Coffee, The Elixir of The Gods (Or Did I Just Make That Up?)

With all that’s going on in my life and in the world, I awoke today thinking, “Coffee, today’s blog is going to be about coffee!”  First thing I did was make the coffee (my turn today) and then pop back into bed with Bear and check Facebook.

And there it was, right in front of me.  And now, here it is, right in front of you. Mark Rosen shared MedicalPk’s coffee post (http://www.medicopk.com/health-benefits/some-surprising-health-benefits-of-coffee/).  Mark originated The Kidney Disease Ideas and Help Page I follow on Facebook and MedicalPk is a medical blog for students.Some-surprising-health-benefits-of-COFFEE  Look at all the benefits of coffee mentioned in this chart!  I made that a very large reproduction so you could read it. I wasn’t so sure this could all be true since I remembered the old adage, “If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.” *Notice, the article also mentions the negatives of coffee so look at the website.

Of course, as Chronic Kidney Disease patients, we can’t run wild in our pursuit of the perfect cup of coffee and how often we can have it. It’s 16 ounces (two cups) maximum for me so I want to have the best taste I can. Coffee Masters’ Jamaican Me Crazy is my favorite.  We discovered it while choosing our wedding cake at Bakery-Wee in Glendale and immediately ordered a ten pound bag.  I sort of, maybe, kind of knew that our wedding guests were not going to drink that much coffee.  Hence, almost two months later, there it is – waiting for me – on the kitchen counter next to the coffee machine everyday.

CoffeeCupPopCatalinStockBut it’s become one of those once-in-a-while-heaven-descends treats for me. I haven’t quite figured out how it can have the “richest, sweetest essence of the darkest tropical island rum” without containing alcohol, despite what it says on the package. That’s a topic for another blog.

Going a step further in my coffee research, I found an article at http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/257888.php that explains the benefits of Greek coffee and how that works.  The part that intrigued me was this:

“The endothelium is a layer of cells that lines the blood vessels, which is impacted by lifestyle habits and aging. The researchers focused on coffee because earlier research has proven that moderate coffee intake may decrease the risk of coronary heart disease, they [sic]} wondered whether it could have a positive impact on other areas of endothelial health.”

According to the article based on the findings which were published in Vascular Journal earlier this year, it did. If you look at the chart, you’ll see heart disease mentioned as one the ailments coffee may help prevent there, too.

Another article, this one from Digestive Disease Week, offered more good news about coffee:

“Coffee consumption helped protect against the autoimmune liver disease known as primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), a disorder of the bile ducts that causes inflammation and obstruction and that can lead to transplantation or death.”

This one is discussed on MedpageToday at: http://www.medpagetoday.com/MeetingCoverage/DDW/39292.  On the chart, liver cirrhosis is mentioned as another ailment coffee may help prevent.liver

There’s a wonderful slide show of both the merits and drawbacks of coffee consumption at: http://www.medscape.com/features/slideshow/coffee?src=ptalk#12.  I urge you to see this for yourself. On this slideshow, not only are the benefits mentioned in the chart about Parkinson’s disease, gout, cancer, diabetes, and heart disease also noted, but there are also slides about improving glucose metabolism, promoting weight loss in the overweight (obviously, you need to drink more than the two cups a day I do), lessening of the risk of developing depression, slowing the progress of Hepatitis C, benefitting dry eye syndrome, and preventing MRSA infections (those are the antibiotic resistant ones).Coffee Beans_0

Coffee does initially raise blood pressure, but it also has the potential to lower it long term… one of life’s little dichotomies. Among the other drawbacks of my favorite beverage are the obvious ones: it can contribute to anxiety, insomnia and tremors (so that’s why my mother and her father had these.  Or was it the Parkinson’s disease that seems to run in the family?) Coffee can exacerbate withdrawal symptoms and there is the potential for it increasing the risk of glaucoma.

The article I liked the best during my research is at: http://bodyodd.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/11/20/15309215-coffee-helps-you-see-the-bright-side.  It offers a detailed explanation of how dopamine is elevated by drinking coffee.  In layman’s terms, that means coffee can make you feel good.  As a non-drinker, non-smoker, I can personally attest to the fact that my two cups of coffee per day make me feel great… and not simply in terms of energy.YGCnpYEUFRtlrF00_f9frLXF_JWiNWNHS9AVZmM1PxI

Talking about coffee, yesterday the Transplant Community Outreach from Facebook invited me to a lunch gathering of people from different parts of Arizona and California. I write KIDNEY MATTERS for the group so they knew I wasn’t a transplant.  I marveled as they ate pretty much whatever they wanted.  The conversations centered on their various transplants and other diseases, but it was so definitely not a pity party.  These people realized they were on their second or third chances and were enjoying life tremendously.  Thank you for inviting me, Janet Peralta.

Kidney educators are waiting to start their kidney education classes on the local Native American reservations.  I am still waiting to get them on the reservations.  If you can think of any access at all, please let me know.  There is nothing like saving a life… even indirectly.

The book has been introduced to British Columbia via Patti Telford and Colorado’s Evans Community Army Hospital via Deanna Leclair.  Thank you both for being the cause of these new avenues for getting the information where it’s needed.  And thank you LandmarkEducation for giving me the opportunity to get this information to places I hadn’t even realized it was needed.

Until next week,The Table

Keep living your life!

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The Coffee Blog

Last week’s blog discussed different kinds of drinks.  I mentioned that coffee is my favorite.  Since I’m still recovering from the second cataract surgery and we all know how good it feels to be self-indulgent when you’re recovering, this week’s blog is all about coffee.  I won’t be repeating what I included in last week’s blog, but there is quite a bit of medical information about coffee available.  Let me just pour myself a cup and I’ll tell you….

We’re smiling because we’ve just had COFFEE.

Really? Drinking Coffee Lowers Colon Cancer Risk

Over the years, most studies of the subject have been either small or plagued by methodological flaws. But recently a team of researchers at the National Cancer Institute followed half a million Americans over 15 years. The researchers looked in detail at their diets, habits and health, and found that people who drank four or more cups of coffee a day — regular or decaf — had a 15 percent lower risk of colon cancer compared with coffee abstainers. While the researchers could not prove cause and effect, they did find that the link was dose-responsive: Greater coffee consumption was correlated with a lower colon cancer risk. The effect held even after they adjusted their findings for factors like exercise, family history of cancer, body weight, and alcohol and cigarette use.

The address for this article is: http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/07/02/really-drinking-coffee-lowers-colon-cancer-risk/?partner=rss&emc=rss

And to answer your question about what colon cancer has to do with chronic kidney disease, you have to remember you are medically compromised already. Cancer is a disease caused by inflammation, just as chronic kidney disease  is.  By the way, it’s said that alkaline foods are a better way of eating should  cancer rear its ugly head in your life.

But that’s not all  drinking coffee can do for you:

Coffee Drinking Linked to Lower Death Risk

Older adults who drank coffee—caffeinated or decaffeinated—had a lower risk of death overall than others who did not, according a study by researchers from the National Cancer Institute and AARP. Coffee drinkers were less likely to die from heart disease, respiratory disease, stroke, injuries and accidents, diabetes, and infections.

You can find this information at http://blog.rwjf.org/publichealth/2012/05/17/public-health-news-roundup-may-17-2/

I am an older (thank you for that ‘er’) adult. I absolutely love coffee. I also have chronic kidney disease which may lead me down the primrose path to diabetes.  Perhaps I can prevent that?  Too bad I’m restricted to two cups a day.

This one can get a bit technical so I’ve copied the most easily understood part of it:

Coffee consumption inversely associated with risk of most common form of skin cancer

PHILADELPHIA — Increasing the number of cups of caffeinated coffee you drink could lower your risk of developing the most common form of skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma, according to a study published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

“Our data indicate that the more caffeinated coffee you consume, the lower your risk of developing basal cell carcinoma,” said Jiali Han, Ph.D., associate professor at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School in Boston and Harvard School of Public Health.

You can find the whole article at http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-07/aafc-cci062612.php

So coffee – formerly universally maligned by the medical community – now can help prevent colon and skin cancer and prolong your life.  I’m liking this very much, but we’re not done, folks.  I’m grinding (love being punny) the sources out right now.

 I am in heaven!  Look what I found at http://www.everydayhealth.com/diet-nutrition/0310/9-healthy-reasons-to-drink-coffee.aspx?xid=tw_weightloss_20120123_coffee (You’ll probably understand my over the top joy if you remember I’ve had both a root canal and a crown replacement so the dentist could reach the cavity underneath the crown  this summer.  Both were so expensive that, even with insurance, I’ll be paying them off well into the new year.)

9 Healthy Reasons to Indulge Your Coffee Cravings

 Coffee gets a bad rap, but study after study shows your java habit is actually good for you. From a lower stroke risk to fewer cavities, here are the best reasons to enjoy a cup or two.

“Coffee is incredibly rich in antioxidants, which are responsible for many of its health benefits,” says Joy Bauer, RD, nutrition and health expert for Everyday Health and The Today Show. Its caffeine content may also play a protective role in some health conditions, but many of coffee’s health perks hold up whether you go for decaf or regular.

According to this article, coffee can help avoid diabetes, skin cancer, stress, cavities, Parkinson’s disease, breast cancer, heart disease, and head and neck cancers.

Parkinson’s disease runs in the family, too.  That’s another reason I’m so happy to have found this article.

One of the most romantic acts my sweet Bear performs is bringing me a cup of coffee to wake me up each day.  Sharing that time as we drink our coffee in bed cements the connection between us.  Could be I’m mixing up coffee and love, but there does seem to be some kind of interaction there.

My neighbor Amy – one of the busiest people I know – makes time to come over for a cup of coffee whenever she can.  She gets an hour’s break from her three kids and household duties or gets to de-stress from her work day and I get the pleasure of her company and hearing what’s going on in her life.

There’s more to coffee than caffeine.

An aside: talk about over problem solving – I just happened to notice that I can link websites from wordpress, too.  I seem to be doing a lot of that over stuff as I get older!

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Drink Up

This is a pre-canned blog written prior to the second cataract surgery. As mentioned last time I brought this up, I can only type (read, watch movies, etc.) for ten minutes at a time during the first two weeks of recovery.  I am not that great at short term thinking – although I get some stunning story ideas and problem solves while I’m simply listening to a book on my Kindle.

One of my problem solves has been to write the blog in Word where I can easily hyperlink sites for you. Then, when I copy the blog to wordpress, you’ve got hyperlinks. It beats your copying and pasting, especially if there are several links that interest you in the blog.  See, there is an upside to non-reading recovery periods (I can just hear Nima now: “Ma, that’s TOO Pollyanna!”)

Something kept nagging at me until I forced myself to remember what it was (who knew humans had the capacity to do that?). Something about what we drink. Since we (as chronic kidney disease patients) barely – or in my case, don’t – imbibe that means juice, water or soft drinks.  I’d rather get the fiber in my big three servings of fruit a day so that narrows the choice to water or soft drinks.  That’s what it was!

This is an older article, but one that resonates even with those who insist upon drinking soda. Well, except for my childhood buddy who insists she’s drunk diet sodas for a long time and they haven’t killed her yet. On the other hand, until her own death my mother was convinced she had contributed to my dad’s death due to pancreatic cancer by insisting he use NutraSweet, a brand name for aspartame.

Aspartame alert: Diet soda destroys kidney function

Thursday, December 17, 2009 by: E. Huff, staff writer

“Scientists from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston have revealed results from a study outlining some of the effects of artificial sweeteners on the body. Conducted on a group of 3,000 women, the results indicated that those who drank two or more artificially-sweetened beverages a day doubled their risk of more-rapid-than-normal kidney function decline.”

The article includes the fact that more sodium is used in diet sodas, and how stevia (natural sweetener) could be used instead. You can read more at: www.naturalnews.com/027758_aspartame_kidney_failure.html

The American Cancer Society seems to have only one concern about aspartame as of February of this year.  You can read about aspartame and Phenylketonuria (PKU) at: http://www.cancer.org/Cancer/CancerCauses/OtherCarcinogens/AtHome/aspartame

Wikipedia has this to say about aspartame: “Aspartame (APM; /ˈæspərtm/ or /əˈspɑrtm/) is an artificial, non-saccharide sweetener used as a sugar substitute in some foods and beverages. In the European Union, it is codified as E951. Aspartame is a methyl ester of the aspartic acid/phenylalanine dipeptide. It was first sold under the brand name NutraSweet; since 2009 it also has been sold under the brand name AminoSweet. It was first synthesized in 1965 and the patent expired in 1992.

The following is my favorite article by far.  I am a coffee lover to the point that I sometimes buy and blend my own beans – a pleasure introduced to me by my ex-husband and the father of my children. Yes, of course I have chronic kidney disease and, yes of course caffeine is frowned upon, but there is that 16 oz. (two whole cups!!!!) permitted for those who simply must have their coffee – me! Remember, I mention in the book that this helps keep me from feeling deprived since I follow the renal diet.

 “Kicking your morning off with a cup of joe may provide more than a caffeine boost. A recent study from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) found that older coffee drinkers — even those who swill decaf — have a lower risk of death than those who don’t drink coffee.

‘Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages, both in the United States and worldwide,’ the authors of the study write. ‘Since coffee contains caffeine, a stimulant, coffee drinking is not generally considered to be part of a healthy lifestyle. However, coffee is a rich source of antioxidants and other bioactive compounds.’ ”

Read more: http://healthland.time.com/2012/05/17/coffee-drink-more-live-longer/#ixzz25FfFcdVo

Another article from June of this year talks about water.  While you read this, keep in mind that CKD folks need 64 ounces of FLUID, not necessarily water, a day.

 8 glasses of water a day ‘an urban myth’

Water and a well-balanced diet ‘do far more than water alone,’ Australian researcher says

CBC News

“The common advice to drink eight glasses of water a day doesn’t hold water, say nutrition and kidney specialists who want to dispel the myth.”

The article includes fluid from other sources, including my beloved coffee.  The address is: http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/story/2012/06/08/water-eight-glasses-myth.html?cmp=rss

I have received three calls just this last month from people picked up the book flier AKDHC has placed in their office waiting rooms. The people who contact me have no computer nor know how to use one. They thought they couldn’t order the book unless they had one.  Wrong: contact me at 623-266-2609 (as they did) or order one by email at: myckdexperience@gmail.com.

Apparently, there was also an economic problem.  These days, we can certainly understand people not having the money for the book, but I can’t see that as a reason for them to have no access to the information in the book. 

I’ve sent an office copy of the book to each of their nephrologists.  This way they can read the parts of the book they need the most while they wait (and don’t we always have to wait?) for their appointments.

Does your nephrologist’s office need a copy of the book for his/her waiting room? Just send me the name and address of your doctor and I’ll be more than glad to send her/him a complimentary copy. The name of the game is making sure chronic kidney disease patients have access to information, not to get rich.

Until next week – when there will be another pre-canned blog,

Keep living your life!