’s disease, breast cancer, heart disease, and head and neck cancers.

Parkinson’s disease runs in the family, too.  That’s another reason I’m so happy to have found this article.

One of the most romantic acts my sweet Bear performs is bringing me a cup of coffee to wake me up each day.  Sharing that time as we drink our coffee in bed cements the connection between us.  Could be I’m mixing up coffee and love, but there does seem to be some kind of interaction there.

My neighbor Amy – one of the busiest people I know – makes time to come over for a cup of coffee whenever she can.  She gets an hour’s break from her three kids and household duties or gets to de-stress from her work day and I get the pleasure of her company and hearing what’s going on in her life.

There’s more to coffee than caffeine.

An aside: talk about over problem solving – I just happened to notice that I can link websites from wordpress, too.  I seem to be doing a lot of that over stuff as I get older!

Until next week,

Keep living your life!