Kidney Anxiety

I clearly remember writing about how depression, grief, and stress affect your kidneys, but not about anxiety. As Bear’s pain worsens, there’s a lot of that in my house recently. I don’t understand why it’s taking so long for his doctors to decide upon a treatment plan for him, but while they do I am one anxious person.

I went directly to my old friend, the Mayo Clinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/anxiety/symptoms-causes/syc-20350961 for a set of anxiety symptoms:

“Common anxiety signs and symptoms include:

  • Feeling nervous, restless or tense
  • Having a sense of impending danger, panic or doom
  • Having an increased heart rate
  • Breathing rapidly (hyperventilation)
  • Sweating
  • Trembling
  • Feeling weak or tired
  • Trouble concentrating or thinking about anything other than the present worry
  • Having trouble sleeping
  • Experiencing gastrointestinal (GI) problems
  • Having difficulty controlling worry
  • Having the urge to avoid things that trigger anxiety”

While I don’t have all these symptoms, there are at least four or five of them I can identify with.

Wait a minute. Maybe I’m barking up the wrong tree. Is my worry about Bear’s pain really causing anxiety? I popped over to Medical News Today at https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323456.php for some help in figuring out just what it is that causes anxiety.

  • Environmental factors: Elements in the environment around an individual can increase anxiety. Stress from a personal relationship, job, school, or financial predicament can contribute greatly to anxiety disorders. Even low oxygen levels in high-altitude areas can add to anxiety symptoms.
  • Genetics: People who have family members with an anxiety disorder are more likely to have one themselves.
  • Medical factors: Other medical conditions can lead to an anxiety disorder, such as the side effects of medication, symptoms of a disease, or stress from a serious underlying medical condition that may not directly trigger the changes seen in anxiety disorder but might be causing significant lifestyle adjustments, pain, or restricted movement.
  • Brain chemistry: Stressful or traumatic experiences and genetic factors can alter brain structure and function to react more vigorously to triggers that would not previously have caused anxiety. Psychologists and neurologists define many anxiety and mood disorders as disruptions to hormones and electrical signals in the brain.
  • Use of or withdrawal from an illicit substance: The stress of day-to-day living combined with any of the above might serve as key contributors to an anxiety disorder.

There are items on this list which I hadn’t considered before. Years ago, when I was teaching in an old vocational high school, a student holding one of those long, heavy, solid oak window poles to open very high windows quickly spun around to answer a question and accidentally hit me in the head with the pole. That was certainly traumatic and also one of the few times I’ve been hospitalized.

We’ve pretty much figured out that there is an undiagnosed history of anxiety in the family. I’m referring to people from past generations who faced pogroms, the Depression, and even having to give up babies for adoption since that’s what was done with babies from unwed mothers in that generation. Could these folks have had anxiety disorders rather than environmental anxiety? Of course, we’ll never really know since they are long gone from this earth, but it is a thought.

Lightning Bolt!!! I remember visiting my buddy and her mother in San Miguel de Allende in Mexico not long after my own mother died and being anxious. I attributed it to still being in mourning for my mother. San Miguel de Allende has an elevation of 7,000 feet. Was that one of those “low oxygen levels in high-altitude area?” I didn’t know, but Laura Anderson author of the Gunnison Country Times’ article on Acli-Mate at https://acli-mate.com/living-at-altitude-the-pros-and-cons-of-a-high-altitude-lifestyle/ did:

“Low landers generally aren’t affected by altitude until they reach 4,500 to 5,000 feet. But after that, the affects (sic) of altitude are compounded about every 1,000 feet — so the affects (sic) of going from 6,000 feet to 7000 feet can feel the same as jumping from sea level to 4,500 feet.”

What in heaven’s name is this doing to my kidneys, I wondered. I was surprised to find an answer… in reverse. Rather than anxiety causing a kidney problem, it seems that fear of kidney disease can cause anxiety, or at least that’s what Calm Clinic at https://www.calmclinic.com/anxiety/kidney-problems claims. Be aware that they are a business and will try to sell to you if you go to their site.

  • Extra Urination Anxiety can cause more frequent urination. When you experience anxiety, the part of your brain that controls the withholding urination slows down because anxiety requires resources to be sent to other parts of your brain. This can lead to concerns over your renal health, although nothing is wrong.
  • Lower Back Pain Lower back pain is also very common with anxiety. Lower back pain comes from severe stress and tension, and yet it’s associated with some conditions that affect the kidneys as well which can have many people worried about their kidney health.
  • Life Experiences Anyone that suffers from anxiety and has had a friend or family member diagnosed with a terrible kidney condition is at risk for developing anxiety over the idea of poor kidneys. Anxiety can turn life experiences into very real concerns, and so kidney health concerns are one of the issues that can come up when you see it in others.”
  • Urine Color Urine color is another issue that can cause anxiety. Many people check their urine color for diseases habitually, and every once in a while the color of a person’s urine may be very different than what they expect. This can create concerns that the urine color changes are due to kidney problems.”

What I find interesting is that kidney disease can cause frequent urination, too. Kidney disease may also cause lower back pain. If you know any CKD patients, you know we’re always checking the color of our urine to make certain we’re well enough hydrated.

So it seems your fear of kidney disease may cause a symptom of kidney disease… and/or possibly diabetes. All I have to say to that is make sure you take the simple urine and blood test to determine if you do really have Chronic Kidney Disease or diabetes.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Help When You Need It

One of the many people I met at the AAKP Conference who opened my eyes to things I’d never even though of before is Samantha Siegner from the Chronic Disease Coalition. We hit it off right away and I felt comfortable exposing my ignorance to her. Once she explained what the coalition does, I wanted all my readers to know about it. Happily for us, Samatha agreed to write a guest blog for us.

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Nearly half of all adults in the United States have one or more chronic health conditions, and the number continues to climb. By 2020, it is projected that over 157 million Americans will battle a chronic disease. While some chronic conditions can be prevented, others are inherited, or may develop as a result of numerous factors. Despite the prevalence of chronic disease, few organizations are specifically dedicated to addressing the needs of patients who battle all types of chronic conditions rather than a single disease.

The Chronic Disease Coalition (CDC) is national nonprofit organization that represents people battling a wide range of chronic conditions, including kidney disease, diabetes, arthritis, multiple sclerosis and more. As patients dealing with kidney disease or other chronic conditions know, it can be difficult to work, attend school or even get adequate health insurance coverage. Our organization works to not only raise awareness and educate the public about chronic conditions, but also to advocate for patients who need better access to care. Our mission is focused on exposing and addressing discriminatory practices and policies that are preventing patients from accessing necessary, often lifesaving care.

Discrimination based on a person having a chronic disease comes in various forms, but we most frequently see it occur in the school, workplace and with health insurance plans.

  1. School: For those looking to complete high school or even college, it can be difficult to regularly attend class or have the energy to complete assignments. For kidney patients, dialysis poses difficulty attending class, as you may be required to dialyze for several hours multiple times a week. It is important to educate yourself on the services offered by the school to ensure that you are receiving reasonable accommodation that support your effort to pursue education.

Our organization works with people to ensure that they are being treated fairly in the school system, read more in one patient’s story here.

  1. Workplace: Many people with chronic conditions may frequently visit the doctor’s office for treatment, response to a flare up or check-ups to ensure that their condition is being managed properly – these actions can require additional time off work. While it is not legal for an employer to ask about your medical history, some patients may disclose it. This can lead to a greater understanding and development of a process for how you miss work, but for others, it may lead to losing their job or being demoted.

The CDC helps patients by supporting legislation that protects the privacy of employee’s medical history and ensures that businesses and corporations cannot discriminate based on their health status. Additionally, we ensure that patients are educated on their rights within the workplace.

  1. Insurance: Unfortunately, insurance discrimination is all too common. Insurers institute a variety of practices to increase their bottom line at the expense of the patients, without consideration for the long-term health consequences. Some of the most common practices include, step-therapy or fail-first, lengthy prior authorization approval times, nonmedical switching and bans on charitable premium and copay assistance, which is a common way for insurers to target kidney patients.

Right now, insurers across the nation are targeting chronic disease patients who rely on charitable premium assistance to help afford the cost of their health care. By utilizing a loophole within a 2014 guideline issued by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, insurers are denying premium and copay payments made by charities, like the American Kidney Fund, on behalf of patients. As a result, patients are forced off their current health plan and left to find other options. This is a commonly used tactic to force patients off of private health plans and onto public plans, because the insurer doesn’t want to cover chronic disease patients that require expensive, regular treatment, like dialysis. While kidney patients are eligible for Medicare before the age of 65, a public plan may not meet their needs or cover services that can help a patient become eligible for a transplant.

The Chronic Disease Coalition is actively working to pass H.R. 3976, the Access to Marketplace Insurance Act to ensure that patients can access charitable premium assistance and choose the health plan that best meets their needs.

So how does the Chronic Disease Coalition work with kidney patients? In addition to advocating on behalf and beside kidney patients to ensure discriminatory policies don’t hinder their ability to access care, we work with patients in their communities to raise awareness and educate the public on kidney disease at an individual level and through our Ambassador Program.

After receiving an initial diagnosis, many people with kidney failure may not know what to expect from treatment, what questions they should ask their medical team and what changes may come to their daily life. Our Ambassador Program was developed on this understanding and is comprised of active advocates who battle chronic diseases and provide guidance, advice and advocate on issues that concern kidney patients. Ambassadors complete advocacy work that is relevant to their specific diseases and communities each month.

If you are interested in learning more about the CDC and how you may be able to become involved, please click here. Change happens when people speak out, share their stories and take action – the CDC is proud to provide a platform for kidney patients and all people with chronic conditions to do so.

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Did you click through on all the blue words? I did. I’d had inklings of what each of these meant, but the full explanation made my understanding so much better. All I can say is: Thank you!

SlowItDownCKD 2014 should be out on Amazon.com any day now. B & N takes a few weeks longer. This had formerly been the second half of the unwieldy, small print, indexless The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2. I’d vowed to separate both this book and the equally unwieldy, small print, indexless The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 into two books each… and now I have. Of course, that leaves me with desk copies of each of the Book of Blogs which I no longer need. Want one? Let me know (but only if you haven’t received a free book from SlowItDownCKD before).

Until next week,

Keep living your life!